Frightful Franklin – Demonizer!

The Bible is full of demons. Revelations predicts demons will come and destroy most of the world, and only believers will be saved.

FLASH! Jesus just told me everyone will be saved. The world will be trashed, though. Oh well. Franklin Graham claims he is not a political animal. But, list to his recite how great the economy is doing!

“What did he say? I thought he told us the Tribulation is just around the corner. I spent our Christmas savings on survival food. Drats!”

Franklin Graham calls the democrats going after Trump “demonic”.  Robert Muller is a Republican and a Christian who goes to the same Bible study as Bill Barr. I predicted all this was coming, these arguments heard first on Royal Rosamond Press. I took some ques from Herbert Armstrong. We are true prophets. I took over his church.

That’s Tom Perkins embracing Trump. Lil Tommy just signed the Manhattan Declaration that calls for civil disobedience if the demons begin to get the upper hand. That’s Fatty Ball Puffhauser – in robes. He too signed the Christian Declaration. Do we really need Christians in America? What good are they? They are supreme trouble–makers who are not in touch with reality.

Trump was surrounded by Christian leaders the day he got elected. The question is, is POTUS following their instructions, or, they can’t control the Pussy Monster? Think………Co-Conspirators!

John Presco

“For Christianity Today to side with the Democrat Party in a totally partisan attack on the President of the United States is unfathomable. Christianity Today failed to acknowledge that not one single Republican voted with the Democrats to impeach the President. I know a number of Republicans in Congress, and many of them are strong Christians. If the President were guilty of what the Democrats claimed, these Republicans would have joined with the Democrats to impeach him. But the Democrats were not even unanimous—two voted against impeachment and one voted present.”

— Rev. Franklin Graham on Facebook

https://www.axios.com/trump-franklin-graham-father-christianity-today-18d5ba38-83c5-4468-9017-3011d6307950.html

Call to civil disobedience[edit]

The declaration vows civil disobedience if Christians feel that their rights to civil liberties of free exercise of religion and freedom of speech are being violated. It states that Christianity has taught through the centuries that civil disobedience is not only permitted, but sometimes required,[8] and refers to Martin Luther King, Jr.‘s defense of the rights and duties of religious conscience in his Letter from Birmingham Jail.[9]

One of the drafters, Princeton University professor Robert P. George, stated, “We certainly hope it doesn’t come to that. However, we see case after case of challenges to religious liberty”, including laws which he claims would force health care workers to assist in abortions or pharmacists to carry abortifacient drugs or birth control.[8] George continued, “When the limits of conscience are reached and you cannot comply, it’s better to suffer a wrong than to do it.”[8]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manhattan_Declaration:_A_Call_of_Christian_Conscience

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/11/to-trumps-evangelicals-everyone-else-is-a-sinner/602569/

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/11/to-trumps-evangelicals-everyone-else-is-a-sinner/602569/

https://www1.cbn.com/cbnnews/us/2019/november/heads-spin-as-franklin-graham-says-demonic-activity-may-be-behind-trump-opposition

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2019/11/25/who-demon-could-impeach-gods-chosen-one/

It isn’t enough for Franklin Graham and Eric Metaxas, two prominent figures within the American evangelical movement, to lavish praise on President Donald Trump. They have now decided they must try to demonize his critics.

Literally.

During his November 21 interview with Graham, Metaxas, a Salem Radio Network talk-show host, asked the son of the late evangelist Billy Graham, “What do you think of what is happening now? I mean, it’s a very bizarre situation to be living in a country where some people seem to exist to undermine the president of the United States. It’s just a bizarre time for most Americans.”

Franklin Graham, president and CEO of the Billy Graham Evangelical Association, responded, “Well, I believe it’s almost a demonic power that is trying—”

At which point Metaxas interjected, “I would disagree. It’s not almost demonic. You know and I know, at the heart, it’s a spiritual battle.”

Graham agreed, though his defense of Trump was based on economic rather than spiritual or cultural issues. (Graham argued that a strong economy leads to more tithing and church-building programs.) Metaxas then complained, “People seem to have devolved to a kind of moralistic Pharisaism, and they say, ‘How can you support somebody blah, blah, blah,’ and then go on to cite how he’s the least Christian—you know, they go on and on, and I think these people don’t, they don’t even have a biblical view when it comes to that—you know, that if somebody doesn’t hold to our theology, that doesn’t mean they can’t be a great pilot, or a great doctor or dentist. I mean, it’s a bizarre situation that we’re in, that people seem only to have these standards for the president somehow.”

To which Graham responded, “I believe that Donald Trump believes—he believes in God. He believes in Jesus Christ. His depth—he doesn’t, you know, he went to churches here in New York; he didn’t get a whole lot of teaching.”

There are several things to say in response to the Graham-Metaxas conversation, starting with the theologically distorted and confused charges that were leveled by Graham and amplified by Metaxas. They didn’t make the case that Trump critics are sincere but wrong, or even that they are insincere and unpatriotic. Instead, they felt compelled to portray those with whom they disagree politically as under demonic influences, which for a Christian is about as serious an accusation as there is. It means their opponents are the embodiment of evil, the “enemy,” anti-God, a kind of anti-Christ.

There is no biblical or theological case to support the claim that critics of Donald Trump are under the spell of Satan. It is invented out of thin air, a shallow, wild, and reckless charge meant to be a conversation stopper.

Just ask yourself where this game ends. Do demonic powers explain opposition to all politicians supported by Graham and Metaxas, or to Trump alone? Would they argue that all Christians (and non-Christians) who oppose Trump are under the influence of Satan? What about when it comes to specific issues? Should we ascribe to Beelzebub the fact that many Americans differ with Graham and Metaxas on issues such as gun control, tax cuts, charter schools, federal judges, climate change, the budget for the National Institutes of Health, foreign aid, criminal justice and incarceration, a wall on the southern border, and Medicaid reform? Are we supposed to believe that Adam Schiff’s words during the impeachment inquiry are not his own but those of demons in disguise? Were the testimonies of Ambassador Bill Taylor, Fiona Hill, and Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman truthful accounts offered by admirable public servants that badly hurt the president’s credibility—or the result of demonic powers?

For Graham and Metaxas, it appears that agreeing with them equates to agreeing with God—and disagreeing with them, at least when it comes to Donald Trump, means doing the work of the evil one.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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