“Savior of the World”

And the Lord appeared unto Abram, and said, Unto thy seed will I give this land: and there builded he an altar unto the Lord, who appeared unto him.

Jesus spent two days amongst the Samaritans and they came to believe he was “the Savior of the World”. Did the Jews in Jerusalem believe likewise? Why didn’t Pilate after questioning Jesus, put this title above his had as he hung on a tree? Why didn’t Jesus’ disciple Baptize the Samaritan BELIEVERS?

Many of the Samaritans from that town believed in him because of the woman’s testimony, “He told me everything I ever did.” 40 So when the Samaritans came to him, they urged him to stay with them, and he stayed two days. 41 And because of his words many more became believers.

42 They said to the woman, “We no longer believe just because of what you said; now we have heard for ourselves, and we know that this man really is the Savior of the world.”

Did the Samaritans look under the Great Oak for the Return of the Lord for many generations, so THE LORD will make of them a “great nation” as promised?

Jereboam and ten tribes rebelled against Rehoboam for continuing the practice of his father of worshipping Chemosh. Jereboam did not build altars to a bull or calf. This is a smear tactic of the Scribes of Judah that drives a wedge between the Samaritans and the Jews of Judah. Jereboam and Ten Tribes rebel against Rehoboam and his Moabite deity. They are dispersed all over the world. As the Good Shepherd, Jesus of The Oak and Well, brings them back into the fold, not at Jerusalem, but Shechem.

The days of cherry-picking Jesus to make him your personal savior, your shamer of human genitalia, your Lord of Rednecks, your King of Trump the false messiah, are over. The Jews do not get to mistreat the Palestinians. Putin gets no part in The Savior of the World who knew the Mosaic Laws regarding a widow, and thus told the Woman at the Well how she came by her husbands, and, the one she had now, was……………….not Kosher.  Either you believe Jesus was ‘The Savior of the World’ or you don’t. You Days of Guessing Games, have come to an end!

I have seen God. He forces my hand at every turn. He has left me nothing but by my cat I call Brembe, who for the last two days has lay at my feet. He hugs my feet, and rests his head against them. He gently puts his claws into my skin, and holds on. He sleeps two feet away from me as I type. Everyone else has forsaken me – as foretold! But for God, I would be utterly alone. You can find us under a Great Oak Tree.

Jon Presco ‘The Nazarite’

According to the Hebrew Bible, Chemosh (Phoenician: 𐤊𐤌𐤔) (/ˈkmɒʃ/) [a] was the god of the Moabites[1] The etymology of “Chemosh” is unknown.[2][3] He is also known from Ebla as Kamish.[4]

While he is most readily associated with the Moabites, according to Judges 11:23-24 he seems to have been the national deity of the Ammonites as well.

According to the Hebrew Bible, the worship of this god, “the abomination of Moab,” was introduced at Jerusalem by Solomon (1 Kings 11:7), but was abolished by Josiah (2 Kings 23:13). (Eleventh-century Jewish commentator Rashi quotes a tradition that Solomon’s wives built the temples to Chemosh and other deities, and that Solomon is considered responsible for not stopping them.)[5] On the Moabite stone, Mesha (2 Kings 3:5) ascribed his victories over the king of Israel to this god, “and Chemosh drove him out from before me.”[6]

Genesis 12 King James Version (KJV)

12 Now the Lord had said unto Abram, Get thee out of thy country, and from thy kindred, and from thy father’s house, unto a land that I will shew thee:

And I will make of thee a great nation, and I will bless thee, and make thy name great; and thou shalt be a blessing:

And I will bless them that bless thee, and curse him that curseth thee: and in thee shall all families of the earth be blessed.

So Abram departed, as the Lord had spoken unto him; and Lot went with him: and Abram was seventy and five years old when he departed out of Haran.

And Abram took Sarai his wife, and Lot his brother’s son, and all their substance that they had gathered, and the souls that they had gotten in Haran; and they went forth to go into the land of Canaan; and into the land of Canaan they came.

And Abram passed through the land unto the place of Sichem, unto the plain of Moreh. And the Canaanite was then in the land.

And the Lord appeared unto Abram, and said, Unto thy seed will I give this land: and there builded he an altar unto the Lord, who appeared unto him.

And he removed from thence unto a mountain on the east of Bethel, and pitched his tent, having Bethel on the west, and Hai on the east: and there he builded an altar unto the Lord, and called upon the name of the Lord.

Shechem was the place appointed, after Solomon‘s death,[citation needed] for the meeting of the people of Israel and the investiture of his son Rehoboam as king; the meeting ended in the secession of the ten northern tribes, and Shechem, fortified by Jeroboam, became the capital of the new kingdom (1 Kings 12:1; 14:17; 2 Chronicles 10:1).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeroboam

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shechem

Let’s now tell the fascinating tale of Shechem and its oak. Shechem, the first city in the Promised Land to be mentioned in the Bible, is located approximately 45 kilometers directly north of Jerusalem. Scholars agree the tree was almost certainly an oak. As if to send up a flare alerting us to its special significance, there, by the tree, three ‘firsts’ occurred:

  • In the past, God had only spoken to Abram (12:1); here by the oak tree He appeared to him — the first of three recorded appearances in his life. (See also 17:1 and 18:1.) Describing this event, Hamilton (1990, p. 377) says, “Here the mode of revelation shifts to a theophany, Yahweh appeared to Abram. The shift is not incidental.” Such an appearance reinforces the assurance that a divine intervention of great significance has occurred.
  • The first declaration made in the Promised Land of history’s most amazing promises occurred here. In fact, the announcement of these promises was the very purpose of God’s appearance to Abram;
  • The first of seven altars built by the patriarchs was erected here. The urgent way the text reads gives the impression that barely had God disappeared than Abram built an altar to worship Him.

Shechem first appears in the Hebrew Bible in Genesis 12:6-8, which says that Abraham reached the “great tree of Moreh” at Shechem and offered sacrifice nearby. Genesis, Deuteronomy, Joshua and Judges hallow Shechem over all other cities of the land of Israel.[6] According to Genesis (12:6-7) Abram “built an altar to the Lord who had appeared to him … and had given that land to his descendants” at Shechem. The Bible states that on this occasion, God confirmed the covenant he had first made with Abraham in Harran, regarding the possession of the land of Canaan. In Jewish tradition, the old name was understood in terms of the Hebrew word shékém — “shoulder, saddle“, corresponding to the mountainous configuration of the place. On a later sojourn, two sons of Jacob, Simeon (Hebrew Bible) and Levi, were said to have avenged their sister Dinah‘s rape by “Shechem the son of Hamor the Hivite, the prince of the land” of Shechem by killing all of the city’s male inhabitants.

Following the settlement of the Israelites in Canaan after their Exodus from Egypt, according to the biblical narrative, Joshua assembled the Israelites at Shechem and asked them to choose between serving the god who had delivered them from Egypt, the gods which their ancestors had served on the other side of the Euphrates River, or the gods of the Amorites in whose land they now lived. The people chose to serve the god of the Bible, a decision which Joshua recorded in the Book of the Law of God, and he then erected a memorial stone “under the oak that was by the sanctuary of the Lord” in Shechem.[7] The oak is associated with the Oak of Moreh where Abram had set up camp during his travels in this area.[8]

Shechem and its surrounding lands were given as a Levitical city to the Kohathites.[9]

Owing to its central position, no less than to the presence in the neighborhood of places hallowed by the memory of Abraham (Genesis 12:6, 7; 34:5), Jacob’s Well (Genesis 33:18-19; 34:2, etc.), and Joseph’s tomb (Joshua 24:32), the city was destined to play an important part in the history of Israel.[citation needed] Jerubbaal (Gideon), whose home was at Ophrah, visited Shechem, and his concubine who lived there was mother of his son Abimelech (Judges 8:31). She came from one of the leading Shechemite families who were influential with the “Lords of Shechem” (Judges 9:1-3, wording of the New Revised Standard Version and New American Bible Revised Edition).[10]

After Gideon’s death, Abimelech was made king (Judges 9:1-45). Jotham, the youngest son of Gideon, made an allegorical speech on Mount Gerizim in which he warned the people of Shechem about Abimelech’s future tyranny (Judges 9:7-20). When the city rose in rebellion three years later, Abimelech took it, utterly destroyed it, and burnt the temple of Baal-berith where the people had fled for safety. The city was rebuilt in the 10th century BC and was probably the capital of Ephraim (1 Kings 4). Shechem was the place appointed, after Solomon‘s death,[citation needed] for the meeting of the people of Israel and the investiture of his son Rehoboam as king; the meeting ended in the secession of the ten northern tribes, and Shechem, fortified by Jeroboam, became the capital of the new kingdom (1 Kings 12:1; 14:17; 2 Chronicles 10:1).

After the kings of Israel moved, first to Tirzah,[11] and later on to Samaria, Shechem lost its importance, and we do not hear of it until after the fall of Jerusalem (587 BC; Jeremiah 12:5). The events connected with the restoration were to bring it again into prominence. When, on his second visit to Jerusalem, Nehemias expelled the grandson of the high priest Eliashib (probably the Manasse of Josephus, “Antiq.”, XI, vii, viii) and with him the many Jews, priests and laymen, who sided with the rebel, these betook themselves to Shechem; a schismatic temple was then erected on Mount Garizim and thus Shechem became the “holy city” of the Samaritans. The latter, who were left unmolested while the orthodox Jews were chafing under the heavy hand of Antiochus IV (Antiq., XII, v, 5, see also Antinomianism in the Books of the Maccabees) and welcomed with open arms every renegade who came to them from Jerusalem (Antiq., XI, viii, 7), fell about 128 BC before John Hyrcanus, and their temple was destroyed (“Antiq.”, XIII, ix, 1).

New Testament[edit]

In Acts 7:16 the place is called Sychem. It is not known whether Sychar in the Gospel of John 4:5 refers to Shechem or to a nearby village. Shechem is also the location of Jacob’s Well, where John 4:5–6 describes Jesus‘ meeting with the woman of Samaria. Some of its inhabitants were of the number of the “Samaritans” who believed in Jesus when he tarried two days in the neighborhood.[12] The city must have been visited by the Apostles on their way from Samaria to Jerusalem (Acts 8:25).

Jeroboam was the son of Nebat (Douay-Rheims: Nabat), a member of the Tribe of Ephraim of Zereda. His mother,[3] named Zeruah (צרוע “leprous”) was a widow. (1 Kings 11:26) He had at least two sons, Abijah [4] and Nadab, who succeeded him on the throne.

While still a young man, King Solomon made him superintendent over his tribesmen in the building of the fortress Millo in Jerusalem and of other public works, and he naturally became conversant with the widespread discontent caused by the extravagances which marked the reign of Solomon.[5]

Influenced by the words of the prophet Ahijah (1 Kings 11:29–39), he began to form conspiracies with the view of becoming king of the ten northern tribes; but these were discovered, and he fled to Egypt, where he remained under the protection of pharaoh Shishak until the death of Solomon. After this event he returned and participated in a delegation sent to ask the new king Rehoboam to reduce taxes.[6] After Rehoboam rejected their petition, ten of the tribes withdrew their allegiance to the house of David and proclaimed Jeroboam their king, forming the northern kingdom of Israel (Samaria). Only the tribes of Judah and Benjamin remained to form the new kingdom of Judah, loyal to Rehoboam.[7]

Jeroboam rebuilt and fortified Shechem as the capital of the northern kingdom, and fearing that pilgrimages to the temple in Jerusalem prescribed by the Law might be an occasion for his people to go back to their old allegiance, he built two state temples [8] with golden calves, one in Bethel and the other in Dan.[5] Although criticised for his cultic activities in 1 Kings 12:25–33, calf worship was not new in Israelite ritual, but a reintroduction of earlier ritual. Bethel and Dan were already established cultic sites.

According to 1 Kings 13:1–6, while Jeroboam was engaged in offering incense at Bethel, a “man of God” warned him that “a son named Josiah will be born to the house of David”, who would destroy the altar (referring to King Josiah of Judah who would rule approximately three hundred years later). Attempting to arrest the prophet for his bold words of defiance, Jeroboam’s hand was “dried up”, and the altar before which he stood was rent asunder. At the entreaty of the man of God, his hand was restored to him again, but the miracle made no abiding impression on him.[9] Jeroboam offered hospitality to the man of God but this was declined, not out of contempt but in obedience to the command of God.[10] The prophecy is fulfilled in 2 Kings 23:15–16.

This “man of God” who warned Jeroboam has been equated with a seer named Iddo.[11]

John 4 New International Version (NIV)

Jesus Talks With a Samaritan Woman

Now Jesus learned that the Pharisees had heard that he was gaining and baptizing more disciples than John— although in fact it was not Jesus who baptized, but his disciples. So he left Judea and went back once more to Galilee.

Now he had to go through Samaria. So he came to a town in Samaria called Sychar, near the plot of ground Jacob had given to his son Joseph. Jacob’s well was there, and Jesus, tired as he was from the journey, sat down by the well. It was about noon.

When a Samaritan woman came to draw water, Jesus said to her, “Will you give me a drink?” (His disciples had gone into the town to buy food.)

The Samaritan woman said to him, “You are a Jew and I am a Samaritan woman. How can you ask me for a drink?” (For Jews do not associate with Samaritans.[a])

10 Jesus answered her, “If you knew the gift of God and who it is that asks you for a drink, you would have asked him and he would have given you living water.”

11 “Sir,” the woman said, “you have nothing to draw with and the well is deep. Where can you get this living water? 12 Are you greater than our father Jacob, who gave us the well and drank from it himself, as did also his sons and his livestock?”

13 Jesus answered, “Everyone who drinks this water will be thirsty again, 14 but whoever drinks the water I give them will never thirst. Indeed, the water I give them will become in them a spring of water welling up to eternal life.”

15 The woman said to him, “Sir, give me this water so that I won’t get thirsty and have to keep coming here to draw water.”

16 He told her, “Go, call your husband and come back.”

17 “I have no husband,” she replied.

Jesus said to her, “You are right when you say you have no husband. 18 The fact is, you have had five husbands, and the man you now have is not your husband. What you have just said is quite true.”

19 “Sir,” the woman said, “I can see that you are a prophet. 20 Our ancestors worshiped on this mountain, but you Jews claim that the place where we must worship is in Jerusalem.”

21 “Woman,” Jesus replied, “believe me, a time is coming when you will worship the Father neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem. 22 You Samaritans worship what you do not know; we worship what we do know, for salvation is from the Jews. 23 Yet a time is coming and has now come when the true worshipers will worship the Father in the Spirit and in truth, for they are the kind of worshipers the Father seeks. 24 God is spirit, and his worshipers must worship in the Spirit and in truth.”

25 The woman said, “I know that Messiah” (called Christ) “is coming. When he comes, he will explain everything to us.”

26 Then Jesus declared, “I, the one speaking to you—I am he.”

The Disciples Rejoin Jesus

27 Just then his disciples returned and were surprised to find him talking with a woman. But no one asked, “What do you want?” or “Why are you talking with her?”

28 Then, leaving her water jar, the woman went back to the town and said to the people, 29 “Come, see a man who told me everything I ever did. Could this be the Messiah?” 30 They came out of the town and made their way toward him.

31 Meanwhile his disciples urged him, “Rabbi, eat something.”

32 But he said to them, “I have food to eat that you know nothing about.”

33 Then his disciples said to each other, “Could someone have brought him food?”

34 “My food,” said Jesus, “is to do the will of him who sent me and to finish his work. 35 Don’t you have a saying, ‘It’s still four months until harvest’? I tell you, open your eyes and look at the fields! They are ripe for harvest. 36 Even now the one who reaps draws a wage and harvests a crop for eternal life, so that the sower and the reaper may be glad together. 37 Thus the saying ‘One sows and another reaps’ is true. 38 I sent you to reap what you have not worked for. Others have done the hard work, and you have reaped the benefits of their labor.”

Many Samaritans Believe

39 Many of the Samaritans from that town believed in him because of the woman’s testimony, “He told me everything I ever did.” 40 So when the Samaritans came to him, they urged him to stay with them, and he stayed two days. 41 And because of his words many more became believers.

42 They said to the woman, “We no longer believe just because of what you said; now we have heard for ourselves, and we know that this man really is the Savior of the world.”

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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