Royal Rosamond & Fanny Y. Cory

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corey9“Rosamond recalls that Jack Cory and his sister Fanny Y. Cory, cartoonist, started him on his writing career.”

In looking for traces of my Muse, Rena Easton, in Montana, I found what can be described as the Rosamond Holy Grail in Helena Montana. My grandfather lived in Helena and says he was inspired to write by Jack Cory, a political cartoonist and equestrian artist, and his sister Fanny Y. Cory, a famous illustrator who lived in a secluded ranch in Montana.

There was an art show of four generations of this family. This is the vision I had for my family when I became a Pre-Raphaelite. Christine Rosamond Benton did several Fairy paintings, as did Drew, who is employed rendering avatars for fantasy games.

Alas we have a true genealogy that traces the Rosamond Family Muse from the Cory family, to my grandfather, to me, to my sister, and to her daughter Drew Benton whose father was the famous muralist, Garth Benton, the cousin of the artist, Thomas Hart Benton. This is the convergence of three creative families – that is unheard of! The Great Muses are at work here. Consider our DNA!

If I had not been following my Muse wherever she leads me, then I would not have made this profound discovery that cast out the outsider from Rosamond Creative Legacy, those parasites who dare title themselves “caretakers” of Rosamond’s art and life story. If my grandfather came back from the dead, he would take a bullwhip to these usurpers – of his history! Fanny was a very famous woman artist – before Christine was born!

Thank you my dear grandfather, whom I never met, for laying down the true stepping stones of our family history.

Royal wrote a short story about a bullfight in Montana where his sister lived. It appears their father adopted these sibling out to W.S. Spaulding after his wife died.

The top two images were done by Drew Benton. The boy with dragon was done by Drew’s mother, Christine Rosamond Benton. The connections I just made – with no ones help – increase the value of all my families creative efforts. This is what real Art Books look like!

I’ve considered doing illustrations for most of my books. C’mon Rena. Show yourself. Do it for Montana! You were Rosamond’s Muse. This is your State History. You got some major bragging rights! Put this in your resame. At least send me copies of photos of you that I can work from to illustrate
‘Capturing Beauty’. I want your side of the story! I will got to the Governor and have you declared Montana’s State Treasure who brought the history of Royal Rosamond and Fanny Cory, together!

Jon Presco

Copyright 2013

I also found an article about a Royal Rosamund, who was said to be the son of W.S. Spaulding – I do not know if that was the same person as the Frank Rosamund who is the coach driver with the family in 1900, but the ages match.

INDEPENDENT RECORD NOVEMBER 26, 1950

Royal Rosamond, Helena native, is Planning Book About
Home City, Chamber Is Told
Royal Rosamond, widely known
author and Helena native, is planning
a book about the city according
to a letter received by the
Helena Chamber of Commerce
from the resident of Oklahoma
City.
Rosamond said the book will
be based on recollections of his
childhood in the city. He asked
the chamber for assistance with
additional material about the city
and the surrounding area.
Rosamond said his parents followed
my grandfather, John L.
Reese, to Helena from Missouri
In the spring of 1884.” The family
lived in the Sixth ward for three
years before moving to the Sanford
and Evans building.
His father, W. S. Spaulding,
and Gary Cooper’s father were
Business partners with a shop on
the lot where the post office now
stands. When he was six years old,
Rosamond said, he was a playmate
of Tommy Cruse’s little boy,
about the time the elder Cruse
was financed with a grub stake by
a local grocer and struck it rich
at Marysville. .
Rosamond asked the name of
the grocer and wanted to know
the Cruse boy’s name. The letter
said Rosamond attended Hawthorne
school when he was six,
seven and eight years old. “There
was not a bob sled in town that
I had not ridden. . . . I was on
speaking terms .with every horse in
every barn in town. . . . I doted
on pigtailed Chinamen but failed
to win their friendship except for
one, a merchant up the gulch,” he
said.
A frame residence built hy Rosamond’s
father at the head of Walnut
still stands. .The author
visited the city In 1945.
His mother died when he was
nine years old and he moved to
Missouri until he was 18 when he
returned to Helena. Rosamond recalls
that Jack Cory and his sister
Fanny Y. Cory, cartoonist, started
him on his writing career.
Rosamond asked for information
about the earthquake, early gold
operations, a map of the city and
other information which he expects
to include in his book.
One of his novels, “Bound in
Clay” is available at the Helena
public library. He has been called
“Oklahoma’s greatest living humorist,”
and is holder of the international
Mark Twain award for
his contribution to literature.

Fanny Y. Cory, Grandmother of Ann Cory on her mother’s side

Now I will go back in time.  I will go back to one of the dearest people in my life, my grandma.  

Today her art work is bought and sold today on e-bay and other sites and she is noted in books about illustrators of the late 1800s and early 1900s.  

Her art name is Fanny Y. Cory, although sometimes she signed with FYC and other versions of her name.  The one thing that never changed, though, was that she signed her art vertically and with carefully formed capital letters.

Fanny Y. Cory was someone who always drew from the time she was old enough to hold a pencil.  One of her early memories was lying on the floor of her home drawing away with adults patiently stepping over her. 

She drew so much and so well that not only could she draw anything she saw but anything she wanted to materialize out of her fertile imagination. 

Fanny Y. Cory’s  brother, Jack Cory, a well-known political cartoonist,  paid her way to attend the Metropolitan School of Fine Arts in New York City. 

She took part in the Artists Student Legue there but soon needed to earn money from her art to support her darling sister who had consumption. 

Many times as I grew up I heard her tell the story about her beginning attempt to sell her illustrations.  The first journey at 17 up the “well-worn iron stairs” into the unknown world of  “Scribners”  was frightening.  

“The young man at the desk flipped carelessly through my portfolio.  Then he looked up and said to ‘Come back when you became known’ “.

“I thanked him kindly and then walked across the hall to “Century” and they took my illustrations right away.” 

Before long Fanny Y. Cory was known as the “Sweetheart of the Century Company,” and became one of the best known illustrators in the country. 

She did covers and illustrations of St. Nicholas, Life, Scribner’s, Century, Harper’s Bazaar and The Saturday Evening  Post. 

She also illustrated many books during this time among them Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland  (1902) by Lewis Carrol, and several books by Frank L. Baum, author of The Wizard of Oz. 

Fanny Y. Cory married a Montana rancher whom she had gotten to know in earlier years via his sisters and moved to his ranch at Canyon Ferry, Montana. 

They raised their children there and she continued her illustration work on a limited basis. 

After Fanny Y. Cory’s  children become older, it was apparent that they needed college training. 

Fanny Y. Cory had always done her art for the good of others and to help her children have their dreams, she threw her talents into a new art field: two syndicated comic strips which she did for 25 and 30 years respectively. 

One was “Little Miss Muffet,” a daily strip that King Features ran originally as their answer to the very popular “Little Orphan Annie” comic strip. 

Her other was a single that ran daily called, “Sonnysayings” which depicted the forever-young Sonny in his family.   Its gentle humor featured life as seen from his youthful point of view.   

During these years of constant black and white comic drawing, Fanny Y. Cory relieved her eyes and her creative heart, painting in watercolors her exquisite “fairy series”. 

There is a wonderful web site which tells yet more about  her life and accomplishments:    http://www.fycory.com  

 

http://www.anncoryart.com/fanny-y-cory

The Artist:
“Fanny Y. Cory –By Herself” was how The Critic magazine captioned this self-portrait in its July 1900 issue.
Fanny Young Cory was born in 1877 and in 1895 an 18 year-old Miss Cory attended the Metropolitan school of Fine Arts in New York City. By the turn of the century, she was one of the best known illustrators in the country. She did covers and illustration for St. Nicholas, Life, Scribner’s, Century, Harper’s Bazaar and The Saturday Evening Post. She also illustrated many books including Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1902) by Lewis Carrol, and several books by Frank L. Baum, author of The Wizard of OZ. Who’s Who of American Women listed F.Y. Cory in their First Edition, Volume One.
Fanny Y. Cory, after marrying Fred Cooney in 1904, resided on a ranch near Helena, Montana, while raising their three children. In the mid 1920s she moved into newspaper cartooning and by 1936, King Features Syndicate carried both her famous “Sonnysayings” and her “Little Miss Muffet” strip in newspapers throughout the country. She was listed in King Features’ Famous Artists and Writers. As a diversion during this period of the late 1920s and early 1930s, Fanny Y. Cory painted in watercolor what she considered her finest work. We now call this collection the “Fairy Series” of which these reproductions are a part.
In addition to her other accomplishments, the popularity of her work led to the publishing of several books of her own and in 1951, Fanny Y. Cory was named “Mother of the Year” for the State of Montana. Soon afterwards she moved to Camano Island, Washington where she continued her cartooning career with King Features Syndicate until she retired in 1956 at the age of 79. This was after a 36-year run of “Sonnysayings” and a 20-year run of “Little Miss Muffet”. The original watercolors in the “Fairy Series” were painted over 60 years ago and remained in the artist’s private collection, unpublished until recently.

http://www.fycory.com/

http://boards.ancestry.com/thread.aspx?mv=flat&m=834&p=localities.northam.usa.states.montana.counties.lewisandclark

On a Ranch 27 miles from Helena, Montana, and “three miles from anything,” lives Mrs. Fred Cooney. To readers of The Evening Star she is Fanny Y. Cory, illustrator and writer of “Sonny Sayings.”

http://www.stanwoodhouse.com/gallery/generations.html

4 generations of artists
On the occasion of the 100th birthday of Sayre Cooney Dodgson of Stanwood, Stanwood House Gallery is mounting an exhibition of her art along with work by her mother, Fanny Cory, a nationally known artist and illustrator from the early 20th century, and other members of this family of artists.

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2012/09/06/drew-benton-meets-baphomet/

The Artist:

“Fanny Y. Cory –By Herself” was how The Critic magazine captioned this self-portrait in its July 1900 issue.

Fanny Young Cory was born in 1877 and in 1895 an 18 year-old Miss Cory attended the Metropolitan school of Fine Arts in New York City. By the turn of the century, she was one of the best known illustrators in the country. She did covers and illustration for St. Nicholas, Life, Scribner’s, Century, Harper’s Bazaar and The Saturday Evening Post. She also illustrated many books including Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1902) by Lewis Carrol, and several books by Frank L. Baum, author of The Wizard of OZ. Who’s Who of American Women listed F.Y. Cory in their First Edition, Volume One.

Fanny Y. Cory, after marrying Fred Cooney in 1904, resided on a ranch near Helena, Montana, while raising their three children. In the mid 1920s she moved into newspaper cartooning and by 1936, King Features Syndicate carried both her famous “Sonnysayings” and her “Little Miss Muffet” strip in newspapers throughout the country. She was listed in King Features’ Famous Artists and Writers. As a diversion during this period of the late 1920s and early 1930s, Fanny Y. Cory painted in watercolor what she considered her finest work. We now call this collection the “Fairy Series” of which these reproductions are a part.

In addition to her other accomplishments, the popularity of her work led to the publishing of several books of her own and in 1951, Fanny Y. Cory was named “Mother of the Year” for the State of Montana. Soon afterwards she moved to Camano Island, Washington where she continued her cartooning career with King Features Syndicate until she retired in 1956 at the age of 79. This was after a 36-year run of “Sonnysayings” and a 20-year run of “Little Miss Muffet”. The original watercolors in the “Fairy Series” were painted over 60 years ago and remained in the artist’s private collection, unpublished until recently.

The Book Brand New And From The Publisher’s Final Production Run:

New Pricing Structure: I am pleased to announce that The Fairy Alphabet book by F.Y. Cory is still available and you can now order it from us on line and we will provide free shipping via the US Post Office! We also now have quantity discounts. The new pricing structure is $14.95 for a one book order, $13.95 per book for a 2 to 4 book order and for a 5 or more book order the price per book is only $12.95. It is an exquisite full color alphabet book with 26 full-page fairy alphabet designs complimented by Fanny Y. Cory’s own whimsical rhymes for each letter of the alphabet. This is a quality, 9″ x 11-3/8″ hard-bound book that adults will love and that children will want read to them and that they will want to read over and over again to themselves. This book will become a cherished treasure in the lives of the people who are fortunate enough to own it.

The History:

Minneapolis Tribune – 1904 “THE ROMANTIC MARRIAGE OF F.Y. CORY”: This syndicated article, as it appeared in the Minneapolis Tribune, May 1, 1904 on page 4. The accompanying photos could not be provided because of the poor quality of the microfiche prints. The article begins as: “News of the culmination of a delightful romance comes from Montana. Of course, that means the marriage of the hero and heroine. In this case the heroine is especially distinguished by reason of the extent to which she has endeared herself to many thousands who have never seen her. And the romance is a welcome relief from the usual article supplied by this sedate and uneventful age, being of the good old-fashioned kind, in which the hero rescues the heroine from the very brink of death.

In short, this heroine is none other than Fanny Y. Cory, whose characteristic pictures of children and child life have delighted magazine readers for the last half dozen years. The charming pictures on this page from the pen of Miss Cory are from the recent files of Harper’s Bazaar, and many of them were drawn to illustrate ”The Memoirs of a Baby,” a delightful volume just issued by Harper & Brothers. Enjoy this epic tale of a talented, unbroken spirit in the body of a tiny lady who would not be denied –not by entrenched New York editors nor by a young and wild Montana frontier!”

The Indianapolis Sunday Star – March 30th, 1930 – Feature Article: This full-page article tells the remarkable story of Fanny Young Cory’s second national career –this time as a lady cartoonist for King Features Syndicate while being a Montana ranch wife and mother of three kids –in story, photos and cartoon drawings.

The Indianapolis Sunday Star – picture portion of the article.

The Indianapolis Sunday Star – story portion of the article.

FANNY’S WORLD – The Life and Art of Fanny Y. Cory (Cooney) from MONTANA MAGAZINE 1988: In the May-June issue of Montana Magazine, the article “Fanny’s World –The Life and Art of Fanny Cory Cooney” was written by Dave Walter. This is another wonderful story featuring photos, F.Y. Cory art, illustrations and cartoons.

F.Y. Cory Is One Of The MONTANANS OF THE CENTURY – Dec 19, 1999: In 1999 F.Y. Cory is featured as one of the most influential Montanans of the 20th Century and here is the article featuring her in the honorary “Montanans of the Century” Centennial Publication.

GROWING UP –On a Montana ranch with pioneer artist F.Y. Cory: Short, revealing sketches of growing up with the pioneer woman illustrator, cartoonist, wife and mother on a Montana ranch. The stories were penned by F.Y. Cory’s daughter, Sayre Dodgson –except for the last story which was written by F.Y. Cory herself while 91 years old. There are photos and a wonderful corral watercolor painted by F.Y. Cory.

MONTANA MAGAZINE 1980: In the summer of 1980, Montana “The Magazine of Western History”, did a cover and 16 pages on Fanny Young Cory. Bob Cooney, a legendary story-teller, cowboy, forester and son of F.Y. Cory wrote the narrative. He had some help from Sayre Dodgson, his sister and the daughter of F.Y. Cory. Enjoy this epic tale of a talented, unbroken spirit in the body of a tiny lady who would not be denied –not by entrenched New York editors nor by a young and wild Montana frontier!

THE BAUM BUGLE – including a partial list of books illustrated by F.Y. Cory: This reprinted article by Douglas Green from the Spring, 1973 Baum Bugle features information on F.Y. Cory who illustrated several of Frank L. Baum’s books. It features illustrations and photos from the original article. Of special interest to F.Y. Cory devotes is a partial but long checklist of the books that she illustrated.

——————————————————————————–

The Shows:

MONTANA HISTORICAL SOCIETY:

The Montana Historical Society has on loan in its possession and has featured the art of F.Y. Cory in periodic shows at their museum in Helena, MT. F.Y. Cory is also featured in a niche under the Montana State Capitol Rotunda in Helena. So, if you are in Helena during one of these occasional F.Y. Cory displays, you will have a rare chance to see the original Fairy Alphabet paintings along with other F.Y. Cory originals.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to Royal Rosamond & Fanny Y. Cory

  1. Reblogged this on rosamondpress and commented:

    Jack, Fanny, and Kate Cory were creative siblings, and are linked to the Benton group of artists. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_(Alice's_Adventures_in_Wonderland)

    http://www.smokimuseum.org/kate_t_cory.htm

    http://www.prescottcorral.org/TT5/V2KateCory.htm

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kate_Cory

    Born in Waukegan, Illinois, she was 14 when she went art school in Helena, Montana. At the age of 17, she arrived in New York and enrolled at the Art Students League.
    Fanny Cory was related to Kate Cory, particularly noted for her photographs and paintings of the Hopi.[5]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fanny_Cory

    http://montanawomenshistory.org/drawing-on-motherhood-the-cartoons-and-illustrations-of-fanny-cory-cooney/

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