John Hodges Rosamond

“Dorothy (Hodges) being a young, tall, attractive woman was taken by an Indian Chief before the cabin was torched. She was gone for ten years. When she returned she brought her Indian son with her.”

With warfare all around them, the Rosamond and Hodge family conducted weddings, and from their unions sprang a Nation.

Samuel Rosamond
Place of Burial: Williamston, SC
Birth: circa 1751
Augusta County, Virginia
Death: August 11, 1814 (63)
Anderson District, SC

John Hodges Rosamond
Birth: September 16, 1789
Abbeville District, SC
Death: May 5, 1859 (69)
South Carolina
Elizabeth Rosamond
Birth: circa 1786
Abbeville District, SC

http://www.geni.com/people/John-Rosamond/6000000003263301262

Most of the information about John Hodges comes from his Revolutionary War application, W10117.

John Hodges was born in 1765 in Essex Co., Virginia. He is probably the son of John Hodges of Culpeper, VA, born about 1725, and wife Elizabeth.

Apparently sometime before the Revolution, the John Hodges family moved to SC. At the age of 15, on April 1, 1780, John Hodges joined the military as a private and served about 21 months. He was widely known as “Major” John Hodges later in life, perhaps from a position in the state militia.

His Revolutionary War pension application contains the following, summarized in Annie Walker Burns’ Revolutionary War Soldiers and Other Patriotic Records of Abbeville, County, SC (Washington, DC), pp. 17-18:

John Hodges, a resident of Abbeville District, S.C., age 67, states he entered service April 1, 1780 under command of Capt Samuel Rosamund, who commanded a beat or militia company in Ninety Six Direct, now Abbeville, S.C., and was marched t…
A family legend is that the father of John Hodges was a Revolutionary soldier and while at home on furlough, his cabin was attacked by Indians, and he was killed. The legend continued that the Indians captured four Hodges daughters,
bound them securely and put them inside the cabin which they prepared to burn.

However, an Indian warrior was reported attracted to one daughter, Dorothy, released her and took her with him, while the others perished in the flames.

(Another version has it that the mother and two daughters died in the fire.)

Many years later, Dorothy Hodges and her Indian son returned for a visit on her promise, the story went, that she would return to her Indian husband in Alabama territory. She yielded to pleadings of relatives to remain and eventually
married [ ] Rosamond. Her son attended the neighborhood school, but in his late teens went back to his father and was never heard from. Mr. and Mrs. Rosamond had children, lived for a time in Pickens, then went West, and South Carolina
kin lost contact with them.

With warfare all around them, the Rosamond and Hodge family conducted weddings, and from their unions sprang a Nation. The city of Hodges South Carolina was built on what was called
“the Jews land”. Then Dorothy Hodges was taken away by an Indian chief, and a child was born in the wilderness.

“The story of Dorothy being taken by Indians was so interesting, with the loss of her father and four younger sisters and all, that everybody told it faithfully. At least according to my grandfather who got it from his father and
compared it to other related Hodges family’s traditions in the1930s. It was his contention that the story was true because he had letters from six different families in six different locations. Each family gave the same basic story.
Dorothy being a young, tall, attractive woman was taken by an Indian Chief before the cabin was torched. She was gone for ten years. When she returned she brought her Indian son with her. He was nine when he arrived. The family talked
Dorothy into staying with them. They clothed, and educated, her son in the ways of his mother. They were shocked, and unbelieving when he told them he was going back to his father.Some of them thought it was rude and disrespectful for him to leave and they couldn’t understand why he would rather live with a bunch of savages.

The boy was seventeen when he left. Dorothy stayed with her family and married the widowed brother of Sarah Rosamond. They had a family of their own. The story ends with “They had a family of their own.”John M. Robinson put Dorothy in the
record as having been captured by Indians about 1781, he showed one son, no name, from the Chief. Then he shows a second husband as — Rosamond. I don’t know where he got his information. I believe it was from a tribute for General
George Washington Hodges, from two books; “Moragnes in America and Related Families” by Nell H. Howard and Bessie W. Quinn, and “Greenwood County Sketches” by Margaret Watson.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to John Hodges Rosamond

  1. Reblogged this on rosamondpress and commented:

    The FBI needs to crawl up Sweeny’s ass – and stay there as long as this fat pig walk the earth. “Sweeney’s second in command, Lt. Comdr. Hodges, had joined a lawsuit to prevent the changes to the executive council. Though the suit remained unresolved, Sweeney also used the convention, which was packed with his own supporters, to eject Hodges and replace him with a Sweeney ally. He then initiated a formal break with the Military Order of Stars & Bars (MOSB), whose former leader, Oklahoma City attorney Jeff Massey, had participated in the lawsuit that Hodges was also a part of. And he presided over the SCV’s donation of $10,000 to Lyons’ SLRC.”

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