Tinkerbelle Time

tinker5

tinker6

tinker7

tinkerb

1965.58.263.324 002

tinkerb9

tinkerb10

tinkerb11

tinkerbell

Yesterday I had Michelle Carr and Sandy over for our inaugural ‘Tinkerbelle Time’. We decided that every Tuesday my friend Michelle is going to bring one of her Tinkerbell movies to my house to watch. She owns the whole collection. I bought Chinese food.

When our friend Hollis Williams was alive, I would cook dinner for my homeless friend, and “our children” as H would call Michelle and Steve. M and S adopted H at Safeway where H stood out in front of cashing in the cans his regular donors handed him. M and S are mentally challenged, and they always got their cut. H would buy them food and give them a few bucks if it was a good day. Wherever H went, M and S would follow.

Above is a photo of M with her baby Connor. There are other names associated with Jack Sparrow, the pirate. The day after Connor was born, and when M’s mother took a break, social services came and took Conner away, and, adopted him out. Because M suffers from Autism, it was ruled she could not be a fit mother. There is a legal battle going on. M gets to see C twice a week for two hours.

Before we ate our supper, Michelle asked if she could say Grace like Hollis did every time we sat down at the table. Michelle’s prayer was very long and moving. I am now dedicated to answering Michelle’s prayer, which is to get her son home – permanently! This child is homeless. He lives with his adoptive parents, but, not his parents. Yesterday, I asked Michelle if she gets Conner, will she bring him to Tinkerbelle Time?

“I guess so!”

Michelle is my model. I have done three drawings of her hands. She has beautiful hands, that I also photographed. Belle has beautiful hands that she would not let me photograph at our meeting.

Above are illustrations by Fanny Cory who my grandfather, Royal Rosamond, claims encouraged him to become a writer, along with her brother who was an artist. How about Fanny’s sister, Kate Cory? What we have here is a family of artists and writers, like MY FAMILY. Drew Benton is a gifted artist who draws Fairy Creatures. Drew has many physical and mental problems and should be getting SSI, but, Vicki is taking care of her. She is an expert with a computer and creates Avatars for gamers.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2014

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/08/22/royal-rosamond-fanny-y-cory/

“Rosamond recalls that Jack Cory and his sister Fanny Y. Cory, cartoonist, started him on his writing career.”

In looking for traces of my Muse, Rena Easton, in Montana, I found what can be described as the Rosamond Holy Grail in Helena Montana. My grandfather lived in Helena and says he was inspired to write by Jack Cory, a political cartoonist and equestrian artist, and his sister Fanny Y. Cory, a famous illustrator who lived in a secluded ranch in Montana.
There was an art show of four generations of this family. This is the vision I had for my family when I became a Pre-Raphaelite. Christine Rosamond Benton did several Fairy paintings, as did Drew, who is employed rendering avatars for fantasy games.
Alas we have a true genealogy that traces the Rosamond Family Muse from the Cory family, to my grandfather, to me, to my sister, and to her daughter Drew Benton whose father was the famous muralist, Garth Benton, the cousin of the artist, Thomas Hart Benton. This is the convergence of three creative families – that is unheard of! The Great Muses are at work here. Consider our DNA!

If I had not been following my Muse wherever she leads me, then I would not have made this profound discovery that cast out the outsider from Rosamond Creative Legacy, those parasites who dare title themselves “caretakers” of Rosamond’s art and life story. If my grandfather came back from the dead, he would take a bullwhip to these usurpers – of his history! Fanny was a very famous woman artist – before Christine was born!
Thank you my dear grandfather, whom I never met, for laying down the true stepping stones of our family history.

Royal wrote a short story about a bullfight in Montana where his sister lived. It appears their father adopted these sibling out to W.S. Spaulding after his wife died.
The top two images were done by Drew Benton. The boy with dragon was done by Drew’s mother, Christine Rosamond Benton. The connections I just made – with no ones help – increase the value of all my families creative efforts. This is what real Art Books look like!
I’ve considered doing illustrations for most of my books. C’mon Rena. Show yourself. Do it for Montana! You were Rosamond’s Muse. This is your State History. You got some major bragging rights! Put this in your resame. At least send me copies of photos of you that I can work from to illustrated.

‘Capturing Beauty’. I want your side of the story! I will got to the Governor and have you declared Montana’s State Treasure who brought the history of Royal Rosamond and Fanny Cory, together!

Jon Presco

Copyright 2013

082

4632

4634

4636

4639

Fanny Y. Cory

Kate Cory (1861-1958) was an American photographer and artist. She studied art in New York, and then worked as commercial artist. She traveled to the southwestern United States in 1905 and lived among the Hopi for several years, recording their lives in about 600 photographs.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kate_Cory

The negatives for the photographs that Cory took between 1905 and 1912 were found in the 1980s in a cardboard box along with other materials donated to the Smoki Museum. Nothing knowing how to preserve the negatives, the museum gave them to the Museum of Northern Arizona, who was better equipped to maintain and preserve the images. Marc Gaede, director of photography at the museum, Marnie Gaede and Barton Wright created the book The Hopi Photographs: Kate Cory: 1905-1912 based on some of the found images, some of which are ceremonial scenes. Due to concern from the Hopis about the rights to their cultural property, many images will not be published by the museum and are available in a restricted file for viewing by researchers.[26]

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2012/05/12/j-r-a-artistic-dynasty/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2012/05/13/tyler-hunt-is-blamed/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/11/26/artistic-line-of-the-rosemond-sisters/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2012/12/07/a-crime-against-history/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/05/31/benton-preston-family-go-west/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/05/30/being-homeless-with-miss-christiansen/

Kate Cory (1861-1958) was an American photographer and artist. She studied art in New York, and then worked as commercial artist. She traveled to the southwestern United States in 1905 and lived among the Hopi for several years, recording their lives in about 600 photographs.

Fanny Young Cory (October 17, 1877 – July 28, 1972)[1] was an artist and illustrator best known for her comic strip Little Miss Muffet, syndicated by King Features.[2] She did both art and writing on “Sonnysayings.”[3][4] She went by several names: F. Y. Cory, F. Cory Cooney and Fanny Cory Cooney but eventually used Fanny Y. Cory as her professional name. She sometimes used FYC as a signature on her early work.

Born in Waukegan, Illinois, she was 14 when she went art school in Helena, Montana. At the age of 17, she arrived in New York and enrolled at the Art Students League.
Fanny Cory was related to Kate Cory, particularly noted for her photographs and paintings of the Hopi.[5]
Career[edit]
She did covers and interior illustrations for Century, Harper’s Bazaar, Life, Scribner’s, The Saturday Evening Post and St. Nicholas.
The Little Miss Muffet comic book was published in 1948 and 1949 by Best Books.
Book illustration[edit]
She illustrated Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll (published by Rand, McNally & Company copyright 1902, 1905)
She illustrated L. Frank Baum’s books, The Master Key and The Enchanted Island of Yew.[6]
She illustrated Marion Hill, The Pettison Twins, McClure, Phillips & Co, 1906.
She died in 1972 in Stanwood, Washington.

Peter Pan in Scarlet[edit]
Tinker Bell makes a come back in the official sequel Peter Pan in Scarlet. When Wendy and the rest of the group reach Neverland and ask Peter where she is, he replies that he does not know anyone by the name Tinker Bell (explained by the fact that he does not remember her after she died). She is mentioned by Wendy and the rest of the Lost Boys to Fireflyer, a silly blue fairy, who when he reaches the top of Neverpeak, makes the wish to meet her. When they open Captain Hook’s treasure chest, among other things, Tinker Bell is seen inside it to Fireflyer’s joy. Initially, Tinker Bell does not like him, but eventually she comes to see that Fireflyer is not as bad as he seems to be. In the end, they get married and start selling dreams to pirates, while having many adventures.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Tinkerbelle Time

  1. Reblogged this on rosamondpress and commented:

    I gave Steve Martin one of my bicycles two days ago

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.