Princess Nest Rhys of Windsor

cardiff2 cardiff3 cardiff4reesec4 reesec5

rosemm

Today is Queen Elizabeth’s birthday. For this reason, and others, I have decided to reveal my latest finding in regards to the Rhys family. I suspect Rosamond Clifford is a Rhys, and very possibly related to Nest Rhys who was the alleged concubine of Henry I of England. They had children. This is key because Henry’s legitimate heir drowned in the White Ship disaster, thus, his daughter Maude was his heir. She married Geoffry de Anjou, who sired King Henry 11 who allegedly saw Rosamond when he went to war with the Rhys kings of Wales, and other Welsh royalty. He had to have her, and took her back to England.

Nest and Rosamond are considered the two most beautiful women of their time, or any age. The Plantagents are born here, and the War of the Roses which the Game of Thrones is based. One site I looked at claims that Henry Tudor VIII was a Rhys, and usurped the rightful heirs and appropriated the crown of Wales under the title “Prince of Wales” . He then launched the Protestant Revolt that was later rescued by William of Orange who married Mary Stuart who had no issue, thus, the Tudor-Windsors fell back on their Rhys roots which they covered up.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Windsor

http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id187.html

In looking at the genealogy of my grandfather, the author Royal Rosamond, was I alas able to arrive at the center of the Labyrinth I have explored for eighteen years. It had puzzled me why the Clifford and Toeni family did not brag about Fair Rosamond, or have one conversation about her that has survived in literary form. There is over a hundred and sixty poems, plays, musical productions, and paintings about Rosamond. She is kin to the Spencers via the Poyntz family, thus, here is the motive for the Windsor-Rhys family marrying the son of the Prince of Wales to Princess Diana Spencer.

Tomorrow morning I will begin my Biblical lessons, take up the gauntlet that was rested from Herbert Armstrong upon his death. Armstrong believed in British Israelism. The Orange Lodge believed there exist a descent from the Israeli tribe, the Zebulon. My kindred, Bennett Rosamond, was a grand master of the Orange Lodge in Canada. The badge of the Orange Lodge of Wales is seen above.

Fair Rosamond now comes forward as on of the most important and beautiful woman in the world. My novel ‘Capturing Beauty’ will reveal more of her profound history.

https://rosamondpress.com/2012/04/02/where-art-thou/

Jon Presco

President: Royal Rosamond Press

Copyright 2015

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbert_W._Armstrong

The Orange Order and British Israelism

Orange Order British Israelism teaching
The British Israelism thinking behind the Orange Order
The Royal Black Institution and British Israelism
British Israelism Exposed
True Israel

.

http://www.lol803cardiff.com/

http://forces.tv/35129543

http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/video/royal-family-celebrates-queen-elizabeth-iis-birthday-31741901

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpxbFxDt0Yk

http://www.geni.com/people/Nest-verch-Rhys-Princess-of-Wales-Concubine-13-of-Henry-I-of-England/6000000002931039490

The Rhys family shield is supported by the Tree of Life, which grows, flourishes, and nourishes the faithful in the middle of the Garden of God [Genesis 2:9; Genesis 3:22; Genesis 3:24; Revelation 2:7; Revelation 22:2; Revelation 22:14; Revelation 22:19; and many others]. The Bible likens the just and holy person to the Tree of Life [Proverbs 3:18; Proverbs 11:20; Proverbs 13:12; Proverbs 15:4; and many others].

The red dragons rampant that flank the Tree of Life are emblems of the civic authority of the State of Wales and of its national “established” church, the Church of England. These dragons necessarily stand outside the Tree of Life which supports and protects the shield, and are prevented by the Tree of Life from directly touching the shield. The imagery speaks for itself. On one hand, it speaks of the long-standing (nearly a millennium) historical prerogatives of civil government which the Rhys family exercised before the reign of Henry Tudor VIII (himself a Rhys) usurped the rightful heirs and appropriated the crown of Wales under the title “Prince of Wales” — and launched the Protestant Revolt. On the other hand, it asserts that this mere human artifice of the Crown of England is incapable of suppressing the truth of the matter. For their public assertions against their kinsman, the Rhys family were forced by him to flee into involuntary exile from Wales under the pressures of heavy persecution and bloodshed. Settling in Holland (the van Rees family) and Germany (in the district of Reesdorf), various members finally also found their ways to the Colonies in America, especially Pennsylvania.

Rhys ap Gruffydd or ap Gruffudd (often anglicised to “Griffith”) (1132 – 28 April 1197) was the ruler of the kingdom of Deheubarth in south Wales from 1155 to 1197. Today, he is commonly known as The Lord Rhys, in Welsh Yr Arglwydd Rhys, although this title may have not been used in his lifetime.[2] He usually used the title “Proprietary Prince of Deheubarth” or “Prince of South Wales”, but two documents have been discovered in which he uses the title “Prince of Wales” or “Prince of the Welsh“.[3] Rhys was one of the most successful and powerful Welsh princes, and, after the death of Owain Gwynedd of Gwynedd in 1170, the dominant power in Wales.

Rhys’s grandfather, Rhys ap Tewdwr, was king of Deheubarth, and was killed at Brecon in 1093 by Bernard de Neufmarché. Following his death, most of Deheubarth was taken over by the Normans. Rhys’s father, Gruffydd ap Rhys, eventually was able to become ruler of a small portion, and more territory was won back by Rhys’s older brothers after Gruffydd’s death. Rhys became ruler of Deheubarth in 1155. He was forced to submit to King Henry II of England in 1158. Henry invaded Deheubarth in 1163, stripped Rhys of all his lands and took him prisoner. A few weeks later he was released and given back a small part of his holdings. Rhys made an alliance with Owain Gwynedd and, after the failure of another invasion of Wales by Henry in 1165, was able to win back most of his lands.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhys_ap_Gruffydd

https://archive.org/stream/genealogyreesef00reesgoog/genealogyreesef00reesgoog_djvu.txt

p://www.mocavo.com/John-L-Reese-B1868-Stevens-Ravalli-Montana-1930-United-States-Census/16754220997876422014

http://www.absoluterealtime.com/photos/Rees/

 

John L Reese

1930 United States Census

First Name:
John L
Last Name:
Reese
Age:
62
Estimated Birth Year:
1868
Place of Birth:
Wales
State:
Montana
County:
Ravalli
City:
Stevens
Marital Status:
Married
Relationship to Head of Household:
Head
Father’s Place of Birth:
Wales
Mother’s Place of Birth:
Wales
Gender:
Male
Race:
White

http://www.mocavo.com/John-L-Reese-B1868-Stevens-Ravalli-Montana-1930-United-States-Census/16754220997876422014

http://www.mocavo.com/Louise-E-Reese-B1874-Stevens-Ravalli-Montana-1930-United-States-Census/08948246079211451449

John L Reese Head M 62 Wales
Louise E Reese Wife F 56 Ohio
George B Reese Son M 20 Montana
Anna W Roark Niece F 25 Montana
Evan Lewis Cousin M 28 Wales

https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XCM1-SMM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravalli,_Montana

https://books.google.com/books?id=tYg_AQAAMAAJ&pg=PR3&lpg=PR3&dq=Idwal:+And+Other+Portions+of+a+Poem;&source=bl&ots=eUPHmj6Eab&sig=VCoHe7t28FLh6uzWUzLy7evzp0o&hl=en&sa=X&ei=AMVzVePlDoug8QWj3YLACw&ved=0CCkQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&q=Idwal%3A%20And%20Other%20Portions%20of%20a%20Poem%3B&f=false

https://books.google.com/books?id=tYg_AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA173&lpg=PA173&dq=tewdwr+the+great%27+mawr+walter+clifford&source=bl&ots=eUPHmieDai&sig=7Z8IxG_xTP1lNCkJBOdgociX12k&hl=en&sa=X&ei=0rxzVbKXGYmvyQTW_IDwDw&ved=0CEQQ6AEwBw#v=onepage&q=tewdwr%20the%20great’%20mawr%20walter%20clifford&f=false

Stevensville is officially recognized as the first permanent settlement in the state of Montana. Forty-eight years before Montana became the nation’s 41st state, Stevensville was settled by Jesuit Missionaries at the request of the Bitter Root Salish Indians.

Through interactions with Iroquois Indians between 1812 and 1820, the Bitter Root Salish Indians learned about Christianity and Jesuit Missionaries (blackrobes) that worked with Indian tribes teaching about agriculture, medicine, and religion. Interest in these “blackrobes” grew among the Salish and, in 1831, four young Salish men were dispatched to St. Louis, Missouri to request a “blackrobe” to return with them to their homeland of present day Stevensville. The four Salish men were directed to the home and office of William Clark (of Lewis and Clark fame) to make their request. At that time Clark was in charge of administering the territory they called home. Through the perils of their trip two of the Indians died at the home of General Clark. The remaining two Salish men secured a visit with St. Louis Bishop Joseph Rosati who assured them that missionaries would be sent to the Bitter Root Valley when funds and missionaries were available in the future.

http://www.stevensville.househunt.com/homesforsale/Stevensville_MT/

 Catharine lU'cse Sharp) was
horn X'^ovemher IS, 1780, and on Ai)ril 5, 1803, 
married John ^IcGuire, of ^[organton, X'^. C. They 
lived there until ahout 1840, when they followed 
their children to Batesville, Ark. There were nine 
children: 1, Evelina; 2, Elvira; 3, Harriet; 4, Wil- 
liam; 5, Elam; 6, Catharine; 7, Edwin; 8, Louisa; 
9, Thomas. 

1. Evelina, married a Mr. Hughes, and lived for 
a time in Morganton, N. C. ; afterwards moved to 
Batesville, Ark. Their eldest daughter was named 
Mary Hughes. Nothing further known.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhys_ap_Gruffydd

Rhys ap Gruffydd or ap Gruffudd (often anglicised to “Griffith”) (1132 – 28 April 1197) was the ruler of the kingdom of Deheubarth in south Wales from 1155 to 1197. Today, he is commonly known as The Lord Rhys, in Welsh Yr Arglwydd Rhys, although this title may have not been used in his lifetime.[2] He usually used the title “Proprietary Prince of Deheubarth” or “Prince of South Wales”, but two documents have been discovered in which he uses the title “Prince of Wales” or “Prince of the Welsh“.[3] Rhys was one of the most successful and powerful Welsh princes, and, after the death of Owain Gwynedd of Gwynedd in 1170, the dominant power in Wales.

Rhys’s grandfather, Rhys ap Tewdwr, was king of Deheubarth, and was killed at Brecon in 1093 by Bernard de Neufmarché. Following his death, most of Deheubarth was taken over by the Normans. Rhys’s father, Gruffydd ap Rhys, eventually was able to become ruler of a small portion, and more territory was won back by Rhys’s older brothers after Gruffydd’s death. Rhys became ruler of Deheubarth in 1155. He was forced to submit to King Henry II of England in 1158. Henry invaded Deheubarth in 1163, stripped Rhys of all his lands and took him prisoner. A few weeks later he was released and given back a small part of his holdings. Rhys made an alliance with Owain Gwynedd and, after the failure of another invasion of Wales by Henry in 1165, was able to win back most of his lands.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhys_ap_Gruffydd

 

The death of King Henry I of England and the ensuing rivalry between Stephen and Matilda gave the Welsh the opportunity to rise against the Normans. A revolt spread through south Wales in 1136, and Gruffydd ap Rhys, aided by his two eldest sons, Anarawd and Cadell, defeated the Normans in a battle near Loughor, killing over five hundred. After driving Walter de Clifford out of Cantref Bychan, Gruffydd set off to Gwynedd to enlist the help of his father-in-law, Gruffudd ap Cynan.[8] In the absence of her husband, Gwenllian led an army against the Norman lordship of Cydweli (Kidwelly), taking along her two youngest sons, Morgan and Maelgwn. She was defeated and killed by an army commanded by Maurice de Londres of Oystermouth Castle. Morgan was also killed and Maelgwn captured.

According to Eyton, he succeeded to the estates of his uncles Walter and Drogo. These two brothers figure in Domesday as the possessors of lands in Herefordshire, Berkshire, and other counties. His father Richard seems to have died between 1115 and 1138, in which latter year we find ‘Walter de Cliffort’ signing a Gloucester charter. He reappears under the same name in 1155. He probably obtained the barony of Clifford, from his wife Margaret, asserted to be the daughter of Raoul II of Tosny, who in 1068 was lord of this fee. According to another theory, his mother Maud, wife of Richard FitzPonce, was the original holder of it. Towards the middle of Henry II‘s reign, he was possessed of the manors of Corfham, Culmington, &c. in Shropshire. He was a benefactor to several monasteries, e.g. Haughmond Abbey, Dore, and Godstow.[4]

Clifford’s name occurs in the Welsh annals as lord of the castle of Llandovery. He ravaged the lands of Rhys ap Gruffydd, who, finding his complaints to Henry II disregarded, surprised his castle (1157-9).

In 1163, he is said to have slain Einion ab Anarawd, son of Anarawd ap Gruffydd. In 1164, he is said to have slain Cadwgan, son of Maredudd. He was still living in 1187, and according to Eyton died in 1190. [4]

He was the son of Richard FitzPons and Matilda, who the sister of Miles de Gloucester, 1st Earl of Hereford.[4]

He is now best known for his daughter, Rosamund Clifford, with Margaret de Toeni, daughter of Ralph de Toeni.[5]

Walter and Margaret’s children were:[6]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_de_Clifford

The Rhys family shield is supported by the Tree of Life, which grows, flourishes, and nourishes the faithful in the middle of the Garden of God [Genesis 2:9; Genesis 3:22; Genesis 3:24; Revelation 2:7; Revelation 22:2; Revelation 22:14; Revelation 22:19; and many others]. The Bible likens the just and holy person to the Tree of Life [Proverbs 3:18; Proverbs 11:20; Proverbs 13:12; Proverbs 15:4; and many others].

The red dragons rampant that flank the Tree of Life are emblems of the civic authority of the State of Wales and of its national “established” church, the Church of England. These dragons necessarily stand outside the Tree of Life which supports and protects the shield, and are prevented by the Tree of Life from directly touching the shield. The imagery speaks for itself. On one hand, it speaks of the long-standing (nearly a millennium) historical prerogatives of civil government which the Rhys family exercised before the reign of Henry Tudor VIII (himself a Rhys) usurped the rightful heirs and appropriated the crown of Wales under the title “Prince of Wales” — and launched the Protestant Revolt. On the other hand, it asserts that this mere human artifice of the Crown of England is incapable of suppressing the truth of the matter. For their public assertions against their kinsman, the Rhys family were forced by him to flee into involuntary exile from Wales under the pressures of heavy persecution and bloodshed. Settling in Holland (the van Rees family) and Germany (in the district of Reesdorf), various members finally also found their ways to the Colonies in America, especially Pennsylvania.

Y Ddraig Goch (the red dragon) is the national flag of Wales, but has been officially recognised only since the 1950s. The white-over-green fields are the livery colours of the Tudors, the Welsh dynasty that once sat on the English throne. It was Henry Tudor VII (father of Henry VIII) who first displayed the red dragon of Cadwallader, from whom he claimed descent, on the Tudor colours of white and green, giving us the Welsh flag of today.

It is known that the “draco” standards of the Roman Second Legion’s cohorts (stationed in Britain and Wales from 44 A. D.) were adopted by the Britons, probably as a metal (possibly real gold) head with a windsock type of body made of silk. In the mouth was a whistling type device that would make sounds as it was waved with vigor. Supposedly used by King Arthur, and certainly used by the Wessex lords in the 700s, the emblem has been used by Britons right up to the present time.

Today the dragon is the most prominent Welsh symbol. It is an ancient symbol, already prominent across England and Wales in the years after the departure of the Romans. With the invasions of the Angles and Saxons, the ancient Britons and their dragon symbol were pushed back towards Wales.


http://www.geni.com/people/Nest-verch-Rhys-Princess-of-Wales-Concubine-13-of-Henry-I-of-England/6000000002931039490
[ syll. roesia, ro-es-ia ] The baby girl name Roesia is pronounced as ROW-SZHAH †. Roesia’s origin is Latin. Roesia is a variant form of the English and French name Rose.

Henry’s only legitimate son and heir, William Adelin, drowned in the White Ship disaster of 1120, throwing the royal succession into doubt. Henry took a second wife, Adeliza, in the hope of having another son, but their marriage was childless. In response to this, Henry declared his daughter, Matilda, as his heir and married her to Geoffrey of Anjou. Relationships between Henry and the couple became strained, and fighting broke out along the border with Anjou. Henry died on 1 December 1135 after a week of illness. Despite his plans for Matilda, the King was succeeded by his nephew, Stephen of Blois, resulting in a period of civil war known as the Anarchy.

 

 

Henry despatched Robert of Gloucester and Ranulf le Meschin to Normandy and then intervened himself in late 1123.[252] Henry began the process of besieging the rebel castles, before wintering in the Duchy.[253] In the spring, campaigning began again. Ranulf received intelligence that the rebels were returning to one of their bases at Vatteville, allowing him to ambush them en route at Rougemontiers; Waleran charged the royal forces, but his knights were cut down by Ranulf’s archers and the rebels were quickly overwhelmed.[254] Waleran was captured, but Amaury escaped.[254] Henry mopped up the remainder of the rebellion, blinding some of the rebel leaders – considered, at the time, a more merciful punishment than execution – and recovering the last rebel castles.

 

Rosamund Clifford (before 1150 – ca. 1176), often called “The Fair Rosamund” or the “Rose of the World”, was famed for her beauty and was a mistress of King Henry II of England, famous in English folklore.

The legend of King Arthur is an enduring one, so popular that it has been shared for centuries. The earliest accounts are simple: A heroic king rescues his country. The story evolved over the centuries, and further elements such as Camelot, the Round Table, and Merlin were added in for flavor. Some versions of the legend state that Arthur did not truly die, but rather that he was put in an enchanted sleep– and it is said that he will return again in an hour of great need.

For hundreds of years the Arthur story has been retold in its various forms, though even ancient historians considered it nothing more than a myth. But in the twelfth century, evidence surfaced that suggested that one of history’s most popular figures might have been more than a mere legend.

In the year 1190, the monks of Glastonbury Abbey in England announced an incredible discovery. According to historical record, the monks began to experience dreams and visions about King Arthur around that time, which prompted them to consult with King Henry II (AD 1133-1189). Henry informed them of a long-kept secret of the royal family: Arthur’s remains were buried in the churchyard of St. Dunstan in Glastonbury. A search was soon commissioned.

Upon excavating the indicated area, the searchers unearthed a massive oak trunk, buried sixteen feet deep just as Henry had described. Inside was a human skeleton which confirmed that they had discovered something special. It was absolutely gigantic. It appeared to be much taller than an average man, and the space between the eye sockets was as wide as the palm of a man’s hand. Apparently, this famous king was truly larger than life.

This skeleton was not alone in its coffin. Alongside it was a second, lying next to a plait of blonde hair. The identities of the two remains were described on an archaic lead cross which was found nearby, inscribed with the Latin message “Hic jacet sepultus inclitus rex Arthurus in insula Avalonia,” meaning “Here lies interred the famous King Arthur on the Isle of Avalon.”

All in all, this was exciting stuff. Men and women flocked to Glastonbury from the surrounding regions, and King Henry II interred the ancient bones. Glastonbury soon became wealthy from the offerings and alms given by those who made the pilgrimage, and few questioned the authenticity of the find. Indeed, a few decades earlier the contemporary historian Geoffrey of Monmouth had claimed that Glastonbury was built on the site of ancient Avalon.

It turns out that Arthur’s grave was not the first historically significant discovery made by the monks of Glastonbury. In 1184, they had allegedly found the remains of St. Patrick. However, this claim failed to convince most people, since it was widely believed that St. Patrick had been buried in Ireland. Soon after this incident, the monks of the town had found the bones of famed Saint Dunstan. This discovery, too, was not widely believed. Though St. Dunstan had begun his career in Glastonbury, he ultimately relocated to Canterbury and had been buried there.

It was several years later that the monks found the grave of King Arthur. The discovery was fortuitous, because the monastery was rumored to be in financial trouble. In 1184, the monastic building and church of Glastonbury had been razed to the ground in a fire, leaving the monks of the town in dire monetary straits. However, if an abbey were in possession of a sacred relic, then it would be assured revenue. People would visit from far and wide to see pieces of the cross, clothes and objects of the saints… and bones. King Arthur was not a religious figure, but as one of the foremost heroes in legendary history, his remains attracted a great deal of medieval tourists.

While the circumstances of the discovery cast it in a suspicious light, the story was supported by King Henry II King Edward, who had succeeded Henry III and who had no need for money. But he may have had political motives in backing such a hoax; England was being ruled by Norman conquerors. The Saxons generally accepted these rulers, but those belonging to the Celtic fringes did not. Among those who revolted against the Norman invaders, it was widely believed that Arthur would one day return and fend off the invaders. With proof that the Celts’ savior was truly dead, Edward would secure a greater hold on his subjects. He interred the bones of King Arthur and Queen Guinevere, symbolically aligning his reign with that of England’s most famous hero and putting the matter to rest.

Taken all together, the evidence strongly suggests that the grave of King Arthur was just an elaborate hoax, designed to benefit several parties. Unfortunately the bones and the cross went missing centuries ago, so the evidence cannot be examined using modern techniques. But if they are ever rediscovered, even if they prove to be forgeries, these artifacts would be an interesting testament to the enduring legacy of political trickery and propaganda.

Capturing Beauty

Part One

‘Capturing Beauties Rose’

Jon Presco

Copyright 2004

“Many men say that there is nothing in dreams but fables and lies,
but one may have dreams which are not decietful, whose import becomes
quite clear afterward.”

Thus begins the ‘Romaunt of the Rose’ by Chaucer, that ends thus…

“The ending of the tale you see
The Lover draws anigh the tree,
And takes the branch, and takes the rose,
That love and he so dearly chose.”

 

Rosamund Clifford (before 1150 – ca. 1176), often called “The Fair Rosamund” or the “Rose of the World”, was famed for her beauty and was a mistress of King Henry II of England, famous in English folklore.

GENEALOGY of the

REESE FAMILY

IN WALES AND AMERICA,

From their Arrival in America
to the Present Time. ”

BY .’^

Miss MARY ETREESE.

Iff

B^R

RICHMOND, VA. :

Whittet & Shepperson, Publishers and Printers.

1903.

This edition published by

This edition published by C^ r\r\a\o

TUTTLE ANTIOUARIAM .BOOKS, INC. Digitized by ^^OOylL

28 South Main Street
Post Office Box 541

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C5

1 \

2

^.-0..

TO THE

Signer of the Mecklenburg Declaration of

Independence of North Carolina,

May 20, 1775,

THIS BOOK IS DEDICATED

By the Writer.

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Description of the Coat-of-Arms.

This coat of arms is quartered, combining the North
and South Welsh house of Rhys!

The upper right quarter : Blue, with silver cross and
crescents, indicating they were religious people. Blue is
symbolic of that fidelity and devotion to duty, always
characteristic of the royal tribes of Wales.

The upper left quarter : White, witii crimson chevron
and two ravens, with the gold letter R for Rhys.

Cambrian history says: ”The Ravens rej(Hce when
blood is hastening, when war doth rage,” showing they
were distinguished warriors.

The lower right quarter: Sable, with crimson chev-
ron, and three gold sheaves of wheat; indicating they
were farming people and possessed large landed estates.

Lower left quarter : Purple, with a white Talbot ram-
pant, on the scent, ready for the fray; showing they
were brave, gallant soldiers. The crimson, blue and pur-
ple were the royal colors.

The crest: A cubit arm vested, the hand grasping
five ears of wheat slipped.

The two Latin mottoes: Spea mellaria aevi (”Hope
for a better age.”) Spea tutiaaima ceolia (”The safest
hope is Heaven”).

Powell’s Cambrian History, and Robert Southey’s
poem “Madoc in Wales,” give an interesting account of
the Rhys family in Wales.

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‘The thing that fimt moved me to take some paines
in this studie, wiis the verie naturall affection which
generally is ill all men to here of the worthiness of their
ancestors, which they should be as desirous to imitate as
delighted to understand/’ — Camden.

“The Holy Writ encourages the search for an Ances-
tor, and a penalty is attached to those who find him not.
Nehemiah vii. 64: ‘These sought their register among
those that were reckoned by genealogy, but it was not
found; therefore were they, as polluted, put from the
priesthood.’ ”

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PREFACE.

There are manv reasons which have induced
the writer of this history to carry on this work.

First, she has the antiquarian’s interest in clear-
ing up the hidden history of the early days of the
family.

Again, a natural desire to learn more about her
own kindred; those whose blood flows in her veins.

She does not hope to interest many others beside
those of whom it treats. These, however, she hopes
will enjoy it, and if it shall promote among the
numerous descendants of the faraway founder of
the family a better acquaintance, a more sincere
affection, and a more worthy desire to honor an
honorable name, she will have her reward.

As imperfect as this work may prove to be, per-
haps it is better to have an imperfect sketch than
none at all. The writer has written hundreds of
letters. Very many never responded to her inter-
rogatories, and should their names not appear in
the book, they have only themselves to blame.

We have distinguished the different generations

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8 Preface.

of the family by the letters of the alphabet, thus :
A, first generation ; B, second, etc.

The writer wishes to express her sincere thanks
to Mrs. C. McAdorj’ for great assistance in genea-
logical research; also, to Mr. G. P. Erwin, of
Morganton, X. C, and to Mr. Bulow Erwin, of
Asheville, X. C, for the use of MS. and family
records, and to Mr. William R. Miller, of Rich-
mond, Va.

M. E. R.

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GENEALOGY

OF

THE REESE FAMILY.

CHAPTER I.

MACAULAY says, “Wales was said to be
reduced by Henry III., and more truly by
Edward I. Although it was conquered, it was not
looked upon as any part of the realm of England.

“Its old Constitution was destroyed, and no good
one substituted in its place. The care of that tract
was put into the hands of Lords Marches.

“A singular kind of government, something be-
tween hostility and government! Wales was in
perpetual disorder, and kept the frontier of Eng-
land in perpetual alarm; it was only known to
England by incursions and invasions. The Eng-
lish attempted to subdue the fierce spirit of the
Welsh by all sorts of rigorous laws. They pro-
hibited by statute the sending of all sorts of arms
into Wales; they made an act to drag offenders
from Wales to England for trial, and the trial
should be always by English. They also prevented
the Welsh from the use of fairs and markets.

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10 Genealogy op the Reese Family.

“Our ancestors did, however, open their eyes to
the ill husbandry of injustice. Accordingly, in the
twenty-seventh .year of Henry VIII., the course
was entirely altered; then the Welsh received the
rights and privileges of English subjects, and eight
years afterward a representation by counties and
boroughs was bestowed upon Wales by act of Par-
liament. From that moment, as by a charm, the
tumults subsided, obedience was restored, peace,
order and civilization followed in the train of lib-
erty. When the daystar of the English Constitu-
tion had arisen in their hearts, all was harmony
within and without.”

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CHAPTER II.

I) EESE originally came from the Welsh Khys,
X and means to twist, to change, thus : Rhys,
Rys, Rees, Reeoe, Reese.

Cambrian history of the tenth century says that
“the family of Rhys has for many generations en-
joyed preeminent rank in the principality of Wales,
and are second to none among the Cambrian fami-
lies in territorial possessions and political influ-
ence.”

Mervyn Ap Rhodri Mawr, King of Powys, who
died A. I>. 900, progenitor of the Kings of Powys,
dispossessed Idwal Ap Menric of his hereditary
throne of Xorth Wales. Grifl&th Ap Cynan, who,
after several ineffectual attempts to reinstate him-
self in his dominions, which had been usurped by
Trahnem Ap Carodoc, formed an alliance in 1079
with Rhys Ap Tewdor, Prince of North Wales,
for the vindication of the rightful succession. The
two princes met Trahnem on the Mountain of
Camo, where an action ensued, which terminated
in the defeat and death of the usurper and the
restoration of Griffith and Rhys. Griffith Ap
Cynan died in 1136, at the age of eighty-two, and
lies buried on the south side of the great altar in

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13 Genealogy of the Reese Family.

the cathedral at Bangor, having reigned fifty-seven
years.

This monarch married Angharad, daughter of
Owen Ap Ednin Ap Rhys, Lord of Tegaingl, and
had sons, viz.: (1) Owen, (2) Gwynedd, (3) Cad-
walader, Ap GrflSth, Lord of Cardigan, who died
in 1172, a distinguished participator in the events
of his times. His son, Owen Gwynedd Ap Griffith,
Prince of North Wales, a chivalrous and distin-
guished monarch, who, after a popular reign of
thirty-two years, died December, 1067, was twice
married; first, to Gwladys, daughter of Llowarch
Ap ThahsBm, Lord of Pembroke, and had son,
lowerth Ap Drwyndon Ap Owen Gwynedd, who
married Margaret, daughter of Madoc, Prince of
Powys, who had son, Llewellyn Ap lowerth, sur-
named the Great, who in 1194 demanded and ob-
tained, without a struggle, his hereditary crown of
North Wales from his uncle, Davydd Ap Owen
Ap Rys Ap Gwynedd.

After an eventful reign of fifty-six years, this
monarch died in 1240, and was buried in the Abbev
of Conway. His grandson, Llwellyn, the last
native sovereign Prince of Wales who was recog-
nized by the English monarch, was slain at Builth,
in the Valley of the Wye, December 11, 1282. His
son, Rodri Ap Owen, Lord of Anglessy, a prince
of great power and authority, married Agnes,
daughter of Rhys Ap Tewdor Mawr, King of South
Wales. Katherine the second, daughter of Rhys,

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GENEALOaY OF THE BeESE FaMILY. 13

married levan Ap Meridith, who owned the Castle
of Gwydir, of the Gwydir family, from whom was
descended Bodri Mawr, King of all Wales, who
married Gwenllian, daughter of Rhys, Lord of
South Wales, representative of the sovereign
princes of South Wales, and their daughter, Jonet,
married Ednyfed Vychan, Lord of BrynfEenigl, in
Denbigland, a powerful noble of his time.^

Dafydd Rhys, son of Tewdor, King of South
Wales, married Gwladys, daughter and heir of
Rynwallon, son of Kynfyn, Prince of Powys.

”Jonet, daughter and heir of Morgan Jenkin
Ap Morgan Ap Rhys, of Llanvyruch, in ye countie
of Brecknok. Ye said Morgan Ap Rhys died in
his father’s tim, and ye said Jonet, being an in-
phant, did possess ye inheritance.

“This pedigree is fully set forth by me, Tomas
Johnes, at Foontan gate, ye 24’*’ daye of March,
1599.”

Rhys of Tewdwor, King of South Wales, mar-
ried Gladys, daughter and heir of Redwallon,
Prince of Powis, and their son, Griffith Ap Rhys,
Prince of South Wales, married Gwellaine, of ye
daughter of Griffith Konan, King of North Wales,
thus uniting the northern and southern branches
of the house of Rhys.

The coat-of-arms of Rhys was sculptured on the
western front of Llanwenog Church, in Cardigan-
shire, and on the tombs of ve ancient dead.

* See Burk’s Landed Oentry.

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14 GEJfEALOGY OF THE ReESE Fa3IILT.

Sir Griffith Rhys, knight, was beheaded by
Henry VIII., on a charge of constructive treason,
from fear of his wealth and power. Such was the
irresistible weight of Rhys’ influence from Llan-
dovey to Haverfordwest, that the landing of the
Earle of Richmond was effected without oppo-
sition.*

“The countrie people flocked in crowds to his
standard, notwithstanding a real attachment to
Henry was suspected until he joined him at
Shrewsberry. Sir Rhys entertained a great aver-
sion to the French followers of the Earle, and pro-
ceeded through his own estates in Carmerthenshire,
collecting his forces, until he came to Brecknok.
While waiting there for the men of Monmouth-
shire, he planted the standard of Henry VIII.
at the standell, afterward called “Standard
Street.”

He then marched northward, and joined the
Earle of Richmond at Shewsberry.*

The History of the Royal Tribes of Wales says
of Lord Rhys “He was one of the bravest, most
liberal, and most celebrated of the princes of South
Wales. He was no less remarkable in courage than
in the stature and lineaments of his bodv, wherein
he excelled most men.”

He was known as Lord Rhvs of Dinevwar, and
dwelt in the Castle of Dinevwar.

* See PowelPs Camhrian History.

* Woodward’s History of Wales.

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Genealogy of the Reese Family. 15

Pedigree of the Montgomeryshire Families, se-
lected in 1699 by the celebrated Welsh poet and
grammarian, John Rhydderch, now in possession
of Sir Thomas Phillips, Baronet, at Middle Hill,
Worcestershire, opens Tvith the family of Rhys,
who were a younger branch of the great house of
Mathrafam.

In 1171 Rhys, Prince of Wales, made peace with
the English King, Henry. The King gave him
a grant of Caredigion, Stratwyny, Amystti and
Elvell. Rhys presented to the King personally
eighty-six horses, but the King accepted only
thirty-six.

King Henry gave Prince Rhys the appointment
of chief justiciary of South Wales, an office he
honorably filled.

In 1175-6 Prince Rhys, by some master stroke
of policy, on the feast of St. Paul and St. Peter,
June 27th, took with him to Henry’s court, at
Gloucester, all the reguli of South WaJes, to do
homage to the King and receive his pardon. These
were all received into the King’s peace. One royal
exhortation upon the occasion is recorded: ”He
bade them understand that if any Welshman made
war against the King’s land, they were bound to
side with him.” This pleased the King wonder-
fully, and the princes returned to their homes with
joy.

The Hirlas horn, also called the Rhys horn, was
the horn of an ox, mounted with silver, and used

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16 Genealogy op the Reese Family.

for drinking. Its size and color procured for it
the epithet, “Long Blue.” In the Vale of Maelor
it was presented in verse, thus :

“First fill thou, cupbearer that bringest joy.
The horn for Rhys here in this generous hall.
In Owen’s hall wherever on the spoil of foes
they feast. Wide open are the gates, the revel
of a thousand thou ma/st hear.”

The celebrated Welsh poet, Rhydderch, thus de-
scribes the Princess Gwendolyn, the wyf of Rhys.

“More vellow was her head than the flower
of the broom; her delicate skin was whiter
than the foam of the sea waves; fairer were
her hands and fingers than the blossoms of the
wood anemone amid the spray of the foun-
tain.”

Her daughter. Princess Gladys, was said to have
been one of the most beautiful women of all Wales,
and, like her mother, a perfect type of the Welsh
blonde.

The twelfth centurj’ is noted, in the history of
Welsh literature, for its poet prince, Owain
Kyvilliog, Prince of Powis, who wrote the Hirlas
Horn.

In Hearne’s Collection of Curiotis Discourses
are these funeral verses upon Lord Rhys, as pre-
served bv Camden :

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Gexealogy op the Reese Family. 17

“Who can describe so great a hero, with his
reed pipe ? How great was he himself, at one
time to the citizens like Homer, at another
like Achilles, brave against hostile troops,
having avenged the Ancestors of his country
for nearly sixty years* How many Armies
routed? how many camps recovered? how
many cities? The hope of his country, the
pillar of peace, the light of the city and the
world, the honor of his race, the glory of
Arms, and the thunder-bolt of war: than
whom none prior in peace, nor another braver
in Arms. The noble diadem of the Cambrian
honor, that is (Rhesus) Rhys is dead! All
Cambria mourns ; he is removed, but not dead,
for his illustrious name is ever deemed fresh
on earth; he is covered, but is revealed, for
his enduring fame does not permit the illus-
trious leader to lie concealed; he surpasses
measure in Sprightliness, in eloquence in
morals.”

During the military expedition which Henry II.
made against South Wales, an old Welshman at
Penoddnir, who had faithfully adhered to him,
being desired to give an opinion about the royal
army, and whether he thought that the rebels would
make resistance, and what would be the final event
of this war, replied, “This nation, King, may
now, as in former times, be harassed, and in a great

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18 Genealogy of the Reese Family.

measure weakened and destroyed, by you and other
powers, and it will often prevail by its laudable
exertions; but it can never be totally subdued
through wrath of man, unless the wrath of God
shall concur. !N’or do I think that any other nation
than this of Wales, or any other language, whatever
may hereafter come to pass, shall in the day of
severe examination before the Supreme Judge
answer for this comer of the earth.”^

*See Hoar’s Oiraldua.

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CHAPTER III.

THE family of Rhys, descended from the south
house of Rhys, emigrated from Wales to
England in 1599, and changed the spelling of the
name to Rees. They were of Presbyterian faith,
and were at the siege of Londonderry and the battle
of the Boyne, in 1688.

Sir David Rees was a lineal descendant of Lord
Rhys, of Dinevwar, and married Gwellion, daugh-
ter of Griffith Konan, King of Wales.

Sir Thomas Rees, son of Sir David, of South
Wales, married Mawd, daughter of Sir William
de Brewys, who was the great-grandson of Bellyt,
some time Emperor of Great Britain.

Sir David Ap Rees, son of Sir Thomas, married
Gladys, daughter of Redwallon, Prince of Powis.

Rev. David Ap Rees was pastor of a Presbyterian
congregation at Southwark. His son. Rev. David
Ap Rees, was pastor of a Presbyterian congregation
at Cardigan. He married Maud, daughter of Sir
Meridith Owen, of South Wales. His line in-
cludes the family of which this history is written.

Welsh Pedigree of Rhys (Reese) is as follows,
and found in Cambrian History, by Powell,
Burke’s Landed Gentry, Hoar’s Giraldus, Wood-
ward’s History of Wales:

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20 Genealogy of the Eeese Family.

Welsh Pedigree of Rhys.

1. Rhodri Mawr, King of all Wales, 876, had

2. Cadell, Prince of South Wales, who had

3. Howell, d. d. a., King of all Wales, who had

4. Owen, Prince of South Wales, who had

5. Einion, eldest son k. v. p., who had

6. Tudor-Mawr, Prince of South Wales, who had

^

7. Rhys Ap Tudor Mawr, Prince of South Wales,
who had

8. Griffith Ap Rhys, Prince of South Wales, who
had

9. Rhys Ap Griffith, Chief Justice of South
Wales, who had

10. Rhys Gryd, Lord of Yestradtywy, who had

11. Rhys Mechyllt, Lord of Llandovery Castles,
who had

12. Rhys Vaughn, of Yestradtywy, who had

13. Rhys-Gloff, Lord of CymeydmsBn, who had

14. Madoc Ap Rhys, Prince of Pbwys, who had

15. Trahaim-Goch, of Llyn Graince and Peul-
lech, who had

16. David Goch, of PeuUech, who had

17. Evan Ap David-Goch, of Graince and Peul-
lech, from whom was descended —

1. Conan, King of all Wales, had

2. Princess Essylt, who married Merefynfrych,
King of Anglessey, K. 845, had

3. Rhodri-Mawr, King of all Wales, died A. D.
876, who married Lady Angharad, daughter of

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Genealogy op t^e Reese Family. 21

Meirig Ap Dynwal, son of Arthur Ap Seissyllt,
Prince of Cardigan^ King of Britain, had

4. Cadell, Prince of South Wales, who married
Lady Reingar, daughter of Tudor Trevor, Earl
of Haverf ord, had

5. Howell, d. d. a., King of all Wales, married
Lady Jane, daughter of Earl of Cornwall, and had

6. Owen, Prince of South Wales, married Lady
Augharad, daughter of Llewellyn Ap Mervyn,
Prince of Powys, and had

7. Einion, eldest son k. v. p., who married Lady
Nesta, daughter of Earl of Devonshire, who had

8. Tudor Mawr, Prince of South Wales, married
Gwenlian, daughter of Gwyr Ap Rhyddrch, Lord
of Dyf et, and had

9. Rhys Ap Tudor Mawr, Prince of South Wales,
married Lady Gwladys, daughter of Rhiwallon,
Prince of Powys, had

10. Griffith Ap Rhys, Prince of South Wales,
married Lady Gwenlain, daughter of Griffith Ap
Cynan, Prince of North Wales, and had .

11. Rhys Ap Griffith, Prince of South Wales.
Lord Rhvs was Chief Justice of South Wales 1171,
who married Lady Gwenlain, daughter of Madoc,
Lord of Bromfield, and had

12. Rhys Gryd, Lord of Yestradtywy, who had

by his wife. Lady Joan, daughter of Richard de

Clare, fourth Earl of Hertford, one of the twenty-

five Magna Charta barons, also of royal descent,

and his wife. Lady Anicia, second daughter of Wil-
8

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22 Genealogy of the Reese Family.

liam, second Earl of Gloucester, and his wife, a
daughter of Robert-Cossn de Bellomont, second
Earl of Leicester, Lord Justice of England, a
grandson of Hugh Magnus, son of Henry I., King
of France, son of Robert the Consul. Earl of
Mellent created 1109 Earl of Gloucester a natural
son of Henry I., King of England.

13. Rhys Mechyllt, died 1242, Lord of Llan-
dovery Castle, father of

14. Rhys- Vaughn, of Yestradtywy, who married
Lady Gwladys, daughter of Griffith, Lord of Cym-
cydmaen, and had

15. Rhys-Gloff, Lord of Cymcydmaen, who mar-
ried Lady Gwyril, daughter of Maclywn Ap Cad-
wallader, and had

16. Madoc Ap Rhys, who married Lady Tan-
glwyst, daughter of Rhys Ap Einion, and had

17. Trahaim-Goch, of Llyn Grainiance and Pen-
lech, who married Lady Gwyrvyl, daughter of
Madoc Ap Meirig, and had

18. David Goch, of Penlech, 1314, who married
Lady Mawd, daughter of David Lloyd and his wife.
Lady Annie, daughter of Gwrgenen-y-Gwyn-
Llylid, of Rhiwaedog Ap Madoc Ap Rhraid-flaidd
(also of royal descent, Ap Cynveloe Ap Llewellyn,
a natural son of David Rhys, Prince of Wales, and
his wife. Lady Joan, a natural daughter of King
John of England, and had

19. levan Ap David-Goch, of Grainoc and Peul-
lech, temp. 1352, who had by his wife, Lady Eva,

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Genealogy op the Reese Family. 23

daughter of Einion Ap Celyimin, of Llwydiarth,
in Montgomen’shire, a descendant of Bleddyn Ap
Cynfyn, Prince of Wales, founder of one of the
roval tribes of “Wales.

1. Rhys Ap Teudor the Great, Prince of South
Wales, had

2. Rhvs, Prince of South Wales, died 1136, had

3. Princess iN’esta, who married Gerald Fitz-
Walter de Winsor, Lord of Moleford, Governor of
Pembroke Castle and High Steward of Pembroken-
shire, 1108, twelfth in descent from Griffith Ap
Lleweley, of Cors-y-gedol, Sheriff of County
Merioneth, who married Lady Efa, daughter of
Madoc, of Cr}Tiierth, descended from Owain
Brogj’ntyn, Lord of Edeirnion, youngest son of
Madoc Ap Meridith, Prince of Powis, and had
Rhys Ap levan, who married Gwenhwyvar, daugh-
ter of Howell Vaughn, of Tronolen, and had levan
Ap Rhys, married Louisa, daughter of Richard
Bamville, and had Meredydd Ap levan Ap Rhys,
of Gwydir Castle, in the Vale of Conwy Camaroon-
shire, father of Lord Rhys, of Dinevwar Castle,
who was a celebrated warrior, and from whom
are descended the Rhys family who went from
Wales to England, and thence to America.

Lord Rhys married Lady Elspeth, daughter of
Rhys Ap Tudor, the great Prince of South Wales,
whose daughter, Gwenlain, married Griffith Konan,
King of South Wales, whose daughter, Gwendolyn,
married Sir Davj’dd Rhys, whose son. Sir Thomas

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24 Genealogy of the Reese Family.

Bees, married Mawd, daughter of Sir William de
Brewys, who was the great-grandson of Bellyt,
some time Emperor of Great Britain.

Sir David Ap Rees, son of Sir Thomas, married
Gladys, daughter of Redwallon, Prince of Powis.
Their son, Rev. David Ap Rees, was pastor of a
Presbyterian congregation at Southwark. His son
was pastor of a Presbyterian congregation at Car-
digan.

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CHAPTER IV.

THIS family of Rees, on coming to America
in 1700, added a final e to the name, spelling
it Reese,

There were several brothers and two sisters, who
landed at New Castle, Delaware. Here they sepa-
rated. Rev. David Reese and his two daughters,
Ruth and Esther, went to Pennsylvania. One
brother, Charles, remained in Delaware, where,
after a few years, he died, and his family emi-
grated to Pennsylvania. George, another brother,
settled in Maryland, where he left a numerous
progeny, but the writer has no information con-
cerning them. Esther married a Scotchman,
Mackay, a descendant of General Mackay, who had
command of the army of Scotland at the battle
of Killicrankie. Ruth, the second daughter, never
married, but studied medicine, and was considered
a fine female doctor and nurse of that period. It
is said of her “that manv times she took her
patients into her home and nursed them back to
health, and many of her old medicinal recipes are
still preserved in the family and used with fine
effect.” These sisters lived and died in Pennsvl-
vania. At one time they visited their brother
David, who had emigrated to Xorth Carolina.

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26 Genealogy of the Reese Family.

They rode double on a big bay horse called Chester,
all the long distance from Pennsylvania to I^orth
Carolina. One would ride in the saddle awhile,
and then the other, changing thus to rest each
other. Ruth walked a good deal, and gathered
roots and herbs, which she found in the woods.
They carried their clothing in saddle-bags thrown
across the saddle. It took them a long time to
make the journey, such was the slow mode of
travel at that period. When they reached their
brother’s home, thev found two of his little bovs
quite ill with measles. Ruth immediately took
charge of them, and soon had them well. It is
said “that these sisters were stout, fine-looking
Welsh women, and were something of a curiosity
to the Xorth Carolina people, especially Ruth, who
for her knowledge of medicine, and excellent nurs-
ing, was held in high esteem, and considered a
veiy wise woman.”

This is the only visit they ever made to North
Carolina. They lived and died in Pennsylvania.
Their brother David, son of Rev. David Reese, was
bom at Brecknoc, Wales, and died at a ripe old
age, and was buried at Poplar Tent graveyard be-
side his wife, with no stones to mark their graves.

He was an elder of Sugar Creek Church, also in
Poplar Tent Church, of which Rev. Hezekiah
Balch was pastor.

“One can but feel regret that the graves of
Rev. H. Balch and his spiritual elder, David

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Genealogy of the Reese Family. 27

lieese, have no stones to mark them, and can-
not be pointed out/’

”Men that represented this congregation in
the Convention, their names will never pass
from the records of history, but a visit to their
tombs might be useful to coming generations,
and the future worshippers in Poplar Tent
might be excited to deeds worthy of their an-
cestors. They ought to dwell upon the past
to be prepared to act worthy of the present
and future.” *

“Previous to the time of Rev. Mr. Balch
there were three elders of Rocky River, living
in the bounds of Poplar Tent, who were con-
tinued as elders after the separate organization
of Poplar Tent, of which they formed a part,
viz., Aaron Alexander, Nathaniel Alexander,
and David Reese. The latter gentleman was
a member of the Mecklenburg Convention.
To these were added in 1771, by choice of the
church, James Barr, Robert Harris, James
Alexander, George Alexander, and James P.
Reese, son of David Reese.” ^

David Reese was a signer of the famous Meck-
lenburg Declaration of Independence, at Charlotte,
X. C, May 20, 1775, and gave five sons to fight in
the Revolutionary War.

In 1737, he married Susan Polk, granddaughter

* Foote’s Sketches of North Carolina.

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28 Genealogy of the Reese Family.

of Robert Polk, of Maryland. The Polks are of
Scotch-Irish descent, the original name being Pol-
lock. John Pollock, a gentleman of some estate in
Lanarkshire, not far from the cathedral citv of
Glasgow, during the troublous times in church and
state, who was an uncompromising Presbyterian,
left his native land to join a colony of Protestants
in the north of Ireland.

His son Robert was a true blue Presbyterian like
his father; he served as a subaltern officer in the
regiment of Col. Tasker in the Parliamentary
Army against Charles I., and took an active part
in the campaigns of Cromwell. He was the
founder of the Polk family in America, and settled
on the eastern shore of Maryland ; he married
Magdalen Tasker, who was the widow of his friend
and companion in arms, Col. Porter, and daughter
of Col. Tasker, then Chancellor of Ireland, of
Bloomfield Castle, on the river Dale.

Pollock, by this marriage, acquired the estate
of Moneen Hill, in the Barony of Ross, Donegal
County, Ireland, of which his wife was heiress.
Pier elder sister Barbara Tasker, married Capt.
John Keys, an English soldier, and their descend-
ants still own Bloomfield Castle.

In 1689, Robert Pollock took ship at London-
derry for the Plantations of America. After a
stormy voyage, in which one of his children died,
he landed on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.
Grants of land were made to Robert Pollock and

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Genealogy of the Reese Family. 29

his sons, and a homestead patented under the
name of “Polk’s Folly” still in possession of the
famih’; it lies south of Fauquier Sound, opposite
the mouths of Xanticoke and Wicomico Rivers.
The old clock which was brought from Ireland by
Robert Pollock still stands in the hall of the
dwelling house, and his mahogany liquor case is
still preserved among the family relics. Among
the descendants of Robert Polk were Charles Polk,
Governor of Delaware ; Trusten Polk, Governor of
Missouri, and United States Senator; Col.
Thomas Polk, of Revolutionary fame; and James
Knox Polk, Speaker of the House of Representa-
tives, and President of the United States. The
first John Tasker of Maryland married Eleanor,
daughter of Thomas Brooke. Issue: Thomas
Tasker (1), married Clara, daughter of Major
Nicholas Seawell, half-brother of Lord Baltimore.
Benjamin Tasker (2), President of the Council and
Governor of the Province of Maryland, married
Annie, daughter of William Bladen.

The Taskers and Bladens are descended from
Henry I., King of France, and his wife, Anne of
Russia, daughter of Jeroslans, Grand Duke of
Russia, 1015.

Magdalen Tasker was the great-granddaughter
of Thomas Tasker, a freeman of Maryland, 1695,
and Judge of Probate, 1098.^

* Browning’s Americans of Royal Descent. Dwinn’s Vis-
itations of Wales.

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30 Genealogy of the Keese Family.

Susan Polk Beese comes down through this line.
Gen. Ewell, of Confederate States Army, comes
down through this line also.

Susan Polk, the wife of David Reese, was line-
ally descended from Robert Polk and Miss Gullett
his wife of Maryland.*

David Reese had in his possession many valuable
books from his father’s library. Rev. David Reese
had what was considered a choice selection of books
for that period. Some of these books were as fol-
lows: A large family Bible brought from Wales.
Watts’ Psalms and Hymns. Shakespeare’s Plays.
Pope’s Works. Youth’s Sermons. Whole Duty of
Man. Royal Fables. Paradise Lost and Regained.
Ancient History. Plutarch’s Lives. Religious
Philosopher. Young’s Xight Thoughts. Hewe/s
Meditations. Looking Unto Jesus. Harwood’s
Testament. Humphrey Clinker. Ray’s Wisdom
of God. Cambrian History. Medical Works and
miscellaneous reading.

^History of Polk Family.

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CHAPTER V.

A 1. David Reese, the signer, as he was called,
was married to Susan Ruth Polk in 1738. Chil-
dren, viz.:

B 1. James Polk, bom 1739.

B 2. Thomas, bom 1742.

B 3. Catharine, bom 1744.

B 4. David Tasker, bom 1746.

B 5. Susan Polk, bom 1748.

B 6. Charles GuUett, bom 1750.

B 7. George, bom 1752.

B 8. Mary Joanna, bom 1754.

B 9. Solomon Trusten, bom 1757.

B 10. Ruth Elizabeth, bom 1760.

David Reese emigrated from Pennsylvania to
Mecklenburg county, X. C, and settled near Char-
lotte, where he lived and died.

“On the 20th of May, 1775, David Reese,
with the following gentlemen, Abraham Alex-
ander, Chairman; John McKnitt Alexander,
Secretary ; Ephraim Brevard, Hezekiah Balch,
. John Phif er, James Harris, William Kennon,
John Ford, Richard Barry, Henry Downs,
Ezra Alexander, William Graham, John
Queary, Hezekiah Alexander, Adam Alexan-

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32 Genealogy of the Reese Family.

der, Charles Alexander, Zacheus Wilson, Sen.,
Waightstill Avery, Benj. Patton, Matthew
McClure, Neil Morrisson, Robert Irwin, John
Fletmiken, John Davidson, Richard Harris,
Sen., Thomas Polk, formed the committee
who went to Charlotte, X. C, and where the
resolutions drawn up by Dr. Ephraim Brevard
to declare themselves free from the British
yoke of oppression were read to a large con-
course of people assembled to witness the pro-
ceedings of the committee.

“There were six resolutions read and unani-
mously adopted and signed by the above
named gentlemen as delegates, and ever after-
ward known as the famous ‘Mecklenburg
Declaration of Independence.’ ” ^

This meeting was held in the Court-house, which
stood on Independence Square, the spot being now
marked by an iron plate with a suitable inscrip-
tion. The same plate also commemorates a battle
fought, in the streets of the town, between a troop
led by Comwallis and the Mecklenburg Militia, in
September or October, 1780, of which event Lord
Comwallis wrote to the Earl of Dartmouth, saying,
“that he got into a veritable ^hornets’ nest,’ a name
which has clung to the town to this day, the hor-
nets’ nest having become emblematic of this sec-
tion.”

* Martin’s History of Xorth Carolina.

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Genealogy of the Reese Family. 33

In Charlotte was located the first educational
institution in this portion of the South, chartered
by the Legislature as the “Queen’s Museum,” in
1771, and generally known as “Queen’s College,”
and where several of David Reese’s children were
educated.

David Reese, after educating his children, re-
moved to his farm on Sugar Creek, where he died,
and was buried with no stone to mark his grave
or the grave of his wife, at Poplar Tent grave-
yard.

It is told by historians that this old court-house
where the Mecklenburg Declaration was signed
was a frame building about fifty feet square placed
upon a brick wall ten or twelve feet high, with a
stairway on the outside. It stood in the center of
the village called the common. At that time
Charlotte town consisted of about twenty houses.

During the war of the Revolution this wall was
ronoved, and wooden piles put under the house,
so that cannon could be used, as it commanded the
entrance to four streets of the village. After the
war it was used as a market house. N’ow there is
an iron tablet, with the name and date, to mark the
spot where this old court-house stood, and the
electric cars run on either side of it. Comwallis’
headquarters were next to the southeast comer of
the street from the court-hOuse, and was the resi-
dence of Col. Thomas Polk, and was known as the
“White House.*’

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3-1: Genealogy of the Beese FAaiiLT.

It is said that during the Revolutionary War,
while the British were at Charlotte, that one of
the British soldiers and one of the American sol-
diers got into a quarrel, and the American soldier
determined to kill the British soldier, and in order
to do this, he got ‘his sweetheart, a countrj”^ girl, to
bring a basket of eggs and carry them over to
where the British soldiers were quartered; and
while there, this soldier came up and was bartering
for the eggs with hi« hand in the basket; the
American soldier, concealed behind a tree across
the street, from a signal given by his sweetheart,
when she drew away from the soldier as far as she
could, her lover fired, and the soldier fell against
the girl, knocking the eggs out of her hand. She
was badly frightened, and screamed so loud that
she was soon surrounded by British soldiers. The
man died in a few moments. While thev were re-
moving him, the girl made her escape, and joined
her lover, who was waiting nearby, and they fled to
the countrv. The British soldier was buried at
Charlotte, and the spot where this occurred is
pointed out to persons who visit the city, and are
interested in its early history.

“The last will and testament of David Reese,
Esq., was proved in open court, by the oath of
Thomas Campbell, and evidence there ordered that
letters testamentary, with a copy of the will an-
nexed, issue to James Reese and William Sharpe,

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Genealogy of the Reese Family. 35

executors nominated in said will, who came into

court and qualified.

“David Allison,
“Robert Wylie.

“Frances McCaul, Guamashee, appears and
sworn, that he owes the Deponent nothing.

“Wednesday, Court met according to adjourn-
ment, present the worshipful Justices, Abraham
Alexander, Hezekiah Alexander, David Reese.”

“In the name of God, Amen. I, David
Reese, of the county of Mecklenburg and
State of Xorth Carolina, being of sound and
disposing mind and memory, Do this 5th day
of Februar}’, in the year of our Lord, 1787,
make and publish this my last will and Testa-
ment in manner following, that is to say,
after all my just debts are paid. First, I give
and bequeath unto my loving son-in-law, Wil-
liam Sharpe, of Rowan county, and to my
loving son, James Reese, all that freehold in
fe-simple in the said county of Mecklenburg,
on Coddle Creek, whereon I now live, with aU
the appurtenances thereunto belonging, to
hold to them the said Wm. Sharpe and James
Reese, their trustees, administrators or as-
signs from and immediately after my decease,
together with sixty acres or thereabouts ad-
joining or nearly adjoining the said manor

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36 Genealogy of the Reese Family.

plantation, as also an entry or claim to and for
a small size piece of land lying between and
adjoining the said sixty acre tract of my said
manor plantation. Upon this special trust
and confidence that the said Wm. Sharpe and
James Reese, or the survivors of them, do and
shall permit Susan Ruth, my dearly and well-
beloved wife, to have, hold, and enjoy all my
manor, plantation and premises, to them de-
nied as aforesaid during her natural life, and
to take to her own use the rents, issues and
profits arizing therefrom during her natural
life aforesaid.

“She making no waste nor destruction
thereon, nor clearing any large quantity of
land. And upon this further condition that
she shall not rent, lease, or farm out the said
land, without the advice and consent of the
said Wm. Sharpe and James Reese or the sur-
vivors of them. And after the decease of my
said wife or with her cheerful concurrence
during life, upon this further trust and con-
fidence that they, the said Wm. Sharpe and
James Reese, or the survivors of them, shall
sell the whole of the land herein demised, with
all the appurtenances thereunto belonging, on
reasonable credit for the most monev that can
be obtained for the same, and that the money
so arising shall as soon as may be paid in the
following manner, namely, ten £s per annum

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Genealogy of the Reese Family. 37

to my beloved wife during her life, 30 £8 to
my son Charles, 5 £s to my son James for his
trouble in executing this will. The remainder
of the money arising as aforesaid to be equally
divided between my sons George and Solomon,
but in case Solomon should choose his share
in land, then his equitable share shall be laid
off for him by my Executors in lieu of his
share of the money above mentioned. To my
grandson Sidney Eeese I give and bequeath
10 £ to be paid out of the above mentioned
fund provided my wife and George and Solo-
mon should agree on the matter, then George
may likewise take his share in land, they first
agreeing with my Executors to pay their
mother and the other legacies hereinbefore
mentioned. . I further give and bequeath to
my beloved wife the largest bay mare, her
choice of a cow and calf, three sheep and five
hogs, also all my beds, bed clothes, household
furniture and vessels of every kind within
doors (excepting such as is hereinafter be-
queathed) to be divided equally at her de-
cease among all my daughters, who may be
then alive. In case they should die intestate
my Executors shall be careful in making an
equal distribution of the beds and furni-
ture which is intended by the foregoing
clause.

“To my daughter Euth I give and bequeath
4

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38 Gexealogy of the Reese Family.

one feather bed and furniture, with two cows
and two calves. To my son Solomon I give
and bequeath a riding horse, saddle and bridle.
I give and bequeath that my just debts be
paid out of the residue of my estate, and the
remainder be equally divided between Solo-
mon and Buth. That in case Solomon should
die without wife or issue, his share shall be
equally divided between my sons James, Da-
vid and Charles, and my grandsons Thomas
Beese Sharpe, Edwin Beese, and Thomas
Henry, and I do hereby constitute and ap-
point my son-in-law Wm. Sharpe and James
Beese to be sole Executors of this my last will
and Testament, strictly charging them to exe-
cute the same according to the plain meaning
thereof.

“Ini witness whereof I, the said David Beese,
have to this my last Will and Testament set
my hand and seal the day and year above-
written. Signed, sealed, published and de-
livered by the said David Beese, the Testator,
as and for his last will and Testament in pres-
ence of all who are present at the signing and
sealing thereof.*

“David Beese.
”(Seal)

‘James Campbell,

‘Thomas Campbell, Witnesses.”

‘ Copied from old records at Charlotte, N. C.

(tr

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Genealogy of the Eeese Family. 39

David Keese was a pious, exemplary man, and
possessed great influence in religion and politics.
He brought his children up around the family
altar, where they assembled for worship each morn-
ing and evening. They were carefully and prayer-
fully taught the principles and practices of their
religion as found in the tenets of the Presbyterian
Church.

His house was the home of the preachers, and
he was a strict attendant on the house of worship,
and required his children to go to church whenever
there was preaching.

His son George used to say that his brother
Charles was inclined to be disobedient and wild,
and gave his father much trouble because he did
not love to go to church, and would often steal off
and not go.

The old Eeese homestead near Charlotte, X. C,
as described by one of the grandsons, was a plain,
comfortable weather-boarded building, one and a
half stories high, having four large rooms, two
shed’rooms and two attic rooms, with dormer win-
dows, besides two rooms in the cellar, one of which
was used for a dining room. At each gable end
were immense rock chimneys, the long piazza in
front, with a trellis covered with roses at either
end. The house, was surrounded by majestic oaks,
under which hung the inviting swing on one side,
on the other was a long row of bee-gums, which
yielded a wealth of golden honey.

The floors were waxed, and the furniture, some

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40 Gexealogy of the Reese Family.

pieces of which were brought from Wales, was pol-
ished like glass. Quaint rag carpets of the bright-
est hues, covered the floors in winter, except in the
drawing-room the floor was covered with a bought
carpet. The flower garden was bright with all the
old-fashioned flowers. The walks were bordered
with sweet pinks. In the rear of the house was the
big spring, with its clear, cold water, hard by the
brick spring house, where the milk and butter was
kept.

On the roadside stood the old sweep well, where
the weary traveller refreshed himself and beast.

In this old home ten children grew up. The
daughters married here and had their wedding sup-
pers. The sons tilled the soil, and at that remote
period, it was considered one of the finest places
in Mecklenburg county. It has succumbed to the
ravages of time, and not a vestige of it is left to
show where it once stood.

Old Deeds.

__ __ “”*

A deed from Thomas Polk to Frances Moore for
iGOO acres of land, dated October 20, 1772, was
acknowledged in open court by said Polk, and
ordered to be registered.

Grand Jury List. — Edward Giles, James Alex-
ander, David Eeese, David Wilson, Charles Alex-
ander, Robert Harris, James Reese and others.
N^oble Osboum, Constable; Robert Harris,’ Judge
of County Court, 1772.

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Genealogy of the Reese Family. 41

April Session, 1787. — ^A deed from David
Reese to James Reese for 150 acres of land, dated
September 20, 1769, was acknowledged by the said
David Reese in person, and ordered to be regis-
tered.

A deed from David Reese, Sr., to David Reese,
Jr., for 150 acres of land. May 16, 1775.

B 1. James Polk Reese, eldest son of David
Reese and wife, Susan Polk Reese, was bom in
Pennsylvania in 1739 ; married his cousin, Annie
Gullet Polk, of North Carolina. Issue:

C 1. Thomas Polk.

C 2. Sidney Alexander.

C 3. Esther Mackay.

C 4. Margaret Tasker.

C 5. Charles Trusten.

James Polk Reese was a Revolutionarv soldier,
and was present at the signing of the Mecklenburg
Declaration of Independence. He relinquished a
college education in favor of his brother. Dr.
Thomas Reese, who was so determined upon a
classical education that it is told of him “that he
cheerfully gave up his share in his father’s estate
to bestow all his means upon an education.’*

James Polk Reese was one of the executors of
his father’s will in 1787. He was considered a
good business man, upright and honest in all his
dealings. His family removed from North Caro-
lina and the writer has been unable to trace them.

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About Royal Rosamond Press

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