Fremont Republic Battles the Pope in Mexico

The Pope spoke in Mexico today at a monument that was erected after Freemasons tried to get rid of the Catholic Church that was sustained by the Habsburg ruler who descends from Jeanne de Rougemont who descends from Bereswithe, the granddaughter of Dagobert, the Merovingian King. I am kin to the Habsburgs and the Fremonts. There is a covert war raging for the souls of Freedom Loving Americans. This is the real Opis Dai.

“”It is very likely that the Jessie Scouts assisted in the delivery
of funds from Sheridan’s headquarters to Juarez in what Sheridan
described as a “covert program” of supporting the Mexican liberals
against Maxmilian’s army.”

California was declared a Republic in Sonoma where my daughter, Heather Hanson, and my grandson, Tyler Hunt, was born. Bill Cornwell convinced my daughter to throw away her heritage, and adopt his Tea Party ways – that sees most Mexicans as parasites, but, is voting for the Catholic candidates, Santorum and Gingrich – rather then put a Mormon in the white House.

Their center is weak! Take back the Republic, one State at a time!

http://jean-paul.caspar.pagesperso-orange.fr/Bereswinthe_2/fp_1c.html

Jon Presco

“Benedict wanted to come to Guanajuato state specifically to see and bless the statue, which Pope John Paul II always wanted to visit but never did, said the Vatican spokesman, the Rev. Federico Lombardi.
The 72-foot bronze monument of Christ with its outstretched arms serves as a potent reminder to Mexicans of the 1926-1929 Roman Catholic uprising against the government and its anti-clerical laws that prohibited public Masses such as the one Benedict will celebrate before an estimated 350,000 people.”

A republic is a form of government in which the government is officially apportioned to the control of the people, or a significant portion of which, and where offices of state are subsequently directly or indirectly elected or appointed.[1][2] In modern times, a common simplified definition of a republic is a government where the head of state is NOT a monarch.[3][4] The word republic is derived from the Latin phrase res publica, which can be translated as “the public affair”, and often used to describe a state using this form of government.

History remembers John C. Fremont not only for his reputation as an explorer and adventurer during the first half of the 19th Century, but also for the distinction of being the Republican Party’s first-ever presidential candidate in 1856. Fremont’s fame (combined with his experience) gained him a unanimous nomination at the National Republican Convention in Philadelphia. During his 1856 presidential run, Fremont staged a vigorous campaign on an “anti-slavery, free labor” platform—making him the first presidential candidate of a major party to oppose slavery. Though defeated in the election by Democratic challenger James Buchanan, a few mementos of Fremont’s historic campaign remain. Presented is one such survivor—an approximately 25-1/8″ x 36-1/2″ campaign flag once used to tout Fremont’s GOP candidacy. The item is designed to resemble an American flag, with thirteen alternating red and white stripes and a blue canon with thirty-one white stars arranged in a star pattern. (Four rings, designed for display, are attached at the left edge of the fabric.) Resting upon three of the white stripes is the slogan, “Fremont and Freedom” a testament to his anti-slavery beliefs. This cloth campaign flag shows overwhelming display quality and has been mounted on a more recent linen mat board, which a professional conservator should be able to remove. This impossibly rare artifact is not listed in Collins’ Threads of History. In fact, it is our belief that this campaign flag is most likely the only known variety! Although he failed in his presidential bid (and abandoned an 1864 presidential campaign in order to support Abraham Lincoln), Fremont eventually served as a major general in the Union Army during the Civil War, and later as governor of Arizona.

William B. Ide wrote a proclamation of independence on the night of June 14–15, 1846, and read it on the fifteenth:[7]

To all persons, citizens of Sonoma, requesting them to remain at peace, and to follow their rightful occupations without fear of molestation.
The Commander in Chief of the Troops assembled at the Fortress of Sonoma gives his inviolable pledge to all persons in California not found under arms that they shall not be disturbed in their persons, their property or social relations one to another by men under his command.
He also solemnly declares his object to be First, to defend himself and companions in arms who were invited to this country by a promise of Lands on which to settle themselves and families who were also promised a “republican government,” who, when having arrived in California were denied even the privilege of buying or renting Lands of their friends, who instead of being allowed to participate in or being protected by a “Republican Government” were oppressed by a “Military Despotism,” who were even threatened, by “Proclamation” from the Chief Officer of the aforesaid Despotism, with extermination if they would not depart out of the Country, leaving all of their property, their arms and beasts of burden, and thus deprived of the means of flight or defense. We were to be driven through deserts, inhabited by hostile Indians to certain destruction. To overthrow a Government which has seized upon the property of the Missions for its individual aggrandizement; which has ruined and shamefully oppressed the laboring people of California, by their enormous exactions on goods imported into this country; is the determined purpose of the brave men who are associated under his command.
He also solemnly declares his object in the Second place to be to invite all peaceable and good Citizens of California who are friendly to the maintenance of good order and equal rights (and I do hereby invite them to repair to my camp at Sonoma without delay) to assist us in establishing and perpetuating a “Republican Government” which shall secure to all: civil and religious liberty; which shall detect and punish crime; which shall encourage industry, virtue and literature; which shall leave unshackled by Fetters, Commerce, Agriculture, and Mechanism.
He further declares that he relies upon the rectitude of our intentions; the favor of Heaven and the bravery of those who are bound to and associated with him, by the principle of self preservation; by the love of truth; and by the hatred of tyranny for his hopes of success.
He further declares that he believes that a Government to be prosperous and happyfying in its tendency must originate with its people who are friendly to its existence. That its Citizens are its Guardians, its officers are its Servants, and its Glory their reward.

— William B. Ide, Head Quarters Sonoma, June 15, 1846

N Toxandrie
(19.479) (19.479)
. .
. .
Mérovingiens Merovingian
– Blesinde d’Alemanie – Blesinde of Alemania
(19.479) (19.479)
. .
R. R. de Cologne Cologne
. .
– Ragnetrude de Bavière – Bavarian Ragnetrude
(860) (860)
. .
. .
D. D. de Bavière of Bavaria
– Berthe de Neustrie – Bertha of Neustria
(860) (860)
. .
. .
Mérovingiens Merovingian
– N d’Alémanie – N of Alemania
(216) (216)
. .
D. D. des Guelfes of Guelph
. .
– Herswinde de Saxe – Herswinde of Saxony  
(644) (644)
. .
. .
Dynastie de Saxe Dynasty of Saxony
– Emma d’Alemanie – Emma of Alemania
(552) (552)
. .
C. C. de Vintzgau of Vintzgau
. .
– Ode d’Enghers – Ode to Enghers
(20) (20)
. .
Dynastie de Saxe Dynasty of Saxony
. .
– Mathilde de Mersebourg – Matilda of Merseburg
(68) (68)
. .
Dynastie de Saxe Dynasty of Saxony
. .
– Bereswinthe d’Austrasie – Bereswinthe of Austrasia
(92) (92)
. .
. .
Austrasie Austrasia
– Hugues II le Peureux – Hugues II Peureux
(92) (92)
. .
D. D. d’Anjou Anjou

Benedict wanted to come to Guanajuato state specifically to see and bless the statue, which Pope John Paul II always wanted to visit but never did, said the Vatican spokesman, the Rev. Federico Lombardi.
The 72-foot bronze monument of Christ with its outstretched arms serves as a potent reminder to Mexicans of the 1926-1929 Roman Catholic uprising against the government and its anti-clerical laws that prohibited public Masses such as the one Benedict will celebrate before an estimated 350,000 people.
The statue “expresses an identity of the Mexican people that contains a whole history in relation to the testimony of faith and those who fought for religious freedom at the time,” said Monsignor Victor Rene Rodriguez, secretary general of the Mexican bishops conference.
After nightfall Sunday the pope will remotely inaugurate its new lighting system.
Guanajuato state was the site of some of the key battles of the Cristero War, so-called because its protagonists said they were fighting for Christ the King. Historians say about 90,000 people died before peace was restored. The region remains Mexico’s most conservatively Catholic.

In these genealogies we see how the name Ferrette (also Pfirt) is
connected to the Shroud Family. The Habsburgs came to own Rougemont
(also Rosemont and Rozemont) castle in the Alsace and intermarried
with the Ferrette family who originally owned Rougemont. With the
marriage of Jeanne de Rougemont/Ferrette to Albert de Habsburg, the
Habsburgs begin a dynastic reign that will last hudreds of years,
forming blood ties to most of the Royal Houses of Europe.

“It is very likely that the Jessie Scouts assisted in the delivery
of funds from Sheridan’s headquarters to Juarez in what Sheridan
described as a “covert program” of supporting the Mexican liberals
against Maxmilian’s army.”

“Sheridan began to send his “trusty scouts,” as he referred to them
in telegraphed reports to Grant, into northern Mexico to collect
information on the French army and their allies. ”

“When the Habsburg “camarilla” repealed the new laws and sent an
army to crush Hungary, Kossuth raised a defense force which defeated
and expelled the invaders by May 1849. The Hungarian Parliament
dethroned the Habsburg dynasty in 1849 and elected Kossuth Governor
of the country. All that prompted the Russian Czar, the leading
member of the “Unholy Alliance,” to dispatch 300,000 soldiers to
help his imperial brother, Francis Joseph. ”

Hungarian Officers, who fled the Habsburgs and Imperial Russians,
became members of John Fremont’s bodyguard and his wife’s ‘Jesse
Scouts’ who conducted clandestine opperation into Mexico and helped
dethrone Emperor Maximilan von Habsburg and install Benito Juárez as
the Mexico’s leader. Juarez and his backers were Freemasons, as was
Jesse Benton’s family. Jesse’s father, Senator Thomas Hart Benton,
was the author of Manifest Destiny, and thus was keen on keeping the
French, the Russians, and the Habsburgs out of North America. The
Hungarian Freedom Fighters were Masons and Fourty-Eighters.

My niece, Drew Benton, is California Royalty. Fremont invaded
California and took it from Mexico. Drew’s half-sister is named
after Jesse Benton. In the marriage of her parents, came together
the Freemasons and Orange Order who opposed Catholic rule. This
history may constitute the foremost history in regards to the
Habsburg’s contact with America.

Several authors, and the movie ‘The Davinci Code’ suggest Maximilan
is descended from Jesus. If this is remotely true, then one must
look at truly important history generated by the offspring of the
Son of God. John Fremont was the co-founder of the Republican Party
that was an Abolitionist party. Fremont authored the first
emancipation of slaves.

” Lt. Col. Henry Young escorted a large group of veteran soldiers
into Mexico where they had volunteered to serve as a body guard for
one of Juarez’ commanders”

Did the Jesse Scouts protect Mexican Freemasons?

http://www.srmason-sj.org/council/journal/jun01/kruger.html

http://www.hungaryemb.org/Pictures4/060315Congress/SimonyiBeszed.htm

The Imperial Mexicans and the French had actively supported the
Confederacy and at the height of the Union blockade, the Mexican
port of Matamoras was providing a great amount of the Confederacy’s
imports. With their history of support for the Confederacy and the
movement of large numbers of former Confederate soldiers into
Mexico, Grant began to be alarmed about the possibility of renewed
hostilities from a Franco-Mexican-Rebel League that appeared to be
forming. Once this possibility was recognized, Grant convinced
Secretary of War Stanton and President Johnson of the potential
danger they faced of a renewed war.

Sheridan was ordered to place his strongest formations on the border
as a demonstration of their intention to prevent any moves by the
French, one of the world’s superpowers at the time, toward the
United States. At this time, Sheridan began to send his “trusty
scouts,” as he referred to them in telegraphed reports to Grant,
into northern Mexico to collect information on the French army and
their allies. Young, Rowand, and White were soon back into their old
Confederate uniforms as they rode across the Rio Grande, posing as
Confederate soldiers seeking to escape from the Union army’s
occupation of their home state.

Most of the reports of their scouting operations were lost or safely
filed away as they were all classified. The little that has emerged
from the research shows that multiple trips were made into Mexico
and, at one time, they were actively planning to kidnap the Imperial
commander in Matamoras, General Meijia, as they had done with Harry
Gilmor. Sheridan wrote to Grant that the loss of Meijia would have a
major disrupting impact on the imperial defenders in that border
city.

It is very likely that the Jessie Scouts assisted in the delivery of
funds from Sheridan’s headquarters to Juarez in what Sheridan
described as a “covert program” of supporting the Mexican liberals
against Maxmilian’s army. What is known is that large amounts of
weapons were transferred from captured Confederate depots, as
Sheridan said, “30,000 stand of muskets from the Baton Rouge Arsenal
alone,” to Juarez’ army as they began to win victories. The
magnitude of this “covert” operation was enormous and Grant made
arrangements for General Schofield to take a leave of absence to
command all of the liberal forces in their war against the French
and their allies. Interestingly, Secretary of State Stanton opposed
their plans and worked behind the scenes to bring about a diplomatic
solution, going as far as securing the services of Schofield as an
emissary to Paris.

Late in 1866, possibly in December, Lt. Col. Henry Young escorted a
large group of veteran soldiers into Mexico where they had
volunteered to serve as a body guard for one of Juarez’ commanders,
General Escobedo. Sheridan later wrote that Young had done this on
his own, as a private citizen, and he, Sheridan, had loaned money to
him for the expedition. Sheridan also told two slightly differing
versions of this story.

http://www.wvcivilwar.com/jessie.shtml

http://www.missouricivilwarmuseum.org/mo-hungarian.htm

Maximilian was born in Schönbrunn, Vienna, Austria, the second son
of Archduke Franz Karl of Austria and his wife Sophie Friederike
Dorothee Wilhelmine, Princess of Bavaria. His brother was Emperor
Franz Josef of Austria (sometimes identified by the English spelling
Francis Joseph). Maximilian was born as His Imperial and Royal
Highness Ferdinand Maximilian Joseph, Prince Imperial and Archduke
of Austria, Prince Royal of Hungary and Bohemia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maximilian_of_Mexico

As the 19th Century went on, Mexican Masonry embraced the degree
system authored by Albert Pike and grew ever more anticlerical,
regardless of Rite. Meanwhile the two major political parties,
Liberal and Conservative had developed. There were Masons in both,
but predominantly among the Liberals. The great Mexican leader of
the Nineteenth Century was, of course, Benito Juárez. When a new
constitution was approved in 1857 that curtailed the power of the
Roman Catholic Church, a Conservative rebellion started yet another
civil war, known as the Reform War. When it ended with a Liberal
victory in 1861, the Reform Laws were implemented, which included
separation of Church and State, freedom of worship, civil marriage,
and secularization of Church properties.

The exhausted country, however, was not granted respite. A new
emperor, the Austrian Archduke Maximilian, was imposed in 1862 by
French Emperor Napoleon III, with connivance of Mexican
Conservatives. Again, Benito Juarez and his Liberals led the fight
against the French occupation army and the second Mexican emperor
ended like the first, before a firing squad, in 1867.

This may well have been the highest point of Freemasonry in Mexico,
as most of the prominent actors in these crucial 10 years were
Masons. The Lodges no longer acted directly in politics as earlier
in the century, but the individual Masons certainly did, each in his
sphere of activity.
When Benito Juarez died, Mexico passed into the hands of Porfirio
Díaz, also a Freemason. Paradoxically a liberal and a dictator at
the same time, he upheld the secular principles of the liberal
constitution while repressing political freedom. He also sought to
bring some order out of the chaos of the Freemasonry of his time by
creating a nationwide Gran Dieta or Grand Diet in which both
Scottish and York Rite Masons participated. Before being dissolved
later in the century, this body originated the regular Grand Lodges
of the Mexican Republic. Indeed, the charters of some of the
constituent Lodges of our York Grand Lodge of Mexico bear the
signature of Porfirio Diaz.

http://www.yorkrite.com/gcmx/os1999.html

http://wampumkeeper.com/Guelphhill.html

When the Habsburg “camarilla” repealed the new laws and sent an army
to crush Hungary, Kossuth raised a defense force which defeated and
expelled the invaders by May 1849. The Hungarian Parliament
dethroned the Habsburg dynasty in 1849 and elected Kossuth Governor
of the country. All that prompted the Russian Czar, the leading
member of the “Unholy Alliance,” to dispatch 300,000 soldiers to
help his imperial brother, Francis Joseph. That intervention settled
the fate of an independent Hungary. On August 11, 1849, Kossuth fled
first to Turkey, where he was under government supervision for a
year, and then to England. The fame of his cause circled the globe,
and the United States pressed for his release, even sending the
U.S.S. Mississippi to bring him to London. Greeted there as a hero
of liberty, Kossuth campaigned for Hungarian freedom at every
opportunity. His military bearing and oratorical ability won
audiences to his cause, and in 1851, he journeyed to America, which
he saw as the birthplace of modern liberty. Reflective of the
popularity he enjoyed, Kossuth was greeted as “Freedom’s Angel” by
the famous American writer Ralph Waldo Emerson who welcomed him to
Concord, Massachusetts. Horace Greeley, the famed journalist, called
Kossuth a leader “of the first rank,” and the poet John Greenleaf
Whittier hailed him as “the noblest guest the Old World’s wrong has
given to the New World of the West.”1 Little wonder that a
monumental statue of Kossuth, according to its inscription,
was “Erected by a Liberty Loving Race of Americans of Magyar Origin
to Louis Kossuth, the Great Champion of Liberty” on Riverside Drive
in New York City.2 Kossuth was the first foreigner after Lafayette
to be invited to address both Houses of Congress in January 1851.
Speaking everywhere to large audiences, Kossuth traveled throughout
the United States and was naturally drawn to Freemasonry. In 1851,
he wrote an extraordinary letter to Brother Ferdinand Bodmann,
Worshipful Master of Lodge No. 133, Cincinnati, Ohio. He wrote:

http://www.srmason-sj.org/council/journal/jun01/kruger.html

http://www.loeser.us/flags/california_note_2.html

History remembers John C. Fremont not only for his reputation as an explorer and adventurer during the first half of the 19th Century, but also for the distinction of being the Republican Party’s first-ever presidential candidate in 1856. Fremont’s fame (combined with his experience) gained him a unanimous nomination at the National Republican Convention in Philadelphia. During his 1856 presidential run, Fremont staged a vigorous campaign on an “anti-slavery, free labor” platform—making him the first presidential candidate of a major party to oppose slavery. Though defeated in the election by Democratic challenger James Buchanan, a few mementos of Fremont’s historic campaign remain. Presented is one such survivor—an approximately 25-1/8″ x 36-1/2″ campaign flag once used to tout Fremont’s GOP candidacy. The item is designed to resemble an American flag, with thirteen alternating red and white stripes and a blue canon with thirty-one white stars arranged in a star pattern. (Four rings, designed for display, are attached at the left edge of the fabric.) Resting upon three of the white stripes is the slogan, “Fremont and Freedom” a testament to his anti-slavery beliefs. This cloth campaign flag shows overwhelming display quality and has been mounted on a more recent linen mat board, which a professional conservator should be able to remove. This impossibly rare artifact is not listed in Collins’ Threads of History. In fact, it is our belief that this campaign flag is most likely the only known variety! Although he failed in his presidential bid (and abandoned an 1864 presidential campaign in order to support Abraham Lincoln), Fremont eventually served as a major general in the Union Army during the Civil War, and later as governor of Arizona.

N Toxandrie
(19.479) (19.479)
. .
. .
Mérovingiens Merovingian
– Blesinde d’Alemanie – Blesinde of Alemania
(19.479) (19.479)
. .
R. R. de Cologne Cologne
. .
– Ragnetrude de Bavière – Bavarian Ragnetrude
(860) (860)
. .
. .
D. D. de Bavière of Bavaria
– Berthe de Neustrie – Bertha of Neustria
(860) (860)
. .
. .
Mérovingiens Merovingian
– N d’Alémanie – N of Alemania
(216) (216)
. .
D. D. des Guelfes of Guelph
. .
– Herswinde de Saxe – Herswinde of Saxony  
(644) (644)
. .
. .
Dynastie de Saxe Dynasty of Saxony
– Emma d’Alemanie – Emma of Alemania
(552) (552)
. .
C. C. de Vintzgau of Vintzgau
. .
– Ode d’Enghers – Ode to Enghers
(20) (20)
. .
Dynastie de Saxe Dynasty of Saxony
. .
– Mathilde de Mersebourg – Matilda of Merseburg
(68) (68)
. .
Dynastie de Saxe Dynasty of Saxony
. .
– Bereswinthe d’Austrasie – Bereswinthe of Austrasia
(92) (92)
. .
. .
Austrasie Austrasia
– Hugues II le Peureux – Hugues II Peureux
(92) (92)
. .
D. D. d’Anjou Anjou

Benedict wanted to come to Guanajuato state specifically to see and bless the statue, which Pope John Paul II always wanted to visit but never did, said the Vatican spokesman, the Rev. Federico Lombardi.
The 72-foot bronze monument of Christ with its outstretched arms serves as a potent reminder to Mexicans of the 1926-1929 Roman Catholic uprising against the government and its anti-clerical laws that prohibited public Masses such as the one Benedict will celebrate before an estimated 350,000 people.
The statue “expresses an identity of the Mexican people that contains a whole history in relation to the testimony of faith and those who fought for religious freedom at the time,” said Monsignor Victor Rene Rodriguez, secretary general of the Mexican bishops conference.
After nightfall Sunday the pope will remotely inaugurate its new lighting system.
Guanajuato state was the site of some of the key battles of the Cristero War, so-called because its protagonists said they were fighting for Christ the King. Historians say about 90,000 people died before peace was restored. The region remains Mexico’s most conservatively Catholic.

In these genealogies we see how the name Ferrette (also Pfirt) is
connected to the Shroud Family. The Habsburgs came to own Rougemont
(also Rosemont and Rozemont) castle in the Alsace and intermarried
with the Ferrette family who originally owned Rougemont. With the
marriage of Jeanne de Rougemont/Ferrette to Albert de Habsburg, the
Habsburgs begin a dynastic reign that will last hudreds of years,
forming blood ties to most of the Royal Houses of Europe.

“It is very likely that the Jessie Scouts assisted in the delivery
of funds from Sheridan’s headquarters to Juarez in what Sheridan
described as a “covert program” of supporting the Mexican liberals
against Maxmilian’s army.”

“Sheridan began to send his “trusty scouts,” as he referred to them
in telegraphed reports to Grant, into northern Mexico to collect
information on the French army and their allies. ”

“When the Habsburg “camarilla” repealed the new laws and sent an
army to crush Hungary, Kossuth raised a defense force which defeated
and expelled the invaders by May 1849. The Hungarian Parliament
dethroned the Habsburg dynasty in 1849 and elected Kossuth Governor
of the country. All that prompted the Russian Czar, the leading
member of the “Unholy Alliance,” to dispatch 300,000 soldiers to
help his imperial brother, Francis Joseph. ”

Hungarian Officers, who fled the Habsburgs and Imperial Russians,
became members of John Fremont’s bodyguard and his wife’s ‘Jesse
Scouts’ who conducted clandestine opperation into Mexico and helped
dethrone Emperor Maximilan von Habsburg and install Benito Juárez as
the Mexico’s leader. Juarez and his backers were Freemasons, as was
Jesse Benton’s family. Jesse’s father, Senator Thomas Hart Benton,
was the author of Manifest Destiny, and thus was keen on keeping the
French, the Russians, and the Habsburgs out of North America. The
Hungarian Freedom Fighters were Masons and Fourty-Eighters.

My niece, Drew Benton, is California Royalty. Fremont invaded
California and took it from Mexico. Drew’s half-sister is named
after Jesse Benton. In the marriage of her parents, came together
the Freemasons and Orange Order who opposed Catholic rule. This
history may constitute the foremost history in regards to the
Habsburg’s contact with America.

Several authors, and the movie ‘The Davinci Code’ suggest Maximilan
is descended from Jesus. If this is remotely true, then one must
look at truly important history generated by the offspring of the
Son of God. John Fremont was the co-founder of the Republican Party
that was an Abolitionist party. Fremont authored the first
emancipation of slaves.

” Lt. Col. Henry Young escorted a large group of veteran soldiers
into Mexico where they had volunteered to serve as a body guard for
one of Juarez’ commanders”

Did the Jesse Scouts protect Mexican Freemasons?

http://www.srmason-sj.org/council/journal/jun01/kruger.html

http://www.hungaryemb.org/Pictures4/060315Congress/SimonyiBeszed.htm

The Imperial Mexicans and the French had actively supported the
Confederacy and at the height of the Union blockade, the Mexican
port of Matamoras was providing a great amount of the Confederacy’s
imports. With their history of support for the Confederacy and the
movement of large numbers of former Confederate soldiers into
Mexico, Grant began to be alarmed about the possibility of renewed
hostilities from a Franco-Mexican-Rebel League that appeared to be
forming. Once this possibility was recognized, Grant convinced
Secretary of War Stanton and President Johnson of the potential
danger they faced of a renewed war.

Sheridan was ordered to place his strongest formations on the border
as a demonstration of their intention to prevent any moves by the
French, one of the world’s superpowers at the time, toward the
United States. At this time, Sheridan began to send his “trusty
scouts,” as he referred to them in telegraphed reports to Grant,
into northern Mexico to collect information on the French army and
their allies. Young, Rowand, and White were soon back into their old
Confederate uniforms as they rode across the Rio Grande, posing as
Confederate soldiers seeking to escape from the Union army’s
occupation of their home state.

Most of the reports of their scouting operations were lost or safely
filed away as they were all classified. The little that has emerged
from the research shows that multiple trips were made into Mexico
and, at one time, they were actively planning to kidnap the Imperial
commander in Matamoras, General Meijia, as they had done with Harry
Gilmor. Sheridan wrote to Grant that the loss of Meijia would have a
major disrupting impact on the imperial defenders in that border
city.

It is very likely that the Jessie Scouts assisted in the delivery of
funds from Sheridan’s headquarters to Juarez in what Sheridan
described as a “covert program” of supporting the Mexican liberals
against Maxmilian’s army. What is known is that large amounts of
weapons were transferred from captured Confederate depots, as
Sheridan said, “30,000 stand of muskets from the Baton Rouge Arsenal
alone,” to Juarez’ army as they began to win victories. The
magnitude of this “covert” operation was enormous and Grant made
arrangements for General Schofield to take a leave of absence to
command all of the liberal forces in their war against the French
and their allies. Interestingly, Secretary of State Stanton opposed
their plans and worked behind the scenes to bring about a diplomatic
solution, going as far as securing the services of Schofield as an
emissary to Paris.

Late in 1866, possibly in December, Lt. Col. Henry Young escorted a
large group of veteran soldiers into Mexico where they had
volunteered to serve as a body guard for one of Juarez’ commanders,
General Escobedo. Sheridan later wrote that Young had done this on
his own, as a private citizen, and he, Sheridan, had loaned money to
him for the expedition. Sheridan also told two slightly differing
versions of this story.

http://www.wvcivilwar.com/jessie.shtml

http://www.missouricivilwarmuseum.org/mo-hungarian.htm

Maximilian was born in Schönbrunn, Vienna, Austria, the second son
of Archduke Franz Karl of Austria and his wife Sophie Friederike
Dorothee Wilhelmine, Princess of Bavaria. His brother was Emperor
Franz Josef of Austria (sometimes identified by the English spelling
Francis Joseph). Maximilian was born as His Imperial and Royal
Highness Ferdinand Maximilian Joseph, Prince Imperial and Archduke
of Austria, Prince Royal of Hungary and Bohemia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maximilian_of_Mexico

As the 19th Century went on, Mexican Masonry embraced the degree
system authored by Albert Pike and grew ever more anticlerical,
regardless of Rite. Meanwhile the two major political parties,
Liberal and Conservative had developed. There were Masons in both,
but predominantly among the Liberals. The great Mexican leader of
the Nineteenth Century was, of course, Benito Juárez. When a new
constitution was approved in 1857 that curtailed the power of the
Roman Catholic Church, a Conservative rebellion started yet another
civil war, known as the Reform War. When it ended with a Liberal
victory in 1861, the Reform Laws were implemented, which included
separation of Church and State, freedom of worship, civil marriage,
and secularization of Church properties.

The exhausted country, however, was not granted respite. A new
emperor, the Austrian Archduke Maximilian, was imposed in 1862 by
French Emperor Napoleon III, with connivance of Mexican
Conservatives. Again, Benito Juarez and his Liberals led the fight
against the French occupation army and the second Mexican emperor
ended like the first, before a firing squad, in 1867.

This may well have been the highest point of Freemasonry in Mexico,
as most of the prominent actors in these crucial 10 years were
Masons. The Lodges no longer acted directly in politics as earlier
in the century, but the individual Masons certainly did, each in his
sphere of activity.
When Benito Juarez died, Mexico passed into the hands of Porfirio
Díaz, also a Freemason. Paradoxically a liberal and a dictator at
the same time, he upheld the secular principles of the liberal
constitution while repressing political freedom. He also sought to
bring some order out of the chaos of the Freemasonry of his time by
creating a nationwide Gran Dieta or Grand Diet in which both
Scottish and York Rite Masons participated. Before being dissolved
later in the century, this body originated the regular Grand Lodges
of the Mexican Republic. Indeed, the charters of some of the
constituent Lodges of our York Grand Lodge of Mexico bear the
signature of Porfirio Diaz.

http://www.yorkrite.com/gcmx/os1999.html

http://wampumkeeper.com/Guelphhill.html

When the Habsburg “camarilla” repealed the new laws and sent an army
to crush Hungary, Kossuth raised a defense force which defeated and
expelled the invaders by May 1849. The Hungarian Parliament
dethroned the Habsburg dynasty in 1849 and elected Kossuth Governor
of the country. All that prompted the Russian Czar, the leading
member of the “Unholy Alliance,” to dispatch 300,000 soldiers to
help his imperial brother, Francis Joseph. That intervention settled
the fate of an independent Hungary. On August 11, 1849, Kossuth fled
first to Turkey, where he was under government supervision for a
year, and then to England. The fame of his cause circled the globe,
and the United States pressed for his release, even sending the
U.S.S. Mississippi to bring him to London. Greeted there as a hero
of liberty, Kossuth campaigned for Hungarian freedom at every
opportunity. His military bearing and oratorical ability won
audiences to his cause, and in 1851, he journeyed to America, which
he saw as the birthplace of modern liberty. Reflective of the
popularity he enjoyed, Kossuth was greeted as “Freedom’s Angel” by
the famous American writer Ralph Waldo Emerson who welcomed him to
Concord, Massachusetts. Horace Greeley, the famed journalist, called
Kossuth a leader “of the first rank,” and the poet John Greenleaf
Whittier hailed him as “the noblest guest the Old World’s wrong has
given to the New World of the West.”1 Little wonder that a
monumental statue of Kossuth, according to its inscription,
was “Erected by a Liberty Loving Race of Americans of Magyar Origin
to Louis Kossuth, the Great Champion of Liberty” on Riverside Drive
in New York City.2 Kossuth was the first foreigner after Lafayette
to be invited to address both Houses of Congress in January 1851.
Speaking everywhere to large audiences, Kossuth traveled throughout
the United States and was naturally drawn to Freemasonry. In 1851,
he wrote an extraordinary letter to Brother Ferdinand Bodmann,
Worshipful Master of Lodge No. 133, Cincinnati, Ohio. He wrote:

http://www.srmason-sj.org/council/journal/jun01/kruger.html

http://www.loeser.us/flags/california_note_2.html

History remembers John C. Fremont not only for his reputation as an explorer and adventurer during the first half of the 19th Century, but also for the distinction of being the Republican Party’s first-ever presidential candidate in 1856. Fremont’s fame (combined with his experience) gained him a unanimous nomination at the National Republican Convention in Philadelphia. During his 1856 presidential run, Fremont staged a vigorous campaign on an “anti-slavery, free labor” platform—making him the first presidential candidate of a major party to oppose slavery. Though defeated in the election by Democratic challenger James Buchanan, a few mementos of Fremont’s historic campaign remain. Presented is one such survivor—an approximately 25-1/8″ x 36-1/2″ campaign flag once used to tout Fremont’s GOP candidacy. The item is designed to resemble an American flag, with thirteen alternating red and white stripes and a blue canon with thirty-one white stars arranged in a star pattern. (Four rings, designed for display, are attached at the left edge of the fabric.) Resting upon three of the white stripes is the slogan, “Fremont and Freedom” a testament to his anti-slavery beliefs. This cloth campaign flag shows overwhelming display quality and has been mounted on a more recent linen mat board, which a professional conservator should be able to remove. This impossibly rare artifact is not listed in Collins’ Threads of History. In fact, it is our belief that this campaign flag is most likely the only known variety! Although he failed in his presidential bid (and abandoned an 1864 presidential campaign in order to support Abraham Lincoln), Fremont eventually served as a major general in the Union Army during the Civil War, and later as governor of Arizona.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to Fremont Republic Battles the Pope in Mexico

  1. Reblogged this on Rosamond Press and commented:

    I am out to win swing-voters in the Republican party.
    “…Abbe Seiyes urged Napoleon to marry Josephine Beauhamais because she was a Merovingian descendant, and to adopt her two children by a previous marriage who were of this anciently royal stock.” In 1798 “on the way to Egypt, Bonaparte detoured to capture Malta and the treasure held by the Knights of Malta.”
    “She has both the versatility and adaptiveness that are characteristic of the genuine American woman, and which have enabled her to make almost as many friends in foreign lands as she has throughout her own country. The Count de la Garde, a cousin of Eugene and Hortense Beauharnais, whom she knew in Paris, and who left her at his death a valuable collection of souvenirs of the Bonaparte family, said of her that she was the only American woman he had ever known. He had known others of her countrywomen, but they were but imitations of English or French women, while in her he felt the originality and individuality of another people.”

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