King David Museum In America

This morning I came across the King David Museum founded by Roth who claims she descends from David via Rashi, whose birth resembles the conception of John the Baptist, and the Prophet, Samuel, who were Nazarites. My great grandfather, Wensel Anton Braskewitz, married Marie Roth, a Jew. This Nazarite connection to a genealogy that descends from King David, renders my twenty four year study paramount to all others in regards to a bloodline of Jesus and the Knights Templar.

What some authors can not stand about me, and refuse to acknowledge, is my astounding understanding of the Torah, I able to see things there that no one has seen before me – including Rashi – whose miraculous birth to barren parents is credited with giving him a divine sight. This sight is now on record, and has nothing to do with the Gnosticism others hold up as their banner planted atop Mount Zion. When Samuel Josefa de Mattos offered me and my offspring an acre of land in South Carolina, he had read my posts on Francis Salvador who fought in the American Revolution as did my ancestors, Samuel and James Rosamond, who named their offspring after Francis Marion ‘The Swamp Fox’ De Mattos is kin to the Mendes, Nunez, da Costa family. Nun is a name found in the genealogy of Jesus, and is Nunez.

“Roth, who claims to be a direct descent of David, is royalty in another sense. She is the daughter of Pesach and Lilian Burstein, and the twin sister of Mike Burstein.”

This is said about Rashi;

“Afterwards he was visited by either a Bath Kol (Heavenly voice) or the prophet Elijah, who told him that he would be rewarded with the birth of a noble son “who would illuminate the world with his Torah knowledge.”

Because Rashi was a Jew, these things can be said because he was not a Christian, whereas their Jewish prophet, Jesus, is turned into a Roman Sky God that no one is worthy to compare themselves to – without being called “nuts” – as planned! Satan Paul kidnapped Jesus, took him away from his Jewish family, and put him in a ivory tower – where only he could get get to him!

The rejection of my twenty four year sobriety by my family – is complete! I am a cast out, a castaway. Then I picked up the Torah. I am a prodigal Son come out of the AMERICAN wilderness. Repent!

I will release Sam de Mattos of his promise to me and my kindred, if he builds a museum on that acre of land, and dedicates it to Francis Salvador, the Sephardic Jews who came to America, and King David. If Sam is agreeable, I as an artist, and sculptor, would like to raise a Nehushtan, there, on the edge of Greenwood Lake.

Jon Prescowitz

Copyright 2012

The Concpetion of Rashi

His fame later made him the subject of many legends. One tradition contends that his parents were childless for many years. Rashi’s father, Yitzhak, a poor vintner, once found a precious jewel and was approached by non-Jews who wished to buy it to adorn their idol. Yitzhak agreed to travel with them to their land, but en route, he cast the gem into the sea. Afterwards he was visited by either a Bath Kol (Heavenly voice) or the prophet Elijah, who told him that he would be rewarded with the birth of a noble son “who would illuminate the world with his Torah knowledge.”
Legend also states that the couple moved to Worms, Germany while Rashi’s mother was expecting. As she walked down one of the narrow streets in the Jewish quarter, she was imperiled by two oncoming carriages. She turned and pressed herself against a wall, which opened to receive her. This miraculous niche is still visible in the wall of the Rashi Shul.[8]

Brazil was discovered by a Portuguese fleet under the command of Admiral Pedro Alvares Cabral lord of Belmonte, in April 1500. Early colonizing efforts by the Portuguese crown were sporadic and consisted mainly of expeditions sponsored and directed by wealthy merchants like the Marchioni, Affaitati, or Fernão de Loronha, who was a converted and ennobled Jew. A more systematic colonial effort began after 1534 when King John III of Portugal spliced up the new land into a dozen or so chunks which were given as fiefs to merchants and enterprising noblemen who were supposed to settle in the colony and explore it. We are here interested in some of the settlers that came to Brazil after 1548, when King John III decided that a centralized government was required to coordinate the Portuguese administration in the New World, and named Dr. Tomé de Sousa, a magistrate, as the country’s first governor-general. De Sousa belonged to a distinguished but partially impoverished family which traced its ancestry to King Alfonso III in the 13th century through illegitimate lines; he arrived in Brazil in early 1549 in a fleet one of whose ships was commanded by Fernão Vaz da Costa, another mid-level nobleman from the bureaucratic establishment around the Portuguese crown. Fernão Vaz da Costa is one of our dramatis personae here.

BUENO DE MESQUITA, CIPRIANE, DA COSTA, DA SILVA, DE PRADO, DIAS, HEAD, HERON, QUIROS, DE SEQUEIRA, HENRIQUES, MENDES, MENDES DA SILVA, MENDES GUTTERES, PORTELLO, PORTELLO DE QUIROS, RODRIGUES, SALVADOR, TEIXEIRA DE MATTOS, XIMENES
NUNES/NUNEZ

The story has been told that all Nunes/Nunez families were originally Jewish from Israel who escaped from the Assyrians when they captured the city of Jerusalem. They scattered to the ends of the earth; some made their way to Spain and Portugal, and still others to Europe. In the late 1500’s there was the Inquisition that forced all Jews to convert to Roman-Catholicism or die, many of them converted, many died and many ran away to Hawaii or the Caribbean. Most converted to whatever religion they felt met their needs and many went back to their Jewish heritage.
The NUNES family is a direct descendent of the royal house of King DAVID of ISRAEL. The Nunes family went to Spain about 2000 years ago, during the time of King Nebuchanezer (king of Assyria). He conquered Israel and “kicked” out the royal family. From there the Nunes family (formerly known as Ben-Nun) went to Greece to Italy to Spain and Portugal. They lived there in peace and equality under the Moorish-Muslim Empire of the Al-Andalucians and the Al-Mohads, then came the Christians (Roman Catholics) and conquered the land from the Moors. For about 500 years there was no problem but in the 1800s Spain began eliminating the Jewish and Muslim families because they wanted to make Spain an all Catholic country so the Jewish people ran to Portugal and the Muslims ran to Morroco. Spain threathened Portugal to do the same, which Portugal did. It was the first Holocaust, it was the Inquisition. Portugal and Spain forced all Jews (Nunes, Pereira, Lopes, Rodrigues, Fernandes, Torres, etc…..) to convert to Roman Catholicism and if they didn’t convert they would be killed in the AUTOS DE FE in Lisbon. Many Jewish people did convert so they wouldn’t die but a few ran away to Brazil, Eastern Europe, and the Carribean Islands. In the early 1900s Portugal and Spain became “RELIGIOUS FREEDOM” nations. This movement helped many of the Jewish descendents to return to their faith. There are now about 200,000 Jews and Muslims in Portugal. It has been said that ALL NUNES FAMILIES ARE JEWISH ANCESTRY. MAY GOD BE WITH YOU ALWAYS….

DR. SAMUEL NUNES, a former court physician in Spain was a practicing Catholic; however, in secret he was a SEPHARDIC JEW. When things got to bad in Spain, Dr. Nunez organized a plan to take his family away to London, England. One night they had a party and in the attendees was a ship captain. The party toured the ship and set sail for London, England that night. In 1732 there were 6,000 Jews living in London. All but eight of the original forty-two Jewish colonists were Spanish/Portuguese Jews who had arrived in London ten years earlier, having lived as Crypto-Jews, publicly practicing Roman Catholicism and secretly preserving their Jewish heritage, prior to their departure from Portugal. Among these sephardic Jews was Dr. Samuel Nunes Ribiero, a physician who had been imprisoned during the Inquisition for his successful efforts to convert New Christians back to the Jewish faith.It was in England that SAMUEL and his wife REBECCA were remarried in a Jewish ceremony. Rebecca gave birth to a son whom both died afterwards in England. Samuel with his mother, ZIPPORAH NUNES, and grown children set sail to America with other Jewish families on the WILLIAM and SARAH. Forty-two brave pioneering Jews, the “largest group of Jews to land in North America in Colonial days” arrived in SAVANNAH on July 11, 1733, just five months after General James Edward Oglethorpe established the colony of Georgia
Historical Savannah, Georgia
The names of the Jews who arrived in Savannah, Georgia, on the 11th day of July, 1733
Doctor Nunis, Mrs. Nunis his mother, Daniel Nunis, Moses Nunis, Sipra Nunis, Shem Noah their servant
Isaac Nunis Henriques, his wife Mrs. Henriques, Shem their son
Raphael Bornal, his wife Mrs. Bornal
David Olivera, Jacob Olivera, his wife Mrs. Olivera, David their son, Isaac their son, Leah Olivera their daughter
Aaron Depivea
Benjamin Gideon
Jacob Costa
David Lopass Depass and his wife
Vene Real Molena
David Moranda, Jacob Moranda
David Cohen and his wife, Isaac Cohen their son, Abigail their daughter, Hannah their daughter, Grace their daughter
Abraham Minis and his wife, Leah their daughter, Esther their daughter, Simeon Minis, brother to Mr. Minis
Jacob Yowall
Benjamin Sheftall and his wife
Abraham Delyon
Isaac Nunis Henriques had a child who died on board the ship*
These persons were the first of our nation who came to this country. They brought with them a SAFER TORA, with TWO CLOAKS, and a CIRCUMSION BOX, which were given to them by Mr. Lindo, a merchant in London, for the use of the congregation they intended to establish”
When Dr. Samuel Nunez arrived in Savannah, Georgia there was an outbreak of yellow fever and many people were dying. James Oglethorpe almost did not let the Jewish immigrants land. Dr. Nunez assured Oglethorpe that he was a doctor of infectious diseases and could help the colony. The Georgia colony had lost their doctor sometime earlier and were much in need of a physician. James Oglethorpe realized here was an opportunity for good help during this epidemic in Savannah and he let the Jewish families remain

sephardim!
Vasco de Balboa
Joseph A. Nunes
Rachel Nunez, great granddaughter of Dr. Samuel Nunez. Her mother Rebecca Machado was the daughter of Zipporah Nunez and David Machado
Children of Samuel Nunez, b. 1668, Portugal; d.1744 Charleston, SC and (Rebecca) De Viego Nunez, b 1678, Portugal; d. abt. 1727, London, England
1. Rodrigo Lopes Joseph Nunez, born 1693, Portugal
2. Moses Manoel Nunez, born 1700, Portugal
3. Izabel De Viego Caetanna (Rachel), born 1702, Portugal
4. Esther (Theresa) Nunez, born 1703, Portugal
5. Daniel (Andre) Nunez, born 1710, Portugal
6. Zipporah (Maria Caetana) Nunez, born 1712, Portugal
7. Infant Son Nunez, born January 12, 1726, and died 1726/1727, London, England
If anyone out there knows anything about No.1 son, RODRIGO LOPES JOSEPH NUNEZ, born 1693, Portugal and lived in London, England please send me an email. I just think maybe our Abram Nunez may be a grandson of Rodrigo Lopes Joseph Nunez ”

http://nunezreport.blogspot.com/2012/01/are-you-descendant-of-house-of-david.html

Are you a descendant of the House of David? If you have ever wondered if blue blood flows through your veins, you might consider visiting the King David Private Museum and Research Center, which reopened on Monday in its new location in central Tel Aviv.

Better yet, run your name through the museum’s online database that curators vow will accurately tell you whether you are related to the monarch from the 10th century BCE (www.Davidicdynasty.org).

The museum, which was founded by Jewish-American philanthropist Susan Roth, is dedicated to telling the story of the ginger shepherd from Bethlehem who became the leader of the Jewish people.

“We want to show who King David was not only here – but also in America and other countries – and especially here because right now the younger generation consider themselves simply Israeli, not Jews,” Roth said in an interview after the museum’s rededication.

The small exhibition, which was previously housed in the Old City of Jerusalem, provides various depictions of the Hebrew king from throughout history including famous paintings and sculptures by the likes of Michelangelo and others. In addition, it displays a few archeological artifacts related to his life including ancient slingshots and pebbles, similar to the ones David is said to have used to slay the mighty Philistine giant Goliath.

“This museum is proof that we would are not a nation of 63 years as some would like us to believe, but in fact we are a nation [that is] 3,000 years old – and that we didn’t take this country from anybody,” said Roth. “In fact, it was taken from us several times.”

Don’t try to ascribe a political agenda to the museum, Roth said, sensing the next question, as you won’t find it.

She is, however, proud of her support of the Tomb of the Patriarchs in Hebron and of Rachel’s Tomb near Bethlehem.

Roth said she influenced the government during the early ’90s under prime ministers Yitzhak Rabin and Shimon Peres and funded protests to keep Rachel’s Tomb in Israeli hands.

“The government realized that they can’t give it away, and that’s how it was saved,” she said.

Roth, who claims to be a direct descent of David, is royalty in another sense. She is the daughter of Pesach and Lilian Burstein, and the twin sister of Mike Burstein.

Together, the family made up the Four Bursteins, the internationally famous Yiddish theater troupe. She is proud of her pedigree but said her interest in Judaism as a religious way of life and in Kabbala did not stem from her upbringing. Rather, it came much later, only as an adult.

“There was no religion connected to it,” she said. “My parents and my brother and I were actors. In a way it was the forerunner of what I’m doing now, since we were entertaining the survivors who needed to hear a Jewish word because they lost everything.”

But if you’re one for science you might not be impressed by the replicas, artifacts and other tchotchkes on display. The only non-biblical evidence that refers to the House of David is the Tel Dan Stele, a replica of which is shown at the entrance to the exhibition. And its authenticity is disputed by some scholars.

“There’s no doubt a historical King David existed, because the scribes of the Bible give us detailed accounts that fit in with other sources of the time,” noted archaeologist Israel Finkelstein said over the phone on Monday. “But the Bible itself is ambiguous in describing the kingdom in various ways and with various boundaries – one time it says [the kingdom] straddled Dan to Beersheba, and another time the Euphrates to Egypt.”

Finkelstein said David may have been a leader of great import in the history of the Kingdom of Judea but that archeological evidence directly related to him was extremely scarce. Furthermore, what does exist suggests he ruled over much less of the land than what was credited to him in the biblical narrative. Finkelstein suggested we think of David as a chieftain of a small but ambitious tribe rather than a mighty king lording over distant lands.

“A founder of a 10th-century BCE dynasty in the Judean Hills existed, but it doesn’t mean he had the power later attributed to him,” Finkelstein said.

For most believers, however, including Roth, the Holy Scriptures do not allow such a minimalist interpretation.

She is a staunch believer in David the Great. And if more people learned about him and even discovered that they were his direct descendants – which she believes can be scientifically proven – then the Jewish people would truly fulfill its destiny of being a light upon the nations.

“Come to the museum,” she implores the disbelievers.

“Come and you will see that David wasn’t a myth.”

Francis Salvador (1747 – August 1, 1776) was the first American Jew to be killed in the American Revolution, fighting on the South Carolina frontier.[1] Salvador was born in London, where his great-grandfather, Joseph Salvador, was a prominent businessman, and leader of the local Portuguese-speaking Sephardic Jewish community.

Contents [hide]
1 Emigration to America
2 Representative to Congress
3 Fighting in the American Revolution
4 See also
5 References
6 Sources

[edit] Emigration to AmericaFrancis Salvador, along with the DaCosta family of London, hoped to settle poor Jews and their own family members in the New World. They sent 42 Jews to Savannah with the original settlers in 1733. When Spain attacked Georgia in 1740, most of the Jewish families fled to Charleston, fearing the Spanish Inquisition. Jews from London began arriving in Charleston in the 1730s, and were later joined by Jews from Germany, the Netherlands and the West Indies. Francis Salvador was the only Jew to settle on the frontier. The Salvador and DaCosta families in London bought 200,000 acres (810 km2) in the new district of Ninety-Six (known as “Jews Land”), and began to populate it.[2] The Salvador family was financially ruined by the Lisbon earthquake of 1755 and subsequent failure of the East India Company, retaining their land in South Carolina and little other wealth.[3] Francis Salvador bought 7,000 acres (28 km2), and moved there in 1773, intending to send for his wife, Sarah, and their children as soon as he was able.

[edit] Representative to CongressAfter arriving in Charleston in December 1773, Salvador at once entered into the American cause, and became close friends with the leaders of the Revolution in the South, including Pinckney, Rutledge, Drayton, Laurens, and Hammond.[4] Salvador was elected to South Carolina’s General Assembly within a year of arriving, the first Jew to hold that office in any of the English colonies in North America.[1] He was just 27, and would hold the post until his death.[3]

Although Jews legally could neither hold office nor vote, no one objected when Salvador was elected, along with his friend and fellow planter Richard Rapley, as the two frontier representatives from Ninety-Six to the provincial congress. He was chosen for important committee assignments: drawing up the declaration of the purpose of the congress to the people; obtaining ammunition; assessing the safety of the frontier, and working on the state constitution.[5]

In 1774, Salvador was chosen to be a delegate to the revolutionary Provincial Congress of the colony, which first met in Charleston in January 1775. The group framed a bill of rights and composed an address to South Carolina’s royal governor setting forth the colonists’ complaints against the Crown. Salvador was appointed to a commission that tried to convince the Tories in the northern and western parts of the colony to join the American cause.

The second Provincial Congress assembled in November 1775. Salvador was one of the champions for Independence. He urged his fellow delegates to instruct the colony’s delegation to the Continental Congress to cast their vote for independence. Salvador chaired the ways and means committee of this second Congress, at the same time serving on a select committee authorized to issue bills of credit as payment to members of the militia. He was also made part of a commission established to preserve the peace in the interior parts of South Carolina.[1]

[edit] Fighting in the American RevolutionEarly in 1776 the British had induced the Indians to attack the South Carolina frontier to create a diversion in favor of British operations on the sea-coast; and on July 1, 1776, the Indians began attacking frontier families. Salvador mounted his horse and galloped to Major Williamson, 28 miles (45 km) away, and gave the alarm. Salvador took part in the engagements that followed. On July 31, Major Andrew Williamson captured two white loyalists, who led his 330 men into an ambush prepared by their fellow Tories and Seneca Indians on the Keowee River.[6] Salvador was shot. Falling among the bushes, he was discovered by the Indians and scalped. He died from his wounds, age 29.

Concerning his death, Colonel William Thomson wrote to William Henry Drayton, in a letter dated “Camp, two miles below Keowee, August 4th, 1775”, as follows: “Here, Mr. Salvador received three wounds; and, fell by my side. . . . I desired [Lieutenant Farar], to take care of Mr. Salvador; but, before he could find him in the dark, the enemy unfortunately got his scalp: which, was the only one taken. . . . He died, about half after two o’clock in the morning: forty-five minutes after he received the wounds, sensible to the last. When I came up to him, after dislodging the enemy, and speaking to him, he asked, whether I had beat the enemy? I told him yes. He said he was glad of it, and shook me by the hand – and bade me farewell – and said, he would die in a few minutes.”[7]

A patriot journal, The Rememerance, wrote: “he was universally loved and esteemed.”[4][8]

Salvador probably never learned that the delegation in Philadelphia had heeded his advice and voted for independence.

In 1950, to celebrate the 200th anniversary of Charleston’s Jewish congregation, the City of Charleston erected a memorial to Francis Salvador, the first Jew to die for the American Revolution.

Born an aristocrat, he became a democrat;
An Englishman, he cast his lot with the Americans;
True to his ancient faith, he gave his life;
For new hopes of human liberty and understanding.[9]

“Come and you will see that David wasn’t a myth.”

Susan Roth,
Founder of The Eshet Chayil Foundation and Davidic Dynasty, is a descendant of King David through Rashi, the Lurie family, the Baal Shem Tov and his great grandson Rabbi Nachman of Breslov, the famous Kabbalist and scholar. She is also a descendant of the first Lubavitcher Rebbe, Shneur V. Zalman of Liadi, through his daughter Freida. She has traveled extensively throughout the world since she was 7 years old, as a member of her family’s Yiddish theatrical company, The Four Bursteins, which included her parents, Pesach and Lillian (Lux) Burstein, and her twin brother, Michael. She has starred on stage, television, films, and various radio programs and recordings throughout the world. In fact, a documentary of the Bursteins entitled “The Komediants” won the Israeli equivalent of an Oscar Award for its portrayal of the famous theatrical family and their impact on the Jewish entertainment world.Susan spent part of her childhood in Israel and was indoctrinated into Kabbalah there. She was only 17 years old and in Tsfat (Safed) when she became immersed into the spiritual realm of Kabbalah. After leaving the world of entertainment at the age of 19, she went on to raise a family with her husband Michael Roth, z”l. While doing so, she embarked on an unusual academic course of study. She began with undergraduate studies in philosophy and comparative religion at Kean College in New Jersey and then received her Bachelor of Arts degree in the Humanities at Thomas Edison College of New Jersey (“The School Without Walls”). She continued on with graduate studies in International Affairs as a Woodrow Wilson Scholar at Princeton University and went on to receive her Master’s degree in Liberal Arts from New York University, where she wrote her thesis on perennial philosophy through Kabbalah.
Susan Roth’s community work includes: Vice President of the Women’s Division of the Jewish Federation of Central New Jersey and the YM-YWHA; advisor, coordinator, speechwriter and public relations manager for the Central New Jersey Holocaust Committee, the Central New Jersey YM-YWHA, and the Central New Jersey Jewish Federation. She also broke ground as the first woman Vice President of an Orthodox Synagogue in Springfield, New Jersey.
In 1991, Susan authored Moses in the Twentieth Century, the first Kabbalistic treatise written by a woman without having access to primary source material. It is a book on perennial philosophy through Kabbalah that integrates the wisdom of Kabbalah, the totality of Jewish religious tradition and modern Western scholarship.

http://www.davidicdynasty.org/familytrees.php#

http://www.davidicdynasty.org/decentofrashi.php

In a cooperative research effort by Rambam Hospital in Haifa, Israel, The University College of London and the University of Arizona, a common DNA signature was found in the present day ‘Kohanim’. The participants, all ‘Kohanim’, had the oral tradition of being descendants of the first High Priest of Israel, Aharon (Aaron, brother of Moses). 60% of the Sephardic Jews and 50% of the Ashkenazi Jews shared a common DNA signature, proving they were indeed descendants of the Biblical figure Aharon.

In the spring of 2000, armed with the knowledge that DNA can in fact trace a group of people back to a common ancestor, Bennett Greenspan, an entrepreneur and life-long genealogy enthusiast, founded America’s first genealogical DNA testing service-Family Tree DNA. Davidic Dynasty, in conjunction with Family Tree DNA, is attempting to do for the descendants of King David what was done in 1997 for the ‘Kohanim’, namely find a common DNA signature in those with the oral tradition of being descendants of King David.

To join our DNA test pool or for more information contact the Family Tree DNA website at http://www.familytreedna.com/surname_join.asp?code=E43088&special=true .

For answers to frequently asked questions on DNA research and Family Tree DNA go to http://www.familytreedna.com/faq.html .

Our recommendation for the specific Davidic Dynasty DNA test is as follows:
Men – Y-DNA25 + mtDNA
Women – mtDNA

The King David Museum opened in Tel Aviv on Monday. The museum is dedicated to King David’s legacy, his life and his ruling period. The museum displays a selection of items that represent the period of David’s kingdom and also offers items illuminating the time period and the lifestyle that was customary during that time period.
The museum was founded by Susan Roth, herself a descendant of King David through the Biblical commentator Rashi. As a child, Roth traveled around the world with her family’s Yiddish theater, which included her parents, Pesach and Lillian Burstein, and her twin brother, famous Israeli actor Mike Burstyn.

http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/151577

Shlomo Yitzhaki (Hebrew: רבי שלמה יצחקי‎), or in Latin Salomon Isaacides, and today generally known by the acronym Rashi (Hebrew: רש”י‎, RAbbi SHlomo Itzhaki; February 22, 1040 – July 13, 1105), was a medieval French rabbi famed as the author of a comprehensive commentary on the Talmud, as well as a comprehensive commentary on the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible). He is considered the “father” of all commentaries that followed on the Talmud (i.e., the Baalei Tosafot) and the Tanakh (i.e., Ramban, Ibn Ezra, Ohr HaChaim, et al.).[1][2]
Acclaimed for his ability to present the basic meaning of the text in a concise, lucid fashion, Rashi appeals to both learned scholars and beginning students, and his works remain a centerpiece of contemporary Jewish study. His commentary on the Talmud, which covers nearly all of the Babylonian Talmud (a total of 30 tractates), has been included in every edition of the Talmud since its first printing by Daniel Bomberg in the 1520s. His commentary on Tanakh — especially his commentary on the Chumash (“Five Books of Moses”) — is an indispensable aid to students of all levels. The latter commentary alone serves as the basis for more than 300 “supercommentaries” which analyze Rashi’s choice of language and citations, penned by some of the greatest names in rabbinic literature.[2]
Rashi’s surname Yitzhaki derives from his father’s name, Yitzhak. The acronym is sometimes also fancifully expanded as Rabban Shel YIsrael (Teacher of Israel), or as Rabbenu SheYichyeh (Our Rabbi, may he live). He may be cited in Hebrew and Aramaic texts as (1) “Shlomo son of Rabbi Yitzhak,” (2) “Shlomo son of Yitzhak,” (3) “Shlomo Yitzhaki,” etc.[3]

Contents
 [hide] 
1 Biography
1.1 Birth and early life
1.2 Legends
1.3 Yeshiva studies
1.4 Rosh yeshiva
1.5 Death and burial site
1.6 Descendants
2 Works
2.1 Commentary on the Tanakh
2.2 Commentary on the Talmud
2.3 Responsa
3 Legacy
4 Supercommentaries
5 “Rashi script”
6 References
7 External links
7.1 References
7.2 Resources
7.3 Wikisource
[edit] Biography
[edit] Birth and early life
Rashi was an only child born at Troyes, Champagne, in northern France. His mother’s brother was Simon the Elder, Rabbi of Mainz.[4] Simon was a disciple of Rabbeinu Gershom Meor HaGolah,[5] who died that same year. On his father’s side, Rashi has been claimed to be a 33rd-generation descendant of Yochanan Hasandlar, who was a fourth-generation descendant of Gamaliel the Elder, who was reputedly descended from the royal line of King David. In his voluminous writings, Rashi himself made no such claim at all. The main early rabbinical source about his ancestry, Responsum No. 29 by Solomon Luria, makes no such claim either.[6][7]
[edit] Legends
His fame later made him the subject of many legends. One tradition contends that his parents were childless for many years. Rashi’s father, Yitzhak, a poor vintner, once found a precious jewel and was approached by non-Jews who wished to buy it to adorn their idol. Yitzhak agreed to travel with them to their land, but en route, he cast the gem into the sea. Afterwards he was visited by either a Bath Kol (Heavenly voice) or the prophet Elijah, who told him that he would be rewarded with the birth of a noble son “who would illuminate the world with his Torah knowledge.”
Legend also states that the couple moved to Worms, Germany while Rashi’s mother was expecting. As she walked down one of the narrow streets in the Jewish quarter, she was imperiled by two oncoming carriages. She turned and pressed herself against a wall, which opened to receive her. This miraculous niche is still visible in the wall of the Rashi Shul.[8]
[edit] Yeshiva studies

Rashi Synagogue, Worms
According to tradition, Rashi was first brought to learn Torah by his father on Shavuot day at the age of five. His father was his main Torah teacher until his death when Rashi was still a youth. At the age of 17 he married and soon after went to learn in the yeshiva of Rabbi Yaakov ben Yakar in Worms, returning to his wife three times yearly, for the Days of Awe, Passover and Shavuot. When Rabbi Yaakov died in 1064, Rashi continued learning in Worms for another year in the yeshiva of his relative, Rabbi Isaac ben Eliezer Halevi, who was also chief rabbi of Worms. Then he moved to Mainz, where he studied under another of his relatives, Rabbi Isaac ben Judah, the rabbinic head of Mainz and one of the leading sages of the Lorraine region straddling France and Germany.
Rashi’s teachers were students of Rabbeinu Gershom and Rabbi Eliezer Hagadol, leading Talmudists of the previous generation. From his teachers, Rashi imbibed the oral traditions pertaining to the Talmud as they had been passed down for centuries, as well as an understanding of the Talmud’s unique logic and form of argument. Rashi took concise, copious notes from what he learned in yeshiva, incorporating this material in his commentaries.
[edit] Rosh yeshiva
He returned to Troyes at the age of 25, after which time his mother died, and he was asked to join the Troyes Beth din (rabbinical court). He also began answering halakhic questions. Upon the death of the head of the Bet din, Rabbi Zerach ben Abraham, Rashi assumed the court’s leadership and answered hundreds of halakhic queries.

Exterior of Rashi’s Synagogue, Worms, Germany
In around 1070 he founded a yeshiva which attracted many disciples. It is thought by some that Rashi earned his living as a vintner since Rashi shows an extensive knowledge of its utensils and process, but there is no evidence for this.[9] Although there are many legends about his travels, Rashi likely never went further than from the Seine to the Rhine; the utmost limit of his travels were the yeshivas of Lorraine.
In 1096, the People’s Crusade swept through the Lorraine, murdering 12,000 Jews and uprooting whole communities. Among those murdered in Worms were the three sons of Rabbi Isaac ben Eliezer Halevi, Rashi’s teacher. Rashi wrote several Selichot (penitential poems) mourning the slaughter and the destruction of the region’s great yeshivot. Seven of Rashi’s Selichot still exist, including Adonai Elohei Hatz’vaot”, which is recited on the eve of Rosh Hashanah, and Az Terem Nimtehu, which is recited on the Fast of Gedalia.
[edit] Death and burial site
Rashi died on July 13, 1105 (Tammuz 29, 4865) aged 65. He was buried in Troyes. The approximate location of the cemetery in which he was buried was recorded in Seder Hadoros, but over time the location of the cemetery was forgotten. A number of years ago, a Sorbonne professor discovered an ancient map depicting the site of the cemetery, which now lay under an open square in the city of Troyes. After this discovery, French Jews erected a large monument in the center of the square—a large, black and white globe featuring a prominent Hebrew letter, Shin (ש) (presumably for “Shlomo”, Rashi’s name). The granite base of the monument is engraved: Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki — Commentator and Guide.
In 2005, Yisroel Meir Gabbai erected an additional plaque at this site marking the square as a burial ground. The plaque reads: “The place you are standing on is the cemetery of the town of Troyes. Many Rishonim are buried here, among them Rabbi Shlomo, known as Rashi the holy, may his merit protect us”.[10]
[edit] Descendants
Main article: Rashi’s daughters
Rashi had no sons, but his three daughters, Miriam, Yocheved, and Rachel, all married Talmudic scholars. Legends exist that Rashi’s daughters put on tefillin. While some women in medieval Ashkenaz did wear tefillin, there is no evidence that Rashi’s daughters did so.[11]
Rashi’s oldest daughter, Yocheved, married Meir ben Shmuel; their four sons were: Shmuel (Rashbam) (b. 1080), Yitzchak (Rivam) (b. 1090), Jacob (Rabbeinu Tam) (b. 1100), and Shlomo the Grammarian, who were among the most prolific of the Baalei Tosafos, leading rabbinic authorities who wrote critical and explanatory glosses on the Talmud which appear opposite Rashi’s commentary on every page of the Talmud. Yocheved’s daughter, Chanah, was a teacher of laws and customs relevant to women.
Rashi’s middle daughter, Miriam, married Judah ben Nathan, who completed the commentary on Talmud Makkot which Rashi was working on when he died.[12] Their daughter Alvina was a learned woman whose customs served as the basis for later halakhic decisions. Their son Yom Tov later moved to Paris and headed a yeshiva there, along with his brothers Shimshon and Eliezer.
Rashi’s youngest daughter, Rachel, married (and divorced) Eliezer ben Shemiah.
[edit] Works

Casto Secundino María Méndez Núñez (July 1, 1824 – August 21, 1869), Spanish military naval officer. Born in Vigo (Galicia). In 1866 during the Chincha Islands War between Spain, Peru and Chile, he was General Commander of the Spanish fleet in the Pacific. As such, he bombarded and destroyed the port of Valparaiso, and fought the Battle of Callao (during which he was injured nine times.) Méndez Núñez was the first man to circumnavigate the world on an ironclad warship: “Enloricata navis quae primo terram circuivit”.
When Hugh Judson Kilpatrick, the American Minister to Chile, learned that Commodore Méndez Núñez was to bombard the port of Valparaiso, he asked the American naval commander Commodore John Rodgers to attack the Spanish fleet. Méndez Núñez famously responded with, “I will be forced to sink [the US ships], because even if I have one ship left I will proceed with the bombardment. Spain, the Queen and I prefer honor without ships than ships without honor.” (España prefiere honra sin barcos a barcos sin honra.)

1. Judith Mendes da Costa (Teixeira de Mattos) (1785 – 1827 …

Join the world’s largest family tree

Gender
Male Female
First Name

Last Name

Email

never shared, never spammed
Start My Family Tree! or Cancel
Follow
Joao Dias Mendes de Mattos

http://genealogy.mendesdacosta.com/links.html

The following information was located on the Internet while researching family history and is reproduced here so you can enjoy browsing through what one historian described as our “interesting collection of ancestors”. Full acknowledgement of their sources is displayed by an accompanying link. Specific links relating to the Mendes da Costa family tree can be found on our Genealogy page.
Please report any dead links to the Webmaster.
 
Dr. Maurits Benjamin Mendes da Costa
Teacher of Greek and Latin to Vincent van Gogh

Maurits Benjamin Mendes da Costa
In 1877 while living with his Uncle Jan, another uncle, Johannes Stricker, arranges for Vincent to be taught Greek and Latin by Dr. Mendes da Costa. Vincent’s studies, in anticipation of his entering the clergy, were difficult but enjoyable for him. Vincent and da Costa had a good relationship and they were soon on a first name basis. Da Costa found Vincent’s character and intellect intriguing and they enjoyed their studies together in Amsterdam’s Jewish quarter. Despite his best efforts, however, Vincent would ultimately have to give up his studies and leave Amsterdam.
Source: The Vincent van Gogh Information Gallery
Letters from Vincent van Gogh to his brother Theo which contain references to Dr Mendes da Costa
Amsterdam, 18 August 1877: “I have written a composition in which all the parables are arranged in proper order, and the miracles, etc. I am doing the same in English and French, and expect to be able to write it later in Latin and Greek too. In the daytime I have to prepare for Mendes, and so I am doing it late in the evening, or for instance as today, deep in the night or early in the morning. . . . This morning I had a talk with Mendes about M. Maris, and showed him that lithograph of those three children, and also “A Baptism,” and he understood them very well. Mendes reminds me now and then of the “Imitation of Jesus Christ,” by Ruyperez.”
Amsterdam, 7 September 1877: “We have been to the Trippenhuis twice, and he went alone to Van der Hoop’s; he was also at Uncle Cor’s gallery (but Uncle was out of town) and went with me to Mendes’s.”
Amsterdam, 18 September 1877: “This week Mendes is out of town, spending a few days with the Rev. Schröder at Zwolle, a former pupil of his.”
Amsterdam, 30 October 1877: “I keep my work together, to help me to pass the examinations; I consult Mendes in everything and arrange my studies according to what he has done, for I should like to do it in the same way. . . . the study of Latin and Greek is arduous; nevertheless, it still makes me happy, I have finally dived into studies of which I have always dreamt. . . . I went to Uncle Stricker’s and had a long talk with him and Aunt, for Mendes had been to see them a few days ago (one must not talk too lightly about genius, even though one believes there is more of it in the world than many suppose, but Mendes certainly is a very remarkable person, and I am and will remain grateful for my contact with him). I am glad to say he did not make an unfavourable report about me, but Uncle asked me if I did not find it very difficult, and I acknowledged that I did indeed, and that I tried my best, in every possible way, to remain strong and keep myself alert in all possible ways. He told me not to lose heart.”
Amsterdam, 19 November 1877: “I have been looking for an algebra and mathematics teacher; I have found one, the cousin of Mendes, Teixeira de Mattos, who teaches religion at the Jewish pauper school. . . . At last I succeeded in making a map of Asia Minor, Greece and Italy, rather a large one (on which the travels of Paul are also indicated) and one of England which finally has the quality I wanted – Mendes, for one, sees it – namely that it has been made with feeling and love. The names I put on it came from a map in the Atlas Antiquus by Sprüner Menke, which Mendes has; it is one used for history.”
Amsterdam, 25 November 1877: “I had to draw for Mendes a map of ancient Italy, or rather two, for I drew also one of middle Italy, just about from Rome to Naples. . . . There are a great many nice people in the book business; Uncle Cor, Mr. Braat, Schröder here (that is where Mendes gets his books, and I, too, sometimes).”
Amsterdam, 4 December 1877: “So another year has almost passed by, in which many things have happened to me; I look back on it with thankfulness. When I think over the time I spent at Braat’s and the months of study here, upon the whole they have really been two good things. Boy, if next Christmas I might be at the university and had overcome the difficulties at the start, as I am now over the beginnings of Latin and Greek, how happy I should be. “Indefessus favente Deo” [unwearied by God’s favour] is a good state to be in; it is a saying that Mendes loves. He spoke to me about it last Saturday. . . . Today I sent you for your St. Nicholas two maps . . . I copied them both carefully. . . . In order to do this I went earlier than usual to Mendes’s for a few mornings. . . . Along with the maps you will receive Gruson’s Histoire des Croisades. I gave this same little book to Mendes, who was glad to have it.”
Amsterdam, 10 February 1878: “Father has been here, and I am so glad he came. Together we went to see Mendes.”
Source: The Vincent van Gogh Information Gallery

Mendes da Costa Ancestry
Click on a branch heading to view its ancestry file; it will open a new window. Where a branch is listed as “Pending,” the link is yet to be uploaded and we appreciate your patience while the database is developed. We do not claim completeness or absence of errors, and would appreciate any assistance that any family members can provide by contacting us as soon as possible. For further information on what we need, please refer to the subheading “HOW YOU CAN HELP . . .” on the About page.
Please subscribe to our mailing list to be advised of updates to this site. All queries, comments, or suggestions regarding information on any of the branch pages should be addressed to the Webmaster.
 
FIRST BRANCH
This oldest branch traces our family back to 15th-century Trancoso, Portugal. It is the branch from which all branches listed below originate.
Includes connections to the following family names:
BRAVO, BUENO DE MESQUITA, D’ALMEIDA, DA COSTA, DA FONSECA, DA FONSECA GUTTERES, DA SILVA, DA SOLLA, DA SOLLA DE MERCADO, DA SYLVEIRA, DE CASTRO, DE GARCIA, DE GRACIA, DE MELLO, DE MERCADO, DE MORAIS, DE PRADO, DIAS MENDES, FAZ, FERNANDES DE CASTRO, FERNANDES MENDES, GOMES, GUTTERES, HENRIQUES, HENRIQUES DA COSTA, LOPES, LOPES DA COSTA, MENDES, MENDES DA SILVA, MENDES DE BRITO, MENDES GUTTERES, MERCADO, NUNES, RODRIGUES, RODRIGUES AYRES, ROIZ, SILVA, SILVEIRA, SOARES
BRANCH A – Pending
Includes connections to the following family names:
DA COSTA, DA COSTA VILLAREAL, GALWAY, MELLISH, MENDES
BRANCH B – Pending
Includes connections to the following family names:
BUENO DE MESQUITA, CIPRIANE, DA COSTA, DA SILVA, DE PRADO, DIAS, HEAD, HERON, QUIROS, DE SEQUEIRA, HENRIQUES, MENDES, MENDES DA SILVA, MENDES GUTTERES, PORTELLO, PORTELLO DE QUIROS, RODRIGUES, SALVADOR, TEIXEIRA DE MATTOS, XIMENES
BRANCH C – Pending
Includes connections to the following family names:
ABENDANA MENDES, ALETRINO, ALVARES, ALVARES PEREIRA, BEEKMAN, BEER, BELINFANTE, BINGER, BUENO, BUENO DE MESQUITA, CATS, COCK, COHEN BELINFANTE, COHEN PARAIRA, COHN, COSMAN, DA COSTA, DA SILVA, DA SILVA ABENATAR, DE CHAVES, DEEN, DE JONG, DE LA HAYE, DE LIMA, DELMONTE, DE PINEDO, DE ROVER, DE SALAZAR, DE SOLLA, DE SOUSA, FANNO, FERARES, FRANCO MENDES, HAIM, HENRIQUES DE CASTRO, HENRIQUES DE SOUSA, HENRIQUES DE MESQUITA, JESSURUN DE MESQUITA, LOPES DE LEAO LAGUNA, LOPES SUASSO, MAAS, MARTEL, MEESTERS, MENDES, MENDES DA SILVA, MENDES DE LEON, MENDES SALAZAR, MEURS, NILE, NUNES HENRIQUES, OROBIO DE CASTRO, PALACHE, PEREIRA, PETERS, RAMON, RODRIGUES DA SILVA, SALVADOR, SARPHATI, SPINOSSA CATELLA MOCATA, STADELHOFFER, SUASSO DE PINTO, TAVARES OSORIO, TEIXEIRA DE MATTOS, THIERY, TREVES, VAN BEIJEREN, VAN DER BEN, VAN GENDT, VAN KONINGSBRUGGEN, VAN WEENEN, VERMEULEN, VET, VIZIVENE, WOLFF
BRANCH D – Pending
Families in this branch seem to have been known as DA COSTA in the secular world but MENDES DA COSTA in the synagogue.
Includes connections to the following family names:
BAYLEY, DA COSTA, MENDEZ DA COSTA, OSORIO
BRANCH E – Pending
Includes connections to the following family names:
BARUCH LOUSADA, COHEN PEIXOTTO, DA VEIGA, DA VEIGA MENDES DA COSTA, DE CASTRO, DE LA MAR, DE MEDINA, DE MIRANDA, DE PAS, DE PINA, FORD, GABAY HENRIQUES, GOMES SOARES, HENRIQUES DE CASTRO, HENRIQUES DE MEDINA, LAMEGO, LEIGH, LEVY, LOPES SALZEDO, MENDES, MENDES MEDINA, MOCATTA, MORENU (MORENO), NAAR, NAMIAS, ROCAMOURA (ROCAMORA), SALOM, SOARES, TOURO, WILLYAMS, XIMENES CARDOSO
BRANCH F – Pending
Includes connections to the following family names:
BRAVO, D’AGUILAR, DA COSTA, DE ALVARO, DE PRADO, FERNANDES NUNES, HERNE, JESSURUN ALVARES, LOPES PEREIRA, MENDES, MENDES GUTTERES, SALVADOR, SKILLMAN, YESURUN RODRIGUES
BRANCH G – Pending
Includes connections to the following family names:
ABARBANEZ DE SOUSA, ABOAB OSORIO, CAPADOCE, DA COSTA, DA COSTA ATHIAS, DAVIDS, DE LA PENHA ROCAMORA, DEL SOTTO, DE PINTO, DE SALAZAR, HENRIQUES, HISQUIA, JESSURUN D’OLIVEIRA, LEVY XIMENES, LOPES SALZEDO, MENDES, MENDES DA SILVA, MENDES GUTTERES DA COSTA, NUNES HENRIQUES, PEREIRA, SEQUEIRA, VAZ NUNES
BRANCH H
Includes connections to the following family names:
ARONS, BEHREND, BOYLE, BRANDON, BRINTON, COVINGTON, DA FONSECA BRANDON, DE MEZA, HALFORD, LEVY, LINDO, MENDES, MENDES BELISARIO, MOCATTA, OLIVE, PEREGRINE (PELLEGRIN), PRETTO, RAYNOR, SELIGMAN, SULLIVAN, VAN RAALTE, WIENER, WOLFF
BRANCH J – Pending
Includes connections to the following family names:
DE CASTRO, DE LEON, DE PINTO, HART LYON, LAMEGO, LYON, MACHORRO, MENDES DA SILVA, NAYLOR, SALVADOR, SAMUDA
BRANCH K – Pending
Some families in this branch changed their name to MENDEZ-DA-COSTA, MENDES-DA COSTA, or MENDES DACOSTA.
Includes connections to the following family names:
ABENDANA MENDES, ADAMS, BENDER, BERKO, BLOND, BUCKWALD, CLEARY, CRITTON, DA COSTA, EDELS, ELLIS, FAUTLEY, FISCHELLIS, FLETCHER, FRANCES, GAFFIN, GAPPING, GEE, GORDON, HARINGHAM, HARRIS, HICKMAN, HILL, HUGHES, JACOBS, KNOWLES, LEVENE (LEVERE), LINDUP, LIPSCOMB, LOPES SALZEDO, MENDES, MUKHERJI, MURDOCH, MUSAPHIA, PARMENTER, POSNETT, POWELL, PREVOST, RAPHAEL, RITCHIE, RIVLIN, RODRIGUEZ (ROGERS), RODRIQUEZ (ROGERS), RUBINS, RUTHERFORD, SENYARD, SLOME, SMETHAM, SOMEO, SPONG, STEWART (STUART), STOCKMAN (or SLACKMAN), THOMPSON, TREVES, WALTERS, WATERS, WHITE, YABLONSKI, ZAGIEL
BRANCH L – Pending
Includes connections to the following family names:
BASSAN, CASTEL, COHEN, GILLES, JOSEPH, HUMBER, LANUSSE, LEWIS, PHILLIPS, POLAK, SIMONS (SIMMONS), VERMEULEN-MINKWIT, VIZEVENE (VIGEVANO), WOOLF
BRANCH M – Pending
Includes connections to the following family names:
AMBROSIUS, AMIOT, BAKKER, BRADSHAW, BUTLER, DE RIJKE, DER KINDEREN, DEZENTJE, DUNKI JACOBS, ENGEL, GOUT, HEIJMANS, HEIJMERING, HORNUNG, JEANTY, KNIJFF, LANDEGENT, MASTHOF, MENDES DE LEON, NOUHUYS, PICTON, ROESSING VAN ITERSON, ROOS VAN RAADHOVEN, SIBENIUS TRIP, SNEL, SOESMAN, SOMERVILLE, SPIJKMAN, TEIXEIRA DE MATTOS, TOOROP, VAN BENTHEM VAN DER BERG, VAN BULDEREN, VAN DER BEN, VAN DER KNOOP, VAN EDE VAN DE PALS, VAN GAALEN, VAN KOESVELD, WILLEMSE, WITTENROOD, WOESTHOF, YOUNG
In addition to the links above, you might enjoy visiting our Links page and browsing through what one historian described as our “interesting collection of ancestors.”

http://www.sardimpex.com/articoli/DoriainBrazil.htm

On the ancestry and descent of Clemenza Doria, one of the earliest European settlers in Brazil.
 
 
 
Francisco Antonio Doria
 
Professor of Communications, Emeritus, at the Federal University in Rio de Janeiro.
Fellow of the Brazilian Academy of Philosophy.
 
 
 
Brazil was discovered by a Portuguese fleet under the command of Admiral Pedro Alvares Cabral lord of Belmonte, in April 1500. Early colonizing efforts by the Portuguese crown were sporadic and consisted mainly of expeditions sponsored and directed by wealthy merchants like the Marchioni, Affaitati, or Fernão de Loronha, who was a converted and ennobled Jew. A more systematic colonial effort began after 1534 when King John III of Portugal spliced up the new land into a dozen or so chunks which were given as fiefs to merchants and enterprising noblemen who were supposed to settle in the colony and explore it.
 
We are here interested in some of the settlers that came to Brazil after 1548, when King John III decided that a centralized government was required to coordinate the Portuguese administration in the New World, and named Dr. Tomé de Sousa, a magistrate, as the country’s first governor-general. De Sousa belonged to a distinguished but partially impoverished family which traced its ancestry to King Alfonso III in the 13th century through illegitimate lines; he arrived in Brazil in early 1549 in a fleet one of whose ships was commanded by Fernão Vaz da Costa, another mid-level nobleman from the bureaucratic establishment around the Portuguese crown. Fernão Vaz da Costa is one of our dramatis personae here.
 
Nearly half a century later his son Cristóvão da Costa, or Cristóvão da Costa Doria, as he is also referred to in documents, gives a deposition before the inquisitor that had been sent to Brazil after 1590 to look for heretical and apostate misbehavior in the new continent. The portion of the deposition that interests us is:
 
..e foi perguntado de sua genelogia/ dixe que he cristão velho filho de fer/nao vaz da costa e de sua molher cle/mencja dorja genevesa não conhe/ceo seus auoos mas ouujo q seu a/uoo paj de seu paj se chama cristo/uão dacosta desembargador que/ foj em Lix.a e sua avoo maj de seu pai/ se chamaua guimar camjnha e ouujo/ dizer que seu avoo paj de sua maj se/chamaua andre dorja, teue tias jr/maas de seu paj florença da costa/ e dona fr.ca da costa molher que foj/ de Ant.o correa moradoras em Lix.a//
 
nao conheceo tios daparte da sua maj/ teue hum jrmão, que matarão em/Lix.a chamado Nicolao da Costa/ soltr.o e outros que morrerão e tem/ tres irmaas ujuas s. Luisa dorja mo/lher de Martim Carvalho, e fr.ca de saa/ molher de fr.co dabreu da costa e Anna dorja Jnda soltr.a e os djttos seus cu/nhados são cristãos uelhos e djxe q/sabia a doutrjna cristãa…
 
In full translation: when asked about his genealogy [Cristóvão da Costa Doria] answered that he is an old christian [had no Jewish blood], the son of Fernão Vaz da Costa and of his wife Clemencia Doria, a Genoese by birth; that he never met his grandparents but heard that his paternal grandfather was called Cristóvão da Costa, a supreme court justice in Lisbon, and that his grandmother on that side was called Guiomar Caminha; and heard that his maternal grandfather was called André Doria. Added that he had aunts on his father’s side, namely Florença da Costa, and Dona [Lady] Francisca da Costa, the widow of Antonio Correa, who both lived in Lisbon; on his mother’s side he didn’t know whether there were uncles. He had a brother named Nicolau da Costa, single, who was killed in Lisbon; there were deceased brothers and sisters, and three surviving sisters, Luisa Doria the wife of Martim Carvalho, Francisca de Sá married to Francisco de Abreu da Costa, and Anna Doria, single. None of those people is of Jewish extraction and he himself was perfectly conversant with the Christian doctrine.
 
This deposition is dated 9 December 1592 (photo 1, photo 2). The charge that had led Cristóvão da Costa Doria to the inquisition was a minor one, that he once overhead some heretical statement and didn’t denounce it  (see below) — he answered that he found it irrelevant and had forgotten about it, and the inquisitor let him go. One can see why: the charge was irrelevant, and Cristóvão da Costa Doria was very well connected by family ties to the Portuguese judicial establishment: his grandfather had been Chief Justice of Portugal (Chanceler da Relação de Lisboa) and a rector of the University of Coimbra, one of the oldest in Europe. One of his paternal uncles was also a supreme court justice, and it was probably felt by the inquisitor that one shouldn’t toy with such a well-connected individual.
 
Biographical data about Fernão Vaz da Costa are scarce, but we can recover a sketchy picture of his personality and that of his father. The father is — we think — the one who received a grant of 50,000 rs (reais) in 1st May 1520 given by King Emmanuel I because of his marriage. Dr. Cristóvão da Costa becomes rector of the University of Coimbra in 1526, and is later made chancellor (chief justice) of the Portuguese supreme court. He was probably born around 1475-80, and — if he is the one who received the 1520 grant — was the son of Afonso da Costa, alcaide-mor (military commander) of Lagos, and the grandson of Soeiro da Costa, a legendary navigator who explored the coast of Africa in the early 15th century. The family bore the full da Costa coat of arms, as can be seen in a grant of arms dated 14 July 1605, and was related to the da Costa branch who held the hereditary offices of Portugal King of Arms from the 16th to the 19th century. (Thus the constant references to governor-general of Brazil Dom Duarre da Costa as an “uncle” of  Fernão Vaz da Costa.)

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to King David Museum In America

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.