Serving The Prince of The Blood

hambley77

hmmBlason_de_la_ville_de_Bourmont_(52)_svg

hmmmbb5

hmmmcc

jesustemOn the eve of the French Revolution, Bourmont entered the Gardes Françaises of the French royal army but he emigrated in 1789. Bourmont served in Louis Joseph de Bourbon, Prince de Condé royalist army in the campaigns of 1792 and 1793. Louis Joseph, Prince of Condé who held the title Prince du Sang.
“Prince of the blood”.

What some Sinclair authors, and other authors of a Holy Bloodline, fail to discuss, is how they can promote any monarchy, and still claim this bloodline has been at the vanguard of modern advancements, such as the founding of two democracies in France and the United States. Ignoring this, and the two books of the Bible altogether, they fall back upon the hint that the Knights Templar were steeped in ancient Gnostic Secrets that have swayed the course of human history. What gnostic secrets? Let’s see them – without paying dues or a fee! What I behold is voo-doo dolls, and what have you! Were the Templars all for a democracy – while at the same time they protected and promoted a Prince of the Blood? Louis-Auguste-Victor, Count de Ghaisnes de Bourmont had no qualms about whose side he was on the eve of the French Revolution. Did Louis read his Bible and conclude King Jesus was not for a democracy – too?

Jon Presco

Copyright 2013

A prince of the blood was a person who was legitimately descended in the male line from the monarch of a country. In France, the rank of prince du sang was the highest held at court after the immediate family of the king during the ancien régime and the Bourbon Restoration. A prince du sang or a princesse du sang had to be a legitimate member of the reigning dynasty (after 1589, the House of Bourbon). In some European monarchies, but especially in the kingdom of France, this appellation was a specific rank in its own right, of a more restricted use than other titles.

During the French Revolution, the prince was a dedicated supporter of the monarchy and one of the principle leaders of the counter-revolutionary movement. He established himself at Coblenz in 1791, where he helped to organize and lead a large counter-revolutionary army of émigrés. In addition to containing the prince’s grandson, the Duke of Enghien, and the two sons of his cousin, the late king’s brother, the Comte d’Artois, the corps included many young aristocrats who eventually became leaders during the Bourbon Restoration years later.
This group included the Duke of Richelieu, the Duke of Blacas and Chateaubriand.
The Army of Condé initially fought in conjunction with the Austrians. Later, due to differences with the Austrian plan of attack, however, the Prince de Condé entered with his corps into English pay in 1795. In 1796, the army fought in Swabia. In 1797, Austria signed the Treaty of Campo Formio with the First French Republic, formally ending its hostilities against the French. With the loss of its closest allies, the army transferred into the service of the Russian tsar, Paul I and was stationed in Poland, returning in 1799 to the Rhine under Alexander Suvorov. In 1800 when Russia left the Allied coalition, the army re-entered English service and fought in Bavaria.
The army was disbanded in 1801 without having achieved its principle ambition, restoring Bourbon rule in France. After the dissolution of the corps, the prince spent his exile in England, where he lived with his second wife, Maria Caterina Brignole, the divorced wife of Honoré III, Prince of Monaco, whom he had married in 1798. She died in 1813.

Prince of Condé
Reign 27 January 1740 – 13 May 1818
Predecessor Louis Henri
Successor Louis Henri

Spouse Charlotte de Rohan
Maria Caterina Brignole
DetailIssue
Louis Henri, Prince of Condé
Louise Adélaïde, Abbess of Remiremont
Full name
Louis Joseph de Bourbon
Father Louis Henri, Duke of Bourbon
Mother Caroline of Hesse-Rotenburg
Born (1736-08-09)9 August 1736
Hôtel de Condé, Paris, France
Died 13 May 1818(1818-05-13) (aged 81)
Palais Bourbon, Paris, France
Burial Basilica of Saint Denis
Signature

Louis Joseph de Bourbon (9 August 1736 – 13 May 1818) was Prince of Condé from 1740 to his death. A member of the House of Bourbon, he held the prestigious rank of Prince du Sang.

Contents [hide]
1 Biography
1.1 Army of Condé
2 Issue
3 Ancestry
4 Titles, styles, honours and arms
4.1 Titles and styles
5 References and notes
6 Succession
7 See also
8 External links

[edit] BiographyHe was the only son of Louis Henri de Bourbon, Duke of Bourbon (1692–1740) and Landgravine Caroline of Hesse-Rotenburg (1714–41). As a junior member of the reigning House of Bourbon, he was a Prince du Sang. His father Louis Henri, was the eldest son of Louis de Bourbon, Prince of Condé (known as Monsieur le Duc) and his wife Louise Françoise de Bourbon, daughter of Louis XIV and Madame de Montespan.

During his father’s lifetime, the infant Louis Joseph was known as the Duke of Enghien, (duc d’Enghien). He was placed under the care of his paternal uncle, Louis, Count of Clermont, his father’s youngest brother after his father died in 1740 and his mother died in 1741 when Louis Joseph was four.

He had an older half sister, Henriette de Bourbon, Mademoiselle de Verneuil (1725–1780) who was in turn the half sister of the Mailly sisters, future mistresses of Louis XV and descendants of Hortense Mancini.

Through his mother, he was a first cousin of Victor Amadeus III of Sardinia, Princess Eleonora of Savoy and Princess Maria Luisa of Savoy (both rejected brides of Louis XV) as well as the princesse de Lamballe. His paternal cousins included the Duchess of Orléans (mother of Philippe Égalité) and sister of the Prince of Conti. Viktoria of Hesse-Rotenburg, the Princess of Soubise was another first cousin.

As a young man, he married Charlotte Élisabeth Godefride de Rohan (1737–1760), the daughter of King Louis XV’s friend, the Prince de Soubise. Charlottes mother Anne Marie Louise de La Tour d’Auvergne was a daughter of the Duke of Bouillon. The couple were married at Versailles on 3 May 1753.

Together, they had three children (a daughter who died young); a son, Louis Henri Joseph, and a daughter, Louis Adélaide. In 1764, he renovated and expanded the Palais Bourbon[1] and decided to leave the Hôtel de Condé[2] where he was born. The latter residence was bought by Louis XV in 1770 only to later end up as the site of the Odéon Theatre.

In 1770, his son married Bathilde d’Orléans, daughter of Louis Philippe, Duke of Orléans and sister of Philippe Égalité. The marriage was supposed to heal relations between the Condé line and the Orléans which were both descended from illegitimate daughters of Louis XIV and Madame de Montespan.[3]

Main article: Château d’Enghien (Chantilly)
Among many other estates, Louis Joseph inherited the famous Château de Chantilly, the main seat of the Condé line. At Chantilly, the prince conducted a number of improvements and embellishments in the years before the French Revolution. He decided to build the Château d’Enghien on the grounds of the estate. Designed to house guests when entertaining at Chantilly, the Chateau d’Enghien was constructed in 1769 by the architect Jean François Leroy. It was later renamed the Château d’Enghien in honour of his grandson Louis Antoine, Duke of Enghien[4] who was born at Chantilly in 1772. He also commissioned a large garden in the English style as well as a Hameau much like the contemporary Marie Antoinette had created at Versailles and the Petit Trianon.

In 1765, named the heir of his paternal aunt Élisabeth Alexandrine de Bourbon, he received generous pensions which Élisabeth Alexandrine had in turn acquired from her cousin Mademoiselle du Maine.

Louis Joseph occupied an important place at court. During both the reigns of Louis XV and Louis XVI, he held the position of Grand Maître de France in the king’s royal household, the Maison du Roi.

He served in the Seven Years’ War with some distinction serving alongside his father in law the Prince of Soubise. He was also Governor of Burgundy and a general in the French army.

After the fall of the Bastille in 1789, Louis Joseph decided to leave France with his son and grandson. This decision proved fortunate, since during the Reign of Terror that followed many of the Bourbons still living in France were arrested, put on trial and guillotined: King Louis XVI, Queen Marie Antoinette and the Duke of Orleans (Philippe Égalité) were executed in 1793, and the king’s sister, Madame Élisabeth, was beheaded in 1794.

[edit] Army of CondéDuring the French Revolution, the prince was a dedicated supporter of the monarchy and one of the principle leaders of the counter-revolutionary movement. He established himself at Coblenz in 1791, where he helped to organize and lead a large counter-revolutionary army of émigrés. In addition to containing the prince’s grandson, the Duke of Enghien, and the two sons of his cousin, the late king’s brother, the Comte d’Artois, the corps included many young aristocrats who eventually became leaders during the Bourbon Restoration years later.

This group included the Duke of Richelieu, the Duke of Blacas and Chateaubriand.

The Army of Condé initially fought in conjunction with the Austrians. Later, due to differences with the Austrian plan of attack, however, the Prince de Condé entered with his corps into English pay in 1795. In 1796, the army fought in Swabia. In 1797, Austria signed the Treaty of Campo Formio with the First French Republic, formally ending its hostilities against the French. With the loss of its closest allies, the army transferred into the service of the Russian tsar, Paul I and was stationed in Poland, returning in 1799 to the Rhine under Alexander Suvorov. In 1800 when Russia left the Allied coalition, the army re-entered English service and fought in Bavaria.

The army was disbanded in 1801 without having achieved its principle ambition, restoring Bourbon rule in France. After the dissolution of the corps, the prince spent his exile in England, where he lived with his second wife, Maria Caterina Brignole, the divorced wife of Honoré III, Prince of Monaco, whom he had married in 1798. She died in 1813.

With the defeat of Napoleon, Louis Joseph returned to Paris, where he resumed his courtly duties as grand maître in the royal household of Louis XVIII. He died in 1818 and was succeeded by his son, Louis Henri. His daughter, Louise Adélaïde de Bourbon, who was a nun and had become the abbess of Remiremont Abbey, survived until 1824. He was buried at the Basilica of St Denis.

Origin of the term prince of the blood of France
The term “prince of the blood of France” was used in a decree given by Henry III in December 1576 which gave them all the quality of peers of France from birth and the right to precede the other peers lay and ecclesiastical in all ceremonies. By the same edict, the king abolished all precedence among the princes of the blood and ordered that they take precedence according to their degree of consanguinity.
The term “prince of the blood” appeared in the fifteenth century, however, to describe the members of the lineages descended from St. Louis; they belong to the French royal lineage and are able to succeed to the Crown in case of the extinction of the royal family, that is to say the king, his son, and son of his son. They are called “princes of the lilies” and “princes of the blood of France.”
[edit] Styles
The rank of prince du sang was restricted to legitimate agnatic descendants. Those who held this rank were usually styled by their main ducal peerage, but sometimes other titles were used, indicating a more precise status than prince du sang.
[edit] Monsieur le Prince
This was the style of the First Prince of the Blood (French: premier prince du sang), which normally belonged to the most senior (by primogeniture) male member of the royal dynasty who is neither a fils de France (son of France) nor a petit-fils de France (grandson of France). In practice, it was not always clear who was entitled to the rank, and it often took a specific act of the king to make the determination.
The rank carried with it various privileges, including the right to a household paid out of state revenues. The rank was held for life: the birth of a new, more senior prince who qualified for the position did not deprive the current holder of his use of the style. The Princes of Condé used the style of Monsieur le Prince for over a century (1589–1709). The right to use the style passed to the House of Orléans in 1709; they, however, seldom if ever used it.
First Princes of the Blood, 1465-1830
1. Valois House of Orléans
1. 1465–1498 : Louis II, Duke of Orléans (1462–1515);
2. 1498–1515 : François, Count of Angoulême (1494–1547)
House of Valois-Alençon
3. 1515–1525 : Charles IV, Duke of Alençon (1489–1525);
House of Bourbon-Montpensier
4. 1525–1527 : Charles III, Duke of Bourbon would have been the first prince had he not been banned from the position for treason (1490–1527);
House of Bourbon-Vendôme
5. 1527–1537 : Charles IV de Bourbon, Duke of Vendôme (1489–1537);
6. 1537–1562 : Antoine de Bourbon, Duke of Vendôme, later King of Navarre (1518–1562).
7. 1562–1589 : Henri III, King of Navarre (1553–1610);
House of Bourbon-Condé
8. 1589–1646 : Henri II de Bourbon, Prince of Condé (1588–1646);
9. 1646–1686 : Louis II de Bourbon, Prince of Condé (1621–1686);
10. 1686–1709 : Henri III de Bourbon, Prince of Condé (1643–1709).
Bourbon House of Orléans
11. 1709–1723 : Philippe Charles d’Orléans, Duke of Orléans (1674–1723), was entitled to the style, but did not use it;
12. 1723–1752 : Louis d’Orléans, Duke of Orléans (1703–1752);
13. 1752–1785 : Louis Philippe d’Orléans, Duke of Orléans (1725–1785);
14. 1785–1793 : Louis Philippe Joseph d’Orléans, Duke of Orléans (1747–1793);
15. 1814–1830 : Louis Philippe d’Orléans, Duke of Orléans (1773–1850), who later ruled as Louis-Philippe I, King of the French.

Antoine, Duke of Vendôme

Louis II, Prince of Condé by Joost van Egmont

Louis d’Orléans, Duke of Orléans; the first Orléans Prince to use the style

The last Monsieur le Prince, Philippe Égalité (husband of Louise Marie Adélaïde de Bourbon, Madame la Princesse).
[edit] Madame la Princesse
This style was held by the wife of Monsieur le Prince. The duchesses/princesses that were entitled to use it were:
1646–1686 : Claire-Clémence de Maillé-Brézé (1628–1694). Niece of Cardinal Richelieu and wife of the Grand Condé, she was also the Duchess of Fronsac in her own right from 1646–1674.
1684–1709 : Anna Henrietta Julia of Bavaria (1648–1723). She was the daughter of Anna Gonzaga and her husband Charles I, Duke of Mantua. In 1663 she married Henry Jules, Duke of Bourbon the son and heir of the Grand Condé. Anne Henriette was the mother of Louis III, Prince of Condé and Madame la Princesse de Conti Seconde Douairière
1709–1723 : Françoise-Marie de Bourbon (1677–1749) – wife of Philippe II, Duke of Orléans
1724–1726 : Margravine Auguste Marie Johanna of Baden-Baden (1704–1726) – wife of Louis of Orléans
1743–1759 : Louise Henriette de Bourbon – daughter of Madame la Princesse de Conti Dernière Douairière and wife of Louis Philippe d’Orléans, Duke of Orléans
1785–1793 : Louise Marie Adélaïde de Bourbon (1753–1821); wife of Louis Philippe Joseph d’Orléans, Duke of Orléans. She was the last holder of the style before the outbreak of the French Revolution.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Serving The Prince of The Blood

  1. Reblogged this on rosamondpress and commented:

    Perhaps France should purchase California and then invite rain-makers to come live there for free. Why not a New Kingdom of France on the West Coast. Here is Virginia’s kindred.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claire-Cl%C3%A9mence_de_Maill%C3%A9-Br%C3%A9z%C3%A9

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.