The Ulster-Scots and the Rosamond Mill

lyton33

lyton55

rose-mont

rosenmund-1crest

dottiew

Charles_Coote,_1st_Earl_of_BellamontToday at 1:30 P.M. I will be seeing an attorney in order to DISINHERIT my daughter, Heather Hanson, and make Jennifer Dundon, my Heir. I do this because my daughter is stupid, and Jennifer is a Historian. I can’t take our amazing family history with me, and my daughter hates my history. I have very little hope that my grandson, Tyler Hunt, will have an interest in his family, because he is being raised to be stupid too.

What I am going to leave Jennifer Dundon is my Intellectual Property. After I reveal the Norse Grail tomorrow, the name Rosamond will forever be associated with the Grail. Rosamond is a Family Brand Name, a Trademark I have developed over the years. It is associated with the Hobbit stories as well. I have long seen the Dundons as the Dunadan.

“In J. R. R. Tolkien’s legendarium, the Dúnedain (singular: Dúnadan, “man of the west”) were a race of Men descended from the Númenóreans who survived the sinking of their island kingdom and came to Eriador in Middle-earth, led by Elendil and his sons, Isildur and Anárion. They are also called the Men of the West and the Men of Westernesse (direct translations of the Sindarin term). They settled mainly in Arnor and Gondor.”

“Intellectual property (IP) is a legal concept which refers to creations of the mind for which exclusive rights are recognized.[1] Under intellectual property law, owners are granted certain exclusive rights to a variety of intangible assets, such as musical, literary, and artistic works; discoveries and inventions; and words, phrases, symbols, and designs. Common types of intellectual property rights include copyright, trademarks, patents, industrial design rights, trade dress, and in some jurisdictions trade secrets.”

Last week I had dinner with the Dundons. I tried to engage Jeremy Dundon in a conversation about his post on the Hobbits, to no avail. Like so many he is content to be a master of Pseudohistory. I percieve he thinks I am mad, but, masters of fake history are threatened by what I am doing, not just for my family, but, the family of Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor. Liz and I share the same grandfather. When I assicate the name of this famous actreess with the Grail, many will take note.

Above is a photp of me with Dottie Witherspoon who desends from John Knox Witherspoon ‘The Signer’ and John Knox the Father of the Reformation. This link is in question because John Knox married Mary Stewart, who I and all Rosamonds are kin to via the marriage of the world famous artist, Christine Rosamond Benton.

Above is a photo of the Rosamond Mill, and it owner, Bennett Rosamond, who was a Grand Master of the Oragne Lodge who are Ulster-Scots. The Druids are assocated with the Odd Fellows, of who my great grandfather belonged.

Here we come! Get out of our way.
Here come the Billy Boys!
Mov aside Bill Cornwell, you drunken bum
For we are coming for my grandson on his birthday!

Jon Presco

Copyright 2013

Billy Boys originated in the 1920s as the signature tune of the Brigton Boys, a Protestant street gang in Glasgow led by Billy Fullerton. The gang often clashed with Catholic gangs such as the Norman Conks.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pseudohistory

In 1825, in the village of Fenagh in county Leitrim in Ireland, a
gang of Catholic youths attacked the Rosamond home. The Rosamonds were
staunch Protestants. James, aged 20 (born 1805) and his brother Edward, aged
15, attempted to protect their mother. A shot was fired by Edward and a
youth was dead. The boys fled to Canada. James went to Merrickville where he
worked for James Merrick as a weaver. Edward, still fearing arrest, worked
his way eventually to Memphis, Tennessee.

I am looking for descendants of Philip Rosemond and Moses Morton Rosemond
who lived in Guernsey County, OH in the mid-1800s. This family descended
from a James Rosemond who lived in County Leitrim, Ireland in the early
1700s. Other members of this same family settled in Lanark, Ontario, Canada.
The southern Rosamond family is also said to be descended from this same
family, as are the Rosamond families in Australia and New Zealand. I am
trying to tie all the branches of the family together. The information on
the family in Guernsey County, OH is shown below. I’d appreciate hearing
from anyone who has any information regarding this family.

The reference for the earlier generations of this family is the booklet “The
History of the Rosemond Family” by Leland Eugene Rosemond, 1939.

Thanks.

Descendants of Moses Morton Rosemond

Every fine day Rosamunda walked the hills, seldom seeing another living creature other than sheep, or, very rarely, a doe or faun. She did not walk south to Hobbiton, however, except on errands or for an appointed visit. She had not forgotten her “understanding” with Bilbo. And Bilbo did not forget her, either.

While I don’t necessarily love all the changes Mr Jackson has made to the Hobbit, I absolutely love the music that went with it, and what that has inspired others to do; e.g. this:

Two days ago I awoke and wondered how best to tell my readers how
the Rougemonts became the Orangemen and Ulstermen, and how their
Dream that was forced flee the ancient lands of their ancestors,
came to dwell in America. Then it struck me, the very ground that
lay at my feet rose up and gave me a good bump, for we go to where
we have been, and back again, and it was time to bring the
Grandfather’s home. And we go there with the words Tolkien’s
Rosamunda, and we return with the words of my grandfather, Royal
Rosamond, for they are very much the same.

I jumped out of bed and rushed to my computer. Had any other writer
taken note of how similar the Hillbillies are to the Hobbits? In no
time I found the observations of the author, Karlton Douglas. I then
went to my book shelf and pulled out ‘Ravola of Thunder Mountain’
published in 1947 the years my late sister was born. Inside the
cover is this dedication;

“To BERTHA MAY ROSAMOND (now Mrs. Bigalow), my second daughter, who
has steadfastly clung to the belief that her Father would leave
Literary Footprints on the SANDS OF TIME.

Royal Rosamond”

On the evening before my frined Hollis Williams died, I got a call from my kin and old freinds, Micahel Dundon who wanted to move from Hawaiwi back to Oregon where his three chilcen and numerous grandchildren live. I told him I think my friend is dying, but, refused to let me take him to the hospital. I was glad to have an old freind to talk to about this, maybe he had an idea as what to do. What I got, was total silence, and then this;

“When are we going to talk about me?”

For a couple of months I had been getting calls from Michael whom I knew since he was fsixteen. His older brother married my younger sister when she was fifteen. Jim Dundon was twenty four. Micahel was worried sick about this move,and sought my help in making a soft landing in the States. I told him I would do all I could to help.

The Williamite war in Ireland (1689–91) was fought between Jacobites who supported the restoration of the Catholic James II to the throne of England and Williamites who supported the Protestant William of Orange. The Protestant Ulster community, including the Scots, fought on the Williamite side in the war against Irish Catholics and their French allies. The fear of a repeat of the massacres of 1641, fear of retribution for religious persecution, as well as their wish to hold onto lands which had been confiscated from Catholic landowners, were all principal motivating factors.

The Williamite forces, composed of British, Dutch and Danish armies as well as troops raised in Ulster, ended Jacobite resistance by 1691, confirming the Protestant monopoly on power in Ireland. Their victories at Derry, the Boyne and Aughrim are still commemorated by the Orange Order into the 21st century.

Finally, another major influx of Scots into northern Ireland occurred in the late 1690s, when tens of thousands of people fled a famine in Scotland to come to Ulster.[9][10]

The Ulster Scots (Ulster-Scots: Ulstèr-Scotch;[3] Irish: Ultais) are an ethnic group[4] that has lived in Ireland since the 17th Century, and are predominantly subjects of the United Kingdom. Their ancestors were Lowland Scottish and Northern English people, many being from the “Border Reivers” culture. These people migrated to the island of Ireland in large numbers with the Plantation of Ulster, a planned process of colonisation which took place under the auspices of James VI of Scotland and I of England on land often confiscated from the Irish nobility, most extensively in the Province of Ulster. The term “Ulster-Scots” refers to both these colonists of the 17th century and, less commonly, to the Gallowglass who began to arrive from what is now northwest Scotland centuries earlier.

Ulster-Scots were largely descended from colonists from Galloway, Ayrshire, and the Scottish Borders Country, although some descend from people further north in the Scottish Lowlands and the Highlands. Ulster-Scots emigrated in significant numbers to the United States and all corners of the then-worldwide British Empire — Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa along with the British West Indies — and to a lesser extent to Argentina and Chile. Scotch-Irish is a traditional term for Ulster Scots who later emigrated to what is now the United States; “Scots-Irish” is a more recent form of the American term,[5] and is not to be confused with Irish-Scots, i.e., recent Irish immigrants to Scotland.

Margaret Knox née Stewart (1547- after 1612), was a Scottish noblewoman and the second wife of Scottish reformer John Knox, whom she married when she was 17 years old and he 54. The marriage caused consternation from Mary, Queen of Scots, as the couple had married without having obtained royal consent.[1]

[edit] Family

Margaret Stewart was born in 1547, the daughter of Andrew Stewart, 2nd Lord Ochiltree, and Agnes Cunningham. The family was staunchly Protestant, and also related to the Scottish royal family and the Hamiltons.[2] Margaret had three sisters and four brothers, including James Stewart, Earl of Arran.

[edit] Marriages and children

On 26 March 1564, she married her first husband, John Knox, leader of the Scottish Reformation, and a close friend of her father. His first wife, Marjorie Bowes had died in December 1560, leaving him with two small sons, Nathaniel and Eleazer. The marriage was strongly criticised by Queen Mary, as they had married without having first obtained her consent. Margaret, as the Queen’s relative,[3] was required to ask the monarch for permission to marry.

The couple made their home on Edinburgh’s Royal Mile, and together they had three daughters:[4]
Martha Knox (1565–1592), married Alexander Fairlie, by whom she had issue.
Margaret Knox (b.1567), married Zachary Pont, by whom she had issue.
Elizabeth Knox (1570- January 1622), married in 1594, John Welsh, minister of Ayr, by whom she had issue.

Margaret served as Knox’s secretary, and later, when he became ill, his nurse. Following Knox’s death in November 1572, the General Assembly, at the suggestion of the Regent Morton, allowed Margaret to receive, for the year succeeding her husband’s death, his pension of 500 merks.[5]

In January 1574, she married her second husband, Sir Andrew Ker of Faldonside. He had been part of the conspiracy of Protestant nobles, led in March 1566 by Patrick Ruthven, 3rd Lord Ruthven, who had stabbed to death Queen Mary’s Italian secretary, David Rizzio in the presence of the Queen, who was almost six months pregnant at the time.[6] It was Ker who had held his pistol at Mary’s side, while she was constrained to watch Rizzio’s killing.[7]

Together they had a number of children.

On 8 April 1574, a Charter of Alienation confirmed Kerr’s provision for Margaret, in her widowhood, of the liferent of a third of ancestral lands in Haddingtonshire.[5] Kerr died on 19 December 1599, and she did not remarry.

Here is a chapter from my Grandfather’s story, whom I never met. I
will soon be leaving to see my Grandson, Tyler, Royal’s Great
Grandson. I will be bringing The Grandfather’s with me so they may
adore Heather’s beautiful son through my eyes.

http://rougeknights.blogspot.com

“Poetry on Leaves

The spring sun was warm now, brightening as with happiness in the
open fields, the broad land resembling a crazy quilt because of the
wooded patches everywhere. Already the wild grapes were in bloom,
and if the sun continued smiling there would be, in every Hillman’s
cellar, many, many jars of grape juice for making jelly, and wine
for those who knew the trick of making it. Those pink-white blossoms
on the pale yellow bushes hard against warm hillside rocks were
huckleberries in bloom. The wild grapes and the huckleberries once
ripe, tangier here in Shannon County, Missouri, than most any other
place in the Ozarks.

I walked on, for I had yet a long way to go before nightfall. Now it
was but a mite after mid-day. After leaving the train at Winona, I
could have perhaps caught a ride to Eminence had I stayed with the
wagon road instead of footing it up the spur-track leading northward
to cross Jack’s Fork at the Hodge place where I left to journey up
Possum Trot toward Little Wonder Schoolhouse and Tucked Away Church
House, above which in the ride to the north, I lived – the place
where I was born and which I called home, where my parents had
settled in their youth and planned some day to die. The way was
long, the trail lonesome and ofttimes steep. As wild a region as
ever grew outdoors. No matter. I wanted to stretch my legs and let
the April breeze take the orders of a Saint Louis foundry away from
me.

I went home on a visit once a year – had already worked five years
up there, long enough to forget how to talk (or write) hillbilly
talk, it seemed like. Still, I didn’t mind being called a hillbilly.
Life in the Ozarks had a tang. I liked everything about them, from
the blooming of the redbud and dogwood in springtime to pumpkin pies
and possum and coon hunting and listening to fox hounds in the fall.
I was born and bred here. This wilderness was in my blood. I felt as
much a part of it as does a back log to a fireplace. I was twenty
six years old now, and when I become fifty, I intend to retire, and
go sit on pappy’s rocker there on the front porch and rock and smoke
and think until I die.

Here on the side of Grapevine Mountain, high above the glistening of
Jack’s Fork below, for days and weeks and years back into the dim
past she had lived in splendid isolation, the silence, save for the
passing Hillman on the road below her cabin, as vast as the greenery
of the heaving land-billows rising higher and ever higher toward the
summit of the far ridge leaning against the blue heaven on the west,
below which was the great spring from which the stream Jack’s Fork
nursed and found perpetual substance. A skinny, faded creature in
her late forties, seemingly as antiquated as the furniture in the
two small rooms in her rustic cabin, yet she possessed the amazing
gift of cheerfulness. Even though her income was very meager, yet
she contrived to spread a spirit of near-opulence and comforting
friendliness about herself which was as convincing as was Mr.
Russell’s plush appearing abundance. In summer she mothered her
pansy beds, naming the little faces, as she called them, after the
little girls she taught in winter, the boys unslighted by living as
vegetables in her garden, the more refractory being a gooseberry
busy or wild plum tree.”

“From first sight, even the site of the new cottage had enchanted
her, dug as it was into the southeast side of a grassy hill in the
midst of Boffin lands, populated with Boffin sheep. There was a
little copse below it, just to the side, and a spring-fed well, all
of which reminded her of her childhood home. The place had come down
to Odovacar through his mother’s side, a Boffin. He had used it as
asort of base, when he and his friends had gone out hunting.
Theywould stock the little hole with gear and rations. Then, with
their bows, and a pony for their gear, they would make forays west
ornorth, towards the Downs or up to the Moors, or, closer still,
intoBindbale Wood. But that was years ago, when the game had not
yetmoved so far off. When Rosamunda had viewed it more carefully,
she saw the hole was inconsiderable disrepair. Also, it was a bit
too small. She had new rooms dug, so that there was a parlour and a
kitchen, a bedroom for each (and one to spare), along with extra
chambers further back fo rstore. When it was finished, it suited
Rosamunda very well. Especially, she loved the light. Situated
facing south-east, the light poured through the windows in the
mornings, her favourite time of the day. And, when she stood
outside, she could see the land stretching east and south far into
the distance. Illuminated by the late afternoonsun, the prospect was
especially fine. From the top of the little knoll that made the
cottage’s roof, she could see far to the northand west, where sheep
dotted the rolling hills. The sky at nighttook her breath away. And,
all day, the birds sang, the wind blew,and the Water, which ran
nearby, just to the west, mostly narrow andquick as it came down out
of Long Cleeve and Needlehole, could justbe heard when the wind
dropped and everything was still. She loved its peace and quiet, so
tucked away and so private. Yet,it was just an hour’s walk over the
hills to Bag End or to Hobbiton. Overhill, to the east, was even
closer. Every fine day Rosamunda walked the hills, seldom seeing
another living creature other than sheep, or, very rarely, a doe or
faun. She did not walk south to Hobbiton, however, except on errands
orfor an appointed visit. She had not forgotten
her “understanding”with Bilbo. And Bilbo did not forget her, either.
Regularly, he sent her gifts of wine or ham or fruit in season, as
tokens of his neighbourly regard. She appreciated the way he could
show marks ofparticular notice, without making her feel the burden
of obligation.”

Ann Witherspoon was born before 1771. She was the daughter of John Witherspoon.1 She married Reverend Samuel Stanhope Smith.
Child of Ann Witherspoon and Reverend Samuel Stanhope Smith
Mary Stanhope Clay Smith+1 b. 30 Aug 1787

Every fine day Rosamunda walked the hills, seldom seeing another living creature other than sheep, or, very rarely, a doe or faun. She did not walk south to Hobbiton, however, except on errands or for an appointed visit. She had not forgotten her “understanding” with Bilbo. And Bilbo did not forget her, either.
Regularly, he sent her gifts of wine or ham or fruit in season, as tokens of his neighbourly regard. She appreciated the way he could show marks of particular notice, without making her feel the burden of obligation.”

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2012/05/17/the-grandfathers-come-home-to-the-shire-for-thanksgiving/

http://www.visitstrangfordlough.co.uk/Utility-menu/Ulster-Scots

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2012/01/29/patton-and-the-glorious-revolution/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2012/11/10/12226/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2012/04/04/sleeping-kingdom-of-the-rose-thread/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2012/03/31/british-israelism-and-orange-order/

Born in Carleton Place, Upper Canada, the eldest son of James Rosamond and Margaret Wilson, Rosamond was educated at the grammar school in Carleton Place. He was president and managing director of the Rosamond Woollen Company and vice-president and managing director of the Almonte Knitting Company. He was Reeve and Mayor of Almonte. He was first elected to the Canadian House of Commons in a 1891 by-election for the riding of Lanark North. A Conservative, he was re-elected in 1896 and 1900.
In 1825, in the village of Fenagh in county Leitrim in Ireland, a
gang of Catholic youths attacked the Rosamond home. The Rosamonds were
staunch Protestants. James, aged 20 (born 1805) and his brother Edward, aged
15, attempted to protect their mother. A shot was fired by Edward and a
youth was dead. The boys fled to Canada. James went to Merrickville where he
worked for James Merrick as a weaver. Edward, still fearing arrest, worked
his way eventually to Memphis, Tennessee.
They were also the setting for social events which brightened the lives of Almonte people, such as the Masonic Ball held at Cole’s Hotel in January, 1868 when the hall was decorated with evergreens and mirrors which reflected the swirling crinolines of the dancers. The annual suppers given to their employers by the male employees of Rosamond’s Woolen Company were sometimes held at Cole’s Hotel. After a copious supper the evening consisted of toasts and speeches interspersed with songs and music, often provided by the Almonte Brass Band.

Ulster Scots Founding Fathers
The rapid development of the Ards and north Down was due to certain Ulster-Scots gentlemen, namely James Hamilton, Hugh Montgomery and their Scottish tenants, known as “The Founding Fathers of the Ulster-Scots.” They arrived in May 1606, and these Ulster Scots settlers, Hamilton and Montgomery acquired two thirds of the huge O’Neill estates; one third was given to Hugh Montgomery by the O’Neills as a reward for freeing Con O’Neill from jail in Carrickfergus and for securing him a Royal pardon from Montgomery’s friend the new King James I. James Hamilton, friend of the King used his influence to acquire one third of the O’Neill estate. These new Ulster Scots settlers arrived several years before the Plantation of Ulster occured.

On his return to Scotland he led the Protestant Reformation in Scotland, in partnership with the Scottish Protestant nobility. The movement may be seen as a revolution, since it led to the ousting of Mary of Guise, who governed the country in the name of her young daughter Mary, Queen of Scots.

http://www.libraryireland.com/articles/ScotchIrishSettlersSouthCarolina/

http://www.scotlands.com/usa/1.html

http://www.lynx2ulster.com/ScotchIrishPioneers/015.php

http://kuborange.wordpress.com/their-heritage-from-john-knox-ch8/

http://www.geocities.ws/lindaellenperry/gen/d361.html

http://www.electricscotland.com/history/descendants/chap5.htm

The Ulster Scots (Ulster-Scots: Ulstèr-Scotch;[3] Irish: Ultais) are an ethnic group[4] that has lived in Ireland since the 17th Century, and are predominantly subjects of the United Kingdom. Their ancestors were Lowland Scottish and Northern English people, many being from the “Border Reivers” culture. These people migrated to the island of Ireland in large numbers with the Plantation of Ulster, a planned process of colonisation which took place under the auspices of James VI of Scotland and I of England on land often confiscated from the Irish nobility, most extensively in the Province of Ulster. The term “Ulster-Scots” refers to both these colonists of the 17th century and, less commonly, to the Gallowglass who began to arrive from what is now northwest Scotland centuries earlier.
Ulster-Scots were largely descended from colonists from Galloway, Ayrshire, and the Scottish Borders Country, although some descend from people further north in the Scottish Lowlands and the Highlands. Ulster-Scots emigrated in significant numbers to the United States and all corners of the then-worldwide British Empire — Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa along with the British West Indies — and to a lesser extent to Argentina and Chile. Scotch-Irish is a traditional term for Ulster Scots who later emigrated to what is now the United States; “Scots-Irish” is a more recent form of the American term,[5] and is not to be confused with Irish-Scots, i.e., recent Irish immigrants to Scotland.
2.
Ann Witherspoon1
F, #153140, b. before 1771
Ann Witherspoon|b. b 1771|p15314.htm#i153140|John Witherspoon||p21347.htm#i213464||||||||||||||||

Last Edited=27 Aug 2005
Ann Witherspoon was born before 1771. She was the daughter of John Witherspoon.1 She married Reverend Samuel Stanhope Smith.

In a paper, like this, it is rather unfortunate that I am not permitted to specify more in detail that which all advanced Orangemen know and understand as the result of initiation (view Orange degrees in full). Doubtless many Orangemen, of less thought and study, have not put a name to their belief coming from their ceremonies of introduction to the various degrees. A child knows pain when it has no word for pain. A rose gives out sweet perfume to man and animals alike, though they may or may not have words to express their sensations. In like manner, tens of thousands of Orangemen have become undoubted believers in our much-loved teaching, long before they heard of British Israelism. But as with the child and pain, so with the hundreds of thousands of Canadian Orangemen who have taken only a few of the degrees; they are permanent believers. I have had the pleasure, privilege and great responsibility of speaking to many hundreds of Orangemen in Canada on this subject. In every case I have found that it required but little explanation and no argument to discover that as soon as the language was given and the terms explained my audiences would rise practically to a man and manifest appreciation of the belief and facts.
I now affirm, as a matter of knowledge, that practically every strongly intelligent Orangeman in the British Empire is a believer in Anglo Israel teaching, in general terms. He cannot be otherwise, or he has not understood or grasped the significance of his vows. Is not this statement of prime importance? I think this is the first time this affirmation has been given to the public for perusal.

John Knox Witherspoon was born at Gifford, a parish of Yester, at East Lothian, Scotland, as the eldest child of the Reverend James Alexander Witherspoon and Anne Walker,[3] a descendant of John Welsh of Ayr and John Knox.[4] This latter claim of Knox descent though ancient in origin is long disputed and without primary documentation.[5] He attended the Haddington Grammar School, and obtained a Master of Arts and Bachelor of Divinity from the University of St. Andrews. He also obtained a Master of Arts from the University of Edinburgh in 1739. He remained at the University to study divinity.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Knox

On his return to Scotland he led the Protestant Reformation in Scotland, in partnership with the Scottish Protestant nobility. The movement may be seen as a revolution, since it led to the ousting of Mary of Guise, who governed the country in the name of her young daughter Mary, Queen of Scots.

http://www.libraryireland.com/articles/ScotchIrishSettlersSouthCarolina/

http://www.scotlands.com/usa/1.html

http://www.lynx2ulster.com/ScotchIrishPioneers/015.php

http://kuborange.wordpress.com/their-heritage-from-john-knox-ch8/

http://www.geocities.ws/lindaellenperry/gen/d361.html

http://www.electricscotland.com/history/descendants/chap5.htm

The Ulster Scots (Ulster-Scots: Ulstèr-Scotch;[3] Irish: Ultais) are an ethnic group[4] that has lived in Ireland since the 17th Century, and are predominantly subjects of the United Kingdom. Their ancestors were Lowland Scottish and Northern English people, many being from the “Border Reivers” culture. These people migrated to the island of Ireland in large numbers with the Plantation of Ulster, a planned process of colonisation which took place under the auspices of James VI of Scotland and I of England on land often confiscated from the Irish nobility, most extensively in the Province of Ulster. The term “Ulster-Scots” refers to both these colonists of the 17th century and, less commonly, to the Gallowglass who began to arrive from what is now northwest Scotland centuries earlier.

Ulster-Scots were largely descended from colonists from Galloway, Ayrshire, and the Scottish Borders Country, although some descend from people further north in the Scottish Lowlands and the Highlands. Ulster-Scots emigrated in significant numbers to the United States and all corners of the then-worldwide British Empire — Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa along with the British West Indies — and to a lesser extent to Argentina and Chile. Scotch-Irish is a traditional term for Ulster Scots who later emigrated to what is now the United States; “Scots-Irish” is a more recent form of the American term,[5] and is not to be confused with Irish-Scots, i.e., recent Irish immigrants to Scotland.

I am looking for descendants of Philip Rosemond and Moses Morton Rosemond
who lived in Guernsey County, OH in the mid-1800s. This family descended
from a James Rosemond who lived in County Leitrim, Ireland in the early
1700s. Other members of this same family settled in Lanark, Ontario, Canada.
The southern Rosamond family is also said to be descended from this same
family, as are the Rosamond families in Australia and New Zealand. I am
trying to tie all the branches of the family together. The information on
the family in Guernsey County, OH is shown below. I’d appreciate hearing
from anyone who has any information regarding this family.

The reference for the earlier generations of this family is the booklet “The
History of the Rosemond Family” by Leland Eugene Rosemond, 1939.

Thanks.

Descendants of Moses Morton Rosemond

Generation No. 1

1. MOSES MORTON11 ROSEMOND (PHILIP10, WILLIAM9, JAMES8, UNKNOWN7, JAMES
“JACOB?”6, HANS ULRICH5, HANS4, FRED3, HANS2, ERHART1 DE ROUGEMONT)1,2,3,4
was born Bet. 1843 – 1845 in Guernsey County, Ohio5,6. He married MARTHA E
LIKES7,8 26 Jul 1868 in Guernsey County, OH9. She was born Abt. 1847 in
Ohio.

More About MOSES ROSEMOND and MARTHA LIKES:
Marriage: 26 Jul 1868, Guernsey County, OH9

Children of MOSES ROSEMOND and MARTHA LIKES are:
2.i.ELIZABETH MARY12 ROSEMOND, b. Jun 1869, Guernsey County,
Ohio; d. 1937, Arkansas City, Cowley County, Kansas.
ii.FRANK ROSEMOND.

Notes for FRANK ROSEMOND:
Never married.

iii.JESSIE ROSEMOND.

Notes for JESSIE ROSEMOND:
Never married.

iv.MABLE ROSEMOND, m. HOWARD YOUNG.
v.W F ROSEMOND.

Generation No. 2

2. ELIZABETH MARY12 ROSEMOND (MOSES MORTON11, PHILIP10, WILLIAM9, JAMES8,
UNKNOWN7, JAMES “JACOB?”6, HANS ULRICH5, HANS4, FRED3, HANS2, ERHART1 DE
ROUGEMONT)9,10 was born Jun 1869 in Guernsey County, Ohio, and died 1937 in
Arkansas City, Cowley County, Kansas. She married FRANCIS MARION TAYLOR
Abt. 1895, son of PETER TAYLOR and MARGARET PERIGO. He was born Abt. 1860
in California, and died 1946.

More About FRANCIS TAYLOR and ELIZABETH ROSEMOND:
Marriage: Abt. 1895

Children of ELIZABETH ROSEMOND and FRANCIS TAYLOR are:
3.i.FRANCES LYNN13 TAYLOR, b. 28 Dec 1897, Springfield, Sangamon
County, Illinois; d. 20 Nov 1968, Los Angeles County, California.
ii.JOHN TAYLOR.

Generation No. 3

3. FRANCES LYNN13 TAYLOR (ELIZABETH MARY12 ROSEMOND, MOSES MORTON11,
PHILIP10, WILLIAM9, JAMES8, UNKNOWN7, JAMES “JACOB?”6, HANS ULRICH5, HANS4,
FRED3, HANS2, ERHART1 DE ROUGEMONT) was born 28 Dec 1897 in Springfield,
Sangamon County, Illinois, and died 20 Nov 1968 in Los Angeles County,
California. He married SARA VIOLA WARMBRODT 23 Oct 1926, daughter of SAMUEL
WARMBRODT and ELIZABETH WILSON. She was born 21 Aug 1896 in Arkansas City,
Cowley, Kansas, and died 11 Sep 1994 in Palm Springs, Riverside County,
California.

More About FRANCES TAYLOR and SARA WARMBRODT:
Marriage: 23 Oct 1926

Child of FRANCES TAYLOR and SARA WARMBRODT is:
4.i.ELIZABETH ROSEMOND14 TAYLOR, b. 27 Feb 1932, London, London
County, England.

Generation No. 4

4. ELIZABETH ROSEMOND14 TAYLOR (FRANCES LYNN13, ELIZABETH MARY12 ROSEMOND,
MOSES MORTON11, PHILIP10, WILLIAM9, JAMES8, UNKNOWN7, JAMES “JACOB?”6, HANS
ULRICH5, HANS4, FRED3, HANS2, ERHART1 DE ROUGEMONT) was born 27 Feb 1932 in
London, London County, England. She married (1) RICHARD BURTON. He was
born 10 Nov 1925 in Pontrhydyfen, Wales, UK. She married (2) JOHN WILLIAM
WARNER. She married (3) LAWRENCE LEE FORTENSKY. She married (4) CONRAD
NICHOLSON HILTON 06 May 1950. He was born 06 Jul 1926 in Dallas, Dallas
County, TX, and died 05 Feb 1969 in Los Angeles County, California. She
married (5) MICHAEL WILDING 21 Feb 1952. He was born 23 Jul 1912 in
Westcliffe on Sea, Essex County, England, and died 08 Jul 1979 in London,
London County, England. She married (6) MIKE TODD 02 Feb 1957. He was born
22 Jun 1907 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and died 23 Mar 1958 in Grants,
Cibola County, New Mexico. She married (7) EDDIE FISHER 12 May 1959. He
was born 10 Aug 1928 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.

More About CONRAD HILTON and ELIZABETH TAYLOR:
Divorce: 01 Feb 1951
Marriage: 06 May 1950

More About MICHAEL WILDING and ELIZABETH TAYLOR:
Divorce: 30 Jan 1957
Marriage: 21 Feb 1952

More About MIKE TODD and ELIZABETH TAYLOR:
Marriage: 02 Feb 1957

More About EDDIE FISHER and ELIZABETH TAYLOR:
Divorce: 06 Mar 1964
Marriage: 12 May 1959

Child of ELIZABETH TAYLOR and RICHARD BURTON is:
i.MARIA15 BURTON.

Children of ELIZABETH TAYLOR and MICHAEL WILDING are:
ii.MICHAEL HOWARD15 WILDING.
5.iii.CHRISTOPHER WILDING.

Child of ELIZABETH TAYLOR and MIKE TODD is:
6.iv.ELIZABETH FRANCES15 TODD.

Cyprian Rougemont visits a deserted mansion at Stepney Green, where he finds the portrait of his ancestor (of the same name), a Rosicrucian brother of the 16th century, one of the Illuminati. Satan has appeared to him in a dream and promised him an ancestral treasure, the price for which is his own soul, or that of Auriol Darcy. Cyprian strikes the portrait and a plaque falls away, revealing the access to the ancestral tomb. There in a seven-sided vault lit by the ever-burning lamp and painted with kabbalistic symbols he finds the uncorrupt body with a book of mysteries, a vial of infernal potion, and a series of chests filled with gold, silver and jewels. With use of the potion, he lures Auriol into a compact whereby he is given a magnificent mansion in St James’s Square and £120,000, in exchange for a female victim whenever Rougemont requires one from him. Thus Auriol can win the woman he loves, Elizabeth Talbot; but Rougemont, once the contract is signed, demands Elizabeth Talbot as his first victim, in a week’s time. Auriol seeks to defy him and to marry her within the week, but he is thwarted and Elizabeth is abducted on the seventh night

http://almonte.clal.ca/articles/rosamond_no_1_mill.html

Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton PC (25 May 1803 – 18 January 1873), was an English politician, poet, playwright, and novelist. He was immensely popular with the reading public and wrote a stream of bestselling novels which earned him a considerable fortune. He coined the phrases “the great unwashed”,[1] “pursuit of the almighty dollar”, “the pen is mightier than the sword”, as well as the infamous opening line “It was a dark and stormy night”.[2]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auriol_(novel)

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to The Ulster-Scots and the Rosamond Mill

  1. Reblogged this on rosamondpress and commented:

    The Rosamond family in Ireland were more than staunch Protestants. The fictitious O’Hara family in Gone With the Wind would have known as leaders of the Orange Lodge in Ireland.

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