King Jesus Was a Nazarite

In Mark 14:22–25 Jesus indicated he took the Nazirite vow when he said, “Verily I say unto you, I will drink no more of the fruit of the vine, until that day that I drink it new in the kingdom of God.”

Scholars have puzzled why Jesus submitted to John the Baptist for baptism if he was born without sin. I believe he did so to purify his lineage from King David that the Jews had come to believe had become corrupted due to Roman rule in Judea. While on the cross, Jesus is purged with hyssop plant put in the jar of vinegar that has been prepared for what appears to be a ritual crucifixion, that has much to do with Psalm 51 authored by King David.

“Later, knowing that all was now completed, and so that the Scripture would be fulfilled, Jesus said, “I am thirsty.” 29 A jar of wine vinegar was there, so they soaked a sponge in it, put the sponge on a stalk of the hyssop plant, and lifted it to Jesus’ lips.John 19:28-29″

What scriptures are fulfilled? Was not a board nailed above Jesus’ head that read ‘King of the Jews’? He knew this ritual of the new heaven snd earth awaited him at the end of his life, where he would break his Nazarite vow by ingesting a grape product, vinigar, mixed with hyssop.

Jon the Nazarite

Copyright 2012

7Purify me with hyssop, and I shall be clean;
         Wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.
8Make me to hear joy and gladness,
         Let the bones which You have broken rejoice.

1Do not cast me away from Your presence
         And do not take Your Holy Spirit from me.
12Restore to me the joy of Your salvation
         And sustain me with a willing spirit.
13Then I will teach transgressors Your ways,
         And sinners will be converted to You.
14Deliver me from bloodguiltiness, O God, the God of my salvation;
         Then my tongue will joyfully sing of Your righteousness.

Hyssop is also often used to fill the Catholic ceremonial Aspergillum, which the priest dips into a bowl of holy water, and sprinkles onto the congregation to bless them. To wit, the invocation in the Psalm Miserere states Thou shalt purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean:. However, researchers have suggested that the Biblical accounts refer not to the plant currently known as hyssop but rather to one of a number of different herbs.”[15][16]

The Announcement of John’s Birth
The Announcement of Jesus’ Birth
The angel Gabriel appeared to Zechariah to tell of a miraculous birth: Luke 1:11
The angel Gabriel appears to Mary to tell of a miraculous birth: Luke 1:26-27
Gabriel tells Zechariah, Zechariah, do not be afraid, for your prayer has been heard. Luke 1:13
Gabriel tells Mary, Mary, do not be afraid; you have won God’s favor. Luke 1:30
Gabriel announces the name of the child, …and you shall name him John Luke 1:13
Gabriel announces the name of the child, …and you must name him Jesus Luke 1:31
Gabriel announces the mission of the child, even from his mother’s womb he will be filled with the Holy Spirit, and he will bring back many of the Israelites to the Lord their God…preparing for the Lord a people fit for him. Luke 1:15-17
Gabriel announces the mission of the child, He will be great and will be called Son of the Most High. The Lord God will give him the throne of his ancestor David; he will rule over the House of Jacob forever and his reign will have no end. Luke 1:32-33
Zechariah expresses disbelief and is rebuked, Zechariah said to the angel, ‘How can I know this? I am an old man…The angel replied…’Look, since you do not believe my words….you will be silenced..’ Luke 1:18-20
Mary expresses concern and is assured, ‘But how can this come about, since I have no knowledge of man?’ The angel answered, ‘The Holy Spirit will com upon you, and the power of the Most High will over you with its shadow. And so the child will be holy and will be called Son of God.’ Luke 1:34-36
John is born: The time came for Elizabeth to have her child, and she gave birth to a son… Luke 1:57
Jesus is born: …the time came for her to have her child, and she gave birth of a son, her first-born. Luke 2:6
John is circumcised and named on the 8th day: Now it happened that on the eighth day they came to circumcise the child; … ‘he is to be called John.’ Luke 1:59-60
Jesus is circumcised on the 8th day: When the eighth day came and the child was to be circumcised, they gave him the name Jesus, the name the angel had given him before his conception. Luke 2:21
Zechariah speaks the prophecy of the Benedictus in Luke 1:67-79
Mary speaks the prophecy of the Magnificat in Luke 1:47-55
John’s birth story conclusion: …the child grew up and his spirit grew strong. Luke 1:80
Jesus’ birth story conclusion: And as the child grew to maturity, he was filled with wisdom, and God’s favor was with him. Luke 2:40

. WHY DID JOHN BAPTIZE JESUS?
John baptized for repentance (Matthew 3:11). Since Jesus was supposedly without sin, he had nothing to repent of. The fact that he was baptized by John has always been an embarrassment to the church. The gospels offer no explanation for Jesus’ baptism, apart from the meaningless explanation given in Matthew 3:14-15 “to fulfill all righteousness.” Other passages, which indicate that Jesus did not consider himself sinless, are also an embarrassment to the church (Mark 10:18, Luke 18:19).
Luke, who claims to be chronological (Luke 1:3), tries to give the impression that John did not baptize Jesus. Luke’s account of Jesus’ baptism occurs after the account of John’s imprisonment (Luke 3:20-21).
C. WHY DIDN’T JOHN THE BAPTIST BECOME A FOLLOWER OF JESUS?
If John knew that Jesus was the son of God, why didn’t he become a disciple of Jesus? And why didn’t all, or even most, of John’s disciples become Jesus’ disciples? Most of John’s disciples remained loyal to him, even after his death, and a sect of his followers persisted for centuries.
The gospel writers were forced to include Jesus’ baptism in their gospels so that they could play it down. They could not ignore it because John’s followers and other Jews who knew of Jesus’ baptism were using the fact of his baptism to challenge the idea that Jesus was the sinless son of God. The gospel writers went to great pains to invent events that showed John as being subordinate to Jesus.

This vow required the man or woman to observe the following:
Abstain from wine, wine vinegar, grapes, raisins;
Refrain from cutting the hair on one’s head;
Avoid corpses and graves, even those of family members, and any structure which contains such.
It is also forbidden for the nazirite to have grape or grape derivatives, even if they are not alcoholic. According to Rabbinical interpretation, there is no prohibition for the nazirite to drink alcoholic beverages not derived from grapes.[18] According to non-Rabbinical interpretation, a Nazirite is forbidden to consume any alcohol, and vinegar from such alcohol, regardless of its source.[19] The laws of wine or grapes mixing in other food is similar to other dietary laws that apply to all Jews.[20]

The practice of a nazirite vow is part of the ambiguity of the Greek term “Nazarene”[33] that appears in the New Testament; the sacrifice of a lamb and the offering of bread does suggest a relationship with Christian symbolism (then again, these are the two most frequent offerings prescribed in Leviticus, so no definitive conclusions can be drawn). While a saying in (Matthew 11:18–19 and Luke 7:33–35) attributed to Jesus makes it doubtful that he, reported to be “a winebibber”, was a nazirite during his ministry, the verse ends with the curious statement, “But wisdom is justified of all her children”. The advocation of the ritual consumption of wine as part of the Eucharist, the tevilah in Mark 14:22–25 indicated he kept this aspect of the nazirite vow when Jesus said, “Verily I say unto you, I will drink no more of the fruit of the vine, until that day that I drink it new in the kingdom of God.” The ritual with which Jesus commenced his ministry (recorded via Greek as “Baptism”) and his vow in Mark 14:25 and Luke 22:15–18 at the end of his ministry, do respectively reflect the final and initial steps (purification by immersion in water and abstaining from wine) inherent in a Nazirite vow. These passages may indicate that Jesus intended to identify himself as a Nazirite (“not drinking the fruit of vine”) before his crucifixion.[34]

Luke the Evangelist clearly was aware that wine was forbidden in this practice, for the angel (Luke 1:13–15) that announces the birth of John the Baptist foretells that “he shall be great in the sight of the Lord, and shall drink neither wine nor strong drink; and he shall be filled with the Holy Ghost, even from his mother’s womb”, in other words, a nazirite from birth, the implication being that John had taken a lifelong nazirite vow.[35]

Later, knowing that all was now completed, and so that the Scripture would be fulfilled, Jesus said, “I am thirsty.” 29 A jar of wine vinegar was there, so they soaked a sponge in it, put the sponge on a stalk of the hyssop plant, and lifted it to Jesus’ lips.
John 19:28-29

When he had received the drink, Jesus said, “It is finished.” With that, he bowed his head and gave up his spirit.
John 19:30
Jesus called out with a loud voice, “Father, into your hands I commit my spirit.” When he had said this, he breathed his last.
Luke 23:46

Jesus’ drink of vinegar
Matthew 27:34
There they offered Jesus wine to drink, mixed with gall; but after tasting it, he refused to drink it.

Matthew 27:47-50
When some of those standing there heard this, they said, “He’s calling Elijah.”
Immediately one of them ran and got a sponge. He filled it with wine vinegar, put it on a stick, and offered it to Jesus to drink. The rest said, “Now leave him alone. Let’s see if Elijah comes to save him.”
And when Jesus had cried out again in a loud voice, he gave up his spirit.

Mark 15:23
Then they offered him wine mixed with myrrh, but he did not take it.
Mark 15:35-37
When some of those standing near heard this, they said, “Listen, he’s calling Elijah.”
One man ran, filled a sponge with wine vinegar, put it on a stick, and offered it to Jesus to drink. “Now leave him alone. Let’s see if Elijah comes to take him down,” he said.
With a loud cry, Jesus breathed his last.

John 19:28-30
Later, knowing that all was now completed, and so that the Scripture would be fulfilled, Jesus said, “I am thirsty.” A jar of wine vinegar was there, so they soaked a sponge in it, put the sponge on a stalk of the hyssop plant, and lifted it to Jesus’ lips. When he had received the drink, Jesus said, “It is finished.” With that, he bowed his head and gave up his spirit.

Hyssop is also often used to fill the Catholic ceremonial Aspergillum, which the priest dips into a bowl of holy water, and sprinkles onto the congregation to bless them. To wit, the invocation in the Psalm Miserere states Thou shalt purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean:. However, researchers have suggested that the Biblical accounts refer not to the plant currently known as hyssop but rather to one of a number of different herbs.”[15][16]

Cleanse me with hyssop, and I will be clean; wash me, and I will be whiter than snow.

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New American Standard Bible

7Purify me with hyssop, and I shall be clean;
         Wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.
8Make me to hear joy and gladness,
         Let the bones which You have broken rejoice.
9Hide Your face from my sins
         And blot out all my iniquities.
10Create in me a clean heart, O God,
         And renew a steadfast spirit within me.
11Do not cast me away from Your presence
         And do not take Your Holy Spirit from me.
12Restore to me the joy of Your salvation
         And sustain me with a willing spirit.
13Then I will teach transgressors Your ways,
         And sinners will be converted to You.
14Deliver me from bloodguiltiness, O God, the God of my salvation;
         Then my tongue will joyfully sing of Your righteousness.
15O Lord, open my lips,
         That my mouth may declare Your praise.
16For You do not delight in sacrifice, otherwise I would give it;
         You are not pleased with burnt offering.
17The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit;
         A broken and a contrite heart, O God, You will not despise.
18By Your favor do good to Zion;
         Build the walls of Jerusalem.
19Then You will delight in righteous sacrifices,
         In burnt offering and whole burnt offering;
         Then young bulls will be offered on Your altar.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to King Jesus Was a Nazarite

  1. Reblogged this on Rosamond Press and commented:

    Jesus was a Nazarite.

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