The Zorthian Sisters

In 1966, Keith Pruvis, Barry Zorthian, and myself drove Highway 101, from LA to San Francsico, in a 1956 Ford Thunderbird convertable. We were never so free, so full of fun. We were on top of the world.

Keith and Barry were lovers. When I introduced the Zorthian sisters to my mother, she went nut, told me to marry one of them because they had money. I could care less.

Barry is a MD at Highland Hospital down the street from the Broderick home. Seyburn is an artist like her father and is co-owner of a winery.

All the above lived in the ‘The Idle Hands’ commune in SF.

Jon Presco

Barry Zorthian, MD

Dr. Zorthian was nominated by ACMC’s Medical Staff to serve as their representative on the Board of Trustees in 2010. She is an internist in ACMC’s Department of Medicine, and holds an appointment as Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California San Francisco. She is a graduate of Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr. Zorthian was appointed Chair of the Quality Professional Services Committee in June, 2012 and serves on the Strategic Planning Committee.

I am perpetually fascinated with ideas that come from the Unconscious. They seem to bubble up and become visible in the form of color, line, and shape inter-relationship. It is part of the journey of understanding the Self and this amazing LIFE we are living.
The most current abstractions on paper are compositions that reflect this ethereal meaning. As in poetry, interpretation may be very personal. The titles I give the works generally relate to my immediate quirky understanding of the pieces when they are completed, however, there is no reason why the paintings should carry conscious meaning to everyone. Most important is that each piece has visual integrity.
These small paintings from 2002 into the present are partly informed by three decades of disciplined brushwork using traditional Asian calligraphy brushes and ink to express emotional and physical response to nature in it’s various forms. Also, figure drawing has been very helpful. I have found that the effort it takes to draw the figure “correctly” gives strength to the eye and hand when painting non-objective works.

 
Regarding the expressive brushwork (1970s to the present):
I’ve shown internationally with a group called Art of Ink in America, which is an international contemporary calligraphy association. I feel honored to be a part of it, especially since I do not do calligraphy in any traditional way. The brushwork that I have been known for and which I developed and practiced for more than 20 years, is calligraphic in the sense that it makes a statement with focus, integrity, spirit and emotion. Also, each stroke came as a result of concentration on someone/thing I was looking at, thinking about, feeling. It was “written” as one would write a character, but abstractly, with the brush. When I went to China to participate in a grand show at the Shanxi Historical Art Museum in Xi’an, I was in the company of accomplished artists who had made it their lives to pursue an artistic extrapolation of the basic calligraphy with which they had grown up. Their expressive brushwork has moved into what seems to be a marriage of contemporary abstraction and ancient symbolism.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to The Zorthian Sisters

  1. Reblogged this on rosamondpress and commented:

    Eastwood made the movie ‘Byrd’ that is about the Jazz great, Charlie Parker, who was a friend of Zorthian and recorded out at the ranch. Pynchon is a Jazz Freak and drops jazz notes and clues all through his books.

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