John of SF – Battle of The Spud

John of San Francisco

by

John Presco

Copyright 2021

After making contact with James Bond via an e-mail, John Holmes John received a small package by special courier. Opening it, he was reading a letter from Queen Elizabeth explaining the coin she gifted him. He was also being informed that his ancestor, Lewes John 11, was also the master of the royal mint, who melted down the treasure Sir Francis Drake had captured in the New World, to make coin of the realm. For this, John was knighted. The coins that Philip von Habsburg was minting from Incan gold, was a threat to capture all of Europe’s commerce – in the name of the Papacy. If British traders could not keep their coins on the world market, then the world would be forced to trade with the King of the Romans, exclusively.

“This is what our piracy was all about. Please keep it a secret. As a profound coincidence, Drake introduced the potato to the Isles, and John introduced the potato to Germany and Prussia. My agent, James Bond will explain the crisis we will be in, if something happened to our tubers. I bought a bottle of your wine. I have to say the Teutonic Monks make the best wine in the world. Your ancestors brought vines from the Holy Land.”

Standing on his runway, John waited to catch sight of the Lear Jet that would bring James Bond to his, dominion. John-John was feeling light-headed, and other-worldly, after Vivian Rosemonde explained how they were related. Bond descended from Sherlock Holmes, that he learned was not a fictional character, nor was James Bond. For all his life he believed Sir Francis Drake was fiction, as was his lost treasure. Now, there is this spud connection that the alleged Queen of England is extremely concerned about. Why is it her business? Isn’t she just a figurehead? Is it any wonder that Meghan wanted to take her life. There is a very unreal quality to it all. James ends his e-mail with this request;

“I want you to study up on the potato blight and famine. You will be knighted into the Teutonic Order in abstention. Put on your best suit!”

Is it possible, I am caught up in a fantastic confidence game, and, an incredible hoax? John put this question to himself, then he spotted the jet coming out of the sun in the west.

To be continued

Augustus John – Wikipedia

M  Augustus Edwin John

Born 4 January 1878 – Pembrokeshire, WalesDeceased 31 October 1961 – Hampshire, England, aged 83 years old1 file available

 Parents

 Edwin William John
 Augusta Smith

 Spouses and children

(hide)

 Events

4 January 1878 :Birth – Pembrokeshire, Wales
Sources: Dowling Family Tree – Tim Dowling – rootsweb, 2001-2015 – – electronic – I130562
— :Pic
— :Occupation – Artist
1900 :Marriage (with Ida Nettleship)
between 1917 and 1925 :Marriage (with Evelyn Beatrice Sainte Croix Rose)
31 October 1961 :Death – Hampshire, England
Sources: Dowling Family Tree – Tim Dowling – rootsweb, 2001-2015 – – electronic – I130562

Evelyn St. Croix Fleming, born Evelyn Beatrice Sainte Croix Rose, in KensingtonLondon, known as Eve Fleming (1885 – 27 July 1964),[citation needed] was an English socialite.

Life[edit]

Evelyn Rose was the daughter of George Alfred Sainte Croix Rose (31 January 1854 – 14 February 1926), a captain in the service of the Royal Buckinghamshire Militia (King’s Own) and Justice of the Peace (J.P.) for Berkshire, son of the 1st Baronet Rose, of Rayners, by his marriage on 8 April 1880 to Beatrice Quain (1857 – 4 January 1911), the daughter of Sir Richard Quain, 1st Baronet, graduated with a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.). On 15 February 1906 she married Valentine Fleming (1882–1917),[1] and by that marriage was the mother of four sons: Peter FlemingIan Fleming – the novelist who wrote the James Bond books, Richard Fleming and Michael Fleming. Evelyn was thus the grandmother of actress Lucy Fleming. She was known for her flamboyant beauty.

After her husband’s death in action in the Great War in May 1917, Evelyn Fleming inherited his large estate in trust, making her very wealthy. However, the conditions of the money in trust transferred it to others should she ever remarry. She became the mistress of painter Augustus John, with whom she had a daughter, the cellist Amaryllis Fleming.

During the 1940s and 1950s, she resided at The Abbey, Sutton Courtenay. She died only two weeks before the death of her son Ian on 12 August 1964.[2]

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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