The Wendish Roots of Christine Wandel

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For several years my dear friend, Christine Wandel, was under siege in New York. She had been living in Greenwhich Village for thirty-four years and was being harassed by her landlord. She was in desperate need of an ally. I could not be there for her. Two years later, the famous artist, Stefan Eins, came to Chistine’s rescue. Stefan was born in Austria and will be returning there for a art show. He has the manners of a diplomat and has turned Chris’s apartment into a small art gallery.

http://www.oneunoeins.com/

Christine grew up in a four story home on Hancock Street on Beacon Hill. Her father was a doctor that had his office on the first floor, and treated the Blue Bloods of Boston. Chris went to the finest schools, and attended Mills College in Oakland California where she majored in Theology. Religion is in her blood.

In looking for Christine Wandel’s ancestors, I found Marie-Louis Wandel who at the time was the Permanent Ambassador to the United Nations from Denmark. I had Christine give her a call. Marie-Louise told Christine all the Wandels lived in a city in Denmark and are kin to a Bishop. After talking to Chris last night, I have found this Bishop, and the city. It is the oldest in Denmark. Johan Wendt-Wandal-Vandel-Wandel was appointed the Bishop of Ribe by King Christian 111 because Wandel was a disciple of Martin Luther, and was with him when he nailed his theses on the church door in Wittenberg.

Johan was a Wend. Vandal (Wenth ell Slavus), Johan – 1541, a Lutheran Reformer and Bishop indicated (on tombstone in Ribe) as born in Goslar. Prince Phillip is the living history of what was set in stone by King Christian the Reformer. King Waldemer IV of Denmark who died in 1375, assumed the official title of “King of the Wends”. This title was used until 1972.


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Marie-Louise Wandel married Carsten Staur who was/is Denmark’s Ambassador to the United Nations. In looking at Johan Wandel, I am looking at Prince Phillip, the husband of Queen Elizabeth, for the first time. Phillip’s ancestors sat on the throne of Denmark because of Johan Wandel and the Reformation of Martin Luther. Elizabeth is a ‘Defender of the Faith’ when it comes to the Protestant religion. Who the Lutheran Church of Denmark blesses, is of profound importance when it comes to the House of Hanover and Oldenburg. The Wandels intermarried which suggests there exist a Protestant hegemony. Were the Wandels nobles kin to Anna of Brandenburg?

Jon Presco

Carsten Staur has also served as Under-Secretary for Bilateral Affairs (Middle East, Africa, Asia and Latin America), and Administrative Affairs. He was Denmark’s Ambassador to Israel from 1996 to 1998 and has held other political and diplomatic posts including Head and Deputy Head of the Policy and Planning Department, South Group, at the Ministry for Foreign Affairs. His diplomatic career began as First Secretary at the Permanent Mission to the UN in Geneva.

Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark (Andreas; 2 February 1882 (N.S.) – 3 December 1944) of the House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, was the seventh child and fourth son of King George I of Greece and Olga Constantinovna of Russia. He was a grandson of Christian IX of Denmark and father of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.

The triumph of a German-speaking Lutheran like Christian III would eventually bring about an end to traditional Christianity in Denmark, but Catholics still controlled the Council of State. Christian III ordered the arrest of three of the bishops on the State Council by his German mercenaries (12 August 1536). Martin Luther wrote to the king congratulating him on his success.

The circumstances under which Christian III ascended the throne exposed Denmark to the danger of foreign domination. It was with the help of the gentry of the Germanic duchies that Christian had conquered Denmark. Holsatian and other German noblemen had led his armies and directed his diplomacy. The first six years of Christian III’s reign were marked by a contest between the Danish Rigsraadet and the German counsellors, both of whom sought to rule through the king.

King Waldemer IV of Denmark who died in 1375, assumed the official title of “King of the Wends”. This title was used until 1972.

While in the midst of that campaign, he went to Estonia to negotiate with the Teutonic Knights who controlled Estonia. Danes had never migrated there in any numbers, and so for 19,000 marks Valdemar gave up Danish Estonia, a far-off eastern province, which allowed him to pay off mortgages of parts of Denmark which were more important to him.

H.E. Ambassador
Carsten Staur
Permanent Representative to the UN in Geneva for Denmark
Incumbent
Assumed office
26 August 2013
Permanent Representative to the UN in New York for Denmark
In office
2007–2013
Ambassador to Israel for Denmark
In office
1996–1998
Personal details
Born
(1954-11-09) 9 November 1954 (age 59)
Spouse(s)
Marie-Louise Wandel
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Johan WENDT (INSECURE FAR FOR IVER) 2
• Born: Abt 1490, Goslar
• Marriage: Anna GYREN about 1527 in Prussia 1
• Death: 11 August 1541, Ribe, Ribe County, Denmark at the age of approx. 51 years
Image
Bullet General Notes:

Vandal (Wenth ell Slavus), Johan – 1541, Lutheran Reformer and Bishop indicated (on tombstone in Ribe) as born in Goslar; However, there is no doubt that he is the Who in 1516 were enrolled in Wittenberg and 1517 took Magister degree ibid. It is not usandsyligt that he has been in the circle of students who were present when Luther P. A. ushered in a new era at The notice of his Theses on the church door in Wittenberg. In all events, it is perceptibly enough that V. as a gifted and docile disciple fully appropriated Luther maxims. We are not acquainted where V in the following years has had its services; but in 1526 he became the Duke Christian (III) called Reading Teacher of the evangelical priest School, Duke intended to create in Haderslev. In this position he developed in connection with the dean in Haderslev, Dr. Eberhard Weidensee, an important company in which North Schleswig was a step forward in reformatory direction than any other part of the Danish monarchy. As Weidensee 1533 left the country, entered V., who nevertheless continue to be retained the title of> Associate Professor> and doubtless have done Benefit as such in his place as parish priest in Haderslev and øverte ecclesiastical overseer of priests in Haderslev and Tørning Len. In this capacity, it was probably that he wrote a still retains instructions for the District Dean provided for Execution of their Tilsynsgjerning (New church hist. Coll VI, 124 ff.). When in January 1537 Odense called together the circle of clerics from the kingdom, which should make outline of a Kirkeordinans, somewhat later forlagdes to Haderslev and this was reinforced by the principal of the Reformation Spokesmen from Bangkok, it is hardly doubtful that V. has exerted no small influence on Ordinansens Content and Form, and when he eminently enjoyed Christian III’s Trust, he was soon after appointed to hold the site as an evangelical Superintendent in Ribe, which he 2nd Sept.

1537 received initiation into Church of Our Lady in Copenhagen. It was a huge task that was asked V. in the vast diocese where so much in need of reformation, and it can not be doubted that he has possessed the spiritual maturity and proficiency check that was necessary; but when his acquaintance with the Danish language only imperfectly, he had on his Visitatsrejser accompanied by one of diocese priests who could interpret his words to the churches what course eminently hemmede influence. Where the other hand, could go in Latin, was V. in his place, and it is known that he diligently taught both the oldest School Students in Dialectics and held theological lectures for priests and teachers.

Since 1538 the speech that Dr. Bugenhagen, who had been a Christian III’s adviser in Church and School Matters should go home, thought the king to handing V. this deed. There was not any of it as the belly Hagens living in this country was extended until the Church Ordinance in June 1539 was lovtagen. 1540 participated in V. Bispemødet in Copenhagen, and at its Incentive he contributed to Dr. Peder Palladius published his explanation of the Catechism of the guide for priests. – V. died already 11 Avg 1541, in the midst of his best years. His wife, Anna Gyren, survived him with four children, as Christian III with friendly solicitude took him. It has been assumed that the later confessed, scholars Wandal-generation descendant of Bishop John. V.; but the thorough connoisseur of Ribes Past, J. Kinch, has expressed one probably due to doubt this Antagelses correctness.

Barefoot and Rørdam, Church Calendar f Schleswig Diocese II, 121 ff. Scr. Rer. Dan. VII, 202 f Kinch, Ribe Hist. and Desc. II-23 HF Rørdam. 3

Johan married Anna GYREN about 1527 in Prussia. 1 (Anna GYREN was born about 1505 in Prussia.)

Iver HANSEN WANDAL

Birth:

Death:
1593 in Ribe
Sex:
M
Father:

Mother:
Susanne JENSDATTER (Wife)

Children:
 
1. Hans IVERSEN WANDAL b. 20 Aug 1579 in Ribe
2. Else IVERSDATTER WANDAL b. 1563 in Ribe
3. Jens IVERSEN WANDAL b. 1570 in Ribe
4. Karen IVERSDATTER WANDAL b. 1573 in Ribe
5. Sara IVERSDATTER WANDAL
6. Daniel IVERSEN WANDAL
7. Jørgen Iversen WANDAL

http://www.gencircles.com/users/elo_andersen/3/data/1895

http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=da&u=http://www.gudmand.se/1.ver%25202009/1212.html&prev=/search%3Fq%3DIver%2BJensen%2BWandal%26biw%3D1067%26bih%3D534

Iver (Hansen) WANDAL 2 Iver (Hansen) Wandal 2
Født: Omkr 1535, Haderslev, Haderslev, Haderslev 3 Born: Abt 1535, Haderslev, Haderslev, Haderslev 3
Ægteskab: Susanne Jensdatter GRUNDET omkring 1562 i Grundet, Hornstrup, Nørvang, Vejle 1 Marriage: Susanne Jensdatter DUE around 1562 in Due, Hornstrup, Nørvang, Vejle 1
Død: 1593, Ribe, , Ribe Amt, Denmark i en alder af ca. Died: 1593 Ribe, Ribe County, Denmark at the age of approx. 58 år 58 years

Anna GYREN 2
Født: Omkr 1505, Prussia Born: Abt 1505, Prussia
Ægteskab: Johan WENDT (USIKKER FAR TIL IVER) omkring 1527 i Prussia 1 Marriage: Johan WENDT (INSECURE FAR FOR IVER) around 1527 in Prussia 1

Anna blev gift med Johan WENDT (USIKKER FAR TIL IVER) omkring 1527 i Prussia. 1 (Johan WENDT (USIKKER FAR TIL IVER) blev født omkring 1490 i Goslar og døde den 11 Aug. 1541 i Ribe, , Ribe Amt, Denmark.) Anna was married to Johan WENDT (INSECURE FAR FOR IVER) about 1527 in Prussia. 1 (Johan WENDT (INSECURE FAR FOR IVER) was born around 1490 in Goslar and died on 11 August 1541 in Ribe, Ribe County, Denmark.)

Wendt means “of the Wends”, Wends (Wenden, Winedas, Winde, Winden, Vendere, Vender, Vindr) being the name that Germanics to the west and north gave to Slavs. For Scandinavians, a Vender was a Slav originating from the southern shore of the Baltic Sea, for people living in the Holy Roman Empire, a Wende was a Slav living west of the Oder River, and to Germans, a Winde was applied to any Slav they had contact with. Wend was eventually applied to any Slav along the southern Baltic coast, between the Elbe and Oder Rivers, and to the Sorbs in Lusatia. Wind or turn is the current definition of Wend, but the original implication was wanderer.

Most Wends took on place-name surnames such as Wellnitz or attribute-names such as Grams (limper), but a large minority adopted the “Wendt” surname.  “Wendt” is especially prevalent along the mouth of the Oder River in Poland, and in the Mecklenburg and Brandenburg states in Germany, areas which were part of Pomerania and Prussia. Given this method of surname adoption, it is difficult if not impossible to claim a close relationship with any Wendt without detailed genealogical evidence.

1. Amalie Sophie von Wendt

http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=da&u=http://www.gudmand.se/1.ver%25202009/1212.html&prev=/search%3Fq%3DIver%2BJensen%2BWandal%26biw%3D1067%26bih%3D534

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He has mentioned in one or two of Wentz
families who are interred in churchyards in Basel, Switz-
erland, where on the doors of their sepulchers are cut
their family crest, or coat of arms (a copy of this crest is
now in my possession). The inscriptions on some of these
tombs date back nearly four hundred years.

Mr. Wentz tells me that at one time a Carl Ludwig
Wentz was Stallmeister (Master of the Horse) to the Duke
of Baden ; also of others in high positions and fine cir-
cumstances.

http://archive.org/stream/recorddescendan00wentgoog/recorddescendan00wentgoog_djvu.txt

http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1957&dat=19900628&id=HHMhAAAAIBAJ&sjid=tIgFAAAAIBAJ&pg=1895,7228821

Elisabeth (Christiane Alvina Möller) Wandel  (1850 – 1926)

Sommerdag I August Motive Fra Bakkerne ved Hjortekjaershuset
–representative work.

Evening Sun. Storm Coming On (image unavailable)–
exhibited in Fine Arts Palace, 1893 Exposition

Elisabeth Möller Wandel was a Danish artist.  She married Oscar Andreas Wandel from Copenhagen. No other information is available online.

Marie Louise De Wandel

http://www.un.org/News/Press/docs/2012/sga1325.doc.htm

Carsten Staur (born 9 November 1954) is the Permanent Representative of Denmark to the United Nations in Geneva. He presented his credentials on 26 August 2013.

Staur holds a Master of Arts in history and Danish literature from the University of Copenhagen.
Career[edit]

Staur was Denmark’s Permanent Representative to the UN in New York from 2007 to 2013; and served as State Secretary in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs from 2001 to 2007 with responsibility for Denmark’s development assistance programme (Danida), and cooperation with the United Nations system and the World Bank. He was Member of the Board of the Global Fund against Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria from 2005-2007 and has served as Chairman of the joint UNDP and UNFPA Board in 2007.

Staur has also served as Under-Secretary for Bilateral Affairs (Middle East, Africa, Asia and Latin America), and Administrative Affairs. He was Denmark’s Ambassador to Israel from 1996 to 1998 and has held other political and diplomatic posts including Head and Deputy Head of the Policy and Planning Department, South Group, at the Ministry for Foreign Affairs. His diplomatic career began as First Secretary at the Permanent Mission to the UN in Geneva.

Carsten Staur joined the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark in 1981. He is born in 1954, married to Ms. Marie-Louise Wandel, Senior Adviser in UNICEF, and holds a MA degree (History and Literature) from the University of Copenhagen.

A permanent representative is the head of a diplomatic mission to one of various international organisations. The best known of the organisations to which states send permanent representatives is the United Nations (see United Nations Permanent Representative); of these, the most high-profile ones are those assigned to headquarters in New York City, but member states also appoint permanent representatives to the other UN offices in Geneva, Vienna, and Nairobi.

Permanent representatives are often colloquially described as “ambassadors”; however, although a permanent representative typically holds the personal rank of an ambassador, he or she is accredited to an international organisation, and not to a head of state (as an ambassador would be) or to a head of government (as a high commissioner would be).
UNESCO has permanent delegates heading the diplomatic missions to the organisation, not permanent representatives. A person can also be appointed as a permanent representative of a country to NATO.

CARSTEN STAUR (Denmark) said that from Tunisia to Egypt, from Libya to Syria, from Bahrain to Yemen and beyond, the winds of change currently sweeping across the Middle East and North Africa had confirmed yet again that the desire for freedom, democratic reforms, and human rights was universal. People in those regions were standing up for core human aspirations and values: they wanted to shape their own lives, economically and politically. Specifically on Libya, he said Denmark was proud to have supported the legitimate aspirations of the Libyan people and to have contributed to the protection of Libyan civilians. It was encouraging that the Security Council had now authorized a new United Nations mission to support that country’s national efforts. Developments across the Middle East and North Africa made it clear that in the twenty-first century, Governments had to be politically accountable, respect the people’s rights and dignity, and deliver on economic opportunities. Even as the General Assembly met, events continued to unfold across the region, including in Syria, where more than 2,600 people had died during the popular uprising. He strongly condemned the violence against, and killing of, peaceful demonstrators and called for increased international pressure on the Syrian regime, including sanctions, declaring: “It is high time to respect the right of peaceful protests and their legitimate demands”. On Afghanistan, Mr. Staur observed that the country had come a long way since the fall of the Taliban regime, and hoped Afghanistan would take yet another step in its transition during the upcoming conference in Bonn in December. Moving towards 2014, the United Nations system, in close cooperation with the Afghan authorities, would have to undertake a thorough review of its activities in Afghanistan in order to continuously maximize its contribution towards good governance, anti-corruption and sustainable socio-economic development. What was occurring around the world was not only a call for political reforms, but also a call for inclusive economic development, for jobs, and for improved standards of living, and not least of all from youth. In that regard, Governments needed to strengthen economic and social reforms, ensuring that they generated growth and shared prosperity for all and not just for the few and already privileged. The Millennium Development Goals had succeeded in galvanizing action, not least in health and education, he said, urging all countries to fulfil their joint obligation to ensure that the Goals were met by 2015. The development challenge was pressing in sub-Saharan Africa, a region long marked by poverty and conflict, but in recent years, many countries also saw strong growth and optimism. Stressing the importance of national ownership and clear political commitments to success, he said countries marred by conflict or fragility required a special focus. Women’s empowerment was also important to that process. Rio+12 in June 2012 was a unique opportunity to revitalize understanding of sustainable development and to put sustainable development at the top of the global development agenda. Denmark also supported the two-State solution to the question of Palestine. – See more at: http://gadebate.un.org/taxonomy/term/411?page=21#sthash.rWb8Oahm.dpuf

http://gadebate.un.org/taxonomy/term/411?page=21

http://gadebate.un.org/taxonomy/term/411?page=21

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http://books.google.com/books?id=Z5_tAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA616&lpg=PA616&dq=german+bishop+wandel+denmark&source=bl&ots=k-OQXb3gju&sig=Z2oaJ5P8DWiykkym5ggx9oVm04I&hl=en&sa=X&ei=Xx2fU_rTEtjhoASQ1IDQCA&ved=0CB0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=german%20bishop%20wandel%20denmark&f=false

Anna of Brandenburg
Duchess consort of Schleswig and Holstein

Duchess consort of Schleswig and Holstein
Tenure
1502–1514

Spouse
Frederick I of Denmark
Issue
Christian III of Denmark
Dorothea, Duchess of Prussia
House
House of Hohenzollern
Father
John Cicero, Elector of Brandenburg
Mother
Margaret of Thuringia
Born
27 August 1487
Berlin
Died
3 May 1514(1514-05-03) (aged 26)
Kiel
Anna of Brandenburg (27 August 1487 – 3 May 1514) was a German noblewoman.
Anna was the daughter of Johann Cicero, Elector of Brandenburg and Margarethe of Saxony. She was born in Berlin, Brandenburg, and died in Kiel, Holstein.
Marriage[edit]
In 1500 she was betrothed to Frederick, then Duke of Schleswig and Holstein and, after her death, king of Denmark and Norway. Because they were second cousins (Frederick’s mother Dorothea of Brandenburg was the cousin of Anna’s father) their marriage required a Papal dispensation. In addition, the marriage was not held until 10 April 1502 due to Anna’s youth. The marriage, held in Stendal, was a double one: on the same day, Anna’s brother Joachim and Frederick’s niece Elisabeth were married.[1]
Anna and Frederick had two children:
1. Christian III of Denmark (12 August 1503 – 1 January 1559)
2. Dorothea (1 August 1504 – 11 April 1547), married 1 July 1526 to Albert, Duke of Prussia
She died in 1514 at age 26. Her husband was remarried, to Sophie of Pomerania, and had six more children.

Christian was born in 1503 at Gottorf Castle which Frederick I had made a primary residence. In 1514, when he was just ten years old, Christian’s mother died. Four years later, his father remarried to Sophie of Pomerania (1498–1568).

Frederick was elected king of Denmark in the place of his nephew, Christian II in 1523. The young prince Christian’s first public service after his father became king was the reduction of Copenhagen, which stood firm for the fugitive Christian II. As stadtholder of the Duchies of Holstein and Schleswig in 1526, and as viceroy of Norway in 1529, Christian III displayed considerable administrative ability.
Religious Views[edit]

Further information: Reformation in Denmark-Norway and Holstein
Christian’s earliest teacher, Wolfgang von Utenhof, and his Lutheran tutor, the military general Johann Rantzau, were both zealous reformers who had an influence on the young prince. At their urging, while traveling in Germany in 1521, he made himself present at the Diet of Worms to hear Martin Luther speak. Luther’s arguments intrigued him. The prince made no secret of his Lutheran views. His outspokenness brought him into conflict, not only with the Catholic Rigsraad, but also with his cautious and temporizing father. At his own court at Schleswig he did his best to introduce the Protestant Reformation, despite the opposition of the bishops. He made the Lutheran Church the State Church of Schleswig-Holstein with the Church Ordinance of 1528.

After the war[edit]
Main article: Reformation in Denmark-Norway and Holstein
A mutual confidence between a king who had conquered his kingdom and a people who had stood in arms against him was not attainable immediately. The circumstances under which Christian III ascended the throne exposed Denmark to the danger of foreign domination. It was with the help of the gentry of the Germanic duchies that Christian had conquered Denmark. Holsatian and other German noblemen had led his armies and directed his diplomacy. The first six years of Christian III’s reign were marked by a contest between the Danish Rigsraadet and the German counsellors, both of whom sought to rule through the king. Though the Danish party won a victory at the outset, by obtaining the insertion in the charter of provisions stipulating that only native-born Danes should fill the highest dignities of the state, the king’s German Lutheran counsellors continued paramount during his early reign.

The triumph of a German-speaking Lutheran like Christian III would eventually bring about an end to traditional Christianity in Denmark, but Catholics still controlled the Council of State. Christian III ordered the arrest of three of the bishops on the State Council by his German mercenaries (12 August 1536). Martin Luther wrote to the king congratulating him on his success.

Danish rigsdaler minted under Christian III in 1537. His coat of arms on the reverse.

Christian’s debt for the Count’s Feud was enormous and confiscating the Church lands (farmed by peasants who had been free from vassalage duties to the nobles) enabled him to pay down the debt to his creditors. The ultimate gainers from the confiscations were the nobles who led the New Faith imported from Germany.

Christian’s Protestant policies led Denmark toward the establishment of the Danish Lutheran Church as the national church of Denmark (Folkekirke). This occurred officially on 30 October 1536 when the reconstituted State Council (purged of Catholics) adopted the Lutheran Ordinances designed by the German Johannes Bugenhagen, which outlined church organization, liturgy, and accepted religious practice.
Monasteries, nunneries, priories were closed and the property taken by the crown (see Chronicle of the Expulsion of the Grayfriars). Vast tracts of land were handed out to the king’s supporters. Churches were closed, cathedral schools terminated, and recalcitrant priests turned out of their parishes. Catholic bishops were imprisoned unless they agreed to marry and give up their privileges. Some submitted after years of imprisonment; others refused to accept the New Faith and became martyrs.
Later reign[edit]
Further information: Schmalkaldic League, First Treaty of Brömsebro (1541) and Treaty of Speyer (1544)

The dangers threatening Christian III from the emperor Charles V and other kinsmen of the imprisoned Christian II convinced him of the necessity to lessen the discontent in the land by relying on Danish magnates and nobles.

First Treaty of Brömsebro: Christian III’s meeting with Gustav I of Sweden in Brömsebro, 1541 (watercolor reproduction of a lost painting made during the Swedish King’s reign)

At the Herredag of Copenhagen, 1542, the newly enriched nobility of Denmark voted Christian a twentieth part of all their property to pay off his heavy debt to the Holsatians and other Germans.
The pivot of the foreign policy of Christian III was his alliance with the German Protestant princes, as a counterpoise to the persistent hostility of Charles V, who was determined to support the hereditary claims of his nieces, the daughters of Christian II, to the Scandinavian kingdoms. War was declared against Charles V in 1542, and, though the German Protestant princes proved faithless allies, the closing of the Sound against Dutch shipping proved such an effective weapon in King Christian’s hand that the Netherlands compelled Charles V to make peace with Denmark at the diet of Speyer, on 23 May 1544.

Partition of Holstein and Schleswig[edit]

Until this peace, Christian III ruled the entire Duchies of Holstein and of Schleswig also in the name of his then still minor half-brothers John the Elder (Hans den Ældre) and Adolf. They determined their youngest brother Frederick for a career as Lutheran administrator of an ecclesiastical state within the Holy Roman Empire.[2]

In the aftermath of the feud, the nobles regrouped and healed the rifts the usual way, namely through inter-marriage. One of the most powerful among the Danish nobility in Scania at this time was the Bille family, who were tied through blood relations to seven of the eight Catholic bishops of Denmark. The Billes also had six family members on the Council of the Realm and owned castles throughout Denmark and Norway. In order to keep the family’s powerful position, in spite of the religious affiliation with the Catholic faith, Claus Bille (of Stockholm Bloodbath fame, second cousin to Gustav Vasa), protected the family by forming a political alliance through marriage with the Brahe family, another powerful Scanian family among the Danish nobility at this time. The Brahe family was one of the first among the nobility to convert to Lutheranism. Claus Bille gave his 18 year old daughter Beate in marriage to Otte Brahe, and thus became a grandfather in 1546 to the perhaps most famous Scanian of the era, the astronomer Tyge Brahe, better known as Tycho Brahe. Tycho Brahe’s paternal grandfather, whom he was named after, Tyge Brahe of Tosterup in eastern Scania, was killed 7 September 1523 during the siege of Malmö, fighting for Frederick I. Axel Brahe, the brother of the older Tyge Brahe, served as governor of Scania for a long period, and was one of the first to convert to Lutheranism.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Count%27s_Feud

Rantzau became especially notable due to his participation in the Count’s Feud from 1534-1536. Together with the Holstein nobility, he supported Christian III in spite of the latter’s desperate situation. An attempt of conquering Funen in 1534 ended in a defeat and a humiliating retreat, but in the same year Rantzau crushed Skipper Clement’s peasant rebellion in Jutland and secured the peninsula for the king. Next year he successfully conquered Funen, defeating Count Christopher of Oldenburg’s army at Øksnebjerg and finally leading the siege of Copenhagen that ended with the triumph of Christian III.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johan_Rantzau
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diocese_of_Ribe

As of 860, Ansgar found a church in Ribe. The diocese of Ribe was formed in 948. During the Reformation in 1530s, the diocese was replaced into a Lutheran diocese.

Established in the first decade of the 8th century[2] and first attested in a document dated 854 AD; Ribe is the oldest town in Denmark.
When Ansgar the Archbishop of Hamburg-Bremen, set out on the “Mission to bring Christianity to the North”, he made a request in 860, to the King of Denmark, that the first Scandinavian church be built in Ribe. This was not coincidental, since Ribe already at that point was one of the most important trade cities in Scandinavia. However the presence of a bishop, and thus a cathedral, in Ribe can only be confirmed from the year 948 AD.

http://www.geni.com/people/Anna-Wandel/6000000002810371521

Anna Catrine Iversdatter Wandel (c.1660 – 1701)
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Death:
Died 1701 in Ribe, Esbjerg Municipality, Region Syddanmark, Denmark

Johan Andersen
husband

Abigael Johansdatter Wandel
daughter

Anders Johansen Wandel
son

Iver Jensen Wandal
father

Abegael Schwabe
mother

Jöns Ivarsson Wandel
brother

Malena Wandal
sister

Abigael Wandal
sister

Susanne Wandal
sister

Nicoalus Wandal
brother

http://www.geni.com/people/Jens-Vandel/6000000000722417241

Jens Iversen Vandel, Janus Aquivallinus Ripensis (1570 – 1628)

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Jens Iversen Vandel, Janus Aquivallinus Ripensis (1570 – 1628)
About Jens Iversen Vandel, Janus Aquivallinus Ripensis
Source: http://www.wangensteen.net/Middelalder/magistere.pdf: 9. Jens Vandel (Janus Aquivallinus Ripensis), since the vicar in Jægerup in grams and Hrd Magstrup. in Haderslev Fjord. Died about 1630. Kirkel. Statb1. over Slesv. Diocese. In, liS …

Biography:
Jens was magister at the University of Copenhagen in may 1595 and called himself as Janus Aquivallinus, i.e. Water Valley, Ripensis.
Then he got calls in Magstrup-Jægerup and moved into Magstrup rectory, where he since spent a quiet life with i.a.. Astronomical pursuits.
Jenses interest in astronomy is probably inspired by Thycho Brahe, as he must have known personally.
Tycho Brahe was a good friend with Anders Sørensen Vedel, who was married to a cousin of Jenses wife, Marine His daughter Svanning.
Thycho Brahe was eg. Guest at Anders Sørensen’s second wedding in Ribe.
Some of the instruments as the son of Peder used, seems to have let Jens manufacture.
He owned also a literary relationship, significant library, as evidenced by the shift after his son Hans.
Jens was a time Dean in Gram district (herred).
For Magstrup-home’s friends were said to King Christian IV, and some of his sons as well as a large number of nobles genera and surrounding prominent men.
Source: “some families with roots in the 16th-century Ribe”, III. Genus Vandel by Ejnar c. Larsen.

http://www.gencircles.com/globaltree/gosearch?l=Vandel&offset=10&id=1985448283

Secretary-General Appoints Jens Wandel of Denmark Assistant Administrator,
 
Director of Bureau of Management, United Nations Development Programme
 

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today announced the appointment of Jens Wandel of Denmark as Assistant Administrator and Director of the Bureau of Management at the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

Mr. Wandel will replace Akiko Yuge.  The Secretary-General is grateful to Ms. Yuge for her dedication and commitment to the United Nations during her term as Assistant Administrator and Director of the Bureau of Management at UNDP.

Mr. Wandel has had many years of distinguished service within UNDP.  He has served as Deputy Regional Director, Regional Bureau for Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), UNDP Bratislava, since August 2008.  Prior to this, Mr. Wandel served in several management functions focusing on change initiatives, including as Director, Centre for Business Solution, as Management Adviser and Project Director for the Work Improvement Tools Project and as a country-level coordinator of UNDP’s New Horizon 2001 change management exercise.

Mr. Wandel has also held various leadership positions at the country level, including as United Nations Resident Coordinator and UNDP Resident Representative, Turkmenistan; UNDP Deputy Resident Representative, Kyrgyzstan; and UNDP Assistant Resident Representative, Viet Nam.  Mr. Wandel began his UNDP career as a junior professional officer in Western Samoa.  Prior to joining UNDP, he served with DANIDA at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Denmark. 

marie-louise17

marie-louise13

Dorothea served as regent during the absence of her spouse. She was granted the slotsloven, which meant she had the right to command all the castles in Denmark. She was a powerful political figure due to her strong economic position, both with regard to her husband and her son. She even acquired fiefs from her husband when she lent him money he could not pay back. In 1460, her spouse acquired Holstein and Schleswig, but only on the condition that he could pay his creditors: Dorothea paid the fee demanded of Christian, and made it possible for him to make these territories a part of Denmark. She acquired a large economic influence in Holstein and Schleswig, and by 1470 she was the de facto ruler of those lands. In 1479, she acquired Holstein and in 1480 Schleswig from her husband as a security for a loan he was unable to pay back, and at the time of his death, she ruled the duchies as her own territories. Her eldest son John opposed her grant of Schleswig-Holstein to her younger son Frederick. The dispute was not solved until 1487, when she divided Schleswig-Holstein between her sons.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothea_of_Brandenburg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margravine_Friederike_of_Brandenburg-Schwedt

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_Andrew_of_Greece_and_Denmark

Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark (Andreas; 2 February 1882 (N.S.) – 3 December 1944) of the House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, was the seventh child and fourth son of King George I of Greece and Olga Constantinovna of Russia. He was a grandson of Christian IX of Denmark and father of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.

Christian IX (8 April 1818 – 29 January 1906) was King of Denmark from 1863 to 1906. From 1863 to 1864, he was concurrently Duke of Schleswig, Holstein and Lauenburg.

Growing up as a prince of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, a junior branch of the House of Oldenburg which had ruled Denmark since 1448, Christian was originally not in the immediate line of succession to the Danish throne. However, in 1852, Christian was chosen as heir to the Danish monarchy in light of the expected extinction of the senior line of the House of Oldenburg. Upon the death of King Frederick VII of Denmark in 1863, Christian acceded to the throne as the first Danish monarch of the House of Glücksburg.

The House of Oldenburg is a European royal house of North German origin. It is one of Europe’s most influential Royal Houses with branches that rule or have ruled in Denmark, Russia, Greece, Norway, Schleswig, Holstein, Oldenburg and Sweden. The current Queen of Denmark, the King of Norway and the ex-King of Greece as well as consorts of Spain, Greece and the United Kingdom belong to this House.

It rose to prominence when Count Christian I of Oldenburg was elected King of Denmark in 1448, and of Norway in 1450. The house has occupied the Danish throne ever since.

The House of Oldenburg was briefly poised to claim the thrones of England and Scotland through the marriage of the Stuart Princess Anne (later Queen) to Prince George of Denmark and Norway; however, following the early death of their only heir, Prince William, Duke of Gloucester, the line of succession passed to the House of Hanover.

Royal descendants[edit]
The current reigning monarchs Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom, King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden, King Juan Carlos I of Spain, King Harald V of Norway, King Willem-Alexander I of the Netherlands, Queen Margrethe II of Denmark, King Albert II of Belgium and Grand Duke Henri of Luxembourg are all her direct-line descendants.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Oldenburg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne,_Queen_of_Great_Britain

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to The Wendish Roots of Christine Wandel

  1. Reblogged this on Rosamond Press and commented:

    My T.V. series will take place on Beacon Hill, where Christine grew up amongst Boston Bluebloods.

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