The $250 Billion Dollar Parasite

My daughter, Heather Hanson, and her drunken lover, Bill Cornwell, told me I was a “parasite” because I receive SSI. I have been on SSI since 1969. A young woman came to see me when I was staying at a very sleazy hotel on 14th. and Jefferson near downtown Oakland. She was my caseworker. I couldn’t believe she had the gust to get out of her car, least enter the building. She was very proud of herself as she took the only chair. I was proud of her. I think she was new to the job. They wanted to check-out my abode, and be sure I was in need of aid, and, I had not given a bogus address in a welfare scam.

For some reason, the large pull-down shade decided to retract at a very high-rate of speed, and with much clamber. We both tried to remain calm. There was a strange energy in the air. I was telling her about my fall on the rocks at McClure’s Beach.

“I have not been the same. I’m in this enlightened state that is very intense. It is very hard to be here. I think about taking my life, almost every day.”

SHRUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUSH!

We both took this sound, and the hair staining up on the back of my neck – as a sign! I received my first check, and after cashing it, I took a shower in our communal shower. When I got out, my pants were on the floor that I had hung on a hook. My wallet was gone. The door had a clasp on it, but, if you pulled the door, there was a gap about an inch wide. I surmised someone used a wire coat-hanger. They sent me another check.

I had waited in line to see a shrink at the welfare office. After telling him about all the LSD I had taken, he said;

“I heard enough! You got it. And, you will be getting it for life.”

In 1987 Seers at the Berkeley Psychic Institute said I died after falling on these beautiful rocks by the sea.

“You died!”

You can say my long epic tale begins here, at Hotel Exel Evil. I would not be alive if it were not for those checks. I would not have sired a daughter, who born my grandson, Tyler Hunt. Heather is utterly ashamed of me. I embarrass her.

On April 7, 2017, I celebrated thirty years clean and sober. All the great stories begin at Hotel Exel Evil.

Jon

Excessive drinking claims the lives of tens of thousands of Americans each year and is responsible for about 1 in every 10 deaths among working age adults. Alcohol abuse also takes a heavy economic toll. A recent study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that excessive alcohol consumption cost the U.S. economy an estimated $250 billion in 2010 — primarily in lost productivity, medical bills, and motor vehicle accidents.
Excessive alcohol consumption, according to the CDC, includes binge drinking — defined as four or more drinks in a single occasion for women and five or more for men — and heavy drinking, which is defined as at least eight drinks per week for women and 15 for men.
An estimated 18% of American adults drink excessively. However, binge and heavy drinking rates are not uniform across the country and can vary greatly from state to state and city to city. Across U.S. metro areas, excessive drinking rates range from fewer than 1 in every 10 adults to more than 1 in every 4 adults.
24/7 Wall St. reviewed data from the CDC to identify the metropolitan areas reporting the highest levels of binge and heavy drinking in each state.
Excessive drinking patterns vary considerably by region. The states with the lowest excessive drinking rates are concentrated in the South, while most of the states with the highest excessive drinking rates are in the Midwest.
Because excessive drinking rates vary so much by state, excessive drinking in a state’s metro area reporting the highest rate may not be especially high compared to the rest of the country. The heaviest drinking metro areas in 13 states have lower excessive drinking rates than the U.S. rate of 18.0%.
Areas where residents report more excessive drinking often share several socioeconomic characteristics. For example, heavier drinking populations tend to have higher median incomes than areas where the population drinks less. Of the 50 metro areas on this list, 34 have a higher median household income than the state a whole.
Heavier drinking metro areas also tend to be relatively well educated. Of the 50 metro areas on this list, 34 are home to a larger share of adults with a bachelor’s degree than their respective state as a whole.
The overall health of a population is tied to a range of economic and lifestyle factors. While excessive drinking is never healthy, the metro areas with the highest excessive drinking rates are often home to healthier populations than their respective state’s population. Of the 50 cities on this list, 44 are home to a larger share of adults who report being in good health than the share across the state as a whole.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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