Rosamunda Took

Rosamunda was the daughter of Sigismond Took.[1] She married Odovacar, future patriarch of the Bolger Family, and had two children: Fredegar and Estella. The couple and their children attended Bilbo’s Farewell Party in S.R. 1401.[2

“As a token of her confidence, she told him he need no longer call
her, “Auntie.” The previous year, Bilbo had suggested that Frodo no
longer address him as, “Uncle,” if he wished. Plain, “Bilbo,” would
do. Frodo still called Bilbo, “Uncle,” now and then; it had become
too ingrained a habit. But, following suit, Rosamunda suggested Frodo
might call her, “Rosa,” or, “Rosamunda.” Frodo forgot, and called
her, “Auntie,” many times, but, within the space of an afternoon
tea, “Rosa,” she became.”

Rosamunda Bolger (née Took) was the mother of Fredegar “Fatty” Bolger
and Estella Brandybuck. She was married to Odovacar Bolger and was
known as Rosamunda Took prior to the marriage. They lived in
Budgeford in Bridgefields in the Eastfarthing of the Shire. Rosamunda
and Odovacar both attended the Bilbo’s Farewell Party in 3001 along
with their children.

Fredegar “Fatty” Bolger

Norman Cates as Fatty Bolger from a Decipher Card designed by Weta
Friend of Frodo Baggins. Fredegar Bolger, called Fatty, was born in
2980 to Odovacar Bolger and Rosamunda Took Bolger. He had a sister
Estella who married Merry Brandybuck. Fatty’s great-great-grandfather
on his mother’s side was Gerontius, the Old Took, who was also the
great-great-grandfather of Merry and of Pippin Took. Fatty’s family
was from Budgeford in Bridgefields in the Eastfarthing.

“From first sight, even the site of the new cottage had enchanted
her, dug as it was into the southeast side of a grassy hill in the
midst of Boffin lands, populated with Boffin sheep. There was a
little copse below it, just to the side, and a spring-fed well, all
of which reminded her of her childhood home. The place had come down
to Odovacar through his mother’s side, a Boffin. He had used it as
a sort of base, when he and his friends had gone out hunting.
They would stock the little hole with gear and rations. Then, with
their bows, and a pony for their gear, they would make forays west
or north, towards the Downs or up to the Moors, or, closer still,
into Bindbale Wood. But that was years ago, when the game had not
yet moved so far off.

When Rosamunda had viewed it more carefully,
she saw the hole was inconsiderable disrepair. Also, it was a bit
too small. She had new rooms dug, so that there was a parlor and a
kitchen, a bedroom for each (and one to spare), along with extra
chambers further back for store. When it was finished, it suited
Rosamunda very well. Especially, she loved the light. Situated
facing south-east, the light poured through the windows in the
mornings, her favorite time of the day. And, when she stood
outside, she could see the land stretching east and south far into
the distance. Illuminated by the late afternoon sun, the prospect was
especially fine. From the top of the little knoll that made the
cottage’s roof, she could see far to the north and west, where sheep
dotted the rolling hills. The sky at night took her breath away. And,
all day, the birds sang, the wind blew, and the Water, which ran
nearby, just to the west, mostly narrow andquick as it came down out
of Long Cleeve and Needlehole, could just be heard when the wind
dropped and everything was still. She loved its peace and quiet, so
tucked away and so private.

Yet, it was just an hour’s walk over the
hills to Bag End or to Hobbiton. Overhill, to the east, was even
closer. Every fine day Rosamunda walked the hills, seldom seeing
another living creature other than sheep, or, very rarely, a doe or
faun. She did not walk south to Hobbiton, however, except on errands
or for an appointed visit. She had not forgotten
her “understanding” with Bilbo. And Bilbo did not forget her, either.
Regularly, he sent her gifts of wine or ham or fruit in season, as
tokens of his neighborly regard. She appreciated the way he could
show marks of particular notice, without making her feel the burden
of obligation.”

Sigismond was the son of Hildibrand Took. He had two children, Rosamunda and Ferdinand.[1]

Hildibrand was the eighth son of the Old Took. He had one son, Sigismond, born in S.R. 1290.[1]

Gerontius Took (S.R. 11901320, died aged 130), also known as The Old Took, was a renowned Hobbit and twenty-sixth Thain of the Shire.

[edit] History

Gerontius was the only son of Fortinbras I. He married Adamanta Chubb, who gave birth to twelve children: Isengrim III, Hildigard, Isumbras IV, Hildigrim, Isembold, Hildifons, Isembard, Hildibrand, Belladonna, Donnamira, Mirabella and Isengar.

After the death of his father in 1248, Gerontius became the twenty-sixth Thain of the Shire.[1] He was a friend of Gandalf, who gave him a pair of magic diamond studs[2] and performed firework tricks during Gerontius’ midsummer-eve parties.[3][note 1]

Gerontius Took reached the impressive age of 130, which made him the oldest Hobbit until his grandson Bilbo Baggins celebrated his 131st Birthday.[4] He also held the record of most offspring, until Samwise Gamgee bested him with Tom‘s birth in S.R. 1442.[5]

[edit] Etymology

He was called The Old Took not because of his age, but because of his numerous younger relatives.[6]

The word element geron is Greek for old. Gerontius was also a Latin name of the Late Roman Empire, and is one of the very few Greco-Latin names appearing in Hobbit lore.

Gerontius is rendered as Geraint in Welsh, found as a royal name in The Mabinogion and in Tennyson’s Geraint and Enid.[7]

[edit] Inspiration

In a letter to Mr. and Mrs. Kloos, Tolkien stated that when he wrote The Hobbit, he had imagined Bilbo’s grandfather to be old, because both of his grandparents were around a hundred years old when they died.[6]

[edit] Portrayal in adaptations

2011: The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey:

The Old Took appears in a scene in the Extended Edition, played by Dan Hennah.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to Rosamunda Took

  1. Reblogged this on Rosamond Press and commented:

    I know The Way! I know The Road!

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