Stella Maris

Stella Maris means ‘Star of the Sea’. The name Marion means ‘star of the sea’ The name MARION FRANCIS ROSAMOND would read ‘Frankish Star of the Sea and Rose of the World’. The Franks have been associated with Mermaids and Stella Maris, as has the Mother Mary and Mary Magdalene -as well as the name Rosa Mundi.

Marion meaning and name origin
Marion \m(a)-rion\ as a girl’s name (also used as boy’s name Marion), is of French origin. Variant of Mary (Latin) “star of the sea”. This form was changed into Marian when introduced to Britain in the Middle Ages, but revived in the 19th century. Marion has 3 variant forms: Marian, Maryon and Maryonn.

Fancis \f-ran-cis, fr(a)-ncis\ as a boy’s name is pronounced FRAN-sis. It is of Latin origin, and the meaning of Francis is “frenchman; free man”. France was originally the kingdom of the Franks.

The name, Franci, applied by the tribes consequently considered Frankish to themselves and their confederacy; i.e., the endonym, was never intended to be an ethnonym.[1] Comprising multiple tribes each with its own ethnonym, it was in origin a socio-political term.

According to another legend, Merovech was conceived when Pharamond’s wife encountered a Quinotaur, a sea monster which could change shapes while swimming.

I have found the TAYLOR family kin to the Rosamonds. My grandfather, Frank Rosamond was named after Francis Marion.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2012

Francis Marion Overturf married Martha T Breeding

3.Rachel A ..she married William Hezikiah TAYLOR on
17 Feb 1884 in Newton County, Arkansas.
William Hezikiah TAYLOR’s parents were: William Hezikiah
Taylor and Jane Yates Taylor Cavin Standridge.
The Taylors had a large family.

Marion Francis Rosamond. Born on Sep 13, 1848 in Corrall, Mississippi. Marion Francis died in Lovelady, Texas in 1934, he was 85. Occupation: Doctor, Violinist. Marion Francis married Sarah Jane Hodges, in Mississippi.

family of Faramund [Pharamond], 1st King of France

01. Faramund [Pharamond], 1st King of France 418 (d428)

=1 Imbegride, dau of Basogast, a Frankish prince (above)

=2 Rosamunde, dau of Genobald, early Frankish king

issue by 1:

a. son [name unsure], mur 428

issue by 2:

b. Argotta [Siegse], mother of Merovech by 1st marriage

=1 Quintus Tarus, Prefect of Provence, a desposynic prince in Roman service (d438), descended from ten generations of “Fisher-Kings”

=2 Chlodio “Le Chevalu”, King of France, a Balthae prince (below)

c. Belizde (dau)

= Gundicar [Gunther], King of Burgundy

——————————————————————————————————————–

genealogy of Rosamunde, 2nd wife of Faramund [Pharamond], 1st King of France

01. Malaric II, early Frankish king (d360)

02. Priaric, early Frankish king (d396)

issue:

a. Marcomir, early Frankish king (d404)

b. Sunno [Huano], early Frankish king, father of (a) Alberic of Moselle, (b) Merovech (d445), & (c) Sigimer of Tournai

c. Genobald, early Frankish king (d419), father of Rosamunde, 2nd wife of Faramund, 1st King of France

Francis Marion Overturf married Martha T Breeding on
4 Jan 1863 in Franklin Co. Illinois.
Martha T Breeding died on 1 Jan 1908 and is buried in
Tarlton Cemetery, Newton Co. AR.
Children:
1.Solomon Overturf
2.Sarah..she married W. T. House in 1882 in Newton Co. AR
3.Rachel A ..she married William Hezikiah TAYLOR on
17 Feb 1884 in Newton County, Arkansas.
William Hezikiah TAYLOR’s parents were: William Hezikiah
Taylor and Jane Yates Taylor Cavin Standridge.
The Taylors had a large family.
i:Martha Jane Taylor, born 18 March 1885,
married Horace C Norton on 12 May 1901 in Newton Co. AR.
Horace Norton was son of Jefferson Davis Norton and
Arizona Matlock.
The Norton children were:
1)Bertha Lee Norton Burdine
2)Lester Norton
3)Georgia Inez Norton Greenhaw
4)Earl Norton
5)William Howard Norton
6)Leonard”Red”Norton
7)Conard Orvin”Doc”Norton
8)Ava Frances Norton Cooper
9)Ova Norton Smith
10)Lucille Jane Norton Smith
There are many Nortons still living in Newton County, AR.
ii:Malinda”Lindia” Taylor Hendrix
iii:Louisa “Lula” Hudson
iv: Frances Maggie Hays
v: Allen Taylor
vi: Arthur Taylor
vii: Arizona Taylor Soard
viii:Walker Taylor
ix: Andrew Taylor
x:Oliver Taylor married Jewell
xi: twin born 14 Nov 1910 and died same date
xii:twin born 14 Nov 1910 and died same date
Mother Rachel A Overturf died on same date as twins.
The twins are buried with her.
William H Taylor, born June 1862, died 4 Dec 1911.
They are buried in Clarksville(Johnson Co.)AR.in the
Shady Grove Cemetery.
4. Elias Overturf married(1)Viola Slape on 1 Sept 1895 in
Newton Co. AR. Viola died 1898 and Elias married (2)
I. Belle (mnu)age 21 on 1910 census with children:
i:Flora Overturf age 13 who married Eugene Rosamond on
31 Dec 1911 in Newton Co. AR.
ii: Iona Overturf, age 6
iii: Robert Overturf age 4

5.Nancy Overturf
6.Alice Overturf
7.Florence Catherine Overturf married James Dixon(age 32)
on 4 Jan 1903 in Newton Co. AR.
1910 Newton Co. AR census (Richland Township)shows children Cora E age 6;
William H age 4 and Henry H Dixon age 1.
Evelyn Flood
Marion Francis Rosamond. Born on Sep 13, 1848 in Corrall, Mississippi. Marion Francis died in Lovelady, Texas in 1934, he was 85. Occupation: Doctor, Violinist.
Marion Francis married Sarah Jane Hodges, in Mississippi.
33 Sarah Jane Hodges. Born in Choctaw Co., Mississippi.

Mary is a feminine given name, the English form of the name Maria, which was in turn a Latin form of the Greek names Μαριαμ, or Mariam, and Μαρια, or Maria, found in the New Testament. Both New Testament names were forms of the Hebrew name מִרְיָם or Miryam.[1]
The usual meaning given by various sources for the name is the Hebrew מרר m-r-r meaning “bitterness”. Other meanings suggested include “rebelliousness” (מרי m-r-y), or “wished for child” or “Our Lady” (ש”ע מריה Sha Mrih) or “beloved lady”, referring to the Christian reverence for the Virgin Mary. The Web site Behind the Name notes that the name could also be a name of Egyptian origin, perhaps from the word elements mry, meaning “beloved” or mr, meaning “love”.[1]
The name was also considered in the Middle Ages to be connected to the sea and the word mare, as in the term Stella Maris, or “star of the sea,” an epithet for the Virgin Mary.[2]
The name has been widely used due to its associations with the Virgin Mary, mother of Jesus Christ, and with Saint Mary Magdalene, who was called an apostle to the Apostles.
It was viewed as too holy a name for use in Celtic communities until toward the end of the 15th century, though other forms of the name were used.[3]
The name María, in combination with other names or with titles of the Virgin Mary, has been the most popular in Spanish-speaking countries, much as Marie was popular in combination with other names in French-speaking countries and Mary was popular in combination with other names in English-speaking countries. Maria or Marie is also occasionally used as a middle name for boys in Catholic families as a sign that the child is under the protection of the Virgin Mary.

http://www.g-dcast.com/naso

Our Lady, Star of the Sea is an ancient title for the Virgin Mary, mother of Jesus Christ. The words Star of the Sea are a translation of the Latin title Stella Maris, first reliably used with relation to the Virgin Mary in the ninth century. The title was used to emphasize Mary’s role as a sign of hope and as a guiding star for Christians, especially gentiles, whom the Old Testament Israelites metaphorically referred to as the sea, meaning anyone beyond the “coasts”, or, that is to say, sociopolitical, and religious (Mosaic law), borders of Israelite territory. Under this title, the Virgin Mary is believed to intercede as a guide and protector of those who travel or seek their livelihoods on the sea. This aspect of the Virgin has led to Our Lady, Star of the Sea, being named as patroness of the Catholic missions to seafarers, the Apostleship of the Sea, and to many coastal churches being named Stella Maris or Mary, Star of the Sea.

The name, Franci, applied by the tribes consequently considered Frankish to themselves and their confederacy; i.e., the endonym, was never intended to be an ethnonym.[1] Comprising multiple tribes each with its own ethnonym, it was in origin a socio-political term. To the people who shortly were to counter the invasions of the Franks: the Romans, the Celts, the Suebi, who in the first two instances spoke significantly different languages, the Franks must have seemed to be all alike: they looked the same and had the same language, so that the word was in fact treated as an ethnonym.
Within a few centuries the names of the original tribes had been eclipsed by the name, Franci. The Franks themselves had developed a new ethnic identity, which they retained until language development created new ethnicities along the geographic lines of the modern Germanic languages, which were now mutually unintelligible to the casual speaker. The old tribal names often remained as local geographic names; for example, Hesse from the name of the Chatti, a constituent tribe of the Franks. The same process happened to the name of the Franks: Franconia is a local name within the ethnic identity of German, or Deutsch.
Following the precedents of Edward Gibbon and Jacob Grimm,[2] the name of the Franks is universally agreed to be the same word as English frank and counterparts in numerous other languages.[3] The word is Germanic; however, it cannot credibly be traced back further. Frank has a range of meanings, all of which have been proposed at one time or another as the basis for the name of the confederacy: free, honest, bold. There is even a suggestion that the meaning of “free” was adopted because, after the conquest of Gaul, only Franks were free of taxation

Subsequently Frankish incursions over the Rhine were so frequent that the emperors began to adopt them into the empire and settle them on the borders so that they could control them better. In 292 Constantius defeated and removed some Franks who had settled on the then island of Batavia at the mouth of the Rhine. These were resettled not far way, in Toxandria, the seat of the later Salian Franks.[20] Eumenius mentioned that Constantius “killed, expelled, captured, kidnapped” two groups of Franks, the one that had settled on Batavia and the other having crossed the Rhine. He also uses the term nationes Franciae, the first use of Francia.
Salian was used for the first time by Ammianus Marcellinus[21] on the occasion of Julian in 358 campaigning against “the first Franks of all, those whom custom has called the Salians,”[22] who at that time were in Toxandria. He defeated them but left them in place, promoting them instead to foederati of the empire.[23] Their soldiers are listed as the Salii in the 5th century Notitia Dignitatum, a book of Roman unit insigniae. The Merovingians were to come from these Salian Franks.
http://goose.ycp.edu/~tgibson/RoyalAncestors/Charlemagne.html

According to another legend, Merovech was conceived when Pharamond’s wife encountered a Quinotaur, a sea monster which could change shapes while swimming. Though never stated, it is implied that she was impregnated by it. This legend was related by Fredegar in the seventh century, and may have been known earlier. The legend is probably a back-formation or folk etymology used to explain the Salian Franks’ origin as a sea coast dwelling people, and based on the name itself. The “Mero-” or “Mer-” element in the name suggests a sea or ocean (see Old English “mere,” Latin “mare,” or even the Modern English word “mermaid,” etc.). The “Salian” in “Salian Franks” may be a reference to salt, a reminder of their pre-migration home on the shores of the North Sea (alternatively, it may refer to the Isala or IJssel river behind which their homeland, the Salland, may have been located). The legend could also be explained in a much easier way. The sea monster could have been a foreign conqueror, coming from the sea, taking the dead king’s (Chlodio or Pharamond) wife to legitimise his rule.
The first Frankish royal dynasty called themselves Merovingians in his honor.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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