France Delivers Arms To Kurds

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Europe is coming to Rose Mountain.

Jon

The French presidency said in a statement that the arms shipment will be delivered “in the coming hours” and has the blessing of authorities in Baghdad.

More European help is also possible. A high-level EU diplomatic meeting late Tuesday ended with a statement that it would consider the Kurdish request for urgent military support “in close coordination with Iraqi authorities.”
The Obama administration’s decision to send 130 additional advisers to northern Iraq to explore evacuation of thousands of refugees under siege by Islamic militants comes amid increased military involvement by the U.S. and other nations.

“This is not a combat boots on the ground kind of operation,” Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said in announcing the additional advisers Tuesday. The U.S. already had about 300 advisers in country.

The Wall Street Journal, however, reported Wednesday that the U.S. is considering a military mission to rescue the Yazidi sect refugees, calling it “a move that risks putting U.S. forces in direct confrontation with Sunni fighters for the Islamic State.”

“People are looking at ways to do something more than just drop water and supplies,” a senior U.S. official who requested anonymity told the Journal. “You can only do that for so long.”

France also weighed in Wednesday, saying it will send arms to Kurdish forces in northern Iraq in response to the Kurds’ “urgent need” of support against militant radicals of the Islamic State.

The French presidency said in a statement that the arms shipment will be delivered “in the coming hours” and has the blessing of authorities in Baghdad.

More European help is also possible. A high-level EU diplomatic meeting late Tuesday ended with a statement that it would consider the Kurdish request for urgent military support “in close coordination with Iraqi authorities.”

USATODAY

Official: 130 advisers heading to northern Iraq

The plight of the refugees in a Kurdish-controlled region of the Sinjar Mountains prompted President Obama to order both airstrikes against the Islamic State militants and humanitarian airdrops there last week. In an interview with USA TODAY on Tuesday, Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said the military’s effort there could take months but will be limited.

Martin added that the effect of the airstrikes had blunted the momentum of the militant group, and shipping heavier arms to Kurdish allies will help solidify the gains.

The survival of the refugees has been assured for now, Dempsey said, but their fate and rolling back the gains the Islamic State has made — such as seizing the city of Mosul — will require the new Iraqi government to reach out to Sunnis and Kurds.

“The crisis has been abated but not solved,” said Dempsey, who is traveling to a series of meetings in Vietnam.

Meanwhile, Iraq’s Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki said Wednesday the president’s tasking of another politician with forming a new government amounts to a “constitutional violation” and would have worse consequences than the militant takeover of much of the country’s north.

He also says he will not relinquish power until a federal court rules on the move, which was aimed at paving the way for new leadership that could reverse the militants’ gains.

“This constitutional violation… will be yield more damage than of the state collapse that took place in Ninevah,” al-Maliki said during his weekly address Wednesday, referring to the northern province which includes Iraq’s second largest city Mosul.

Al-Maliki has vowed legal action against President Fouad Massoum for carrying out “a coup against the constitution and the political process.”

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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