Belle Burch and FBI

I am done with people and ex-friends who betrayed me and tried to destroy me. I have proven I have a uncanny knack to see into the future. Alley Valkyrie lived in Portland and incited the Homeless, the same way she did in Eugene. She is now in Paris, doing the same thing. I am going to make a report and send it to the FBI. I want their evil report of me in a Fake Abuser site, removed.

There are many news articles on Portland’s Crime Spree amongst the homeless. The solution is always to be very kind to them, and give them many FREE THINGS! Belle and her Bunch thought I was going to give them FREE STUFF when Burch met with me. SLEEPS knew about our meeting. THEY decided it best Belle now tell me who she was, and that she had gotten arrested. THEY STALKED ME! Their ilk stalk many people!

Members of SLEEPS conspired to deprive me of my Civil Liberties and conspired my right to own Freedom of the Press. They wanted me to suffer like the homeless suffer. They hoped they could ruin me and I end up in the street. Here is other newspapers giving their kind – BAD PRESS!

I am going to give the City Council of Eugene my report and ask for the resignation of Council Person, Semple.

John Presco

President: Royal Rosamond Press

https://rosamondpress.com/2018/06/29/alley-valkyrie-cyber-bully-2/

https://rosamondpress.com/2018/06/29/alley-valkyrie-president-of-nightingale-2/

BY REBECCA WOOLINGTON AND MELISSA LEWIS

One in every two arrests made by the Portland Police Bureau last year was of a homeless person, an analysis by The Oregonian/OregonLive has found.

The number of arrests is dramatically disproportionate to Portland’s homeless population. People experiencing homelessness represent a tiny fraction of the city’s overall population — well below 3 percent even using the biggest estimates.

Yet in 2017, they accounted for 52 percent of arrests.

The arrests affect a staggering percentage of the city’s homeless population. A federal survey last year found 4,177 people living outside, in shelters or transitional housing in all of Multnomah County. That survey likely undercounts the true number of people who are homeless, which could be as much as three times higher.

The newsroom found that 4,437 homeless people — 260 more than the survey counted — were arrested by Portland police last year.

Most often, police arrested homeless people on property, drug or low-level crimes. The vast majority of the arrests, 86 percent, were for non-violent crimes, the analysis found. And more than 1,200 arrests were solely for offenses that are typically procedural — missing court or violating probation or parole.

The leader of the Portland police union defended officers interactions with homeless people, slammed Mayor Ted Wheeler’s response to homelessness and said the city “has become a cesspool.”

“Livability that once made Portland a unique and vibrant city is now replaced with human feces in businesses doorways, in our parks, and on our streets,” Officer Daryl Turner, president of the Portland Police Association, wrote in a lengthy statement posted on Facebook Monday.

“Aggressive panhandlers block the sidewalks, storefronts, and landmarks like Pioneer Square, discouraging people from enjoying our City. Garbage-filled RVs and vehicles are strewn throughout our neighborhoods. Used needles, drug paraphernalia, and trash are common sights lining the streets and sidewalks of the downtown core area, under our bridges, and freeway overpasses. That’s not what our families, business owners, and tourists deserve.”

The union’s statement comes in response to remarks the mayor made to the The Oregonian/OregonLive’s editorial board last week, acknowledging it’s a problem that half of the arrests police made last year were of homeless people.

“I am incensed that once again the Mayor has thrown Portland Police Officers under the bus instead of saying what we all know to be true: that his proposed solutions to our homelessness crisis have failed,” Turner wrote in the statement.

Michael Cox, the mayor’s chief of staff, said the office is reviewing the union’s message.

The newsroom published an analysis last month that showed homeless people accounted for 52 percent of arrests while making up less than 3 percent of the population.

Wheeler told the editorial board that people who are experiencing homelessness or who have mental health and addiction issues should interact less with police and more with social service providers. But he praised officers for trying to connect homeless people with services and said arrests are “their last choice.”

Wheeler said he wants to learn what’s driving the arrests.

In the statement, Turner took particular issue with the mayor telling the newsroom that the city must determine whether officers are profiling homeless people.

“True to form, instead of standing up and leading, Mayor Wheeler has reverted to the, ‘Is there some sort of profiling or implicit bias by the cops’ rhetoric to smokescreen his own failed policies,” the statement says. “Will investigating our officers result in more housing for the homeless? Will it provide more mental health or addiction resources for those in need? Will it resolve the livability issues that Portland residents and business owners face daily? Of course not!”

The city’s police oversight agency, the Independent Police Review, launched an investigation last week to examine how police interact with homeless people in response to The Oregonian/OregonLive’s reporting and a complaint from the American Civil Liberties Union of Oregon. Police Chief Danielle Outlaw requested the investigation.

In the police union’s statement, Turner says the police bureau is understaffed and unable to take needed time to connect homeless people with social services.

The city has failed to give officers the resources they need, the statement says, and the mayor is blaming police for his own policy shortfalls.

Here’s the full statement that’s posted on the union’s Facebook page.

Our City has become a cesspool. Livability that once made Portland a unique and vibrant city is now replaced with human feces in businesses doorways, in our parks, and on our streets. Aggressive panhandlers block the sidewalks, storefronts, and landmarks like Pioneer Square, discouraging people from enjoying our City. Garbage-filled RVs and vehicles are strewn throughout our neighborhoods. Used needles, drug paraphernalia, and trash are common sights lining the streets and sidewalks of the downtown core area, under our bridges, and freeway overpasses. That’s not what our families, business owners, and tourists deserve.

Mayor Wheeler’s public policies have failed. Record tax revenues are being brought into the City; yet what do we have to show for it? I am incensed that once again the Mayor has thrown Portland Police Officers under the bus instead of saying what we all know to be true: that his proposed solutions to our homelessness crisis have failed. What we need is for our City and County leaders to take responsibility for this crisis getting out of hand. They need to put forth actual solutions with actual results and stop throwing hard-earned taxpayer dollars down a black hole.

True to form, instead of standing up and leading, Mayor Wheeler has reverted to the, “Is there some sort of profiling or implicit bias by the cops” rhetoric to smokescreen his own failed policies. Will investigating our officers result in more housing for the homeless? Will it provide more mental health or addiction resources for those in need? Will it resolve the livability issues that Portland residents and business owners face daily? Of course not! It’s more of the same from the Mayor; failed policies and blaming others for his failures.

The Portland Police Bureau has not been given nearly enough resources to fulfill its small piece in addressing the homelessness crisis. We are understaffed. Officers are unable to spend the time needed to connect our homeless to necessary services, whether it be housing, mental health services, drug rehabilitation, or other resources. It’s a recipe for failure to put the burden of the homelessness solution on the Police Bureau’s shoulders and then give us insufficient resources to do the work.

The rank and file of the Portland Police Bureau are working tirelessly to improve livability in our City, preserve public safety, and connect our vulnerable communities to social services. We are the first line resource on the streets serving the public—including the homeless—every day with care and professionalism. The fact that our officers have become the scapegoats for Mayor Wheeler’s failed public policies aimed at solving our homelessness crisis is insulting.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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