Rosamond of Charleston

Panoramic image of Rainbow Row

pirates5
Famous American Privateers.

American Merchant Marine and Privateers in War of 1812

The War of 1812 was fought over the Merchant Marine. The British were seizing American ships on the high seas, and forcing seamen to join the British navy or merchant navy. In addition, Britain seized vessels bound for Europe that did not first call at a British port. France retaliated, confiscating vessels if they had first stopped in Britain. Together they seized nearly 1,500 American vessels between 1803 and 1812.

The War was fought by merchant ships, because the U.S. had almost no Navy. The battle cry was; “Free Trade and Sailors’ Rights!” During the War of 1812, the U.S. Navy and Privateers together captured 30,000 prisoners, while the American army captured 6,000 British prisoners. Privateers captured British prizes worth almost $40,000,000.

http://jbtaylor.typepad.com/jb_taylor/2011/03/the-sandpiper-1965.html

A year ago I discovered there was a ship named Rosamond that was a Privateer. I wonder if she was owned by Captain Samuel Rosamond of Charleston. She was sunk with all hands lost. She was carrying $100,000 in plunder. Captain Samuel Rosamond was a true Patriot who fought alongside the Swamp Fox who was depicted in the movie ‘The Patriot’ starring Mel Gibson.

Samuel owned two lots on Bay Street in Charleston that was spelled Charles Town. Two days ago I saw ‘Black Sails’ for the first time. When I saw Flint’s ship sailing into Charles Town that was located on New Providence, my jaw dropped. I was looking at the replication of real history as lived by my Rosamond kindred. When I saw the moody look of Bonny Ann, I whispered…….”Rena”.

When she came at me out of the darkened doorway at the Venice Pier at 2:3o A.M. I restrained my gasp! Rena became my muse, and later Christine’s after she saw the large painting I did of her. Rosamond lived in Pacific Grove where Robert Lewis Stevens took haunting walks. Point Lobos was his model for ‘Treasure Island’ that Black Sails is based upon. My kindred, Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor, starred in ‘The Sandpiper’ a movie about a artist who lives by the sea near Rocky Point at Pfeiffer Beach. Did Liz ever star in a Pirate movie – with Richard Burton?

Below is the reply I got from my Congressman. I sent his a e-mail almost two weeks ago. I included some of the history of Samuel and James Rosamond. The latter is the great, great, great grandfather if Liz, and myself.

It has all come together, my struggle and long journey. I have immortalized my family. They will forever be in the Congressional Record, and forever known as Patriots. It remains to be discovered whether we were Privateers. John Rosamond was titled ‘The Highwayman’. He served in the militia and had two sons, Samuel and James.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2017

The Highwayman

The Highwayman

rockyp23

black-sails-anne-bonnyrenaa6liz15 pebble6

Reply from Congressman Peter DeFazio

To: Congressman Peter de Fazio and Senator Ron Wyden

At his press conference, Donald Trump produced a stack of legal documents he would not let reporters see. He says the read, and signed, papers, turned his business over to his children who will get everything when he dies. Why not leave everything to the American People, now, and let his children make their own money, like most of us who don’t have a legacy? Many suspect there were blank pieces of paper inside. Is this a hoax?

I am asking my Congressman and Senator to put these documents in the public domain. There is a precedent for doing this, being Revolutionary War Veterans, and their Widows, had to submit papers to the United States Government, and, undergo questioning, in order to receive some of the first monies given by our Founding Fathers to our first citizens. This was the case of my kindred, Captain Samuel Rosamond, and his first wife, Ann Pressley, also spelled, Presley. There was even an instance where cash grants were given to families who were on the brink of starvation due to our desire to be free. Why not author a Trump Trust that goes to paying off the National Debt? Every three months Ivanka can recite how much debt has been paid by the Trump Dynasty. When Trump leaves office, he and his children would be free to make, and keep, as much money as they want.  Who knows, Obama might give Donald an award – before he takes office!

In looking at my family tree, and these records, we see slaves being left in the Wills of brave men who founded one of the strongest democracies the world has ever known, thus these chained men and women contributed to the financial strength of our nation’s first families. They took care of the children and property of these fighting men. I suggest that anyone who can produce evidence they were the property of these world famous Rebels, be compensated. I suggest the First Family to be, offer a Freedom Bounty to the grandchildren of slaves. This amount can be determined by our elected Lawmakers, or, by all members of the Trump family who subscribe to economic incentives – and higher education! A thousand dollars can go to school supplies.

Because Trump and Putin have a great interest in Coats of Arms, any slave descendant of a family who owned a Coat of Arms, will be awarded a special Freedom Coat of Arms that will contain the image of The Liberty Tree, along with their family name.

Because the Republicans put before our Lawmakers one frivolous Bill after another, may I suggest a Bill be introduced that forbid President Trump from forming a motorcycle club modeled after the Knight Wolves of Russia, who are considered Putin’s storm troopers. The leader of the Knight Wolves wants additions made to the Russia Coat of Arms that Putin installed, that contains a SERPENT and TWO-HEADED EAGLE!

“And the President will wear no colors of any motorcycle club lest it appear his intention is to ride hard all over the countryside, and with other lawless men, terrorize the good citizenry.”

Elvis Presley was kin to President Carter, and may be in my family tree, along with Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor.

John Presco

That he is the son of Samuel and Sarah Rosamond both now deceased.  That his Father the said Samuel Rosamond was a soldier and served in the War of the Revolution in the South Carolina Militia.  That he held the rank of Lieutenant and Captain in Colonel Anderson’s Regiment — and for proof of the services of the said Samuel Rosamond he refers to the evidence hereto annexed.  And deponent further states that he is informed and believes that the said Samuel and Sarah Rosamond his parents were legally married in Abbeville District South Carolina on the __ day of __ 1785.  And deponent further states that the said Samuel Rosamond died on the 11th day of August 1814 in Anderson District South Carolina leaving the said Sarah Rosamond his widow and that she remains his widow to the period of her death.

In 1724, my ancestor John ROSAMOND and his friend William Ray were arrested in Abingdon, Berkshire, England for stealing a hat, periwig, 30 pounds British sterling, five pairs of shoes, and a brown gelding. They were held in the gaol in Reading, Berkshire, after their trial where they were sentenced to be exiled to the colonies for 14 years hard labor. By March 1725, they were transported to Newgate Prison and held there until they boarded the convict ship “Forward” owned by Jonathan Forward, and captained by Daniel Russell. The ship set sail on 28 September 1725 from London via the Thames River. The ship arrived disbarked at Annapolis, Maryland on 8 December 1725. We don’t know who bought his indenture, but he is recorded as being in CPT Beall’s militia of Prince George Co, Maryland between 1734-1737. By 1747-1765 we find John ROSAMOND living in Augusta Co, Virginia and listed as a master shoemaker, owned land, paid tithes, served in the militia, etc.

http://santacruz.hilltromper.com/article/robert-louis-stevenson-california

Deep in the wilderness of the Peninsula, he emerged from dense forest into a “dream-like” town—brand-new houses built on a trim grid of parallel streets and right angles. Yet the place was eerily deserted and there was “no sound but of the waves.” Stevenson had unwittingly stumbled into the recently constructed Methodist camp that would eventually become the town of Pacific Grove.

Stevenson’s long, ranging hikes took him around the rocky shore of Point Pinos, which reminded him of Scotland. He admired “the lighthouse in a wilderness of sand” with an expert eye. He delved deep into what is now Pebble Beach’s Del Monte Forest and haunted the area’s groves of live oak, which he called, “the kind of wood for murderers to crawl among.” He lurked through the grotesque, wind-sculpted Monterey pine and cypress: “No words can give the idea of the contortion of their growth,” he writes. “They might figure without change in a circle of the nether hell as Dante pictured it.”

http://santacruz.hilltromper.com/article/robert-louis-stevenson-california

https://rosamondpress.com/2015/12/12/i-cover-the-waterfront/

https://rosamondpress.com/2015/05/02/capturing-the-lone-monterey-cypress/

Twenty-something Laura Reynolds is a free spirit who questions social conventions, laws and regulations. A struggling artist, she lives in a secluded beach-side cabin in Big Sur with her nine year old illegitimate son, Danny, on who she has instilled her values.

http://jbtaylor.typepad.com/jb_taylor/2011/03/the-sandpiper-1965.html

http://home.earthlink.net/~copeland.deal/pressly.htm

http://www.elvis.com.au/presley/elvislinktocarter.shtml

https://famouskin.com/famous-kin-chart.php?name=12937+jimmy+carter&kin=27955+elvis+presley

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements & Rosters Pension application of Samuel Rosamond W4579  Sarah  fn55SC    Transcribed by Will Graves    12/4/09 [Methodology:  Spelling, punctuation and/or grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database.  Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations.  Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote.  Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original. Folks are free to make non-commercial use this transcript in any manner they may see fit, but please extend the courtesy of acknowledging the transcriber—besides, if it turns out the transcript contains mistakes, the resulting embarrassment will fall on the transcriber.]

State of Georgia will County: Special Inferior Court January 14 day 1845  On this day of January 1845 personally appeared before the Honorable the Inferior Court held in and for said County and State the same being a Court of record, Mr. James Rosamond a resident of said County and State aforesaid aged 38 years past who being duly sworn according to law saith that the following statement is true to the best of his knowledge and belief and according to the information given him by his parents in which he verily believes to be true viz.  That he is the son of Samuel and Sarah Rosamond both now deceased.  That his Father the said Samuel Rosamond was a soldier and served in the War of the Revolution in the South Carolina Militia.  That he held the rank of Lieutenant and Captain in Colonel Anderson’s Regiment — and for proof of the services of the said Samuel Rosamond he refers to the evidence hereto annexed.  And deponent further states that he is informed and believes that the said Samuel and Sarah Rosamond his parents were legally married in Abbeville District South Carolina on the __ day of __ 1785.  And deponent further states that the said Samuel Rosamond died on the 11th day of August 1814 in Anderson District South Carolina leaving the said Sarah Rosamond his widow and that she remains his widow to the period of her death.  That she died on the 25th day of April 1844 without ever applying for a pension leaving Elizabeth Phyles, Ezekiel in right of wife Margaret Powell[,] Barksdale in right of wife Sarah Garrison[,] Abner in right of wife Lucinda Clark[,] James S in right in right of wife Jane Liddel[,] Madison Rosamond, Richard Rosamond, Mary Clark and James Rosamond, this deponent — her only surviving children and legal heirs then living.  That this affiant was informed in the winter of 1844 that the act of Congress of 7 July 1838 gave pensions to widows of soldiers that were married prior to 1794 for the military services of their husband.  That this affiant made some exertions prior to the death of his said mother Sarah Rosamond by letters to procure the necessary proof in order to procure her pension and that she died on the day aforesaid and never made application for pension.  That He has qualified as administrator on the Estate of his mother Sarah Rosamond and makes this Declaration to obtain the pension due her at the time of her death.      S/ James Rosamond

[fn p. 8: in August 1845 in Anderson district South Carolina, Mrs. Ann Pressley, 84, submitted  the record of the births of her children in support of her assertion that she was acquainted with Samuel Rosamond a Captain in the war of the revolution and Colonel Anderson’s Regiment and his wife Sarah Hodges before their marriage; that they were married prior to the birth of her 2nd child, James Pressley in August 1787 and that they lived together as husband and wife during her acquaintance with them. That family record reads as follows: David Pressley & Ann Edmiston was maried Novr 16th  1784 Pressley Junior was born January 29th 1786 and departed this life March 21st Insuing James Pressley was born August 7th 1787 Mary Ann Pressley was born June 26 1789 David Pressley Junior was born March 26 1791 Abner Edmiston Presley was born January 27th 1793 Esther Brown Presley was born May first 1795 Janet Pressley was born December 8th 1796 and died October 8th 1797 Jean Miller Presley was born March 15th 1799 Elizeth Pressley was born April 3rd 1800 Agnes Pressley was born February 17th 1802 Rachel [illegible] Presley was born December 10th 1803 A Daughter born October 3rd 1805 and departed this life on the 25th day of her age being 3 weeks & 4 days old

[fn p. 12: Abner Clark testified on April 21, 1845 in Walton County Georgia that Sarah Rosamond’s home was burned in 1834 along with all its contents which may have included the Bible record of the marriage of said Sarah to Samuel Rosamond and the birth dates of their children.]

[fn p. 33] State of South Carolina Abbeville District  Be known that the 14th day of May 1844 before me John C. Waters a Magistrate in and for the District aforesaid personally appeared Thomas Moore1
1
a resident of the said District and State aged 82 years who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following statement that he was acquainted with Samuel Rosamond and served in the company [indecipherable word or words] with said Samuel and that said Samuel was Lieutenant and Captain in the war of the Revolution the deponent states the dates he does not well recollect that the said Samuel was Lieutenant in this militia before independence was declared under the command of Captain Jones and as soon as volunteers was called for the said Samuel volunteered and held a commission of Lieutenant under Captain Crain Jones Colonel Robert Anderson and General Andrew Pickens until about the year 82 the said Samuel was appointed Captain (after the Resignation of said Captain Crain Jones) the deponent further states that he [was?] not with the said Samuel during the war of the Revolution with the exception of one small Tour that was at a station called Due West Corner against the Cherokee Indians and that the said Samuel held the command of Lieutenant at that Tour the deponent thinks that tour was in the year 79 Due West Corner is in the district and State aforesaid the deponent further states the reason he cannot give a full detail of the said Samuel’s Tours is that he the deponent as soon as he was large enough to do militia duty enlisted and was in the lower part of the State when the Principal Battles was fought in the upper part of the State but when he the deponent returned home he was informed from the most respected men that the Samuel was at the siege of Ninety Six and also at a battle at Kettle Creek in the State of Georgia, the said [affiant] further states that the said Samuel Rosamond and Sarah Hodges he believes was lawfully and at any rate they settled in Abbeville District in the said State and lived together as such and was understood by all that
Thomas Moore S21387
knew to be man & fife [sic, wife] and after a number of years then moved to Pendleton District and that he has been informed that the said Samuel died in Pendleton District but he does not recollect the day when he moved or when he died.        S/ Thomas Moore

State of South Carolina Abbeville District: Be it known that on this 15th day of always 1845 before me John C. Waters a Magistrate in and for the District aforesaid personally appeared Thomas Moore a resident of said District aged 83 years past who being duly sworn according to law saith on oath that he resided in Abbeville District ever since and before the Commencement of the War of the Revolution and did himself rendered services in the American cause and that Peace was ratified in November 1783 — And that he deponent was married in September 1785 near 2 years after Peace was ratified and that deponent’s oldest Child was born September the following say 1786 — deponent further states that was personally acquainted with Samuel Rosamond who was a Captain in the South Carolina militia in Colonel Anderson’s Regiment and Sarah Hodges before the Commencement of the War of the Revolution and knows that they were married in the course of the year following after deponent was married namely in the year 1786 – prior to the Birth of deponent’s eldest child in September 1786.          s/ Thomas Moor

 

Here is

Rev. William H. Hodges. The father of our subject was James L. Hodges, a native of South Carolina, where he was born about 1787, and was the son of William and Elizabeth Hodges, also of South Carolina. Mr. Hodges, Sr., was married, in about 1810, to Sarah Comings, and they were the parents of eleven children: Francis, Nancy, Thomas, Elizabeth, William H., Sarah, Margaret, James, Mary, Martha and Benjamin F. William H. was born in South Carolina on March 22, 1822, and came to Mississippi with his parents when but eight years of age, where he was reared on a farm. He was married, in 1844, to Sarah F. Roseman, a daughter of Samuel and Frances (Hill) Roseman. After his marriage he settled on a farm, where he resided until 1869. As the result of this union the following children were born: James S., Casandria E. (deceased), Thomas H, John F., William A., Benjamin F. (deceased), Marshall L., Sarah F., Archie N. (deceased), Emmett L. and Joseph T. They also have twenty-seven grandchildren. Mr. Hodges commenced preaching the Gospel in Choctaw County, Miss., in 1863. In 1869 he came to Arkansas and settled in White County and in Cane Township, on 240 acres of land, of which he now has about 100 acres under cultivation. Mr.Hodges is pastor of the Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church. He has been a very active worker in his labors and has organized four churches in this neighborhood.

==========================================================

Notes from Jimmy Rosemond :

Came to Mississippi with his parents in 1830. He became a Baptist Minister in 1863 in Choctaw County, Mississippi. He moved to White County, Arkansas in 1869. He married Sarah Frances Roseman, daughter of Samuel Roseman and Francis Hill Roseman.

On 9 January 1813 while cruising between Curacao and the Spanish Main FELLOWES retook a brig and learnt that she had been taken by one of three American privateers in the area.
He went in pursuit and discovered her the next morning off Porto Cabello and after a long chase he got within range at 2 o’clock on the morning of the 11th. and drove the privateer ashore on Point Hicacos.
Her commander and 24 men were drowned trying to reach the shore. She proved to be the ROSAMOND of 8 heavy guns and 105 men and she had on board 100,000 dollars in specie beside other plunder.

On 9 January 1813, Fawn captured the Spanish brig Teneriffe and sent her into Port Cavello.[25] From her Fellowes found out that her captor was one of three American privateers that had come from a rendezvous between Beata and Saint Domingo. Fawn set out in pursuit and on 10 January Fellowes sighted a strange vessel. After a long and arduous chase during which the batteries of Port Cavello fired on the privateer to prevent her entering,[20] Fawn succeeded in chasing the American privateer Rosamond, of eight guns and 105 or 120 men, on shore.[26] Rosamond ran on shore on Point Hicacos where her captain and 24 men drowned in attempting to reach the land. Rosamond had on board $100,000 in specie and valuable merchandize, the plunder of various English and Spanish vessels.[20]

An Act for the relief af Alexander Scott. July 22, 1813. Be it enacted, eye., That the Secretary for the Department of State Account to be be directed to cause to be settled the accounts of Alexander Scott, for “”l°d· his trouble and expenses in liberating from confinement, in supplying with provisions and other necessaries, and in sending from Porto Cavello to the port of New York, the crew of the private armed schooner Rosamond, who were confined on board a Spanish armed vessel at that place; and also for his trouble and expenses in supplying with provisions and other necessaries, and in sending sundry distressed American seamen from Porto Rico to the port of New York; and that he allow the said Alexander Scott full reimbursement for all expenses incurred for the purposes aforesaid, and also such compensation for his trouble therein as may be deemed just and equitable. Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That a sum not exceeding nine Appropriation. thousand dollars be, and the same is hereby appropriated out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the purposes aforesaid

http://www.carolana.com/SC/Towns/charleston_1849_map.html

http://www.carolana.com/SC/Revolution/patriots_sc_capt_samuel_rosamond.html

https://rosamondpress.com/2011/10/16/the-rosamond-hodges-all-american-redneck-family/#comment-31050

http://sarsat.org/HistoricalAccounts/patriotbiographies/johnhodges.htm

Rainbow Row is the name for a series of thirteen colorful historic houses in Charleston, South Carolina. It represents the longest cluster of Georgian row houses in the United States. The houses are located north of Tradd St. and south of Elliot St. on East Bay Street, that is, 79 to 107 East Bay Street. The name Rainbow Row was coined after the pastel colors they were painted as they were restored in the 1930s and 1940s. It is a popular tourist attraction and is one of the most photographed parts of Charleston

Rainbow Row originally fronted directly on the riverfront of the Cooper River, but that land was subsequently filled in. Merchants constructed commercial buildings with stores on the first (ground) floor and living quarters above. Most of the buildings had no interior access between the first and second floors; exterior stairs were located in the yards behind the houses. In 1778, a fire destroyed much of the neighborhood, and only 95 to 101 East Bay Street were spared.

After the Civil War, this area of Charleston devolved into near slum conditions. In the 1920s, Susan Pringle Frost, the founder of the Society for the Preservation of Old Dwellings, now the Preservation Society of Charleston, bought six of the buildings, but she lacked the money to restore them immediately. In 1931, Dorothy Haskell Porcher Legge purchased a section of these, house numbering 99 through 101 East Bay, and began to renovate them. She chose to paint these houses pink based on a colonial Caribbean color scheme. Other owners and future owners followed suit, creating the “rainbow” of pastel colors present today. The coloring of the houses helped keep the houses cool inside as well as give the area its name. By 1945, most of the houses had been restored.[1]

Common myths concerning Charleston include variants on the reasons for the paint colors. According to some tales, the houses were painted in the various colors such that the intoxicated sailors coming in from port could remember which houses they were to bunk in. In other versions, the colors of the buildings date from their use as stores; the colors were used so that owners could tell illiterate slaves which building to go to for shopping.

Panoramic image of Rainbow Row

Houses[edit]

Rainbow Row is composed of thirteen different buildings, most of which share party walls with their neighboring houses. The following are summaries of the buildings.

79-81 East Bay Street[edit]

The two-part structure at the northwest corner of Tradd St. and East Bay St. anchors the southern end of Rainbow Row. The southernmost building dates from about 1845 (making it the newest building in Rainbow Row), while the adjoining building at 81 East Bay St. was built after a 1778 fire and before 1785.[2]

83 East Bay Street[edit]

The William Stone House was built in about 1784 by a Tory merchant who left Charleston for England during the Revolutionary War. An earlier building was destroyed in a fire in 1778, but it had been replaced by the time the tract was sold in 1784. Susan Pringle Frost bought 83 East Bay Street and restored it as a dwelling in 1941, adding a neoclassical balcony to the front and replacing a storefront with a Colonial Revival style door.[3]

85 East Bay Street[edit]

The house at 85 East Bay Street was probably built near the time of the American Revolution. Like others on Rainbow Row, it had a commercial use on the ground floor (viz., a ship chandlery) and living space above. The interior living space displays Chinese Chippendale details. In 1944, the house was purchased by Mrs. Louise Graves and restored. It was the last house along Rainbow Row to be restored following many years of vacancy.[4]

87 East Bay Street[edit]

In 1778, a former building was destroyed in a fire and was replaced by Scottish merchant James Gordon after he bought the land in 1792. The four-story building was purchased by Susan Pringle Frost in 1920, and she subsequently did some of the restoration work. She added a balcony to the front of the house before reselling it in 1955. The house still has its original windows and stucco.[5]

89 East Bay St. was built in about 1770.

89 East Bay Street[edit]

Like its neighbors, 89 East Bay Street, also known as the Deas-Tunno House, was built for commercial uses with residential space above. It was constructed in about 1770 and is unlike most houses along Rainbow Row in that it includes a side yard separating it from the adjacent house to the south. The garden is screened by a wall with a balustrade. A garage fronts the sidewalk.[6]

91 East Bay Street[edit]

Merchants Peter Leger and William Greenwood bought a building at 91 East Bay Street in 1774, but it was destroyed in a fire in 1778. In 1793, the building was sold to Nathaniel Russell, a Rhode Island merchant. After a series of owners and uses, Susan Pringle Frost bought the house in 1920; she sold it to New York playwright John McGowan in 1941. McGowan removed Greek Revival details which had been added to the house in the 19th century and had the current details created including the large arched doors on the first floor and roofline.[7] In the panoramic photo above, 91 East Bay St. is the second house from the left. In the panoramic photo above, the house is at the extreme right edge.

93 East Bay Street[edit]

The James Cook House was built in about 1778 and had a commercial use on the first floor with a residence above. Following its restoration, there is a kitchen and dining room on the first floor and a drawing room and library on the second floor.[8] In the panoramic photo above, 93 East Bay St. is the bright yellow house, third from the left.

95 East Bay Street[edit]

Because of gaps in the chain of title, a builder for 95 East Bay Street has been impossible to pinpoint. However, it has stylistic clues which suggest a connection to the neighboring houses at 97 and 99-101 East Bay Street and a possible connection to the builder of those buildings, Othniel Beale. In 1779, 95 East Bay Street was owned by Charles Cotesworth Pinckney. In 1789, a commercial interest bought the property, but the storefront window was later replaced with the existing pair of entrances and small windows.[9] The house was restored by New York playwright John McGowan in 1938.[10] In the panoramic photo above, 95 East Bay St. is the green, four story house with Flemish gable roofline.

Drawing, Othniel Beale House and Rainbow Row, Historic American Buildings Survey

97 and 99-101 East Bay Street[edit]

Othniel Beale bought the lot upon which 97 East Bay St. is built in March 1741 for a price not indicating the presence of a building. When he added a small piece of land to his lot in 1748, the deed referred to his “new Brick Store” as one of the landmarks. Beale also built the adjoining 99-101 East Bay St., a building which shares a roof, party wall, and decorative elements. After the death of Beale, both properties passed through several owners and uses. Susan Pringle Frost bought 97 East Bay Street and resold it in 1936.[11] Judge Lionel K. Legge and Mrs. Dorothy Legge undertook a restoration of 99-101 East Bay Street starting in July 1931.[12] Their house was the first on Rainbow Row to be restored along Rainbow Row; Mrs. Dorothy Haskell Porcher Legge was recognized for her groundbreaking restoration work on the house with an award from the Preservation Society of Charleston in 1992.[13] Detailed plans of the house were produced for the Historic American Buildings Survey and can be viewed here. In the panoramic photo above, 99-101 East Bay St. is the widest house shown, and 97 East Bay is the blue house with three windows and a door on the ground floor to its left.

103 East Bay Street[edit]

The Joseph Dulles House was built about 1787. The builder was an ancestor of John Foster Dulles. The house was restored in the 1930s by Anna Wells Rutledge with the assistance of architects Simons and Lapham.[14]

105 East Bay Street[edit]

The Dutarque-Guida House was built after the tract was acquired by Lewis Dutarque in 1778.[15] The sales price in 1784 suggests that the house had been built in that small window.[15] The building was bought by Italian immigrant Giovanni Domenico Guida who installed an iron, Victorian storefront on the building with his name displayed. Anna Wells Rutledge purchased the building in 1970 and retained the storefront. It is the only building on Rainbow Row to retain its Victorian storefront.[16]

107 East Bay Street[edit]

John Blake bought the lot at the southwest corner of Elliott St. and East Bay St. in 1791 and immediately executed an agreement with the owner of the neighboring property to the south at 105 East Bay St. The neighboring house had been built eight inches across the property line onto Blake’s new lot. In exchange for receiving a deed to the misplaced wall, Blake agreed to build a gutter to drain water from between the existing building and the one which he planned to construct. Thus, 107 East Bay Street seems to date to about 1792. During more than 200 years, the house has seen many alterations to its appearance and interior. Indeed, when the house was bought by Irving Solomon in the 1970s, the new owner was unable to determine the original configuration for restoration. A two-story kitchen house stands behind 107 East Bay St. and can be seen from Elliott St.; it is now a separate house titled 1 Elliott St.[17]

 

Mortages 1786 – 1815
South Carolina

Mortgages, 1786-1815
Series: S218157In South Carolina the American Revolution was a bitter civil war, and the state emerged from that conflict with heavy damage to property and its economy in shambles. The Paper Medium Loan was one of a number of measures of debtor relief passed by the General Assembly in the 1780s. Like some of the other measures, it primarily helped large planters, many of them in the lowcountry.Series 218157, South Carolina Department of Archives and History, consists of signed and sealed mortgages to the Commissioners of the Loan Office. Information includes the name of the person receiving the loan, a description of property being mortgaged, the amount of the loan, and the terms of the loan. Many of the signatures were cut out or defaced in the process of recording the satisfaction of the loans. In a few cases receipts have been substituted for removed mortgages that explain their removal for use in legal proceedings.Property descriptions for mortgaged real estate usually include acreage; physical location including natural features, boundaries, and surrounding landholders; and description of how the property was acquired by the owner who mortgaged it. Some mortgages mention that the owners purchased the property from the Commissioners of Forfeited Estates.  All personal names and geographic locations mentioned in the mortgages are included in the repository’s.

‘The Rosamond’ An American Privateer

pirates

pirates3

Tall Ships in Newport, RI

pirates5
Famous American Privateers.

Several days ago I discovered there was a ship named Rosamond that was a Privateer. I wonder if she was owned by Captain Samuel Rosamond of Charleston. She was sunk with all hands lost. She was carrying $100,000 in plunder. I have been looking as to why the Rosamonds got up and left South Carolina and moved to Mississippi. Did Samuel mortgage everything in order to purchase this ship, including his two homes on Bay? Was this ship deliberately grounded so the fortune would not have to be shared with other investors? The Rosamond family bought several tracts of land in Mississippi and built plantations on them.

The ship above in the USS Providence carrying eight guns. The Rosamond would be of this size.

Every American Grandson would love to hear stories of family Pirates. Tyler Hunt will not be hearing any stories from his grandfather for he was kidnapped by the pirate imposter, Barnacle Bill, the drunken fake sailor man who never served his nation in time of war.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2014

Early in. the War of 1812 most of the ‘[ American privateers were small pilot boats, but it was soon found that they were too weak to capture many vessels, as most of the English merchantmen were too heavily armed for them. This led to the construction of powerful i swift-sailing craft, mounting twelve, j eighteen, twenty-four and even thirtyi three pounders, and manned by 120 and j 100 men—veritable corvettes —which ‘ were sent to sea at private expense. Of j this class were the privateers Paul Jones, Rosamond, Saratoga, General Armstrong and Tb’rktown. Perhaps the most formidable of all was the frigatebuilt ship America, a privateer which was purchased in France in 1793 byGeorge Crowninshield. Many of our merchant vessels, transformed into privateers, proved to be formidable craft. In fact, a large proportion of our merchantmen were built with a view to speed; for, thanks to British interference in our mercantile affairs, the American shipowner had found it preferable to sacrifice a little carrying space in his ships to additional speed, as It would enable him to outsail the British cruiser and thus avoid disastrous delays and degrading impressments.—

On 9 January 1813 while cruising between Curacao and the Spanish Main FELLOWES retook a brig and learnt that she had been taken by one of three American privateers in the area.
He went in pursuit and discovered her the next morning off Porto Cabello and after a long chase he got within range at 2 o’clock on the morning of the 11th. and drove the privateer ashore on Point Hicacos.
Her commander and 24 men were drowned trying to reach the shore. She proved to be the ROSAMOND of 8 heavy guns and 105 men and she had on board 100,000 dollars in specie beside other plunder.

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2011/07/04/patriot-samuel-rosamond/

http://sarsat.org/images/templates/SARheadertemplate.htm

The Rosamond Home and Family

The Rosamond Family

Sitting L to R:
Etta Ernisteen Rosamond b. March 03, 1903
Jessie Theolya Rosamond b. July 25, 1907
James Vardamin Rosamond b. July 13, 1911
Hervey Lindsey Rosamond b. January 10, 1909
Standing L to R:
Wilsie Irna Rosamond b. December 03, 1901
Othella Marshall Rosamond b. April 01, 1900
Henderson Dee Rosamond b. December 08, 1897
Not shown:
Mary Dow Rosamond b. March 02, 1899
Bernic Howard Rosamond b. June 01, 1904  d. February 06, 1908
Addison Benjamin Rosamond b.  March 29, 1906  d. November 02, 1910

ROSAMOND
My mother’s (Barbara June ROSAMOND Smith) family ties go back to those SC Counties. A brief synopsis of my own direct descendancy. (The name ROSAMOND has been spelled so many different ways through the years: ROSAMOND, Rosemond, Rosman, Roseman, Rosemon, Rosamon, Rosamund, ROSAMOND, etc. but for our group of ROSAMOND’s they are still the same persons.) My fellow distant cousins and I have researched our ROSAMOND ancestors for 14 years now. We have a lot of information bu which we can write a book. Still there facts we don’t have yet, and some persons scattered throughout the country from whom we haven’t contacted nor have they contacted us — especially in California. For many years our family legend has it that our “ROSAMOND” ancestor came from Ireland and came to the colonies prior to the American Revolutionary War. There are many legends about the family. A small part of the legend might be true, but has not factually true for me and some my fellow “ROSAMOND” descendants’ researchers at least those who stem from John ROSAMOND. We hired a researcher in England based on the earliest history we can, at present, find on our ancestor. Below is all that we can find on him so far..showing England, not Ireland. It doesn’t mean he wasn’t born in Ireland, just that he was not in Ireland in 1724-1725. We just don’t know.

In 1724, my ancestor John ROSAMOND and his friend William Ray were arrested in Abingdon, Berkshire, England for stealing a hat, periwig, 30 pounds British sterling, five pairs of shoes, and a brown gelding. They were held in the gaol in Reading, Berkshire, after their trial where they were sentenced to be exiled to the colonies for 14 years hard labor. By March 1725, they were transported to Newgate Prison and held there until they boarded the convict ship “Forward” owned by Jonathan Forward, and captained by Daniel Russell. The ship set sail on 28 September 1725 from London via the Thames River. The ship arrived disbarked at Annapolis, Maryland on 8 December 1725. We don’t know who bought his indenture, but he is recorded as being in CPT Beall’s militia of Prince George Co, Maryland between 1734-1737. By 1747-1765 we find John ROSAMOND living in Augusta Co, Virginia and listed as a master shoemaker, owned land, paid tithes, served in the militia, etc. His wife Sarah Wilson, a daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Wilson, arrived with her mother, brothers: Samuel and Matthew, sisters, and uncles and cousins in June 1740 in Philadelphia, PA from Co Antrim, Ireland. Her brother Nathaniel Wilson must have been born in Virginia because there is no listing of him arriving on the ship. In 1767, John and Sarah ROSAMOND were living in the old Granville Co, owning land on Turkey Creek. Supposedly this was part of the later called Abbeville District. Sarah’s brother, Nathaniel Wilson and two of her uncles (one was named William) and several cousins also moved to this Abbeville District. Their known children according to their daughter’s, Jean ROSAMOND, will were her brothers Samuel ROSAMOND who married Sarah Hodges (believed to be a daughter of John Hodges), James ROSAMOND, Margaret ROSAMOND who married Bartholomew Weems, Sarah ROSAMOND who married Richard Hodges (possibly a brother of Sarah Hodges.) Lots of brothers from one family marrying sisters or cousins in another family here. It even continues today from time to time. We believe John and Sarah may have had a son named John, but we are not sure. John ROSAMOND and his son Samuel were listed in the 1779 census. Although legend has it that Samuel was born in Ireland, we have find no factual documentation to substantiate this. We feel he was born in Virginia sometime between 1742-1750. Samuel and James ROSAMOND both served in the SC militia during the Revolution. Samuel was a lieutenant under Adam Crain Jones and as a captain under Colonel Anderson. In the 1790 SC census, John ROSAMOND was not listed, assuming he had already died. His widow, Sarah, and their two sons, Samuel and James were all listed as heads of households. Samuel died in 1814 and James died in 1806. We already know about Samuel’s wife, Sarah Hodges. However, we’re trying to find James’s first wife. His second wife was a widow named Mary Lahorty or Dahorty, who had a son James Lahorty. James is my direct ancestor. Though I’m not listing all his children’s descendants. His children were Nathaniel Jones, Thomas A., Benjamin, Samuel, and Mary ROSAMOND—
a) Nathaniel J. ROSAMOND (b. abt 1784, Laurens Co, dbf 1840, not sure where or where he’s buried.) (who received the 947 acres, and most of the property, where James lived somewhere near where the Saluda and Reedy Rivers meet). Nathaniel J. (we believe his the “J” was Jones) first marriage was to Mary Lighon. Their son was James Blackmon ROSAMOND. After Mary’s death, he married Amy Powell, a niece of his cousin. They had several children who included William Capers ROSAMOND (a physician, who settled in Jasper, AL prior to the Civil War.) Many of Nathaniel’s descendants are still in SC, except for William Capers’ –one of these lives in Birmingham.
b) Thomas A. ROSAMOND (a minister) who married Mary Jane Simpson. This group settled in MS.
c) Samuel ROSAMOND (b. abt 1792, d. in Attalla Co, MS) md Frances “Fanny” Hill, daughter of John and Susannah Hill. She is a sister of Benjamin’s wife, Susannah. Samuel and his family came to MS about 1842-1847.
d) Benjamin ROSAMOND (b. 1790, Laurens Co, d. 1859 in Attalla Co, MS). His first marriage was to Susannah Hill (a daughter of John and Susannah Hill, I believe of Greenwood Co). She died in probably Greenwood Co, before 1842. (They are my great-great-great grandparents). He and Susannah had seven sons, one who is Thomas Henry ROSAMOND (my great-great grandfather). The book Greenwood Co Sketches shows that Benjamin and Susannah and Samuel, Ben’s brother, and Frances “Fanny” Hill ROSAMOND, Susannah’s sister, were founders of the first Walnut Grove Baptist Church near Ware Shoals. Benjamin remarried in 1843 to Jane (Rogers) Mays, daughter of Daniel Rogers and widow of Abner Mays. From his marriage to Jane, they had two sons–Marion Francis and Tillman Jasper ROSAMOND. Benjamin and Jane ROSAMOND moved to Attalla Co, MS about 1850. Benjamin’s son: Thomas Henry ROSAMOND (b. 1811, Abbeville or Greenwood Co, d. sometime after 1880 census. Their granddaughter stated she thinks they may have been buried in Cleburne Co, AL) md Sarah Mays, a daughter of Matthew (Meedy or Medy) and Lucretia Rogers, a daughter of Daniel Rogers. Lucretia (Rogers) Mays and Jane (Rogers) Mays ROSAMOND were sisters..making Jane not only the aunt to Sarah Mays ROSAMOND, but also her step-mother-in-law. By 1860, Thomas Henry and Sarah moved to several counties in GA.

Thomas ran a store in Abbeville prior to coming to GA. In GA he worked in a flour mill and with lumber. They had several children, amongst their sons were Joseph Henry ROSAMOND, Benjamin Augustus ROSAMOND (who remained in GA, and is buried in La Grange, GA), and William Arthur ROSAMOND. Joseph Henry ROSAMOND (b. Oct 1861 in Coweta Co, GA, d. Jul 1944, and buried in Anniston, AL) md Nancy Ann Lester (also born in GA). They had five sons and three daughters. Their sons: John, Thomas Jackson ROSAMOND m. Maggie Payne, Arthur, Augustus, and their last son and youngest child, Joseph Ira ROSAMOND. Joseph Henry, called “Joe,” worked as farmer in Cleburne and Calhoun (around Piedmont), AL. He later was listed in the 1908 city directory and 1910 census as a policeman. After his retirement in the 1930’s he owned a lumber yard. Joe’s and Nancy’s son, “Ira”: Joseph Ira ROSAMOND (b. 1902, d. 1949 in Anniston, AL) m. Nelle Underwood (b. 1902, died Mar 1931), a daughter of Texas Stephens and Maude (Buckner) Underwood. Although Ira helped his father at the lumber yard and sometimes helped his uncle Tom with carpentry and cabinetmaking in his younger years, Ira was a plumber in the 1930’s and 1940’s until his death in 1949.

He married his second wife, Eula Mae (Morrison) about 1934. She died in October 1995 in Anniston, AL. Ira and Nelle had only three daughters, Barbara June (called June), Iris Lee (Iris), and Edith Juanita (called Juanita). All born in Anniston, AL in 1924 (June), 1926 (Iris), and 1928 (Juanita). All daughters are still living.

My MOTHER:
Barbara June ROSAMOND (b. 6 Aug 1924) md Willie Edgar Smith (b. 11 Sep 1917, in Cherokee Co, AL, d. 21 August 1975, at the VA hospital in Birmingham, AL). Willie was a World War II veteran, serving in France and Italy. He also worked for Lee Brothers Brass Foundry for 25 years, until he was forced to retire in 1973 due to his bad health. Their living children: Barbara Ann Smith , Sondra Carole Smith, and Gloria Lanelle Smith.

MYSELF:
Barbara Ann Smith (b. 31 Aug 1944) md James Morgan. Have two grown children.

What we would like to know is there a possible chance about James ROSAMOND, my gggg grandfather’s first wife’s name was Lettice. According to a Hodges’ tradition, if this Lettice might possibly be the unnamed daughter of Benjamin Jones, according to “Greenwood Co

Sketches” which says that her family was massacred by Indians in the so-called “Long Cane Creek Massacre” and that she had married an unnamed ROSAMOND? Where was Long Cane Creek, by the way? It may be just coincidental that Nathaniel’s middle name is Jones, and that my ggg grandfather’s name was Benjamin, since James ROSAMOND did not have a brother named Benjamin. Is it possible that Lettice could be Lettice Jones? There are just so many unanswered questions.
Morgan, Barbara :
MORGANB@mcclellan-emh2.army.mil Posted : 7/8/1998

PATRIOT JOHN HODGES

 

A Biography of John Hodges

 

JOHN HODGES

 

John Hodges came from Essex County , Virginia , to Abbeville I)istrict, South Carolina , before the American Revolution. His parents, Richard and Elizabeth Hodges, brought their family, with twelve children to Mulberry Creek. One of the sons, named John, born 1765 in Essex County , VA , became a Revolutionary soldier at age 15. Father Richard died in South Carolina soon after arriving. Indians attacked the widow Hodges and she was able to take some of the children into the forest where they hid in a hollow tree. The Indians tied two of the daughters in the cabin and burned the home and the girls. They took one daughter with them. She returned after the Revolution with a half Indian son. She could not speak English.

The John Hodges family settled near the present location of Hodges, SC. The country was rich in wild animals and dense forest. Also, there were more Indians than settlers. Young John Hodges was only eleven years old when the American Revolution started. He had been born in Essex County, VA, in 1765. A volunteer at age sixteen, on 1 April 1780, John became a private in Captain Samuel Rosamond’s company. Later, he served in Colonel Picken’s Regiment. He fought in many battles. The U.S. Archives has a complete record of his service. Extracts are in a number of reference books. The best record is the actual request for a pension, made by the man himself . It is a long, hand written document, signed by John Hodges. Written on both sides, there is ‘bleed-through” but all words can be read. It has important historical value because the descriptions are first hand accounts. The transcription by Albert Metts left spelling and punctuation unchanged. The U.S. Archives File number is W10117

——————————————————————————————————————-

State of South Carolina )

Abbeville District

On this twenty-third day of Octr 1832 personally appeared in open court before the honorable Richard Gantt Presiding Judge of the Court of Common Pleas & General Sefsions

(in old writing, an ‘f’ was used when there was a double “s”.) for the said State & District now sitting John Hodges a resident of Abbeville District in the State of South Carolina aged sixty seven years who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declarations in order to obtain the benefit of the act Congrefs passed June 7th 1832.

‘That he entered the service of the United States at the age of fifteen as a volunteer and private on or about the first day of April One thousand seven hundred and eighty and was enrolled as such under the command of Capt. Samuel Rosamond who commanded a beat or militia company in the then District of ninety-six, now Abbeville in the State of South Carolina that he was marched in the said company from Ninetysix l)istrict to a place called Beach Island in this State near Augusta in the State ol Georgia where he was taken sick and left by his company under the care of one Capn Tutt a regular Officer under whose care he soon recovered and under whom he done and performed service and duty for at least the period of one month and he returned home where he soon alter rejoined Capt. Rosamonds company who had also returned from an attempt to aid Charleston but who had heard of the fall of that place in May seventeen hundred and eighty on his march to its relief and then returned to the aid of the upper country where from the time of the fall of Charleston the tories had become formidable and dangerous to the friends of liberty by not only their own acts of murder rapine & plunder but by influencing and exciting the indians on the borders of South Carolina to every savage and rapacious act of cruelty and outrage towards the whigs and they the tories frequently themselves taking the lead in plunder and depredation these state of things existing at that time in full energy against the comparatively few friends of liberty in Carolina give to these friends almost constant and active employment in apprising in every manner they could this double enemy until a third enemy the British under Col Cruger affected a lodgement of their force in the District of Ninety six at a place called Ninety six or sometimes Cambridge which force together with their allies the tories and indians kept the surrounding settlements or country in a subjected state until the arrival of Gen Greene with his forces before Cambridge to which he laid seige and to which place the whigs of the country flocked to aid the beseigers in driving or expelling the British. The applicant was marched in Capn Rosamands company with all the whig militia of the country who were all under the command of Col or Genl Pickens to succour and aid Genl Greene in his advances against Col Cruger at Cambridge or Ninety six and continued there in active employment against the beseiged British under Gen Greene until he raised the seige in June 1781 / seventeen hundred and eighty one / and marched his force as well as the force under Gen Pickens toward the Congaree River in this State at which place Genl Greene ordered Gen Pickens with his militia to the Orangeburg Post and to the upper part of South Carolina to check the tories in that section of country accordingly the applicant in Capt Rosamands company was marched back to the District of Ninety six and then soon after discharged. The applicant at the seige of Cambridge lost a horse saddle and bridle appraised at one hundred dollars which fell into the hands of the British & and for which he never received one cent in any way towards the payment for his lofs directly or indirectly and from the best of his recollection he computes this tour of service and duty to be at least nine months. The applicant John Hodges shortly after his return aforesaid with Capn Rosamand from Green’s army volunteered his services for six months under a Capt. Samuel Moore a partizan Officer of mounted men in whose company he performed active & constant duty for six months & towards the later part of his service he acted as Second Lieutenant of the company but how long he done Lieutenant duty in this compn he cannot recollect he however continued in this company until Capn Moore was killed while alone and unattended by a skirmishing party of tories under the command of the notorious William Cunningham who is in South Carolina to this day distinguished by the name of Bloody Cunningham but when Capt Moore was killed the applicant cannot tell but thinks it was in the year one thousand seven hundred and eighty one.

 

The pension application of John Hodges continues:

The applicant subsequently then volunteered his services for six months under Capn Robert Maxwell a partizan officer of mounted men some time in the latter part of the year seventeen hundred and eighty one and he in Capn Robert Maxwells company together with a number of other troops were ordered to march to the Cherokee country by Gen Pickens who in person conducted the expedition against the indians the army entered the Cherokee nation & arrived at Choata town where a battle was fought & terminated in the defeat of the indians a large number of whom were put to flight forty or fifty killed and about one hundred of them taken prisoner, Choata town burned, besides other indian villages, & their corn destroyed, after which the army returned to the settlement, where peace was restored by the overthrow of the indians The applicant remained in the said Robert Maxwells company the full term of the said six months guarding the frontiers, & scouting from place to place to awe the enemies of the country until peace was restored to it by its British enemies & the applicant discharged from further service in the defence of his country.

http://www.threedecks.org/index.php?display_type=show_ship&id=22920

http://www.threedecks.org/index.php?display_type=show_ship&id=4233

http://books.google.com/books?id=ZOMiAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA20&lpg=PA20&dq=the+rosamond+american+privateer&source=bl&ots=sD06PhXGgS&sig=2D2ykS9BptEOX7HWrkj_k9bZb0k&hl=en&sa=X&ei=TXIuU-DYKpXloASVtYCABw&ved=0CC8Q6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=the%20rosamond%20american%20privateer&f=false

http://web.massar.org/privateers-of-the-revolution/
http://castroller.com/podcasts/HistoryAccordingTo/3824464
http://castroller.com/podcasts/HistoryAccordingTo/3399360

http://www.nps.gov/revwar/about_the_revolution/jp_jones.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Rose_(1757)

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About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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