Capturing Beauty – The Prick

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Above is the Rosamond cote of arms that has a cross made of a weavers needle on a mount with two flowers. You can not have a cross in your cote of arms unless your kindred went on crusade. Did the Lords of Rougemont and Florimont go on Crusade? I believe they went as Knights Templar.

The Rosamond family were weavers for countless generations. Surely we took interest in the story of Sleeping Beauty. Perhaps, it is a family yarn whose woof and weave connects us to the bloodline of the Swan Knight? Hans Ulrich Rosemond was a weaver. Ulrich means “wolf ruler’, and Hans is John.

A month into World War Two, German troops entered the city of Louvain and utterly destroyed it because freedom fighter were allegedly sniping at the Kaizer’s men. Atrocities were committed. Nuns were stripped naked in search of weapons. Citizens were herded off to concecration camps. Louvain College was burned to the ground along with four Art Colleges. One of them was the Falcon Art College of which my ancestor Godeschald Rosemondt was the Master. Was his artwork lost in the flames?

Above is a photo of Rosemondt’s book that he signs with a Rose and Mont. There is a Habsburg cote of arms and a emplem for the Falcon College. The Rosemondts were members of the Swan Brethren who wore a pen of a closed rose surrounded by thorns.

Here is the story of the Sleeping Beauty Princess named Rosamond and a beautiful city full of Artists and Thinkers that is destroyed because of the Kulturekumpf (cutlure war) The Kaizer is waging against Catholics. Louvain is a famous Cathlic University that was established in a Weaver’s Hall donated by another Godeschalk Rosemondt. Losing a Weaver’s Rebellion, many weaver families fled to England.

I just found out about the destruction of Louvain this morning. I believe much of the Rosemondt Family history was lost. I believe I was born to raise it from the ashes. I am The Rose of the World.

The cote of arms of Louvain depicts a open book with empty pages. Consider the Faun showing Ofelia the book of the Crossroads – the Rose Crossroads. The Louvain atrocity preceeds the atrocities of Franco against the Freedom Fighters of Spain, and the Jews of Germany. Louvain was a portal into the future, a bell that sounded a warning.

A Seer said I go each knight to a place the Rosicrucians discovered called ‘The Catherdral of the Souls’ where I have a reserved seat at a great wooden table. There is a hood figure standing behind because I am……..The One.

Awake and rise my dear Roses! Arise!

John Ulirch Rosemond

Copyright 2012

Peter Rosemond further reported
information from the Records Office in Basle that “before Basle the
family resided in Holland up to 1338, and it is said they descended
from the estate Rosemont, near Belfort, in France, where also the
village Rougemont is found.” A family coat-of-arms was registered
in Basle about 1537 when the first Hans became a resident there. A
reproduction of this coat-of-arms in the writer’s possession shows a
weaver’s crook conspicuously, and it will be remembered that in
Ireland our people were linen weavers and farmers, and that Edward,
the elder, was a weaver in this country. Peter Rosemond had seen in
print the letters from Erasmus to Gotschalk Rosemondt. He noticed
that a seal used by a Rosemont in Holland, bearing a jumping fox,
was like an emblem he had noticed in a wall of the house Rebleuten-
Zunft in Basle. This seal dated back to 1430, whereas the coat-of-
arms above mentioned dates from 1534, it seems.

World War I was barely one month old when the German forces, fighting their way through neutral Belgium, committed one of the worst atrocities of the war. A crime against humanity, the burning of Louvain on August 25, 1914 was also a crime against history. Louvain was a medieval city on the road to Brussels with a famous university and a library that held priceless medieval works. According to historians John Horne and Alan Kramer, “Louvain was a genteel city, inhabited by wealthy retired people, academics, priests, monks, and nuns.” German troops, however, destroyed the city, skillfully placing the blame on the Belgians, accused of attacking and killing German soldiers and officers.

Six gifts were given to Rosamond at her christening.

-Beauty. The first faerie gave the princess the gift of being the most beautiful person in the world.
-Wit. The second faerie gave the princess the wit of an angel. Wit is intelligence and cleverness.
-Grace. The third faerie gave Rosamond wonderful grace. Grace is charm and elegance. The princess must have grace to be a pleasant person. Grace will also help her treat her subjects in way that will make them love her as their leader.
-Dance perfectly well. The fourth faerie gave Rosamond the gift of being able to dance perfectly well, an important feature at a royal court.
-Voice like a nightingale. The fifth faerie gave the princess the voice of a nightingale, to be able to sing all kinds of music. People with beautiful singing voices are usually held in high esteem.
-Be able to play all kinds of music. The sixth faerie gave Rosamond the gift of being able to play all kinds of music. The ability to perform music was held in even higher esteem before recorded sound.

The seventh gift was a curse, and the eighth gift soothed it.

-Spindles. The seventh faerie said Rosamond would have her hand pierced by a spindle, and that she would die from the wound. This was somewhat undone by the eighth faerie, who said that Rosamond would not die from the wound, but fall into a profound sleep which would last a hundred years, and from which she would be wakened by a King’s son. – Rosamond only needs a small prick from a spindle, and she falls asleep. She can only be awakened from this sleep by her husband, Prince Phillip.

History: Princess Rosamond was born the daughter of a king and queen, as most princesses are. At her christening, seven faeries were invited to be her godmothers, and a great feast was held. Unfortunately, an eighth faerie appeared, and she was mightily offended to not have been invited to this grand occasion. One of the faeries hid to be able to speak last, and somewhat lift the curse of the eighth faerie. Princess Rosamond was given the gifts mentioned under Magics.

Of course, nothing could be done to prevent such a thing from happening, and Rosamond had her hand pricked by a spindle, and she fell asleep in the highest tower of the castle. The whole castle fell asleep along with her, courtesy of the eighth faerie. And while the castle slept, the thorn bushes grew high around the castle so that the princess would not be disturbed by any curious people. Many years came and went, but no prince came to the castle to awake the princess.

Finally, a prince heard about the beautiful princess in the castle behind the thorn hedges, sleeping and waiting for the prince for whom she was reserved. He instantly vowed to save her, and approached the castle.

Princess Rosamond was awakened by a kiss, and it was of course love at first sight for both of them. They talked, falling more and more in love, and the Prince had the good sense to not tell the Princess that she was dressed like his great-grandmother where she laid in the bed. Not losing any time, the Prince and Princess were married that very evening by the castle almoner.

When our troop train reached Louvain, the entire heart of the city was destroyed, and the fire had reached the Boulevard Tirlemont, which faces the railroad station. The night was windless, and the sparks rose in steady, leisurely pillars, falling back into the furnace from which they sprang. In their work the soldiers were moving from the heart of the city to the outskirts, street by street, from house to house.

In each building they began at the first floor and, when that was burning steadily, passed to the one next. There were no exceptions — whether it was a store, chapel, or private residence, it was destroyed. The occupants had been warned to go, and in each deserted shop or house the furniture was piled, the torch was stuck under it, and into the air went the savings of years, souvenirs of children, of parents, heirlooms that had passed from generation to generation.

The people had time only to fill a pillowcase and fly. Some were not so fortunate, and by thousands, like flocks of sheep, they were rounded up and marched through the night to concentration camps. We were not allowed to speak to any citizen of Louvain, but the Germans crowded the windows of the train, boastful, gloating, eager to interpret.

In the two hours during which the train circled the burning city war was before us in its most hateful aspect.

In other wars I have watched men on one hilltop, without haste, without heat, fire at men on another hill, and in consequence on both sides good men were wasted. But in those fights there were no women or children, and the shells struck only vacant stretches of veldt or uninhabited mountain sides.

At Louvain it was war upon the defenceless, war upon churches, colleges, shops of milliners and lace-makers; war brought to the bedside and the fireside; against women harvesting in the fields, against children in wooden shoes at play in the streets.

At Louvain that night the Germans were like men after an orgy.

The Nineteenth Century

Vol. LXXVII – No. 59, p. 1061

May 1915

THE LIBRARY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF LOUVAIN

In the Review Zentralblatt für Bibliothekwesen some German intellectuals have attempted to explain and excuse the destruction of the Library of Louvain University. Monsieur Burger, director of the Amsterdam Library, has replied to them in masterly fashion in the Dutch Review Het Bœk.

The Germans, in their efforts to justify the burning of a monument entirely devoted to Learning, blame the officials of the Library of Louvain for not having been present to point out to the soldiers the value of the collections—which otherwise would certainly have been spared! A ghastly pleasantry and in the worst possible taste! Can it be possible that after all these months the directors of this German Review are unaware of the horrible scenes of massacre and pillage that go to make up the crime of Louvain? No one will credit that. Rather shall we say that their ignorance is merely a sham—and a monstrous and clumsy sham!

I will not waste time in refuting this vile insinuation, which tile official and well-authenticated accounts of the outrage on Louvain suffice definitely to dispel. It is now acknowledged by all right-minded men who are not prejudiced and do not refuse to seek and admit the truth (1) that the fire in the Library of the University broke out suddenly after eight days’ peaceful occupation of the town by the German troops; (2) that the fire broke out during the night of the 25th of August, when all the Library premises were closed and the residents were forbidden to leave their houses after seven o’clock in the evening; (3) that that night of the 25th of August was unquestionably the first night of fire, pillage, and massacre. We know the unhappy fate of the unfortunate people who fell into the hands of the drunken soldiers that night—as also during the days and nights that followed. I saw the ruins of the Library again eight days after the fire, and even then I was only able to look at them from a distance and at considerable risk. Broken pillars, an impassable heap of bricks, stones, and beams smouldered in the fire which slowly consumed thousands of volumes between huge portions of [*1062] dangerous and threatening walls: that was all remained of the majestic building known as tile Halles Universitaires, and of the rich treasure it contained. In the streets of the ruined and deserted city, where the soldiers were completing their work of pillage, and further on even into the country, leaves of manuscripts and books fluttered about, half burned, at the mercy of the wind.

The German Review, without taking into consideration the manifest inconsistency of its assertions, dares to claim that the loss of the Library of the University of Louvain is of no great importance. A somewhat arbitrary assertion! I am glad to take advantage of the hospitality offered me by the Editor of the Nineteenth Century to contradict it.

The burning of the Library of Louvain has caused two irreparable losses: the loss of an historic monument, a gem of the most beautiful architecture of two distinct periods-the fourteenth and eighteenth centuries-and the loss of the collection of manuscripts, books and. relics of the University of Louvain.

Let me first say a few words about the monument in which was enshrined the Library of the University. This monument, known as the Halles Universitaires, was the old Halle aux draps, or Weavers’ Hall, of the town of Louvain, which in the course of centuries has been adapted and enlarged, as we shall shortly see.

Ulrich \u-lri-

ch,

ul-

rich\ as a boy’s name is a variant of Alaric (Old German) and Ulric (English, Old German), and the meaning of Ulrich is “noble, regal ruler; power of the wolf; power of the home”.

http://www.angelfire.com/ny2/ulrickastle/Ulrickancestry.html

Louvain is in a certain sense the mother city of Brussels. Standing on its own little navigable river, the Dyle, it was, till the end of the Fourteenth Century, the capital of the Counts and of the Duchy of Brabant. It had a large population of weavers, engaged in the cloth trade. Here, as elsewhere, the weavers formed the chief bulwark of freedom in the population. In 1378, however, after a popular rising, Duke Wenseslaus besieged and conquered the city; and the tyrannical sway of the nobles, whom he re-introduced, aided by the rise of Ghent, or later, of Antwerp, drove away trade from the city. Many of the weavers emigrated to Holland and England, where they helped to establish the woollen industry…

The following is a curious example. The proclamation of the Primus in Philosophy was a great event in our provinces. The Faculty of Arts at the ancient University consisted of four schools: la pédagogie du Porc, la p&eacuate;dagogie du Faucon, la pédagogie du Lis, la pédagogie du Chateau. At a great annual meeting these four schools contended for the palm to be awarded to the Primus. At Louvain the success of the Primus was celebrated with much pomp, and in the province a reception worthy of a prince or a king was given to the laureate. Discourses were delivered and Latin poems recited, extolling the merits of the victor in ceremonious fashion. We possessed quantities of these verses, beautifully written on parchment and surrounded by very gorgeous illuminations. In 1778 on the occasion of the triumph of the pupil of the pédagogie du Porc a little allegorical picture [*1069] was painted which attracted the attention of all the visitors to the Library. The Pig crowned with a Baron’s coronet (the Primus was Baron François de Sécus) occupied the centre of the picture; it was armed with its natural weapons—recalling the Porcus silvestris which gave its name to the college. The two fore feet of the animal rested on the dead body of the Falcon—which was lying on its back discrowned; the hind feet of the animal were just about to trample down two lilies. In front of him the Château was collapsing; this was a two-storied tower tottering to its ruin and from the top of it was falling an enormous crown. The animal had in its mouth a streamer on which could be read the following inscription: ‘Num Portia quaeque pedibus calcavi.’

The principal wealth of the Library of Louvain lay in its store of old printed works, and amongst these a collection of incunables,[1] wonderful from every point of view. In this collection were several very rare editions and some unique specimens. In order to throw full light on it, a few words on the intro-[*1066]-duction of printing at Louvain and the relations of the publishers with the University are indispensable.
In 1473 John of Westphalia came to Louvain and there established his printing presses; in the following year the University appointed him to be magister ai Lis impressoriae. In 1474 the first printed work of John of Westphalia appeared at Louvain under the title of Petri de Crescentiis opus ruralium commadorurn; and this very rare edition with large initial hand-made letters belonged to our Library. Under the auspices of the school of Louvain John of Westphalia brought to light over one hundred and twenty works, editions of classical texts, and even quotations from the Old Testament in Hebrew characters. Our collection of incunables included several editions by John of Westphalia. After the arrival of John of Westphalia several printers carne to settle in Louvain, and their numbers grew to such an extent that the University had often to come to the aid of poor, aged, and sick printers. Later, in 1512, the celebrated printer Thierry Martens came to take up his abode in Louvain, and devoted his printing presses to the Faculty of Arts. At that time Louvain occupied one of the highest positions amongst the grandes écoles of Europe. Some of the greatest humanists of the day went there—such as Erasmus, Ludovicus Vives, Martin Dorpuis, Barland, Rexius, etc. These humanists, with the help of Thierry Martens, edited and revised a large number of texts, and accomplished a series of translations of Greek works into Latin. When in 1518 Thierry Martens announced his intention of printing in Hebrew, he could truthfully say ‘so far as Latin editions are concerned I am second to none; in the Greek I have very few rivals; I wish to achieve the same distinction for my printing of Hebrew.’ When Thierry Martens left Louvain in 1520 his printing presses were taken over by Jiexius, a professor at the college of the Trois-Langues, and a prolific publisher of Greek texts.
These beautiful editions, which first saw the light at Louvain, were preserved by the savants of our provinces, and when the central Library was planned in the seventeenth century it was enriched by many gifts of special libraries, and among them were found several fine specimens of the earliest printed editions. Formerly the number of incunables in the Library of Louvain was estimated to be about three hundred and fifty; but at the time of the removal recently carried out, to which I have already referred, we found in practically all the ancient collections—in the theological collections in particular—a further mass of precious incunables. We had just begun to catalogue them, and in a few years’ time we should have been able to offer to the [*1067] public a magnificent catalogue of eight hundred or even one thousand incunables.
The Library of the University of Louvain contained between two hundred and fifty thousand and three hundred thousand printed volumes. In this immense collection I would specially mention a set of rich and precious works, such as, in regard to completeness of ensemble, no other library in the world possessed. I refer to the ancient theological collection. The part played in successive centuries by the Faculty of Theology of Louvain in the great doctrinal quarrels is well known. When Luther’s writings made their appearance in our provinces, the doctors of Louvain, who had already been for a long time in conflict with the new doctrines, promptly censured them; and this was the first condemnation of Luther pronounced by a constituted body. On the advice of Margaret of Austria the theologians of Louvain produced some pamphlets refuting Luther; later on they made an index of forbidden books and a list of the works that could be read in the schools; they published several translations of the Bible in the vulgar tongue; and they proclaimed a profession of faith, to which, by command of the Emperor, all the ecclesiastical dignitaries and instructors in religion had to conform. When, by dint of pamphlets and writings, heresy attempted to force its way at all costs into our provinces, the School of Louvain, throwing overboard its ordinary curriculum, devoted itself to refuting every writing of the Reformers by scientific treatises based on the Scriptures and the Fathers; the number of pamphlets, letters, and papers of every description published in our provinces or the occasion of the doctrinal controversies of the Reformation is incalculable.
The controversies of the Reformation had hardly been settled, when a fresh heresy—Baianism—made its appearance in the Faculty of Theology at Louvain, and shook it to its foundations; it was merely the prelude to a longer and sharper controversy—indeed in a very short time Jansenism was causing divisions in the Faculty of Louvain. Jansenius, Professor of Holy Scriptures at the University of Louvain, numbered many supporters, and the disputes and quarrels between the Jansenists and the Jesuits were the source of an abundant and especially interesting controversial literature.
   I have already mentioned the valuable collection of Jansenist books bequeathed to the University by Snellaerts. All the documents relating to the Reformation, Baianism, and Jansenism had been hound in volumes, and on the parchment covers could be read the following titles: Varia reformatoria, or Janseniana, or even Jesuitica. What treasures were gathered together in that vast theological library-the like of which we shall never see [*1068] again! Two years ago we began to catalogue the old theological collections. In doing so we came upon surprise after surprise, and the publication of the catalogues of these treasures, which had not so far been exhaustively examined, would have been of very great use to the history of the theological controversies.
Like all old collections of books, our Library possessed several bibliographical rarities and typographical curiosities of every description. We had a collection of coins, medals, and some very fine specimens of Flemish bookbinding of the sixteenth century, several of which had been made the object of special study. All the visitors to the Library examined carefully the magnificent work of Andreas Vesalius: De humani corporis fabrica. Andreas Vesalius gave lessons at Louvain, and at the same time public anatomical demonstrations. A very rare occurrence at that time was the fact that he had been able to procure a complete skeleton at Louvain. The publication of his work raised quite a storm in the scientific world; Charles the Fifth presented to the Library of the University a magnificent vellum copy of the celebrated anatomical treatise, illustrated by numerous plates representing all the details of the human skeleton. We preserved carefully in large cupboards all the relics of the ancient University—the foundation of which dates back to 1425. Until the last few years the papal bull for the building of the University granted by Pope Martin the Fifth had been kept at the great seminary of Haaren in Holland; in 1009, however, on the occasion of the seventy-fifth anniversary of the restoration of the University, the Bishop of Bois-le-Duc graciously offered this precious parchment to our University, kind we considered it the rarest relic of our glorious past. In these cupboards were also to be admired the seals of the Faculties, the medals, the diplomas, and souvenirs of every kind recalling the most important events and customs of the ancient University.
The following is a curious example. The proclamation of the Primus in Philosophy was a great event in our provinces. The Faculty of Arts at the ancient University consisted of four schools: la pédagogie du Porc, la p&eacuate;dagogie du Faucon, la pédagogie du Lis, la pédagogie du Chateau. At a great annual meeting these four schools contended for the palm to be awarded to the Primus. At Louvain the success of the Primus was celebrated with much pomp, and in the province a reception worthy of a prince or a king was given to the laureate. Discourses were delivered and Latin poems recited, extolling the merits of the victor in ceremonious fashion. We possessed quantities of these verses, beautifully written on parchment and surrounded by very gorgeous illuminations. In 1778 on the occasion of the triumph of the pupil of the pédagogie du Porc a little allegorical picture [*1069] was painted which attracted the attention of all the visitors to the Library. The Pig crowned with a Baron’s coronet (the Primus was Baron François de Sécus) occupied the centre of the picture; it was armed with its natural weapons—recalling the Porcus silvestris which gave its name to the college. The two fore feet of the animal rested on the dead body of the Falcon—which was lying on its back discrowned; the hind feet of the animal were just about to trample down two lilies. In front of him the Château was collapsing; this was a two-storied tower tottering to its ruin and from the top of it was falling an enormous crown. The animal had in its mouth a streamer on which could be read the following inscription: ‘Num Portia quaeque pedibus calcavi.’
I do not think it is necessary to enter into further details nor give a more complete description of our different collections in order to show how important and valuable was the treasure contained in the Library of the University of Louvain. I am indeed pledged to make a thorough, categorical, and strict examination into this subject; but this examination I am unable to make while absent from my own country, on account of the lack of material.
From 1432 until our own time the Halles of Louvain have always been the centre of university life. What precious and touching memories were connected with that historic monument, every one of the halls reminding us of the most glorious events of the past of our University and the heroic episodes of our national history! Over these ruins, so stupidly heaped up in one tragic night, we reflect sadly on the scholarly lessons of Justus Lipsius, on the splendid processions which used to escort the sovereigns of our nation through those imposing halls of the Renaissance; our kings and princes signed their names in the golden book of the Library, in which were also inscribed all the great names of the ecclesiastical, political, and scientific worlds. We also reflect on the heroic struggles that the Alma Mater of Louvain had to endure under Austrian domination, and on the resistance which arose in the ancient Halles and declared itself boldly against a foreign and oppressive rule; we reflect that between those venerable walls there burned always that flame of purest patriotism which brought our country to the glorious destiny of 1830 and to the heroic struggle of to-day in defence of honour and liberty! I see again in my mind’s eye the stately fêtes which took place a few years ago on the occasion of the celebration of the seventy-fifth anniversary of the restoration of the University. These fêtes were held in the great halls of our Library. Intellectuals from Germany were present in large numbers, and they must have been able in a leisurely fashion to [*1070] compare our ancient monuments—every stone of which evokes a memory—with their colossal libraries which always lack the maturity of years and the memories of a glorious past. The compliments they paid us on that occasion scarcely coincide with the arbitrary statements of one of their principal scientific Reviews.
A monument of the fourteenth century, a model of the architecture of the period in pleasant and harmonious lines, original and varied designs; magnificent halls, recalling by their majestic aspect and perfect sculpture the most beautiful specimens of the Renaissance; treasures stored up by centuries of fruitful labour and patient research, manuscripts, incunables, very rare prints, relics piously preserved by past generations: all that is of little importance in the eyes of the new Kultur that Germany would inflict upon the world; all that is nothing compared with the delirious joy felt by a few hundreds of soldiers, drunk with wine and carnage, in contemplating the tragic spectacle of a town in flames, and in terrorising and massacring an innocent population.
Up till now, said the Germans at Louvain, we have burned only small villages, but we are now going to see a large town in flames. This, and this alone, was the reason for the crime of Louvain; for nine days massacre, pillage, and incendiarism succeeded one another under the direction of the military authorities. Now that the crime has been committed, have the German authorities, and that nation which believes itself to be the sole guardian of true civilisation, expressed regret for it? Do they disown it and look upon it as a punishable outrage of the War—the authors of which must be chastised? No, they understood only too well the horror of the criminal action at Louvain and feared that the reputation of the whole of Germany would be attacked; they have tried therefore by every means to justify the crime.
But I must not wander from time point; of the discussion, as the Germans tried to do. However often, as an excuse. for the pile of ruins left by our enemy’s armies in other parts of Belgian soil and in the north of France, the pretext of military operations (frequently, of course, unjustly) may be pleaded, there could obviously be no such pretext to rely upon in the case of Louvain; any statement to the contrary is contradicted by lime most glaring facts, and it is equally contradicted by those people in Germany who laid the blame for the Louvain affair at the door of the civilian francs-tireurs this legend, too, the official reports made by our commission of inquiry into the atrocities in Belgium have sufficiently shattered. In vain has the band of intellectuals from beyond the Rhine set itself file task of proving that the German army is guiltless of the hideous crime of [*1071] Louvain, yet now, in order to
excuse the burning of the Library of the University and all its treasures, they are fabricating fresh arguments the officials were not at their posts to allow themselves to be massacred, the so-called treasures of the Library were of no value! These are merely so many categorical statements the absurdity and insolence of which leap to the eyes of everyone-and this I hope I have sufficiently proved.
The halls of Louvain will rise again from their ashes; they will become, as in former days, the centre of a school of learning of which the glorious past is a guarantee for the future. In building a new and magnificent Library we wish not only to restore to our professors and students those materials indispensable to all scholarship and scientific work; we wish also to show present and future generations that, if the German intellectuals accept the responsibility for the most odious crimes against reason and civilisation, on the other hand the civilized and right-thinking world knows how to unite in execrating barbarity as it deserves, and in solemnly avenging the intellectual and artistic patrimony of which barbarians have callously robbed it.
http://www.uniset.ca/microstates/delannoy_louvain.htm

Throughout the following pages will be found many
paragraphs in quotation marks. These are
exactly as written by Fred L. Rosemond. Much of the
information secured by the writer is a
duplication of this, so the quotations are taken
direct from Fred L. Rosemond’s record.

Leland E. Rosemond
March, 1938
Scarsdale, N. Y.

THE NAME ROSEMOND

Some confusion seems to have resulted from the fact that
more than one origin for this name has existed. The oldest,
perhaps, is the Teutonic “Hrosmond”, conspicuous as far back as the
6th century in the history of the Gepidae and the Lombards of
northern Italy. “Mond” in the Anglo-Saxon signified the protection
given by a noble, or chieftain, to this dependents of every kin, and
the name signified among them strong, or famous, protection. The
form “Rosenmund”, usually reckoned as German, has been interpreted
as “rose of the world,” form the Latin “mundus” for world. In
Danish the name appears as Rozamond; in French, as Rosemonde, in
Italian, as Rosmonda, and in Latin and Spanish, as Rosamunda.

“The Huguenot tradition in the family, confirmed by such
sources as O’Hart’s Irish Pedigrees and Agnew’s French Protestant
Exiles, suggests a French origin also and this has been found in the
name “Rougemont”, still perpetuated by the name of a village in
southeastern France, near Switzerland, and another village in
southwestern Germany. Why this source seems preferable for our
origin will be mentioned again.

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“Such a name, transported to other countries and dealt with
in other languages, was certain to be changed and even distorted.
Our own people have at times adopted the form “Roseman”,
or “Rosman”, or “Rossman”, or “Rosmond”, or “Rosmon”. The first
three forms are common in Germany although wholly unconnected with
our family. Elders in the family have held the view that the
presence of the “d” is significant and, since it is the equivalent
of the “t” in “Rougemont,” that seems reasonable. As many as thirty
variations are found, and yet the name in any form is not a common
one in this country if the German forms above are to be disregarded.

“In the Southern states among those identified with our line
in Ireland, the form “Rosamond” prevails as it does in England and
Canada, but the legends of “Fair Rosamond” Clifford which
popularized it there have no significance for us. It is, in one
form or another, the name of towns, but inquiry has developed that
our family had nothing to do with giving them.

“It is not to be thought surprising, therefore, if persons
bearing the name be found whose ancestry traces back along a line
quite different from the Huguenot line.”

THE “ROUGEMONT” ORIGIN

The gracious and intelligent aid of Peter Rosemond of
Flushing, Holland, who lived for some years in Basle, Switzerland,
was a large contribution to the writer’s* investigation of the
Huguenot tradition. His family went from Basle to Holland in 1754.
Researches he made over many years, including 1911 to 1917 in Basle,
furnished him with material which he regarded as identifying us with
a James (or Jacob) Rosemond, born in Basle, January 1st, 1654 (which
date is not far from our traditional date of `about 1655′) who left
home and who did not reappear there even for the reading of
_______
*Fred L. Rosemond

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his father’s will in 1679 nor thereafter. This James (or Jacob,
for these names were once interchangeable) was the son of Hans
Ulrich Rosemond, born 1623, a weaver; who was a son of Hans, a
weaver, born 1581; who was a son of Fred Rosemond, born 1552, a
weaver, member of town council and a local captain; who was the son
of another Hans whose date of birth is not known, but he too, was a
weaver and became a citizen of Basle in 1534. His father was Erhart
de Rougemont who bought in 1495 “the house called Rebleuten-Zunft in
Basle in the Freistrasse.’ Peter Rosemond further reported
information from the Records Office in Basle that “before Basle the
family resided in Holland up to 1338, and it is said they descended
from the estate Rosemont, near Belfort, in France, where also the
village Rougemont is found.” A family coat-of-arms was registered
in Basle about 1537 when the first Hans became a resident there. A
reproduction of this coat-of-arms in the writer’s possession shows a
weaver’s crook conspicuously, and it will be remembered that in
Ireland our people were linen weavers and farmers, and that Edward,
the elder, was a weaver in this country. Peter Rosemond had seen in
print the letters from Erasmus to Gotschalk Rosemondt. He noticed
that a seal used by a Rosemont in Holland, bearing a jumping fox,
was like an emblem he had noticed in a wall of the house Rebleuten-
Zunft in Basle. This seal dated back to 1430, whereas the coat-of-
arms above mentioned dates from 1534, it seems. Peter Rosemond died
September 22, 1930. This is but a sketch of what he wrote.”

THE HUGUENOT ANCESTRY

One northern line and two southern lines of the family have
been traced back to a “Sergeant” Rosemond, first name unknown, name
of wife unknown, who, according to a tradition confirmed in
different lines of the family, was born and married in Europe, was a
drill sergeant in the Army

Book shows end of Page 5 here

of William III, Prince of Orange, went with that army through
Holland and England to Ireland, and settled in Ireland, in County
Leitrim in the neighborhood of Drumshanbo and Ballinamore. The
tradition is that he was born about 1655 and William’s invasion may
be dated 1688. He is said to have been offered and to have refused
the township of Mayo in Leitrim. While the tradition is silent
beyond these matters of nativity and pedigree, investigations, aided
by correspondents in Europe, identify the family name back to the
14th century, and indicate that our ancestor was a French Huguenot,
born in Basle, Switzerland of Hans Ulrich Rosemond in 1654, on New
Year’s day, who left home and did not appear when his father’s will
was read in 1679, or thereafter so far as appears.
His name was James, or Jacob, these having once been practically
interchangeable. The name is believed to have originally been
Rougemont, meaning “red mountain”, which is perpetuated by villages
in southeastern France and nearby in Germany. The Basle family took
citizenship there in 1534, and the ancestry there runs back to
1495. In Holland the name goes back to 1338. Family archives show
that one Gotschalk Rosemond (or Rosemont) was a correspondent of the
celebrated Erasmus (1466-1536), Dutch scholar and theologian, and
that the two studied together about 1483 at Bois le Duc and at
Louvain, Belgium.

“The inference that the `drill sergeant’ was a Huguenot
exiled from France at the time of the revocation of the edict of
Nantes may be correct, but not if James of Basle is accepted as the
ancestor , because it is evident that his family had long before
that been in Basle. But their being citizens of Basle does not at
all contradict their being

Huguenots. Being one of the army of William III, Prince of Orange,
is an indication of such sympathies. In Ireland, the Rosemonds
were, so far as the writer has heard or read, Protestants and
Orangemen. That fact had much to do, according to tradition, with
the emigration of both Philip, the elder, and Canada Ed. A
descendant

Book shows end of Page 6 here

of a brother of Philip, the elder, has told the writer that a lodge
of Orangemen regularly met in the home of the former in Leitrim.
The recognition of the family name in Ireland as a Huguenot name
carries with it the weight of contemporary knowledge and opinion.

“If Rougemont be accepted as the origin of the line from
which the drill sergeant sprung, that location is in harmony with
the Huguenot tradition. There is a Rougemont parish in Department
Doubs, and there is a Rougemont village in Department Haut Rhine
(Upper Rhine), near Belfort, with two destroyed castles. There was
a time, it seems, when this territory was a part of Pfirt, in
Austria, as a part of what was locally known as `the Sundgau’,
extending form Basle to Belfort. Maps show another Rougemont
village in southwestern Germany not far away. The name means `red
mountain’ and is accounted for by local mountains of reddish color;
therefore having a purely logical significance and being
distinguishable from other origins of the name. The variations in
the family name in these records illustrate strikingly how readily
Rougemont could become Rosemond, especially in view of the French
pronunciation.

“After this lapse of time the writer* does not expect the
origin of the name to be susceptible of strict proof, but is
disposed to accept the view shared by Peter Rosemond in Holland,
that our family originated in the Rougemont region in southeastern
France and were Huguenots. In one of his last letters, Peter
Rosemond wrote that he was inclining to the belief that the coat-of-
arms relates to the Crusades and that the `weaver’s cross’ is that
worn on the shoulder by some Crusaders.”

“Rougemont village is said to have been at one time embraced
in Neufchatel, which was a principality of William III of Orange,
which suggests a reason why this James (or Jacob)
_______
*Fred L. Rosemond

Book shows end of Page 7 here

should be disposed to attach himself to the forces of William when
he recruited them for his British conquest.

“Some sixty years elapsed after his settling in Ireland
before any of his descendants came to this country. Three sons,
Thomas and Nathaniel, and one whose name is unknown, have been
traced here, but no other children if any. About 1740 Thomas and
Nathaniel settled in Abbeville District, South Carolina, and the
name is traceable from Virginia south and southwest, as far as
Texas, and up into Illinois, then Missouri. The unnamed son, born
about 1690, never left Ireland and is taken to be the ancestor of
the northern line to which Fred L. Rosemond, Leland E. Rosemond, and
others of the name in Ohio belong, with branches of descendants in
various northern states.

“This unnamed progenitor had a son James, believed to have
been born about 1730, who married Nancy Cook, never left Ireland,
and died about 1813; said to have had fifteen children, ten of these
having been positively identified namely: James (1759-1836); Philip
(1765-1831); Edward (1770-1850); William (1775-1841); Thomas, born
1785; Bennett, died 1852; Anne, Mary Margaret, and Fanny. It is
likely there was a John also, who emigrated with his brother James
to Pennsylvania and thence down the Ohio to the neighborhood of
Cincinnati. They spelled the name “Rossman,” and descendants still
live at Franklin, Ohio. Philip and Edward are believed to have come
either together or about the same time. Edward landed August 30th,
1794, form Ireland, according to naturalization papers taken out by
him March, 1820, at St. Clairsville, Belmont County, Ohio.” (A
photostatic copy of these naturalization papers will be found in
this booklet.) (NOTE: a photostatic copy is placed between pages
14 and 15 of the booklet.)

“This was a time of wide unrest in Ireland, and the
tradition among the descendants of Philip is that the was “warned
out’ by Roman Catholics, hastily converted his property into gold
coin, and brought the coin with him secreted in deep holes

Book shows end of Page 8 here

bored in the corner supports of a wooden chest. William did not
come until 1841 and died soon after arriving at Fairview, Guernsey
County, Ohio, which was a Rosemond headquarters for many years with
as many as five families of the name in the village at a time.
Bennett, father of the family at Almonte, Ontario, woolen
manufacturers on a large scale, and of Edward, known as “Canada Ed’,
came over once with some ideas of remaining, but returned to
Edentenny, near Drumshanbo, and died there. Thomas lived and died
in Ireland, leaving numerous descendants, some about Carrigallen,
and some in Canada. His location was known as Aughalague, east of
Ballinamore. The available information as to the other children of
this first James is scanty. For the present purpose, the general
relations of the line of this Edward, the Elder and Philip, the
Elder (so called to distinguish them) are followed.”

PHILIP THE ELDER

He is head in this country of Fred L. Rosemond’s line and,
in addition, was one of the founders of Fairview, and that village —
touching the line between Guernsey and Belmont counties in eastern
Ohio — was conspicuous for many years in the family history. He
brought with him in 1795 his wife, Mary Bennett, and their oldest
child, James, landing in Philadelphia, and coming west through
Pennsylvania, with some stops by the way, until they reached `The
Seven Ranges’ of available lands in eastern Ohio. Brownsville,
Pennsylvania, was one stop, where a residence was taken up.

“One of the early conveyances in Belmont County, Ohio, was
to this Philip for forty acres on McMahon’s Creek, some

Book shows end of Page 9 here

nine miles northeast of St. Clairsville, for One Hundred Sixty
dollars including all buildings and improvements, dated January
22nd, 1805. This land he conveyed to John Mitchell for Three
Hundred Fifty dollars June 2nd, 1809. These conveyances described
him as of “Richland Township, in Belmont County,” but in 1810 he was
settled at Fletcher, near Fairview, where only a church now remains,
and alter joined in platting Fairview.

“He was a merchant, tavern-keeper and stock buyer, riding
west to buy and driving the herds over the mountains to the eastern
market, often at Philadelphia. He was the first postmaster between
Zanesville and Wheeling on the “Zane Trace.” He is described as a
strict, shrewd businessman, who never allowed one year’s business to
run over into the next and accumulated several farms.

http://www.namebase.org/main2/Jean_2Dlouis-Du-temple-De-
rougemont.html

http://www.namebase.org/main1/Andre-Malraux.html
http://www.ellopos.net/politics/europeanunion.htm

http://www.napoleonseries.org/genealogy/158410.htm

http://worldroots.com/brigitte/royal/royal36i.htm

http://www.ping.be/~jos81/link/philippides/phA25.htm

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to Capturing Beauty – The Prick

  1. Reblogged this on rosamondpress and commented:

    I am gong to wake The Knight Templar Saints from the Dead. On August 25, 2014 I called for the making of a Cyber Sanctuary. Providentia is that sanctuary built to ferret out, and destroy Terrorism. ““U.S. authorities warn that IS poses the greatest threat in years with its “apocalyptic” vision.”

    How many of my readers thought I had really flipped when I saw the awakening of a apocalyptic nightmare in the artwork of my ex-wife, Mary Ann Tharaldsen?

    Pope Francis has called for a new crusade, but stops short of bidding Christians to take up arms. Instead, he called upon the secular United Nations to intervene on the behalf of religious people.

    For over a month, I have been seeking a way to found a secular state, or cyber-nation, that would be a sanctuary to secular peoples such as my Jewish mathematician friends. I call upon Francis to call for a world-wide truce, and bid all Christian sects to end their long holy crusade against secular non-believers that are being targeted by ISIS. I am poised to found a new Knight Templar Order that will be secular in nature, but will contain a religious branch.

    I am going to do a mock-up of a modern day secular I-Ching based upon the novels of Thomas Pynchon, where the literary genius crowd can consult the Pyhng-Ching using 49 of the 50 yarrow sticks in order to grasp what kind of secular day they can look forward to, or, own another clue who Tom was, and where he is at. He is the Liberal Confucius of our day.

    ISIS has called my President a “crusader” who is spreading Freemasonry. The Templars have been associated with the Masons. This suggests ISIS was born on the World Wide Web spun by a rose-colored spider up in her high tower. Since June 30th, when I posted my apocolyptic vision, the whole world has had to bring out its weaving spider in order to repair the rents made my ISIS. They have put the world on the defense, which gives them the upper hand. This is why God born prophets to be warning sirens. The Benton family were Freemasons.

    https://rosamondpress.com/2014/06/30/the-united-states-of-armageddon/

    When the Pope called for the last crusade, there was no democracy in the world. The Papacy controlled the royalty of the world, and defended the divine right of kings. The Protestant religion did not exist. My ancestors were there at its inception. Pope Adrien came up with his own Reformation, and rescued the Knights of Saint John from Malta. Adrien also had Rosemondt found the Pope’s college for poor students.

    The Rosamonds were in Basle when the weavers had their reformation that called for the world’s first democracy. This is key, for ISIS is first a threat to Democracy, then Religion. Sectarian Warfare has torn the world apart. Consider Ghandi and India and the rise of the neo-Confederate evangelical Red State Doomsayers who took over our Congress claiming their brand of Jesus founded a Democracy. Prove it!

    But for John the Baptist, when Jesus rose from the water of his baptism, not one believer did he behold, Everyman was his potential friend. Jesus has evolved in to a simple Man of Democracy. What banner does he wave?
    God has His own banner. It is not red, white, and blue!

    The Catholic Church has engaged in forceful conversions, and ISIS is a Deadly Ghost from that Papal history. Denis de Rougemont co-founded the United Nations, and may be kin to the Rougemont Knights Templar who I proved owned the Shroud of Turin. For this reason I claim rightful ownership of the Linen Shroud in the name of my Rosamond Family Weavers who belonged to the Linen Weavers Guilds of Basle, and fought in the American Revolution under the “Don’t Tread On Me” flag in South Carolina.

    I declare the image on this linen to be a Democratic Man born in America in 1776, and was crucified for wanting to free the slaves and for wanting women to won the right to vote. He is our Democratic Liberator and Gonfalon. As I see it, President Barack Obama, has come to the aid of those in dire stress, employing our Democratic Armed Forces against real Evil.

    Our President is much more than a Crusader. The long silenced voices of the Knights Templar of Fontenette, salute our Commander in Chief.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gonfalon

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/08/19/on-isis-pope-francis-is-no-crusader.html

    In an apparent reference to the United States, Francis said “one nation alone cannot judge” the best means of stopping groups like ISIS, which calls itself the Islamic State. Those decisions should be made collectively by the United Nations, the pontiff said.

    yarrow2

    yarrow3
    Alpenglow

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpenglow

    The Ark upon the mountain
    The Dove and Branch upon the sea
    The hammers of iniquity
    beat upon my forgotten tomb
    I am awake upon the turbulant waters
    My enemies cast lots
    and blame me for their sins
    while God’s friends
    read me on the Day of Atonement
    so all will be saved
    so all will be united in peace
    The sun went down on me
    so long ago
    The vine that grew over my head
    has wilted in the desert of forgetfulness
    But, there on a mountian
    a purple haze
    a rosy afterglow
    in a King’s rosegarden atop a mount
    that bid noble knights to climb hither
    that beckon knights to sever a thread
    and once again
    be brave

    Jon

    “Senior Pentagon officials described the Islamic State (Isis) militant group as an “apocalyptic” organization that posed an “imminent threat” on Thursday, yet the highest-ranking officer in the US military said that in the short term, it was sufficient for the United States to “contain” the group that has reshaped the map of Iraq and Syria.”

    I wrote about Thomas Pynchon’s apocalyptic visions. In the painting he refers to, I see the eight beauties weaving the Holy Shroud of Turin.

    https://rosamondpress.com/2014/08/12/pynchons-apocalypse/

    European leaders face calls to take direct action against the Islamic State including in Syria after the beheading of U.S. journalist James Foley, but politicians are reluctant to take the lead after previous missteps in the region.

    Bennett Rosamond and I look alike. At the Mill I asked our guide, Bill, about a “weaver’s needle”. He showed me an object that could not have been what the Rougemonts wore on Crusade. We talked to five elderly women in the weaving room, and they concluded the needle was a spindle. I found myself in a living Fairy Tale, and Templar Legend.
    On the floor of the mill was wool. We were given a sample to touch. The woman next to me asked if we could keep it, and gave half to me. See photo above of my piece of yarn.”

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