Trump Cries “Treason!”

Rena and I met in July of 1970. The war in Vietnam was being fought to prevent the spread of Russian and Chinese Communism. Firfy thousand Americans died fighting the Reds in a undeclared war. Today, the Russians are the friends of our President, and his evangelical base in the Red States. Russian State Television just took Trump’s side and attacked the FBI. Russia supplied North Vietnam with arms that killed our troops. They knew McCain was being treated poorly, and allowed it. Trump insulted John, and his goons squealed with delight!

As predicted, Trump-Jesus declared holy COLD WAR on the Democratic party. Trump has taken us back to 1970. I suspect he is getting lessons from Neo-Confederates, some of them, ministers. I can not say how many of the Southern Rosamonds were Loyalists in both our wars. A line has been drawn in the sand that will declare half of America for Law and Order, and the other, against it. I wonder if investors are putting their stock in another market now that the writing is on the wall. The stock market fell 666 on Friday.

https://www.cnn.com/2018/02/02/politics/pentagon-nuclear-posture-review-russian-drone/index.html

My great grandfather and his brother fought with Francis Marion who Gibson played in the movie ‘The Patriot’. To have lived in the woods with the most beautiful woman you have ever seen – while in survival mode – is an experience I will never hide, or throw away! I was a anti-cold war radical. Did I make the FBI list?

My kindred founded the Abolitionist Republican Party who put blacks in office down south after the real traitors lost their war against the Feds. These fake Red State Moralists have no right to tell anyone what to do. They raised arms against the United States. There were alternatives. The phony excuses are over. Some folks are always looking for a fight. My kindred whooped them last time. I’m talking about the Forty-Eighters! John Fremont was the first Presidential candidate for the Republican party.

I suggest the Military Budget be cut in half because the Commander in Chief failed to protect the Justice Department. War Taxes should be given to the middleclass.

Jon Presco

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3276163/You-clap-want-live-North-Korean-defector-reveals-truth-Kim-Jong-s-staged-public-appearances-tells-citizens-jailed-liking-wrong-TV-show.html

https://rosamondpress.com/2017/12/10/restoring-the-republican-party/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/06/04/jessie-ann-benton-fremont/

Jessie Scouts were irregular soldiers during the American Civil War on the side of the Union who operated in territory of the Confederate States of America in the southern United States in insurgency missions.[1][2] The unit was created by John C. Frémont and named in honour of his wife, rather than of a Colonel Jessie, who was himself a myth.[3] The initial Jessie Scout unit was formed in St. Louis, Missouri early in the war as the plan to develop independent scouts was implemented. The first man to command the scouts was Charles C. Carpenter.[4][5] The Jessie Scouts wore Confederate uniforms with a white handkerchief over their shoulders to signify their allegiance to friendly troops, and number around 58 for much of the war, commanded by Major Henry Young.[6]

http://www.jessiescouts.com/Jessie%20Scouts%20Home.html

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2000/jun/15/news.melgibson

http://www.patriotshistoryusa.com/teaching-materials/bonus-materials/american-heroes-francis-marion/

After that things are a little clearer. WE know that Samuel grew up in the Abbeville District, SC. He may have been married more than once as his will mentions a daughter Polly (Mary) that was not the daughter of his wife Sarah Hodges.His wife Sarah was from a neighboring plantation and she was 10-15 years younger than Samuel.

Samuel enlisted in the militia around 1776-77 and served as a Lieutenant under Captain Adam Crain Jones and Colonel Robert Anderson (for whom Anderson County, SC was named.) In 1782 he was appointed Captain and served at the Siege of Ninety-Six and the Battle of Kettle Creek in Wilkes County, GA on Feb. 14, 1779 during the Revolutionary War. This battle enabled the revolutionists to halt the British advance in Georgia after the capture of Savannah. According to Samuel’s great-grandson James Oliver Rosamond, Samuel served as a scout and spy under the direction of Colonel Francis Marion, the “Swamp Fox”.

A copy of Samuel’s will is contained in another web page on this site at http://rosamond.ourfamily.com/samswill.htm.

President Donald Trump called Democrats’ stone-faced reaction to his State of the Union address “treasonous” and “un-American” during a visit to a manufacturing plant in Cincinnati, Ohio Monday.

Trump described Republicans “going totally crazy wild” during his State of the Union remarks one week ago, while Democrats remained seated and stone-faced for the majority of the speech. “They were like death,” Trump lamented. “And un-American. Un-American.”

But the reaction, he said, was also something much worse.

Vaguely noting that “someone” called the Democratic reactions “‘treasonous,'” Trump said he agreed. “I mean, yeah, I guess. Why not?…Can we call that treason? Why not? I mean, they certainly didn’t seem to love our country very much.”

Though the word has gotten plenty of attention in Washington of late, not standing during a speech certainly does not count as treason.

Trump’s speech — billed by the White House as another push for the newly-passed Republican tax plan and “not a political event” — swung wildly from the tax package’s finer selling points to the president’s rosy outlook on 2018 while he leveled hard knocks against Democrats, specifically House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi. As Trump spoke, the stock markets he once used as an example of his positive impact on the economy continued their downward slide.

Section 3.

Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying war against them, or in adhering to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort. No person shall be convicted of treason unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act, or on confession in open court.

The Congress shall have power to declare the punishment of treason, but no attainder of treason shall work corruption of blood, or forfeiture except during the life of the person attainted.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loyalist_(American_Revolution)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Loyalist

Their chief weapon was surprise, and the ambush was their specialty. They attacked swiftly, and then vanished into the swamps before reinforcements could arrive. British officers soon became obsessed with capturing the Swamp Fox and his men. “Our army will be destroyed by these damned driblets,” one British general raged. Marion actively gathered intelligence and disrupted the redcoats’ supply and communication lines. Yet the British seemed powerless to stop him. As his name and reputation spread, scores of volunteers rode into the lowlands to join his band. The once-strong Loyalist militia refused to fight him and, as Colonel Marion observed, “the Torreys are so affrighted with my little Excursions that many is moving off to Georgia with their Effects; other are rund into Swamps.”

Covenanters started their migration to North America by way of Ireland. Having come to Ireland for religious, economic, and political reasons throughout the Seventeenth Century, Scottish Presbyterians, including Covenanters, once again for religious, economic, and political reasons felt compelled to migrate again. The migration is usually dated from the year 1717, when preacher William Tennent, founder of Log College, the first Presbyterian seminary in North America, came with his family to the Philadelphia area. In North America Covenanters became known as members of the Reformed Presbyterian Church. They were among the most vocal agitators for independence from Great Britain and volunteered in large numbers as soldiers in the revolutionary armies. The Covenanters were opposed to slavery, and in 1800 the Reformed Church voted to outlaw slave-holding among its members.

In 1825, in the village of Fenagh in county Leitrim in Ireland, a
gang of Catholic youths attacked the Rosamond home. The Rosamonds were
staunch Protestants. James, aged 20 (born 1805) and his brother Edward, aged
15, attempted to protect their mother. A shot was fired by Edward and a
youth was dead. The boys fled to Canada. James went to Merrickville where he
worked for James Merrick as a weaver. Edward, still fearing arrest, worked
his way eventually to Memphis, Tennessee.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Covenanter

 

When you learn to read between the political lines of the Evangelical Neo-Confederate Redneck Party, you get a clear picture of the Jesus they expect to come save them – and the Red State South!

1. He’s got to be a singer in a Country Western band.
2. He’s got to be able to play ‘Somehwere Over The Rainbow’ – on a saw.
3. He’s got to be able to do a mean Hambone.
4. He is born of real Patrtiots, Confederate Veterans, and Arkansas Moonshiners.
5. His sisters are named Lillie Mae, and Arizona Zoe.
6. Ancestors must be Texas born.
7. Must be able to deliver a bone-chilling Rebel Yell.

Well, if the shoe fits……! However, I do have an older brother who is a racist woman hater, who refused to pay Income Tax.

Jon ‘The New Highwayman’ Presco

RICHARD OGLE HODGES – SON OF SUSAN OGLE HODGES & JOHN HODGES OF OMAHAW HILL, PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY, MARYLAND. ENLISTED IN THE PALMETTO GUARDS, SOUTH CAROLINA .

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palmetto_Regiment

Now the whole city is the Temple, realized under one roof.
The Tree of Light is prominent in the foreground, standing above the Peace Forest of Jerusalem; children of New Jerusalem are preparing it for the celebration of the new Millennium.

They took palm branches and went out to meet him, shouting, “Hosanna!” “Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord!” “Blessed is the King of Israel!”

WILLIAM CAPERS ROSAMOND, Druggist. Jasper Alabama, son of Nathaniel J. and Amy (Powell) Rosamond, was born in Lawrence (my note: s/b Laurens Co.) District, S.C. in 1833, worked on a farm until he was eighteen, whe he began the study of medicine at Northport, Ala., and was licensed to practice at Tuscaloosa, this State (my note: Alabama). He came to Walker County in 1856, and soon attained an extensive practice here. In 1862, he joined the Confederate Army, serving as a Private; was appointed Assistant-Surgeon in General Furgeson’s brigade, and saw service in Tennessee, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. He was at Shiloh and Vicksburg, and served under Bragg and Johnston in Tennessee.

More About Warner Thelma Rosamond:
Record Change: 17 Apr 1999

Notes for William Monroe Free:
William Monroe Free died of a heart attack in his sleep. He and his bride, Warner Thelma Ros amond moved from the Choctaw County hills around Weir to Drew in Sunflower County, MS in 191 9 where they are shown on the 1920 census. He was 26 and she was 23 years of age. They had t en children with two dying as infants. They also had a set of identical twin girls, Arlene an d Earlene. According to Arlene Free Carter, “Warner and Monroe’s children were talented. Th ey could play several stringed instruments: guitar, fiddle,and mandolin as well as piano, org an, and drums. They could also sing. In the late 1930’s the boys played together in a ban d and called themselves the ‘Delta Clodhoppers.’ They played at barn dances around the countr y side. They would all jump into the wagon and go to the barn dances.”

William Richard Rosamond I Will29, born 26 Dec 1887 in Weir, Choctaw, Ms, Usa; died 19 Sep 1976 in Greenwood, Leflore, Ms, Usa. He married Virginia Lee Knight Virgie29 20 Jun 1912 in , Choctaw, Ms, Usa; born 14 Jul 1897; died 19 Sep 1979 in Greenwood, Leflore, Ms, Usa.

Notes for William Richard Rosamond I Will:
William Richard “Will” Rosamond and his wife Virginia Lee Knight are buried
in Evergreen Cemetery, Carrolton, Carrolton County, MS., Lot #403. Will was an excellent bask et weaver and as a young boy he spent many hours at an Indian Reservation near Ackerman, Choc taw County, MS., squatting and watching them weave baskets. Ila Mae, his daughter, remember s him stating that he was a “hobo for a few years and that he rode the train through Meridia n [MS].” He was a good singer with a fine bass voice. He could even make music by slapping h is knees and chest. He could also play a cross cut saw, and make it sing! He was an excellen t story teller and a lover of riddles. His daughter, Maxine, stated that in the 1920’s afte r his mother, Nancy Bowie Rosamond sold the old home place, Will and wife Virgie moved from t he hills around Weir,
Choctaw, MS to the Delta area and share-cropped. They lived in several different counties, i ncluding Sharkey, Washington, and Humphreys. When his sister, Lillie Mae, wife of Wade Rosam ond died ca 1918 in Drew, Sunflower, MS., Will and Virgie took Lillie and Wade’s three younge st children so raise (Arthur Borden age 9; Arthena [Jackie] age 7; and Shirley Denver age 2) . From 1943 to 1946 Will and his family lived in Pascagoula, Jackson, MS., where he worked i n the Ingalls Shipyard. In 1946 they moved to Carrolton, Carrolton County, MS., where they fa rmed on Mr. Dale Mann’s farm. From 1953 to 1973 they were living in California.

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Re: Jane Roseman/Rosamond> Liddell
Posted by: Jimmy Rosamond
Date: May 04, 2001 at 19:41:13
In Reply to: Re: Jane Roseman/Rosamond> Liddell by Rhonda Lunsford
of 209

Hello Rhonda. I only have two Blacks listed. The first is Arthur Black who married Nannie Sarah Rosamond. I have no information on Arthur Black, but Nannie Sarah Rosamond Black was born 1884, died 1947. She was the daughter of Thomas Newton Rosamond and Nancy L. Bowie. They had one daughter that I know of named Sarah Mae Black, born in 1925 and died in 1950 at age 25.

I don’t know how much data this site will allow to be posted, but I will try to paste below a register report for the ancestry of Jane Rosamond Liddell. Here goes.

First Generation
-, that Thomas was really his father-in-law, Thomas Wilson. John arrived in Annapolis aboard the ship ‘Forward’ in December 1725. He was tried in Berkshire, England, Oxford Circuit Court. The ship was owned by Johathon Forward who was a contractor transporting prisoners for England to their colonies. Ruth Menhel, another of our current researchers, shows him located in Prince George’s County Maryland as a Corporal in some sort of military organization.

John apparently relocated to Virginia where he married Sarah Wilson. Barbara Morgan located ship records showing that Sarah arrived in Virginia with her Mother and sisters in 1740. This could be where WSR erroneously picked up that year for Thomas’ arrival in the colonies. Thomas Wilson was Sarah’s father, and had been in Virginia since 1737. John and Sarah relocated their family to the Abbeville District of South Carolina no later than 1765.

The first instance of John being in Virginia is from Chalkley’s Chronicles showing hin in Augusta County in 1747. Then in 1765, there is a record in Chalkley’s that says the property he and Sarah owned was sold to them by a man who didn’t own the property himself. This apparently caused a problem, because the final record in Chalkley’s shows them selling the land to someone else with the courts permission. The next record of him is a land grant dated 1767 in Abbeville District, SC. That dates their move to SC between 1765 and 1767.

John was in the militia in Prince Georges County, MD in the 1730s (1734-37) as a private serving under a CPT Beall.

John was a master shoemaker in Augusta County, VA in the 1750s. This is documented in Chalkleys.

3. Samuel Null Rosamond, R255, M. Born ca 1751 in Augusta County, Virginia. Samuel Null died in Anderson District, SC on 8 Nov 1814, he was 63. Buried in Williamston, SC. Occupation: Farmer, Soldier.

Again there is some controversy regarding Captain Samuel Rosamond. William Sam Rosamond shows him as being born in County Leitrim, Ireland arouund 1738. This is based on the supposistion that his father John came to the US in 1740. If we accept that John arrived in 1725, and Samuel’s mother, Sarah Wilson, didn’t come to Virginia until 1740, Samuel would have to have been born after 1740. Barbara Morgan estimates that he was born sometime between 1745 and 1755. If we assume that John and Sarah were married ca. 1749, 1750 would be an approximate date for his birth.

After that things are a little clearer. WE know that Samuel grew up in the Abbeville District, SC. He may have been married more than once as his will mentions a daughter Polly (Mary) that was not the daughter of his wife Sarah Hodges.His wife Sarah was from a neighboring plantation and she was 10-15 years younger than Samuel.

Samuel enlisted in the militia around 1776-77 and served as a Lieutenant under Captain Adam Crain Jones and Colonel Robert Anderson (for whom Anderson County, SC was named.) In 1782 he was appointed Captain and served at the Siege of Ninety-Six and the Battle of Kettle Creek in Wilkes County, GA on Feb. 14, 1779 during the Revolutionary War. This battle enabled the revolutionists to halt the British advance in Georgia after the capture of Savannah. According to Samuel’s great-grandson James Oliver Rosamond, Samuel served as a scout and spy under the direction of Colonel Francis Mariion, the “Swamp Fox”.

A copy of Samuel’s will is contained in another web page on this site at http://rosamond.ourfamily.com/samswill.htm.

Several women have joined the DAR based on the Revolutionary War record of Capt. Samuel Rosamond: Mrs. Josie Dean Rosamond HILBUN (275253); Miss Nannie SULLIVANT; Mrs. Molly Rosamond SULLIVANT; Mrs. Mary Rosamond RHYNE (251829); Mrs. Allison Sullivant GUYTON (254893) – – – From 1965 DAR book.

In Feb 1785 when Samuel Null was 34, he married Sarah (Salley) Hodges, H322, F, daughter of Richard Hodges, M & Elizabeth (Betty) Jones, F, in South Carolina. Born ca 1765 in South Carolina. Sarah (Salley) died in SC or MS on 24 Apr 1844, she was 79.

Ruth Menhekl noted that Sarah’s father, whose name is unknown, also served in the Revolutionary War. It is uncertain whether Sarah died in SC, or if she traveled to Missisiippi with the family when they migrated in the early 1800s.

They had the following children:
12       i.       Margaret “Peggy”, F (1786-1872)
13       ii.       Elizabeth, F (ca1786-)
14       iii.       John Hodges, M (1789-)
15       iv.       Sarah, F (>1790-)
16       v.       Richard, M (1795-1856)
17       vi.       Addison, M (1803-1873)
18       vii.       James, M (ca1807-)
19       viii.       Mary, F
20       ix.       Lucinda Jane, F
21       x.       Jane, F

4. James Rosamond[6],[7],[8],[9],[10], R255, M. Born ca 1754 in Augusta County, Virginia. James died in Abbeville District, SC bef 10 Jul 1806, he was 52. Occupation: Farmer.

[11]James served in the Revolutionary War in the Ninety-Six District before and after the fall of Charleston. The Siege of Charleston occurrend in 1790 by the British Army led by Sir Henry Clinton. James furnished 150 lbs. of pork to the militia in 1782. He obtained land grants as a result of his service in the war. An abstract of his service in the Revolutionary War is on file at the Historical Commission in South Carolina.

James may have been married to a Dorothy/Norah Hodges (daughter or John Hodges and Elizabeth ?) prior to marrying Mary Daugherty. No one has been able to fine any record of this. Barbara Morgan lists a Lettice Jones as a possibility for James’ first wife. Much depends on when his first wife died, and the date he married Mary.

In the first national census in 1790, James, his brother Samuel, and his mother Sarah were the only Rosamond Heads of Household listed in South Carolina.

From info received from Ruth: “The census listing shows him as living in the Ninety-Six District 1 male & 1 female age 40-50, 2 males under 16 years and 9 slaves.” This can’t be the 1790 census data as that census didn’t break down the ages except the males, and that only younger and older than 16. Also, there is no 40-50 age group for the 1800 census. This breakdown didn’t occur until at least 1830, so where did this data come from?

A transcripted copy of his will is located in the SC Archives in Columbia, SC. A copy also appears on a separate page within this web site. James’ will was recorded in Abbeville County, 10 July 1806.

He and his brother Samuel are mentioned in their sister Jean Rosamond’s will.

From “Mississippi Ancestors”
“ROSAMOND, James, Soldier, S.C., b. Abbeville, S.C., d. aft 8 June 1805, Abbeville, S.C., m ca 1778-79, wf Mary Dohorty, Abbeville, S.C., d aft 15 July 1795; ch, Thomas (Rev.), b 1788, Abbeville Dist., S.C., d. prob Jan 1862 Yalobusha Co., Miss., m Elizabeth A. Williams, ca 1820-21, b 20 Apr 1805, Kershaw Dist., S.C., d 23 Apr 1857, Yalobusha Co., Miss.; Nathaniel, b ca 1786, m (1) Mary Lighon, (2) Amy Powell; Benjamin, b ca 1784; Samuel b ca 1782; Mary, b ca 1780.

ca 1778 when James was 24, he first married Lettice ?, F. Born ca 1757. Lettice died ca 1793, she was 36.

The big question is who was James’ first wife???? One record shows her as Lettice, others speculate that she was Dorothy Hodges, sister to Sarah and Richard Hodges who married Samuel and Sarah F. Rosamond respectively, and some still believe it could be Mary Doherty (Daugherty), although that now seems very unlikely. If her name was Lettice, she might have been a Jones.

Alternate spellings for Lettice – Letice, Letitia, Lettitia, Leticia, Letticia, …

They had the following children:
i.       Mary, R255, F. Born ca 1780.

1820 Census of Abbeville County shows a Mary Rosamond over 45 years old as a Head of Household with no one else living with her. This is probably her as she is right next door to James’ sons Samuel and Benajmin, and only 11 houses away from Nathaniel Jones Rosamond.

22       ii.       Nathaniel Jones, M (ca1784-ca1840)
23       iii.       Thomas A., M (1787-1861)
24       iv.       Benjamin, M (1790-1870)
53       viii.       Nancy Narcissus, F (1828-1921)

25. Samuel E. Rosamond, R255, M. Born abt 1792 in Abbeville District, SC. Samuel E. died in Attala County, MS ca 1862, he was 70. Was on the census for Attala County, Mississippi in 1850.

In 1850 Samuel owned land in Attala County, MS and 15 slaves. He lived three houses down from his brother Benjamin. Both men were married to Hill sisters.

In 1860 Samuel and Frances were living in the home of their youngest daughter Nancy Ann (Mrs. Elijah Little). They lived next door to Jessie Mays.

In 1812 when Samuel E. was 20, he married Frances E. ‘Fannie’ Hill, H400, F, daughter of John Hill Sr., M & Susannah ?, F, in Abbeville District, SC. Born ca 1785 in Abbeville District, SC. Frances E. ‘Fannie’ died in Attala County, MS ca 1867, she was 82. Buried in Holmes County, MS.

They had the following children:
i.       William Edward, R255, M. Born ca 1817 in Abbeville County, SC. William Edward died in 1889, he was 72. Buried in Franklin, Holmes County, MS. Occupation: Physician / Farmer.

From MS Archives of Descriptive Register of Men in Attala County, MS:
“W.E. Rosamond, age 48, Grey eyes, Dark hair, 5′-6″ tall, dark complexion, Born in Mississippi, Occupation-Physician.”

William Edward first married Emily L. ?, F, in South Carolina. Born ca 1820 in South Carolina. Emily L. died bef 1870, she was 50.

William Edward second married Susan Sally (or Sarah E.?) Davis, D120, F, in Mississippi. Born ca 1835.

54       ii.       Thomas Andrew, M (1818-1887)
55       iii.       Samuel E, M (ca1826-<1860)
56       iv.        Sarah Frances L., F (1827-1905)
v.       Mary C., R255, F. Born on 12 Jun 1828 in South Carolina. Mary C. died in Mississippi on 22 Jun 1873, she was 45. Buried in Kosicusko, MS.

Listed in 1850 Attala County census #200/200; 1860 Attala Co. 1291 p.447, and 1870 Attala Co. #38/38 Beat 4.

Mary C. married Nicholas Smith, S530, M.

vi.       James A., R255, M. Born on 4 Jul 1832 in South Carolina. James A. died in Mississippi on 8 Apr 1855, he was 22. Buried in Attala County, MS.

James is buried in the Rosamond-Sweaney Cemetery. This is the one gravestone that was in good shape when we visited Mississippi in 1999. The property that this cemetery now belongs to the Bufords, but is the property shown as belonging to Sameul Rosamond in his will (Township 14N Range 5 East Sec 4).

vii.       Nancy Ann E., R255, F. Born in 1834.

Listed on Attala Co., Mississippi census #1209/1325 and 1210/1325.

Nancy Ann E. married Elijah Little, L340, M, son of Rolly Little, M & Nancy Ellison, F. Born in 1833 in Mississippi.

57       viii.       Susan V., F (-1893)

26. Samuel Hodges, H322, M. Born on 25 Oct 1788. Samuel died on 25 Apr 1873, he was 84.

Samuel and Elizabeth had six boys and five girls. Don’t know the girls names.

Samuel married Elizabeth Razor, R260, F.

They had the following children:
58       i.       Rosamond, M (1822-)
ii.       Hiram, H322, M. Born in 1820.

iii.       Ruben, H322, M. Born on 6 Dec 1823. Ruben died in 1865, he was 41.

iv.       John, H322, M. John died bef 1890.

v.       Samuel, H322, M.

Fourth Generation
————————————————–

27. Robert Lewis Keown, K500, M. Born on 13 May 1817 in Georgia. Robert Lewis died in Hinds County, Mississippi on 14 Feb 1886, he was 68.

Robert Lewis married Margaret Flowers, F462, F. Born on 1 Feb 1828. Margaret died in Hinds County, Mississippi on 20 Sep 1885, she was 57.

Wife of Robert Lewis Keown was previously shown as Margaret Magee. Per email from Ann Boyer 04 April 2001, her name was actually Margaret Flowers. Ann has extensively researched this line.

They had one child:
i.       Martha Ann, F (1859-1946)

28. James Madison Weems, W520, M. Born on 8 Oct 1809 in South Carolina. James Madison died in Holmes County, Mississippi on 3 Dec 1873, he was 64. Buried in Mississippi.

On 20 Jan 1831 when James Madison was 21, he married Jane C. Speer, S160, F, in Pendleton District, South Carolina. Born on 16 Mar 1813 in South Carolina.

They had the following children:
i.       James Madison, M (1841-1916)
ii.       Hester A., F (~1833-)
iii.       John W., M (~1835-)
iv.       Sarah Ophelia, F (~1842-)
v.       Mary M., F (~1844-)
vi.       Jane Eleanor, F (1847-)
vii.       Eliza J., F (1851-1905)

29. Amy Powell, P400, F. Born in Laurens County, South Carolina. Amy died in 1855 in Northport, Alabama.

Family group sheet from LDS Archives shows Amy’s father’s nane as William Powell and mother as Nancy Bobo. Her date of birth shown on this sheet would make her age inconsistent being the daughter of Ezekial Powell and Margaret Rosamond.

A short biography of William Capers Rosamond, written before 1904, says that his mother, i.e. Amy Powell was born in Kentucky. This again contradicts Ezekiel and Margaret being Amy’s parents.

Another mystery here.

Amy married Nathaniel Jones Rosamond (22) , R255, M, son of James Rosamond (4), M & Lettice ?, F. Born ca 1784 in Abbeville District, SC. Nathaniel Jones died in Abbeville County, SC ca 1840, he was 56. Occupation: Farmer.

Nathaniel Jones Rosamond and second wife Amy Powell were second cousins.

Listed in the 1810 thru 1830 census and is shown owning six slaves in 1810.

They had the following children:
i.       Nancy, F (~1814-)
ii.       Bascaline, F (~1816-)
iii.       Mary, F (~1828-)
41       iv.       William Capers, M (1833-1904)
v.       Martha, F
vi.       Joseph, M

30. John Westfield Rosamond, R255, M. Born on 25 Dec 1824 in Anderson County, SC. John Westfield died in Anderson County, South Carolina on 21 Sep 1912, he was 87. Buried in Anderson County, South Carolina. Occupation: Physician, Farmer.

Information on the descendants of John Westfield Rosamond was provided by Lowry Wilson in an email dated 9/26/2000. Pickens7 genealogy on GenCircles shows birth place as Pickens County, SC. Where the family was located was on the border between Pickens and Anderson County, and the family home was acutally in Anderson County.

abt 1849 when John Westfield was 24, he married Aurelia Adelaide Oliver, O416, F, daughter of Dr. James Oliver, M & Martha Leech, F, in South Carolina. Born on 15 Apr 1832 in South Carolina. Aurelia Adelaide died in Anderson County, South Carolina on 14 Nov 1900, she was 68. Buried in Anderson County, South Carolina.

They had the following children:
i.       Jennie Westfield[21], F (1854-1913)
ii.       Mattie, F (1856-1856)
iii.       Addie, F (1861-1949)
iv.       Dora Jackson, F (1863-1948)
v.       James Oliver, M (1865-1938)
vi.       John Hodges, M (1866-1867)
vii.       R. B., M
viii.       Claude White, M (1873-)
ix.       Maude Leech, F (1877-1916)

31. Samuel Milton Rosamond[22],[23],[24], R255, M. Born on 2 Nov 1820 in South Carolina. Was on the census for Attala County, Mississippi in 1850. Was on the census for Attala County, Mississippi in 1860. Samuel Milton died in Attala County, Mississippi on 9 Mar 1861, he was 40.

Listed in the Attala County, MS census for 1850.
Listed in the Attala County, MS census for 1860 at Township 15, Range 7.

Will recorded in Attala County, MS Wills C-231 & 1862-1868 B-183.
Charles W. Clark and Thomas Stribling Rosamond (his brother) were listed as executors of his estate. According to the will he owned some interest in the Rochester Steam Mill. He owned land E 1/2 of W 1/4 and NE 1/4 of SW 1/4 Section 8, and SE 1/4 of SW 1/4 Section 5, and 20 acres off W 1/2 side of W 1/2 of SE 1/4 Section 8, all in township 15 north of Range 7.

Land was sold to William B. Thompson for $1367.00 on Sept. 2, 1863. Ruth Menhel has a copy of the estate inventory which totaled approximately $2500 cash.

On 17 Dec 1846 when Samuel Milton was 26, he married Mary Jane Morrison, M625, F, daughter of Neil Morrison, M & Jane McCant, F, in Winston County, MS.[25] Born on 28 Feb 1828 in Alabama.

They had the following children:
i.       Deolice, F
ii.       Spartana, F
iii.       Elizer, M
iv.       William Etta, M
v.       Cornelius Milton, M
vi.       Samuel Milton, M
vii.       Annie, F
viii.       Richard Neve, M

32. Thomas Stribling Rosamond[26],[27],[28],[29],[30],[31], R255, M. Born on 1 Jan 1823 in South Carolina. Thomas Stribling died in Attala County, MS on 6 Mar 1908, he was 85. Buried in Attala County, MS. Occupation: Carpenter.

On 19 Jan 1858 when Thomas Stribling was 35, he married Nancy Woodard Dean, D500, F, daughter of Teresa ?, F, in Mississippi. Born on 27 Sep 1837. Nancy Woodard died in Attala County, MS on 25 Feb 1908, she was 70.

They had the following children:
i.       Henrietta, F (1859-)
ii.       Charles Richard, M (1860-1898)
iii.       Felix Ewora, M (1870-1885)
iv.       Thomas Jefferson, M (1863-1863)
v.       Cornelius Joseph, M (1864-)
vi.       John Stribling, M (1874-)
vii.       Mary Theresa “Mollie”, F (1868-)
viii.       Chlotilda Theolia, F (1872-)

33. Addison “Adam” Rosamond[32],[33],[34], R255, M. Born on 25 Apr 1825 in South Carolina. Addison “Adam” died on 17 May 1879, he was 54. Buried in Crowley, TX. Occupation: Farmer, Shoe Maker.

Addison served in the Civil War from Mississippi. After the war, he moved his family in ox drawn carts to current day Tarrant County, TX and settled about twelve miles south of Fort Worth. Only one of his and Julia Holands married.

Listed in the 1860 and 1870 Attala County Census.
According to 1860 Census the family lived in Township 16, Range 7, Burkettsville, MS.

This Addison is the grandfather of William Sam Rosamond, 1925 family researcher.

On 16 Jan 1851 when Addison “Adam” was 25, he married Julia A. Holland, H453, F. Born in 1832 in Georgia.

They had the following children:
i.       William Addison, M (1861-)
ii.       James Hilliard, M (1854-)
iii.       Mary Alice, F (1864-1924)
iv.       John Robert, M (1868-)
v.       Marcene E., F
vi.       Andrew Thomas, M (1858-)

34. Mary Elizabeth Rosamond, R255, F. Born on 9 Feb 1828 in South Carolina. Mary Elizabeth died in Attala County, MS on 28 Feb 1863, she was 35.

On 20 Apr 1843 when Mary Elizabeth was 15, she married Dolphus Drew Pender, P536, M, in Lowndes County, MS. Born on 16 Jan 1813. Dolphus Drew died on 3 Mar 1894, he was 81. Buried in Attala County, MS.

They had the following children:
i.       George W., M (1844-1901)
ii.       James, M
iii.       Lucy Enone, F (1854-1941)

35. John Richard Rosamond[35],[36], R255, M. Born on 23 Jan 1833 in Mississippi.

1900 Census shows John Richard and Sallie had six children.

In 1858 when John Richard was 24, he married Nancy Emma Dean[37], D500, F, in Mississippi. Born on 27 Nov 1840 in Mississippi.

Nancy Emma Dean is the cousin of Thomas Stribling Rosamond’s wife Nancy Woodward Dean.

They had the following children:
i.       Sallie, F
ii.       Oddie, F
iii.       Ed, M
iv.       Tom, M
v.       Warren, M
vi.       Clara Arminta, F (1859-1926)

36. Samuel A. Rosamond, R255, M. Born in 1846 in Mississippi. Samuel A. died in Mississippi. Buried in Winston County, Mississippi.

This Samuel may have been married three times.

On 25 Oct 1874 when Samuel A. was 28, he first married Gracie Whitehead, W330, F, daughter of Joshua Whitehead, M & Sara ?, F, in Winston County, MS. Born ca 1841.

Samuel A. second married Annie E. “Pinkie” Hatcher, H326, F.

They had one child:
i.       Mary, F

37. James Allen Rosamond[15], R255, M. Born on 10 Jul 1853 in Mississippi. James Allen died on 7 Feb 1897, he was 43. Buried in Winston County, MS.

There are two unmarked graves of James & Tincy’s children in the Rosamond Family Burial Grounds in Winston County, MS.

abt 1878 when James Allen was 24, he married Tincy J. Robertson, R163, F, daughter of E. Robertson, M & Jane Coleman, F. Born on 28 Jan 1862. Tincy J. died on 11 Jan 1940, she was 77.

Surname may be Robertson, instead of Roberts.

They had the following children:
i.       Infant, ?
ii.       Infant, ?
iii.       Addison B. “Pat”, F (1893-1963)
iv.       Otho, F (1891-1944)
v.       Jessie Willie, F (1881-1946)
vi.       Mamie, F (~1880-)
vii.       Nora Jane, F (1886-1979)

38. Benjamin Franklin Rosamond[15],[38],[39], R255, M. Born on 4 Jan 1868 in Winston County, MS. Benjamin Franklin died in Mississippi on 21 Jan 1924, he was 56. Buried in Winston County, MS.

1900 Census shows Benjamin and Zoe with 8 children. The list I got from Tim Hisaw lists seven additional children born after 1900. Taht would make a total of fifteen children. I have only twelve listed.

Different sources are shoing Mt. Hebron Cemetery in Winston County and Kemper County, MS. This may be on a county line, or the boundaries may have changed. I need to investigate this.

Benjamin Franklin married Mary Rebecca Arizona “Zoe” Henderson[15], H536, F, daughter of Robert Wilson Henderson, M & Queen V. Calicutt, F. Born on 8 May 1874 in Kemper County, MS. Mary Rebecca Arizona “Zoe” died in Winston County, MS on 16 May 1939, she was 65. Buried in Winston County, MS.

They had the following children:
i.       Henderson Dee, M (1897-1981)
ii.       Dovie, F (ca1899-)
iii.       Mary Dow, F (1899-1984)
iv.       Rutherford, M (ca1900-)
v.       Othello Marshall, M (1900-1932)
vi.       Wilsie Irna, F (1901-1994)
vii.       Etta Ernisteen, F (1903-1986)
viii.       Bernice Howard, M (1904-1908)
ix.       Addison Benjamin, M (1906-1910)
x.       Jessie Theolya (Foley), F (1907-)
xi.       Harvey Lindsey, M (1909-1980)
xii.       James Vardamin, M (1911-1985)

39. Samuel Porter Rosamond, R255, M. Born in 1870 in Mississippi. Adopted in Mississippi.

Samuel Porter married Anne ?, F.

They had one child:
i.       Mary, F

40. John S. Rosamond, R255, M.

John S. married Lenora ?, F.

They had one child:
i.       Frances, F

41. William Capers Rosamond, R255, M. Born on 24 Aug 1833 in Abbeville County, SC. William Capers died in Alabama on 4 Apr 1904, he was 70. Occupation: Physician.

[40]Taken from Northern Alabama biographies:
WILLIAM CAPERS ROSAMOND, Druggist. Jasper Alabama, son of Nathaniel J. and Amy (Powell) Rosamond, was born in Lawrence (my note: s/b Laurens Co.) District, S.C. in 1833, worked on a farm until he was eighteen, whe he began the study of medicine at Northport, Ala., and was licensed to practice at Tuscaloosa, this State (my note: Alabama). He came to Walker County in 1856, and soon attained an extensive practice here. In 1862, he joined the Confederate Army, serving as a Private; was appointed Assistant-Surgeon in General Furgeson’s brigade, and saw service in Tennessee, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. He was at Shiloh and Vicksburg, and served under Bragg and Johnston in Tennessee.

In 1866, Dr. Rosamond returned to Jasper, and practiced medicine until 1878, when he retired from practice on account of his health. He was soon afterward elected to the State Senate from Walker, Jefferson, and Shelby Counties. Since that time he has been engaged in merchandising, and is now a druggist.

Dr. Rosamond was first married in 1856 to Miss Medorah F., daughter of Rev. Jas. H. Freeman, a popular Methodist preacher then living at Tuscaloosa.

There were six children born to this union. viz.: Edward P., Willie L., Ethbert C., Franklin K., Hester May and Amy Lee.

Mrs. Rosamond died November 15, 1882, and the doctor contracted his second marriage December 6, 1883 with Miss Henrietta, daughter of David F. Dinsmore of Lauderville. Mr. Dinsmore was a prominent citizen and held several county offices in Lawrence County. ((my note: ?? was this in Laurens Co, SC ??))

Nathaniel J. Rosamond, Dr. Rosamond’s father, was of French Huguenot origin. His ancestors came to Virginia about the time of the Edict of Nantes (1598). The doctor’s mother, Amy Powell, was born in Kentucky, and came to South Carolina with her parents, and was married there.

Dr. Rosamond is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South and of the Masonic fraternity.

On 6 Nov 1866 when William Capers was 33, he first married Medora “Martha” Frances Freeman, F655, F, daughter of James H. Freeman, M. Born in Jun 1846 in Alabama. Medora “Martha” Frances died in Alabama on 15 Nov 1882, she was 36.

They had the following children:
i.       Edward P., M
ii.       Ethbert C., M
iii.       Franklin K., M
iv.       Hester May, F
v.       Amy Lee, F
vi.       William Lucius, M (~1869-)

On 6 Dec 1883 when William Capers was 50, he second married Henrietta Dinsmore, D525, F, daughter of David F. Dinsmore, M, in Alabama.

42. John Robert William Rosamond MD, R255, M. Born on 31 Mar 1824 in Abbeville District, SC. John Robert William died in Grenada County, MS on 12 Nov 1912, he was 88. Occupation: Physician.

His granddaughter Vera Rosamond Schulz Phillips is quoted in “The History of Grenada County” by Barbara Daigre as saying John Robert William Rosamond graduated from Louisville, KY Medical School in 1857 and served as a doctor during the Civil War.

On 5 Dec 1865 when John Robert William was 41, he married Frances ‘Fannie’ Jane Lucas, L220, F, daughter of Abraham Johnson Lucas, M, in Yalobusha County, MS. Born in 1842. Frances ‘Fannie’ Jane died in 1874, she was 32.

They had one child:
i.       John Robert William, M (ca1870-)

43. Tillman Rosamond, R255, M. Born on 7 Nov 1822 in Abbeville District, SC. Occupation: Farmer.

ca 1853 when Tillman was 30, he married Margaret H. Spivey, S110, F. Born ca 1826 in South C

51. William Addison Rosamond, R255, M. Born on 17 Sep 1819 in Abbeville District, SC. William Addison died in Weldon, Houston County, Texas on 29 Nov 1900, he was 81. Buried in Weldon, Houston County, Texas. Occupation: Mill Operator.

William and Canzada came to Mississippi sometime between 1847-1849. Theya re listed on the 1850 census as living near William’s father Benjamin Rosamond and his uncle Samuel Rosamond. In 1860 they are listed in the Choctaw County, MS census. William served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War (1861-1865). After the war they moved briefly to Arkansas, they went on to Texas around 1866 according to a letter I (Jimmy D. Rosamond) received from Myrtle Beatrice Rosamond Tanner Hyde in 1995. The story as told in this letter is repeated below. Myrtle is the granddaughter of William and Canzada.

“William A. Rosamond and his wife Canzada (Coleman) Rosamond and their six sons and other members of the Rosamond Family came from Kosciusko, Attala County, Mississippi, where his parents owned a plantation on Big Black River. They came here in covered wagons in 1866 and experienced all the hardships on the way – wild animals and other threats to their lives.

about 23 years old at the tme.

“Dress as well as conduct came to church attention as shown by the April 1834 report. ‘Three of our yong members, Thomas Rosamond, M. Henderson and Charles Hodges were seen at an election ground and among the mixed multitude with coats off and sleeves rolled, and in hostile array, a sorowful sight to see Emanuel’s soldiers parading in and enemy’s camp, they being the case. The three brothers came forward and confessed their sorrow for such conduct, stating that they had no design in being stripped but to get their friends, whom they were afraid would be abused, out of the fray and that they had no intention of fighting, only to save their friends. The moderator arose and gave them a friendly admonition and retained them in full fellowship.'”

The 1850 Abbeville County census lists Thomas, age 39, Merchant, wife Sarah age 25 with the following relatives and family members of Sarah. John Graham age 13; Egbert E. Rankin age 20, Clerk; Larkin Mays age 28; Elizabeth Mays 21; George E. Mays 2; Abner Mays 18; Jane Mays 15; Lucretia Mays 13. Lucretia and Abner Mays can be found in the Attala County, MS census also with Thomas’ dad, Benjamin Rosamond and his second wife, Jane. Diane Atkinson determined that Jane’s maiden name was Rogers and that she had been married to a Mays.

Thomas and Sarah are foound in the 1870 Coweta County, Georgia census. He is listed as working in a flour mill. Three children listed with them in the census were all born in Georgia. According to the family Bible inherited by Sammy Rosamond of Carrollton, GA, on son was born Jan 1853 in Harris Couonty, GA; three born 1857, 1861 and 1863 in Coweta County, GA; and one born in Terrell County, GA in 1864.

ca 1846 when Thomas Henry was 34, he married Sarah Mays, M200, F, daughter of Matthew Mays, M & Lucretia Rogers, F. Born on 3 Apr 1825 in Abbeville District, SC.

CB Mays’ records shows Sarah married twice. Her other husband was Elihu Campbell who died before 1845. According to CB Mays, Elihu Campbell married leaving no children.

They had the following children:
i.       Jefferson, M (1847-<1850)
ii.       Isabel M., F (1851-)
iii.       Ebeann Ellart Lucretia, F (1857-)
iv.       William Arthur, M (1861-)
v.       Joseph Henry, M (1861-1944)
vi.       James Thomas, M (1863-1864)
vii.       Benjamin Augustus, M (1864-1935)

49. Benjamin Rosamond Jr., R255, M. Born ca 1814 in South Carolina. Occupation: Farmer.

According to the birth dates of the children, Benjamin and Elizabeth probably came to Mississippi between 1837 and 1839. In 1850 they were living next door to Richard and Mary Hodges. Ruth Menhel speculates that Elizabeth was a Hodges.

In 1850 census they are listed in Choctaw County, MS. In 1860 they are shown on the census for Pontotoc County, MS.

Benjamin married Elizabeth ?, F.

Surname could be Hodges. She could also possibly be Mary’s sister and we don’t know Mary’s maiden name.

They had the following children:
i.       William, M (ca1837-)
ii.       George, M (ca1839-)
iii.       John B. L., M (ca1841-)
iv.       Martha Jane, F (ca1843-)
v.       Benjamin L., M (ca1847-)
vi.       Joseph I, M (ca1851-)
vii.       Silas D., M (ca1855-)
viii.       Preston L., M (ca1857-)

50. Samuel Rosamond, R255, M. Born in 1815 in Abbeville District, SC. Occupation: Farmer.
http://genforum.genealogy.com/roseman/messages/98.html

By 1850 Benjamin had sold his South Carolina property whoich was located somewhere near the Mulberry Creek/Saluda River area. He divided the profit with his sons and was living near his brother Samuel in Atalla County, Mississippi. In the same time period his other brother Thomas and all his sons except Thomas and Joseph were also in Mississippi. In 1850 Benjamin was listed in the Mississippi census as owning 9 slaves and being married to Jane. Census Ed. 126, 495/495.

OTHER NOTES ON BENJAMIN’S CHART:
In November 1858, James Rosamond (Benjamin’s son James ??) was appointed guardian of Jerusha W. (who is this?) and Tilman J. Rosamond. Then on May 16, 1859, Jane is named as guardian of Tilman J. and Marion F. Rosamond. These are her sons by Benjamin. On this date she gave her annual accounting regarding her sons.

On 12/20/ 1858, William T. Wright, referred to as the guardian of Jantha Rosamond (presumably Jantha Mays who was under guardianship of Benjamin and Jane), gave his final accounting. Jantha at this time was married to John F. Temple.

1850 Census Data, Attala County, MS
Page 126 & 127
495/495 Rosemon, Benj., Age 60, farmer, value 400, born SC = means b. ca. 1790
Jane, Age 44, born 1806, SC = Jane Rogers Mays
Lucretia, age 14, born SC
Daniel, age 12, SC
Jantha, age 11, female, SC
Marion F., age 2, born 1848, SC – – – Contradicts Carroll County, MS birth.
Mayse, Abner, age 18, male, born SC–Question-when did Benjamin get to MS?

Addison “Adam” Rosamond[32],[33],[34], R255, M. Born on 25 Apr 1825 in South Carolina. Addison “Adam” died on 17 May 1879, he was 54. Buried in Crowley, TX. Occupation: Farmer, Shoe Maker.

Addison served in the Civil War from Mississippi. After the war, he moved his family in ox drawn carts to current day Tarrant County, TX and settled about twelve miles south of Fort Worth. Only one of his and Julia Holands married.

Listed in the 1860 and 1870 Attala County Census.
According to 1860 Census the family lived in Township 16, Range 7, Burkettsville, MS.

This Addison is the grandfather of William Sam Rosamond, 1925 family researcher.

On 16 Jan 1851 when Addison “Adam” was 25, he married Julia A. Holland, H453, F. Born in 1832 in Georgia.

They had the following children:
i.       William Addison, M (1861-)
ii.       James Hilliard, M (1854-)
iii.       Mary Alice, F (1864-1924)
iv.       John Robert, M (1868-)
v.       Marcene E., F
vi.       Andrew Thomas, M (1858-)

Benjamin Franklin married Mary Rebecca Arizona “Zoe” Henderson[15], H536, F, daughter of Robert Wilson Henderson, M & Queen V. Calicutt, F. Born on 8 May 1874 in Kemper County, MS. Mary Rebecca Arizona “Zoe” died in Winston County, MS on 16 May 1939, she was 65. Buried in Winston County, MS.

They had the following children:
i.       Henderson Dee, M (1897-1981)
ii.       Dovie, F (ca1899-)
iii.       Mary Dow, F (1899-1984)
iv.       Rutherford, M (ca1900-)
v.       Othello Marshall, M (1900-1932)
vi.       Wilsie Irna, F (1901-1994)
vii.       Etta Ernisteen, F (1903-1986)
viii.       Bernice Howard, M (1904-1908)
ix.       Addison Benjamin, M (1906-1910)
x.       Jessie Theolya (Foley), F (1907-)
xi.       Harvey Lindsey, M (1909-1980)
xii.       James Vardamin, M (1911-1985)

The American Revolution in South Carolina

Capt. Samuel Rosamond*
Known Regiment(s) Associated With:
Known Year(s) as a Captain:
Ninety-Six District Regiment
1777-1778
Upper Ninety-Six District Regiment
1778-1782

Known Lieutenants:
Known Sergeants:
Known Corporals:
Known QMs:
Richard Hodges
James Hodges
NONE KNOWN
NONE KNOWN

Known Privates, etc.:
Thomas Adams
William Allen
William Beneson
George Benison
James Braidon
James Dobbins
Ebenezer Floyd
James Graham
James Hodges
John Hodges
Richard Hodges
James Kirkwood
John McAdams
William McCalleb
Adam McKee
Joseph McMillan
Thomas Moore
William Moore
Thomas Norwood
Hugh Porter
Philip Porter
William Seawright
Rowland Stone
Joshua Wallace

Date(s):
Known Battles / Skirmishes:
Feb. 3, 1779
Kettle Creek (GA)
May 21 – Jun. 19, 1781
Siege of Ninety-Six
Sep. 8, 1781
Eutaw Springs
*Also known as Samuel Roseman.

Descendants of Richard Hodges, Sr.
Page 1 of 3

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1 Richard Hodges, Sr.b: Bef. 1725 d: Bef. 1776 in Abbeville District, SC . +Elizabeth (Betty) Jonesd: Abt. 1816 in Abbeville District, SC . 2 James Hodgesd: Bef. September 01, 1828 in Abbeville District, SC …. +Ann [Nancy] Wareb: 1767 in VA d: 1856 …. 3 Nathaniel Ware Hodges
…. 3 Thompson Hodges b: January 10, 1786
…. 3 Elizabeth Jones Hodges b: March 25, 1788
…. 3 Mary Hodges b: May 05, 1790
…. 3 John Hodges b: March 24, 1792
…. 3 James Hodgesb: July 24, 1794 d: Aft. 1837 in Pontotoc, Mississippi …. 3 Nicholas Ware Hodges b: January 01, 1797 d: October 07, 1841
…. 3 Reuben Hodges b: July 23, 1799
…. 3 Mahala Hodges b: April 25, 1801 d: 1817
…. 3 Martha Hodges b: April 02, 1803
…. 3 Ezekiel Hodges b: May 28, 1808
. 2 Sarah Hodges
…. +Samuel Rosamond
. 2 William Hodges
…. +Frankie Long
. 2 Samuel Hodges
. 2 Dorothy Hodges
…. +— Rosamond
. 2 Richard Hodges b: 1756
…. +Sarah F. Rosamond
. 2 John Hodgesb: 1765 in Essex County, VA d: December 24, 1834 in Hodges, SC b: Hodges Family Cemetery, Hodges, SC …. +Margaret Longd: 1790 in Hodges, Abbeville District, SC …. 3 Lucy Hodges b: December 24, 1787
……. +Hugh (or Robert) Wardlaw
…. 3 Reuben Hodges b: February 01, 1790
. *2nd Wife of John Hodges:
…. +Frances Andersonb: March 22, 1773 in Augusta County, VA d: March 14, 1844 in Abbeville District, SC b: Hodges Family Cemetery, Hodges, SC …. 3 Matilda Hodgesb: July 12, 1791 d: Aft. 1850 in Mississippi ……. +Francis Sharp b: 1780
…. 3 George Washington Hodgesb: September 03, 1792 in Abbeville District, SC d: March 24, 1876 in Hodges, SC b: Hodges Family Cemetery, Hodges, SC ……. +Rebecca Douglassb: August 12, 1798 in Abbeville District, SC d: January 16, 1868 in Hodges, Abbeville District, SC b: Hodges Family Cemetery, Hodges, SC ……. 4 Elizabeth Hodgesb: 1817 in Abbeville District, SC d: 1868 ………. +Paul Woolfolk Connor, Dr.
……. 4 Frances G. Hodgesb: May 17, 1820 in Hodges, Abbeville District, SC/Hodges, Greenwood Co., SC d: September 16, 1876 in Cokesbury, SC – Abbeville Dist. ………. +Francis Ambrose Connor b: January 18, 1818 d: July 22, 1893
………. 5 George Legare Connorb: September 01, 1849 d: March 09, 1914 in Cokesbury, SC …………. +[1] Bessie Ravenel Hodges b: July 14, 1873 d: September 29, 1954
………. *2nd Wife of George Legare Connor:
…………. +[1] Bessie Ravenel Hodges b: July 14, 1873 d: September 29, 1954
…………. 6 Frances Legare Connor b: July 31, 1902
……. 4 Washington Ludlow Hodges b: 1827
………. +Ann Elizabeth Waring Parker
………. 5 Annie Hodges
…………. +Walter Lindamood
………. 5 Frank Emory Hodges
…………. +Jennie Lou Hodges
………. 5 Bessie Ravelen Hodges
………. 5 Ludlow Hodges
……. 4 Anna Rebecca Bowen Hodgesb: June 16, 1828 in Hodges, SC d: July 01, 1858 in Hodges, SC b: Hodges Family Cemetery, Hodges, SC ………. +Joseph H. Stokesb: May 27, 1826 in Colleton County, SC d: August 07, 1853 in Hodges, SC b: Hodges Family Cemetery, Hodges, SC ………. 5 Harriett E. Stokes b: 1846 d: Aft. 1860
………. 5 Anna C. Stokesb: 1848 d: Aft. 1860 in Hodges, South Carolina ………. 5 Anna Stokes b: 1849 d: Bef. 1860
………. 5 Frances Stokes b: 1851 d: Aft. 1860
………. 5 Laura Josephine Stokesb: May 22, 1854 in Hodges, SC d: October 21, 1892 in Chappells, SC b: Providence Baptist Church, Hodges, SC …………. +George Thomas Reidb: August 13, 1849 in Pickens County, SC d: February 10, 1919 in Chappells, SC b: Providence Baptist Church, Hodges, SC …………. 6 Joseph Thompson Reidb: August 04, 1874 d: August 19, 1878 in Walhalla, South Carolina …………. 6 Samuel Hodges Reid b: January 09, 1876 d: July 31, 1877
…………. 6 George Thomas Reid b: October 16, 1877 d: May 28, 1879
…………. 6 Ethel Genevieve Reidb: September 09, 1879 in Chappells, SC d: October 12, 1963 b: Providence Baptist Church, Hodges, SC ……………. +Julian Luvic Webb b: November 09, 1884 d: December 19, 1968 b: Providence Baptist Church, Hodges, SC
…………. 6 William Eckford Reid, Sr.b: July 07, 1884 in Chappells, SC – Newberry County d: December 21, 1953 in Lancaster, SC b: Old Waxhaw Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Lancaster, SC ……………. +Julia Alberta Bradyb: August 07, 1906 in Brunswick, GA d: November 22, 1992 in Lexington, SC b: Old Waxhaw Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Lancaster, SC …………. 6 James Thompson Reidb: October 06, 1886 in Chappells, SC d: June 10, 1926 in Parris Island, SC b: Providence Baptist Church, Hodges, SC ……………. +Washington Steele Fullerb: April 04, 1889 in Charleston, SC d: June 24, 1970 in Asheville, NC …………. 6 Mary Victoria Reidb: February 07, 1890 in Chappells, South Carolina d: November 08, 1962 ……………. +Grover Parsons Fowler b: November 22, 1893 d: April 23, 1964
……. 4 America Victoria Hodgesb: 1832 d: September 28, 1908 in Cokesbury, SC b: Providence Baptist Church cemetery, Hodges, South Carolina ………. +Lewis R. Dantzlerb: Abt. 1822 d: November 13, 1888 b: Providence Baptist Church cemetery, Hodges, South Carolina ………. 5 George Dantzler
………. 5 John Dantzler
………. 5 Laurence Keitt Dantzlerb: September 03, 1855 in Hodges, SC d: October 04, 1907 in Hodges, SC …………. +Mary Elizabeth Smith b: October 25, 1858 d: January 14, 1933
…………. 6 Jennie Louise Dantzler
……………. +Frank Brent Reynolds
…………. 6 Laurence Keitt Dantzlerb: June 30, 1883 in Hodges, SC d: January 03, 1924 in Orangeburg, SC ……………. +Mary Elizabeth Wise
……. 4 John Fletcher Hodgesb: 1833 d: 1876 in Coronaca, SC ………. +Mary Acker Townsend
………. 5 Frank Connor Hodges
………. 5 Rebecca Douglass Hodges
………. 5 Fletcher Dantzler Hodges
………. 5 Bob Shiver Hodgesb: September 05, 1870 d: June 09, 1962 b: Providence Baptist Church cemetery, Hodges, South Carolina …………. +Janie Agnes Connor b: March 31, 1878 d: July 30, 1941
……. 4 Emory Archibald Hodgesb: 1835 d: 1862 in Civil War, CSA ……. 4 Mary Edwina Hodgesb: 1839 in Abbeville District, SC d: 1898 in Meridian, MS? ………. +E. J. Wiss
……. 4 Gabriel Mitchell Hodgesb: 1841 in Abbeville District, SC ………. +Imogene Petronella Cantey
………. 5 Gabriel Mitchell Hodges, Jr.
………. 5 Mary Cantey Hodges
………. 5 Bennett Hodges
………. 5 Helen M. Hodges
………. 5 Mitchell Hodges
…. 3 Gabriel Heyward Hodgesb: January 06, 1794 in Hodges, SC d: September 07, 1874 in Hodges, SC b: Hodges Family Cemetery, Hodges, South Carolina …….
102. Nancy L.7 Bowie (James Price6, Richard Price5, Rhodi4, John3, Abraham2, John1 Boye) was born Oct 1858 in Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa, Al, Usa, and died 25 Apr 1932 in Weir, Choctaw, Ms, Usa. She married Thomas Neuton Rosamond Tommie25 in Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa, Al, Usa. He was born 1846 in , Choctaw, Ms, Usa, and died Abt. 1925.

Notes forNancy L. Bowie:
Nancy L. Bowie is buried in Buelah Baptist Church Cemetery, Weir, Choctaw, Ms.,in an unmarke d grave. The church was destroyed in a storm in 1993. She was a mid-wife and delivered a baby , and the mother apparently died, because Nancy raised the child till he was old enough to ea t. The father had several
children and could not feed this one. There was no nurse, cow, etc in the
community. She raised him on coffee and biscuit with a little sugar in it.
One relative said Nancy was called “Dr. Rosamond” and was “a fine old lady.”
She “doctored” everyone, not just delivering babies. She and her husband took in at leas t 6 persons and gave them a home. Another family member said she was left handed, and that sh e had scarlet fever which caused her hair to fall out, and grow back curly. She had brown hai r and brown eyes.
-courtesy: Gwen Rosamond Forrester
Henderson, Arkansas

More AboutNancy L. Bowie:
Record Change: 14 Jun 1999

Notes for Thomas Neuton Rosamond Tommie:
Tommie Rosamond attended church at Buelah Baptist Church, Weir, Choctaw, MS.
He is buried beside his wife Nancy L. Bowie in the church cemetery in an
unmarked grave. The church was destroyed by a storm in 1993. Everyone called
him Uncle Tom, a salutation of affection. He and Nancy owned a grist mill and sawmill, and m ade molasses on their farm below Ackerman, MS and near the
Natchez Trace Parkway, which totaled 294 acres according to the 1900 census.
Thomas and Nancy’s land adjoined that of his father. His parents had a store with a post off ice in it. Thomas and Nancy raised James Thomas “J. T.” Rosamond, after his mother died o f a fever caused by mosquitoes. J. T. was 10 years old when his mother died. Thomas and Nanc y were known to have taken in and given a home to at least six persons, if not more, at som e time or other. He was known to have a long white beard and would often sit under a tree i n his front yard and play his fiddle. Tommy was the son of John Rosamond and Sarah Graham.
-courtesy Gwen Rosamond Forrester
Henderson, Arkansas

More About Thomas Neuton Rosamond Tommie:
Record Change: 25 Jan 1999

Childrenof Nancy Bowie and Thomas Rosamond are:

314
i.

Benton Richard8 Rosamond26, died Abt. 1901.

Notes for Benton Richard Rosamond:
Benton Richard Rosamond is not shown on the 1900 Choctaw, MS census. However, Pearl Rosamon d Downs stated she had a brother named Benton Richard who died very young. He may have succu mbed to a virus or the plague that hit the area circa 1900-1901 that also claimed his bother s John and Silas.

More About Benton Richard Rosamond:
Record Change: 17 Apr 1999

315
ii.

Moursia Cecilia Rosamond, born Nov 1877; died 194027. She married John Spivey.

Notes for Moursia Cecilia Rosamond:
Moursia Cecilia Rosamond married John Spivey and had no issue. Her name may
have been Missouri instead of Moursia. -Courtesy Gwen Forrester, Henderson,
AR.

More About Moursia Cecilia Rosamond:
Record Change: 25 Jan 1999

More About John Spivey:
Record Change: 16 Jan 2001

316
iii.

Lillie Mae Rosamond28, born Dec 1878 in , Choctaw, Ms, Usa; died in Drew, Sunflower, Ms, Usa. She married Wade Hampton Rosamond 06 Aug 1900 in , Choctaw, Ms, Usa; born 15 Aug 1861 in Kosciusko, Attala, Ms, Usa; died 17 Apr 1935 in Lepanto, Poinsett, Ark, Usa.

Notes for Lillie Mae Rosamond:
Lillie Mae Rosamond married her third cousin, Wade H. Rosamond, who was born in Kosciusko, At tala, Ms,Usa. Lillie Mae and Wade had seven children. Their first child, Mae Rosamond was bo rn in 1901 and died as an infant, probably from plague or flu that ravaged the area. It als o killed Mattie, Earnest and Wade L. Rosamond from Wade’s first marriage. It also killed 2 o r 3 chilkdren of Thomas Neuton and Nancy Bowie Rosamond’s children. Therefore, 6 or 7 childre n died in this same family. When Willie Timothy Rosamond was 2 years old, Wade went and got h im from his aunt and Lillie Mae raised him. Lillie Mae died in 1918 in Sunflower County, MS o f cancer. After her death, her brother Will took Lillie’s three youngest children, Arthur Bo rden age 9, Arthena “Jackie” age 7, and Shirley Denver age 2, and raised them. After Lillie M ae’s death, Wade stayed a lot with his daughter Eva. In 1935, Wade was visiting his children , Arthur and Marie, and Timothy and Florence, in Lepanto, Arkansas. While there he contacte d Pneumonia and died 17 April, 1935.

More About Lillie Mae Rosamond:
Record Change: 25 Jan 1999

Notes for Wade Hampton Rosamond:
Wade H. Rosamond married his 3rd cousin, Lillie Mae Rosamond. He is buried in
Potter Memorial Cemetery, Lepanto, Ark., Poinsett County. He was a farmer

More About Wade Hampton Rosamond:
Record Change: 16 Jan 2001

317
iv.

John Rosamond, born Dec 1881 in , , MS, Usa29; died 1901.

Notes for John Rosamond:
John Rosamond died of a virus or the plague. A family member stated that a
plague came through ca 1901 and killed several of the children of Thomas Newton and Nancy L . Bowie Rosamond, probably John, Richard Benton, and Silas. It also killed Lillie Mae and chi ld Mae. Lillie Mae’s husband, her 3rd cousin Wade Rosamond was marrried first to Mary Ellis . They had four children: Mattie, Earnest, Wade L., and William Timothy. The plague kille d the first 3 children. This happened after Lillie Mae had married Wade Rosamond. Mary Elli s died in childbirth when Willian Timothy was born. Mattie, Earnest, and Wade L. were bein g raised by Lillie Mae and Wade when they died. This information furnished by Gwen Forreste r who received it from Florence Stewart Rosamond, wife of William Timothy Rosamond.

COLUMBIA — Denne Sweeney, the controversial commander in chief of the Sons of Confederate Veterans who was ousted in court last month by a temporary restraining order, was given back his title yesterday during a court hearing.
But not before Chancellor Robert Jones took Sweeney, who lives near Dallas, to issue for taking his title too seriously.
”The evidence suggests that Mr. Sweeney, on occasion, has exceeded his powers at the detriment to the organization,” the judge said near the conclusion of a seven-hour hearing.
Although Sweeney was renamed to the top post of the 30,000-member organization, the judge noted specifically that the commander in chief does not have the authority to suspend, either permanently or temporarily, any member of the General Executive Council. The GEC, which has members who are elected and appointed, acts as the group’s supervising board of directors.
Sweeney will replace C. Anthony Hodges, a Chattanooga doctor who held the post for about a month.
The fight has been brewing for several years as the organization has become divided along ideological lines that pit ”progressives” against ”traditionalists.”
The traditionalists contend that the SCV should remain non-political and should serve as a tool for living history exhibits for schoolchildren and continue to promote events such as Confederate Memorial Day. The traditionalists contend the lawsuit was needed to keep the organization from being unduly influenced by radicals who are in favor of Southern ”re-secession” from the remainder of the country.
The progressive wing is more confrontational, vocal and political, believing the group should speak out when issues such as the Confederate flag and Southern heritage are raised. They call the other group, the ”old guard,” stuck in their ways.
Tom Hardin, a Columbia lawyer representing several members of the ”old guard” in a lawsuit against the commander in chief, told Jones that Sweeney suspended five GEC members at a meeting of the group last December.
”He did that to allow his supporters to have a quorum so that a number of items that he wanted passed could be voted on,” Hardin said.
”We would not be here if Mr. Sweeney had not engaged in suspending people. Mr. Sweeney forgot that he works for the board of directors and took powers that he did not have.”
Ironically, the defense fired back a similar argument, alleging that three members of the GEC, who opposed Sweeney, organized a teleconference meeting Feb. 16 and ousted the commander in chief from office.

Following the Feb. 17 court action, Commander-in-chief Hodges, in a statement posted on the Internet, sought to assure the organization’s 30,000 to 35,000 members that the ouster was “mandatory,” and that “the GEC acted in the best interests of the SCV.”
“Never before have we faced such an atmosphere of intimidation in the SCV, in which members, officers and GEC members have been suspended or threatened with suspension or expulsion for little or no reason,” Hodges wrote. “Our pride in history has become, for a few, a faÁade masking anger, resentment and an apparent desire to browbeat the SCV into a new direction, one with [a] politically ideological path determined by a select few.”
Hodges listed eight allegations against Sweeney, including suspensions and threatened suspensions of board members, conducting “harassing investigations” against opponents on the board, and “creating and maintaining a hostile work environment.”
Hodges closed by warning members, “Be very skeptical of the shrill voices of contentiousness.” He asked for members’ “prayers, support and patience” in the board’s efforts “to return the SCV to an organization committed to reasonable conduct, a precious heritage and the rule of law.”
However, Sweeney predicted victory at the March 9 hearing, saying the other side “misrepresented a lot of things to the court.”
Sweeney added, “Close to 90 percent of the members are not happy about this. They’re not happy about a democratically elected board being overthrown.” Hodges and his supporters “have become like a little monarchy. Some people describe it as a house of lords.” Sweeney said he was getting 200 to 300 e-mails of support a day from members.
Sweeney’s appointees removed from the board by the Feb. 17 temporary restraining order included Adjutant-in-Chief Jim Dark, Chaplain-in-Chief Ron Rumberg, Editor-in-Chief (of SCV’s Confederate Veteran magazine) Frank Powell, Judge Advocate-in-Chief Sam Currin, and Chief of Staff Ron Casteel. The board also removed Trans-Mississippi Department council member Chuck Norred, who had been appointed by Sweeney to fill a vacancy.

Following the Feb. 17 court action, Commander-in-chief Hodges, in a statement posted on the Internet, sought to assure the organization’s 30,000 to 35,000 members that the ouster was “mandatory,” and that “the GEC acted in the best interests of the SCV.”
“Never before have we faced such an atmosphere of intimidation in the SCV, in which members, officers and GEC members have been suspended or threatened with suspension or expulsion for little or no reason,” Hodges wrote. “Our pride in history has become, for a few, a faÁade masking anger, resentment and an apparent desire to browbeat the SCV into a new direction, one with [a] politically ideological path determined by a select few.”
Hodges listed eight allegations against Sweeney, including suspensions and threatened suspensions of board members, conducting “harassing investigations” against opponents on the board, and “creating and maintaining a hostile work environment.”
Hodges closed by warning members, “Be very skeptical of the shrill voices of contentiousness.” He asked for members’ “prayers, support and patience” in the board’s efforts “to return the SCV to an organization committed to reasonable conduct, a precious heritage and the rule of law.”
However, Sweeney predicted victory at the March 9 hearing, saying the other side “misrepresented a lot of things to the court.”
Sweeney added, “Close to 90 percent of the members are not happy about this. They’re not happy about a democratically elected board being overthrown.” Hodges and his supporters “have become like a little monarchy. Some people describe it as a house of lords.” Sweeney said he was getting 200 to 300 e-mails of support a day from members.
Sweeney’s appointees removed from the board by the Feb. 17 temporary restraining order included Adjutant-in-Chief Jim Dark, Chaplain-in-Chief Ron Rumberg, Editor-in-Chief (of SCV’s Confederate Veteran magazine) Frank Powell, Judge Advocate-in-Chief Sam Currin, and Chief of Staff Ron Casteel. The board also removed Trans-Mississippi Department council member Chuck Norred, who had been appointed by Sweeney to fill a vacancy.

Following the Feb. 17 court action, Commander-in-chief Hodges, in a statement posted on the Internet, sought to assure the organization’s 30,000 to 35,000 members that the ouster was “mandatory,” and that “the GEC acted in the best interests of the SCV.”
“Never before have we faced such an atmosphere of intimidation in the SCV, in which members, officers and GEC members have been suspended or threatened with suspension or expulsion for little or no reason,” Hodges wrote. “Our pride in history has become, for a few, a faÁade masking anger, resentment and an apparent desire to browbeat the SCV into a new direction, one with [a] politically ideological path determined by a select few.”
n

Eleven years ago, when the NAACP pushed to remove the Confederate battle flag from statehouses and other government buildings across the South, then-Lt. Gov. Perry opposed the effort. Texas had a pair of bronze plaques with symbols of the Confederacy displayed in the state Supreme Court building. Perry, contending that Texans “should never forget our history,” said they should not be removed.
In a March 2000 letter to the SCV, obtained by the Associated Press under a public information request, he wrote: “Although this is an emotional issue, I want you to know that I oppose efforts to remove Confederate monuments, plaques and memorials from public property.”
State Sen. John Carona, R-Dallas, who described himself in a recent letter to the governor as “a friend of Governor Perry, fellow conservative and former chairman of the Senate Transportation Committee,” sees the issue differently. He urged the governor to instruct his appointees to reject the Confederate plate proposal.
“No one wishes to deny our history as a state,” Carona wrote. “But we as leaders should take every opportunity to support that which unites our citizenry. Reminding those among us of their painful past has no place in celebrating our great state.”
Perry has not commented.
“This is a matter for the board,” said Lucy Nashed, a spokeswoman for the governor’s office.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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