I Am The Rose Lord of the Pentecost

I read to my disciples from the Book of Ruth on the Mount of Olives during the Shavout, when the figs were being harvested. My tribe, Judah, was involved in slavery. I confronted them. They tried to murder me by throwing me over a cliff. I have come to found a True Democracy in the name of the Lord, so that all men and wonen shall be free and equal in the eyes of our Creator.

Jon the Nazarite

I have Found the Grail

The Jewish Historian, Joseph Flavius, said the war between the Jews
and Rome in 70 A.D. began with the burning of the Debt Archive all
over Judea, including the one that was located within the temple
grounds. I have found strong evidence Jesus began this rebellion that
ended with a victory for the Romans and the destruction of the
temple. For this reason, his teaching was later altered. Jesus was
teaching forgiveness of all debts after restoring the Jubilee. Indeed
Jesus and his disciples came to Jerusalem to celebrate the Shavuot
which fell on the Jubilee, and thus Jesus was celebrating the
Pentecost that involved a Feast of the First Fruits and the waving of
two loafs of bread. Was there a Cup on the table as Jesus restored
the Jubilee Law that was abolished a hundred years hence?
Jesus has restored the Land of the Landlord, who is the Lord Himself!
It is His return that Jesus prepared for, for he hated the temple
Herod built for Him. It had to be cleansed! When devout Jews rejected
the gift Caesar made for the temple, war with the Slave Masters of
the World was just around the corner. Indeed, the arrest of Jesus may
have set the Fire of Freedom!

King Arthur set his Knights out to search for the Holy Grail so the
land can be restored. There were Phoenicians and Jews living in
England before Jesus was born. My good friend, Virginia Hambeley
(land of the Ham) descends from the Phoenicians who descend from Ham.
Surely celtic priests conversed with the Jews about their religion,
and heard about their Lord who bid his followers bring Him a small
sacrafice, and in returne He give them His Kingdom of Bounty.

The land is part of the contract between God and the people. It
belongs not to the people – but to God who gives it to them – on loan
as it were – so that they may fulfill their part of the bargain. And
so we read in Leviticus chapter 25, verse 23:

“The land shall not be sold in perpetuity; for the land is Mine; for
you are strangers and settlers with Me.”

There is a Pilgrimage on the Shavuot where Jews are bid to return to
the land of their ancestors. That the Savior returned to the Mount of
Olives suggests his ancestors owned property there. Did come down
from the mount and enters the temple – and drive out the money
lenders? Did Jesus proclaim the temple ground as the ancient home of
his ancestors? Was this where the threshing floor of Boaz was
located. Boaz married Ruth the first convert to Judaism?
The multitude of the Jews that Moses brought out of Egypt were
converts. The giving of the Torah to the chosen of God is celebrated
on the Shavuot, that is the Pentecost. The Pentecost is related to
the Jubilee where every fifty years Jews return to the ancient homes
of their ancestors whether they still own this property or not. Jesus
announces his mission is to restore the Jubilee when he came out of
the wilderness. He is doing just that on the Mount of Olives where he
reads the Book of Ruth to his disciples. He also waves two loaves of
bread in the ceremony of the First Fruits.

[425] Now the next day was the festival of Xylophory; upon which the
custom was for every one to bring wood for the altar (that there
might never be a want of fuel for that fire which was unquenchable
and always burning).

The festival of the Xylophory is the festival of the Pentecost.
Christian writers, who reworked Joseph Flavius’s history, used this
word to hide the Pentecost, and the revolt that began on the fiftieth
Jubilee year where a procession of Jewish Saints dressed in pure
white, and carrying wood for the temple sacrifice – suddenly threw
off their robes to reveal themselves as Warriors of the Lord, or,
produced a sword or knife!
This action resulted in the capture of the temple grounds on the
Jubilee-Pentecost – and the burning of the debt archives! This is
what Jesus promised to do when he began his mission after he came out
of the wilderness where I believe he was tempted by Satan to come
fulfill the Nazarite vow he took at the temple. This is why the Jews
in the Synagogue tried to kill him, because he said he had come to
tear down the temple of Herod and rebuild a new one in three days!

I suspect these priests dressed in white, were Nazarites, and they
came two by two onto the temple grounds. Did they do so as Man and
Woman, side by side, as Jewish Women were allowed to take the
Nazarite vow. The dust and ash from the alter of sacrifice was put
under a stone inside the temple, and this ash represented Eden Lost –
and Restored. It was this ash that was put in a Cup of Water and
given to the Sotah to drink, after the priest wrote the name of the
Lord in this dust!

It is done! Let Freedom ring! Let the Lord of Bread and the Host of
Heaven restore the land of the American People and once again bring
us the bounty of the Holy Grail!
Thanksgiving is a day away. Let us celebrate in the Spirit of the
Savior of the Pentecost!
“And ye shall count unto you from the morrow after the sabbath, from
the day that ye brought the sheaf of the wave offering; seven
sabbaths shall be complete: Even unto the morrow after the seventh
sabbath shall ye number fifty days; and ye shall offer a new meat
offering unto the LORD. Ye shall bring out of your habitations two
wave loaves of two tenth deals: they shall be of fine flour; they
shall be baken with leaven; they are the firstfruits unto the LORD.”
Jon Presco
The Nazarite
Copyright 2008

http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=111&letter=A
http://www.atam.org/FeastofPentecost.html

[425] Now the next day was the festival of Xylophory; upon which the
custom was for every one to bring wood for the altar (that there
might never be a want of fuel for that fire which was unquenchable
and always burning). Upon that day they excluded the opposite party
from the observation of this part of religion. And when they had
joined to themselves many of the Sicarii, who crowded in among the
weaker people, (that was the name for such robbers as had under their
bosoms swords called Sicae,) they grew bolder, and carried their
undertaking further; insomuch that the king’s soldiers were
overpowered by their multitude and boldness; and so they gave way,
and were driven out of the upper city by force.

The others then set fire to the house of Ananias the high priest, and
to the palaces of Agrippa and Bernice; after which they carried the
fire to the place where the archives were reposited, and made haste
to burn the contracts belonging to their creditors, and thereby to
dissolve their obligations for paying their debts; and this was done
in order to gain the multitude of those who had been debtors, and
that they might persuade the poorer sort to join in their
insurrection with safety against the more wealthy; so the keepers of
the records fled away, and the rest set fire to them. And when they
had thus burnt down the nerves of the city, they fell upon their
enemies; at which time some of the men of power, and of the high
priests, went into the vaults under ground, and concealed themselves,
while others fled with the king’s soldiers to the upper palace, and
shut the gates immediately; among whom were Ananias the high priest,
and the ambassadors that had been sent to Agrippa. And now the
seditious were contented with the victory they had gotten, and the
buildings they had burnt down, and proceeded no further.

Popular festival in Judea during the time of the Second Temple,
corresponding approximately to the fifteenth day of August. According
to a tradition preserved in the Mishnah (Ta’anit, iv. 9, 10; Gem. pp.
26, 31), on that day, as well as on the Day of Atonement, the maidens
of Jerusalem, rich and poor, without exception, dressed in white,
went out to dance in the vineyards with the young men, asking them to
make their choice of a partner for life. The fair ones sang: “Young
men, turn your eyes to beauty; for woman stands for beauty.” The
patricians’ daughters sang: “Young men, turn your eyes to noble
parentage; for woman is the preserver of family pride.” Those
possessing neither beauty nor noble birth sang: “Grace is beautiful
and beauty is vain; but a woman that feareth the Lord, she shall be
praised.” Of the many reasons given in the Talmud for the celebration
of this day, that attested by the oldest authority, R. Eliezer ben
Hyrcanus of the first century (Megillat Ta’anit, v.) is thatit was
the great day of wood-offering, when both priests and people brought
kindling-wood in large quantities to the altar, for use in the
burning of sacrifices during the whole year. This day being Mid-
summer Day, when the solar heat reached its climax, the people
stopped hewing wood in the forest, probably until the Fifteenth Day
of Shebaṭ (February), the so-called New-year’s Day of the trees (see
R. H. i. 1), because the new sap of spring entered vegetation on that
day.

Various reasons are given in the Talmud for this celebration. One is
that the tribes were allowed to intermarry (Num. xxxvi.) on that day;
another, that the interdict on the tribe of Benjamin was removed on
that day (Judges, xxi. 15 et seq.); again another, that the death
penalty following the bad report of the spies (Num. xv. 32) had
ceased; or that the interference with the pilgrimage to Jerusalem at
the festal season by Jeroboam I. (I Kings, xii. 32) was removed by
Hosea on that day. Others, by a strange anachronism, maintain that
those slain on the battle-field in the war of Bar Kokba received the
customary burial rites on this day. The actual explanation is given
in Meg. Ta’anit, v. and Mishnah, iv. 5, according to which nine
families of Judah brought at certain times during the year the wood
for the burning of the sacrifices on the altar, in accordance with
Neh. x. 34; on the Fifteenth Day of Ab, however, all the people, the
priests as well as the Levites, took part in the wood-offering.

Josephus (“B. J.” ii. 17, § 6) also mentions this festival, and calls
it the Feast of Xylophory (“Wood-bearing”), but places it on the
Fourteenth of Ab (Lous), saying that “it was the custom for every one
to bring wood for the altar on that day so that there should never be
any lack of fuel for the eternal fire.” Zipser suggested that the
day, called also the Day of the Breaking of the Ax, was celebrated by
bonfires in the same fashion that the Syrians, according to Lucian,
celebrated Midsummer Day (“De Syria Dea”). The festival had a purely
secular character, like the Fifteenth Day of Shebaṭ (February), the
one being an ancient midwinter, the other a midsummer, festival of
pagan origin; while the various explanations and stories given in
Megillat Ta’anit and the Talmud show that in the course of time the
main reason was forgotten. Compare the St. Valentine’s Day
celebrations and the bonfires on the hills among the various nations
in connection with marriage, and the St. John’s Day festivities, in
Mannhardt’s “Baumkultus,” pp. 449-552.

Chretein de Troyes was not from Troyes, it a mystery where he hail
from. I believe he was from Rougemont who were vassals of the Counts
of Troyes who commissioned Grail legends. My mother’s ancestors
allegedly hailed from Rougemont. Here is why my blog is titles
Rougeknights!

CHRETIEN, Jeanne Marguerite Birth: September 04, 1692 in Rougemont
the Castle, 90, FDeath: June 09, 1714 in Felon, 90, FCHRETIEN,
Antoine Joseph Birth: March 20, 1694 in Rougemont the Castle, 90,
FCHRETIEN, Thomas Birth: March 19, 1696 in Rougemont the Castle, 90,
FCHRETIEN, Elisabeth Birth: February 21, 1698 in Rougemont the
Castle, 90, FCHRETIEN, Jean Pierre CHRETIEN, Henrion CHRETIEN, Jean
CHRETIEN, Claude

According to history, King David died on Shauvot. This was the end of
a 40 year reign that was filled with Warfare; the kingdom was
transferred over to Solomon, a man of Peace.

EVENTS SURROUNDING SHAUVOT SINCE PENTECOST WAS ESTABLISHED

1) Tribe of Benjamin Get Wives. Because of Benjamin’s sin and
perversion, they were about to become extinct. Judges 21:15-24

Israelite virgins returning from the Feast of Pentecost with dances
were taken by the Benjamites as their wives. The elders had vowed
that no one was to give Benjamin wives; later they felt sorry and
devised a plan of kidnapping to save Benjamin. Had this not happened,
there would not have been a King Saul, the first king of Israel. Nor
would there have been Rabbi Saul, which later became Apostle Paul,
they both were Benjamites.
This was foreshadowing Law -vs-Grace. We know that King Saul was
killed by his sword (Word), but Rabbi Saul was made alive by the
Word. “The letter kills, but the Spirit makes alive”. So it is with
the left-handed Benjamite Company today.
2) King Saul was anointed on Shauvot – 1 Sam.10:1-7 He was anointed
with a vial (limited), not the horn which represented unlimited
anointing. The realm of Pentecost as wonderful as it is, is only a
limited expression of what’s coming.

http://www.atam.org/FeastofPentecost.html

According to history, King David died on Shauvot. This was the end of
a 40 year reign that was filled with Warfare; the kingdom was
transferred over to Solomon, a man of Peace.

EVENTS SURROUNDING SHAUVOT SINCE PENTECOST WAS ESTABLISHED

1) Tribe of Benjamin Get Wives. Because of Benjamin’s sin and
perversion, they were about to become extinct. Judges 21:15-24

Israelite virgins returning from the Feast of Pentecost with dances
were taken by the Benjamites as their wives. The elders had vowed
that no one was to give Benjamin wives; later they felt sorry and
devised a plan of kidnapping to save Benjamin. Had this not happened,
there would not have been a King Saul, the first king of Israel. Nor
would there have been Rabbi Saul, which later became Apostle Paul,
they both were Benjamites.

This was foreshadowing Law -vs-Grace. We know that King Saul was
killed by his sword (Word), but Rabbi Saul was made alive by the
Word. “The letter kills, but the Spirit makes alive”. So it is with
the left-handed Benjamite Company today.

2) King Saul was anointed on Shauvot – 1 Sam.10:1-7 He was anointed
with a vial (limited), not the horn which represented unlimited
anointing. The realm of Pentecost as wonderful as it is, is only a
limited expression of what’s coming.

Q: Why do Christians annually celebrate a Jewish Festival called
Shavuot or Pentecost?
EDB: Because a major event in Jewish history which became a universal
blessing for all mankind, took place in the Jerusalem Temple during
that harvest festival of Shavuot also called Pentecost.
It was on the first day of the week, Sunday, in the Roman Julian
calendar, May 24th, in the year A.D. 30. This was also the year 3,790
in the Hebrew calendar. Christian scholars mark that historic
Pentecost in Jerusalem as the “spiritual birthday of the church.”
(A.R. Fausset’s Bible Dictionary, p. 557)
http://philologos.org/bpr/files/s005.htm

QUESTION: Why do we stay awake the entire night of Shavuot?
ANSWER: The Midrash Shir Hashirim Rabba says: On the night of Matan
Torah – the giving of the Law – the Israelites felt drowsy and began
to fall asleep, so Moshe Rabbenu had to wake them up with thunder and
lightning. Therefore we show that we appreciate the Torah and we
don’t fall asleep but stay up the entire night studying the Torah.
(Likutei Tzvi – also Magen Avraham, Orach Chaim 494).

QUESTION: Why do we read Megillat Ruth on Shavuot?

ANSWER: 1) It describes the season of reaping and cutting which is
the time of Shavuot.
2) Our ancestors became converts to the Torah at this time. We read
about Ruth who also became a convert (Keritot 9, Yevamot 47).

3) King David is descended from Ruth and David was born on Shavuot
and he died on Shavuot (Tosefta 17, Shaarey Teshuva, Orach Chaim 494).

And ye shall count unto you from the morrow after the sabbath, from
the day that ye brought the sheaf of the wave offering; seven
sabbaths shall be complete: Even unto the morrow after the seventh
sabbath shall ye number fifty days; and ye shall offer a new meat
offering unto the LORD. Ye shall bring out of your habitations two
wave loaves of two tenth deals: they shall be of fine flour; they
shall be baken with leaven; they are the firstfruits unto the LORD.

The land is part of the contract between God and the people. It
belongs not to the people – but to God who gives it to them – on loan
as it were – so that they may fulfil their part of the bargain. And
so we read in Leviticus chapter 25, verse 23: ” The land shall not be
sold in perpetuity; for the land is Mine; for you are strangers and
settlers with Me.”
This startling critical verse is part of the account of the Yoveil –
the Jubilee. According to the Torah, in every fiftieth year,
following seven cycles of seven years, , the shofar shall be blown on
the Day of Atonement, proclaiming `deror – liberty throughout the
land, to all its inhabitants’ (: 10). And `deror’ is defined very
specifically: Liberty means that, every person returns to their
family, and any land-holdings which have been sold off during the
previous half century return to their original owners.
While the sabbatical year of rest for the land was – and is to this
day – practised, there is little evidence that the Jubilee ever took
place. Perhaps, the practicalities involved proved insurmountable.
But then again, perhaps the importance of the Jubilee lies precisely
in the ideal it proclaims to every generation. Again: “The land shall
not be sold in perpetuity; for the land is Mine; for you are
strangers and settlers with Me.”

http://philologos.org/bpr/files/s005.htm

http://christianactionforisrael.org/judeochr/pentcost/pentcost.html

“And on the morrow, when they had come out of Bethany, he [Jesus]
hungered. And seeing a fig tree afar off having leaves, he came, if
perhaps he might find anything thereon: and when he came to it,
hefound nothing but leaves; for it was not the season of figs. And he
answered and said unto it, `No man [will] eat fruit from you from now
on – for ever.’ And his disciples heard it . And as they passed by in
the morning, they saw the fig tree withered away from the roots. And
Peter calling to remembrance said unto him, `Rabbi, behold, the fig
tree that you cursed is withered away'” (Mk. 11:12-14; 20-21).

http://www.jrf.org/showdt&rid=450&pid=110

Deuteronomy 24:20 “When you beat the olives from your trees, do not
go over the branches a second time. Leave what remains for the alien,
the fatherless and the widow.Deuteronomy 24:19 “When you are
harvesting in your field and you over look a sheaf, do not go back to
get it. Leave it for the alien, the fatherless and the widow, so that
the LORD your God may bless you in all the work of your
hands. “Strangers shall stand and feed your flocks, and foreigners
shall be your plowmen and your vinedressers.”
“The Spirit of the Lord GOD is upon me, Because the LORD has anointed
me To preach good tidings to the poor; He has sent Me to heal the
broken hearted, To proclaim liberty to the captives, And the opening
of the prison to those who are bound; To proclaim the acceptable year
of the LORD, And the day of vengeance of our God; To comfort all who
mourn.” (Isaiah 61:1-2)”
At the beginning of the Jubilee Israel was to “proclaim liberty
throughout all the land to all its inhabitants” (Leviticus 25:10),
and all Israelites held in servitude receive liberty (verses 39-
41).In Isaiah 61 we find a similar statement to proclaim liberty: It
is written in the Torah, “You shall sanctify the 50th year and
proclaim freedom throughout the land for all its inhabitants; it
shall be the Jubilee year for you, you shall return each person to
his ancestral heritage and you shall return each to his family. It
shall be a Jubilee Year for you – the 50th year – you shall not sow,
you shall not harvest its after-growth and you shall not pick what
was set aside of it for yourself. For it is a Jubilee Year, it shall
be holy to you; from the field you eat its crop.” (Leviticus 25:10-13)

The Magi were Parthians from Iran. There is good evidence the
observance of the Sukkot was installed in Judea by the Magi priests
who served Cyrus the Great who the Jews titled “Messiah” because he
returned them to the Promised Land. The Parthians who converted to
Judaism, came to Jerusalem to celebrate the Sukkot Booths, which were
temporary shelters similar to a manger. JESUS WAS BORN IN A SUKKOT
BOOTH AND NOT A MANGER!

Jon Presco

“Shavuot becomes the occasion for reading Ruth because of the
rabbinic connection between Torah and identity. Shavuot affirms that
the Torah and the Jewish people are not closed systems, but rather
are (potentially) universal systems which welcome all who in
sincerity and faith pledge their fate with that of the Jewish people.
Curiously, Ruth’s declaration places joining the Jewish people before
affirming the God of Israel. This raises the question of what
metaphor we employ to understand conversion. Conversion to Judaism is
often misunderstood to mean affirming the faith of Jewish religion,
as if “Judaism” and “Jewish religion” were synonymous. Under this
metaphor, one becomes “Jewish” by declaring faith in one God and in
the Torah. The operative verb here is “believing.” But a better, more
accurate, metaphor should be “citizenship.” One who converts joins
the Jewish people, taking on the culture, history, traditions, and
rituals of Judaism as well as the faith of Jewish religion. The
operative verb here is “belonging.”

Pentecost means Fiftieth (50), this is a number denoting Jubilee,
liberation. This Feast celebrates the remembrance of how we were
delivered from Egypt (the world). It is a time of Rejoicing and
Giving of the freewill offering; it is harvest time. It has been
celebrated as a time of supplying the needs of others for 3500 years,
we also see this demonstrated in the Book of Acts. It is a time of
showing compassion, and consideration to the widows, orphans, and
strangers (foreigners, mission).

Shavuot, the Festival Weeks, is the second of the three major
Biblical pilgrimage festivals ,the other two being Passover and
Sukkot. Shavuot has both agricultural and historical significance.
Originally an agricultural festival in the month of Sivan, Shavuot
was celebrated by pilgrimages to the Temple in Jerusalem, where Jews
offered the first fruits of their harvest. Historically, it
commemorates the anniversary of the giving of the Ten Commandments to
Moses and the Israelites at Mount Sinai. The name “Shavuot” stems
from the counting of the Omer, the seven weeks between Passover and
Shavuot. Shavuot is similar to the other two major festivals,
Passover and Sukkot, in that it has Shabbat-like restrictions against
work, but is different in that it’s only two days long, one in
Israel. This time celebrate Shavuot at Holiday Spot as it has loads
in store for you. Click on the sections and enjoy!

Christian Origins

By Richard A. Horsley

“Barnabas 3:3But unto us He saith; Behold, this is the fast which I
have chosen, saith the Lord; loosen every band of wickedness, untie
the tightened cords of forcible contracts, send away the broken ones
released and tear in pieces every unjust bond. Break thy bread to the
hungry, and if thou seest one naked clothe him; bring the shelterless
into thy house, and if thou seest a humble man, thou shalt not
despise him, neither shall any one of thy household and of thine own
seed.”

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?lookup=J.+BJ+2.437.

http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=111&letter=A

http://rougeknights.blogspot.com/2008/03/behold-ark-of-samuel-
nazarite-messiah.html

417] And as they said these things, they produced those priests that
were skillful in the customs of their country, who made the report
that all their forefathers had received the sacrifices from foreign
nations. But still not one of the innovators would hearken to what
was said; nay, those that ministered about the temple would not
attend their Divine service, but were preparing matters for beginning
the war. So the men of power perceiving that the sedition was too
hard for them to subdue, and that the danger which would arise from
the Romans would come upon them first of all, endeavored to save
themselves, and sent ambassadors, some to Florus, the chief of which
was Simon the son of Ananias; and others to Agrippa, among whom the
most eminent were Saul, and Antipas, and Costobarus, who were of the
king’s kindred; and they desired of them both that they would come
with an army to the city, and cut off the seditious before it should
be too hard to be subdued. Now this terrible message was good news to
Florus; and because his design was to have a war kindled, he gave the
ambassadors no answer at all. But Agrippa was equally solicitous for
those that were revolting, and for those against whom the war was to
be made, and was desirous to preserve the Jews for the Romans, and
the temple and metropolis for the Jews; he was also sensible that it
was not for his own advantage that the disturbances should proceed;
so he sent three thousand horsemen to the assistance of the people
out of Auranitis, and Batanea, and Trachonitis, and these under
Darius, the master of his horse, and Philip the son of Jacimus, the
general of his army.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barnabas
In 16:3-4, the Epistle of Barnabas says: “Furthermore he says
again, ‘Lo, they who destroyed this temple shall themselves build
it.’ That is happening now. For owing to the war it was destroyed by
the enemy; at present even the servants of the enemy will build it up
again.” This clearly places Barnabas after the destruction of the
temple in 70 CE. But it also places Barnabas before the Bar Kochba
revolt in 132 CE, after which there could have been no hope that the
Romans would help to rebuild the temple. This shows that the document
comes from the period between these two revolts.

Popular festival in Judea during the time of the Second Temple,
corresponding approximately to the fifteenth day of August. According
to a tradition preserved in the Mishnah (Ta’anit, iv. 9, 10; Gem. pp.
26, 31), on that day, as well as on the Day of Atonement, the maidens
of Jerusalem, rich and poor, without exception, dressed in white,
went out to dance in the vineyards with the young men, asking them to
make their choice of a partner for life. The fair ones sang: “Young
men, turn your eyes to beauty; for woman stands for beauty.” The
patricians’ daughters sang: “Young men, turn your eyes to noble
parentage; for woman is the preserver of family pride.” Those
possessing neither beauty nor noble birth sang: “Grace is beautiful
and beauty is vain; but a woman that feareth the Lord, she shall be
praised.” Of the many reasons given in the Talmud for the celebration
of this day, that attested by the oldest authority, R. Eliezer ben
Hyrcanus of the first century (Megillat Ta’anit, v.) is thatit was
the great day of wood-offering, when both priests and people brought
kindling-wood in large quantities to the altar, for use in the
burning of sacrifices during the whole year. This day being Mid-
summer Day, when the solar heat reached its climax, the people
stopped hewing wood in the forest, probably until the Fifteenth Day
of Shebaṭ (February), the so-called New-year’s Day of the trees (see
R. H. i. 1), because the new sap of spring entered vegetation on that
day.

Various reasons are given in the Talmud for this celebration. One is
that the tribes were allowed to intermarry (Num. xxxvi.) on that day;
another, that the interdict on the tribe of Benjamin was removed on
that day (Judges, xxi. 15 et seq.); again another, that the death
penalty following the bad report of the spies (Num. xv. 32) had
ceased; or that the interference with the pilgrimage to Jerusalem at
the festal season by Jeroboam I. (I Kings, xii. 32) was removed by
Hosea on that day. Others, by a strange anachronism, maintain that
those slain on the battle-field in the war of Bar Kokba received the
customary burial rites on this day. The actual explanation is given
in Meg. Ta’anit, v. and Mishnah, iv. 5, according to which nine
families of Judah brought at certain times during the year the wood
for the burning of the sacrifices on the altar, in accordance with
Neh. x. 34; on the Fifteenth Day of Ab, however, all the people, the
priests as well as the Levites, took part in the wood-offering.

Josephus (“B. J.” ii. 17, § 6) also mentions this festival, and calls
it the Feast of Xylophory (“Wood-bearing”), but places it on the
Fourteenth of Ab (Lous), saying that “it was the custom for every one
to bring wood for the altar on that day so that there should never be
any lack of fuel for the eternal fire.” Zipser suggested that the
day, called also the Day of the Breaking of the Ax, was celebrated by
bonfires in the same fashion that the Syrians, according to Lucian,
celebrated Midsummer Day (“De Syria Dea”). The festival had a purely
secular character, like the Fifteenth Day of Shebaṭ (February), the
one being an ancient midwinter, the other a midsummer, festival of
pagan origin; while the various explanations and stories given in
Megillat Ta’anit and the Talmud show that in the course of time the
main reason was forgotten. Compare the St. Valentine’s Day
celebrations and the bonfires on the hills among the various nations
in connection with marriage, and the St. John’s Day festivities, in
Mannhardt’s “Baumkultus,” pp. 449-552.

There were different reasons for taking the Nazarite vow. “It is
usual with those that had been afflicted either with a distemper, or
with any other distress, to make vows; and for thirty days before
they are to offer their sacrifices, to abstain from wine, and to
shave the hair of their heads” (Josephus, l.c.). The vow was taken
also for the fulfilment of a wish, such as for the birth of a child
(Naz. i. 7; comp. 9 and 10). “The pious in ancient times took such a
vow, that they might have an opportunity to make a sin-offering”
(Ned. 10b). “If one sees a woman suspected of adultery and convicted
by the water of jealousy [Num. v.] let him become a Nazarite, since
the law of Nazariteship follows immediately in Num. vi.” (Ber. 63a).
Some said: “I shall not die before I have become a Nazarite” (Ned.
3b), or, “Let me be a Nazarite on the day when the son of David [the
Messiah] shall come.” Such a Nazarite was allowed to drink wine only
on the Sabbath and on feast-days, since the Messiah will not appear
on these days (‘Er. 43a). A shepherd who saw a lock of his own
beautiful hair reflected in the water, and was tempted thereby to
sin, took a Nazarite vow (Tosef., Naz. iv. 7; Ned. 9b). Although
Nazariteship was marked by asceticism, many abstained from wine and
meat even without taking the vow (B. B. 60b; Shab. 139a). Because of
this some prominent rabbis who were opposed to asceticism regarded as
sinners those who fasted or became Nazarites or took any vow
whatsoever, and held that the person in question was an evil-doer,
even if the vow was fulfilled (Ned. 9a, b, 20a, 77b; Naz. 4a; Ta’an.
11a).

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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One Response to I Am The Rose Lord of the Pentecost

  1. Reblogged this on Rosamond Press and commented:

    The Book of Ruth is read throuhg the night on Shovout. I believe Jesus is celebrating the sacred meal known as the Last Supper. His disciples can not stay awke.”QUESTION: Why do we stay awake the entire night of Shavuot?
    ANSWER: The Midrash Shir Hashirim Rabba says: On the night of Matan
    Torah – the giving of the Law – the Israelites felt drowsy and began
    to fall asleep, so Moshe Rabbenu had to wake them up with thunder and
    lightning. Therefore we show that we appreciate the Torah and we
    don’t fall asleep but stay up the entire night studying the Torah.
    (Likutei Tzvi – also Magen Avraham, Orach Chaim 494).

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