What is in a name?

woolenmill2

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mills3

mills2

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dottie22

“Vernon and Virl said they remember seeing the bullet holes in the door and staircase (two hit the staircase). A Prince Albert Tobacco can was flattened out and nailed over the holes in the door. This is such a sad thing that happened to this family. So sad! ”

My kindred, Samuel Rosamond, Lemuel Benton, and Gavin Witherspoon, fought under the Francis Marion ‘The Swamp Fox’ in the War of Independence. John Witherspoon is a Signer and is kin to the Preston family, the premiere American Family. These four men are kindred to the Stewart family, and thus William and Harry Windsor. Add to this roster, the Hart and Hull family, then here is America’s most illustrious and Patriotic Family.

Today, I am launching a campaign to change the name of Lane County to Miller-Lane County for the reason Joseph Lane was a Confederate leader who ran with John Breckenridge for the White House on a pro-slavery ticket. Lane was appointed Governor of Oregon by Polk who was a slave owner until the day he died.

Polk’s mother, Jane Polk, descends from John Knox, as does the Signer, John Witherspoon, as does my girlfriend, Dorothy Witherspoon. Above is a photo of Dottie and I. We had just moved from Boston to Oakland California, after stopping off in South Carolina to see her illustrious family of Patriots. I am kin to Dottie and Polk via the marriage of my late sister to Garth Benton, who is kin to Senator Thomas Hart Benton, the Administrator of the Oregon Territory. Both Benton and Polk were promoters of ‘Manifest Destiny’ and subscribed to “Fifty-four Forty or Fight”. Polk was making a stand against the British sending troops into the Oregon and seizing it in the name of the crown. Consider Putin seizing the Crimea.

For the reason, John Fremont and the Radical Abolitionist Republicans, formed a new party in order to keep slave-owners out of power, and for the reason these same Radical Republicans put freed slaves in office down in the Red States, I am going to petition my State Senate to author a Vote of Confidence in the President of the United States. Now that We the People have entered into a new Cold War, it is imperative that all loyal Americans get behind, this current President, and future Presidents, as long as this cold war continues. Not like the last cold war, I am calling upon all the elected leaders of the State of Oregon, to pass a Bill stating this war will be fought in an overt manner, and for precise written reasons.

Take note of Dotties red hair and freckles. She descends from the Ulster-Scotts that Polk and his family represented. This is why black slaves called their masters ‘Peckerwoods’ because woodpeckers have red hair. Oregon Lawmakers need to make a stand as an Abolitionist State that has recently been voting the Democratic ticket. We Oregonians need to make a statement that defies the alleged Tea Party Patriots who are not a grassroots organization, and who promote a Redneck ideology from Neo-Conferates who are systematically putting lawmakers in office down in the Red States where the Rosamond, Hodges, and Witherspoons once owned plantations. We Oregonians have to acknowledge who won, and who lost, the Civil War, and who exactly is dividing our nation in twain, once again! We need to turn back the Creeping Red State Menace, one man, one vote, one State at a time.

I was introduced to Miss Witherspoon by a mutual friend who asked me to meet with a Mafia Chief in Boston. We three met in a bar in Roxbury. As I predicted, he pulled out a gun and pointed it at this twenty-three year old woman whose childhood friend was this guys lover. She took something from him, and ran. He wanted Michelle to take his money and go look for her in New Orleans.

“Just say NO!”

When Michelle said “no I won’t go” he put his gun away. I had just won my court case against the Mafia over a building on Beacon Hill built in 1795. When I declared myself the Virtual Sheriff of Brownsville, I was not fooling around. I had the guts to stand up to the REAL bad guys. For this reason I found a REAL movement of TRUE patriots, called ‘Patriotic Son and Daughters of Justice of Peace and Justice’. I am prepared to deputize my fellow loyalists! We don’t need to carry a gun, just the Truth.

A Sheriff was a shire reeve, a neighborhood watch. Consider the Lord of the Rings and Gandalf coming to the aid of the least in the land, the Hobbits. Above is the cemetery where are buried my humble Rosamond kindred in the State of Arkansas.

Here lie Nonimus Rosamond who was a Justice of the Peace. He was killed in the line of duty while trying to bring to justice a crazy wildcat whisky maker, a real Bubba of the type Sarah Palin honors. The Rosamond’s were Rednecks in Ireland. Take a good look at those humble tombstones. One is just a rock stuck in the ground, a historic marker put there later on.

In the insipid American Humble Pie Contest being conducted by alleged Rednecks who rub beer-bellies with neo-Confederate Secessionists on Capitol Hill, no knee can get lower to the ground then the knee of my Rosamond kindred, Noniamus Nathaniel Rosamond. He was unarmed when he fell fighting a loud-mouthed bully who terrorized his wife and all the folks of the shire. The contest – is over!

However, some folks are going to give me an argument, thus, I bring out the Big Guns! Eliza Hart Spalding is kin to Captain Isaac Hull of the U.S.S. Constitution who married Ann Hart. My grandfather, Royal Rosamond, claims Isaac is his great, great, great-grandfather. The history of Eliza and the Brownsville Woolen Mill is coming next!

Jon Gregory Presco

P.S. No sooner did I post this, then I read Sarah Palin has a new reality show called ‘Amazing America’. It’s time for a showdown. It’s time this Justice of the Peace get his own reality show.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~edgmon/lurrosmur.htm

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/08/09/have-a-hart/

http://www.mediaite.com/tv/sarah-palins-new-reality-show-is-basically-jackass-for-conservatives/

http://www.geni.com/people/Reverend-John-Knox-Witherspoon-Signer-of-the-Declaration-of-Independence/6000000005791608179
John Knox Witherspoon[3] was born at Gifford, a parish of Yester, at East Lothian, Scotland, as the eldest child of the Reverend James Alexander Witherspoon and Anne Walker,[4] a descendant of John Welsh of Ayr and John Knox

James Knox Polk, the first of ten children, was born on November 2, 1795 in a farmhouse (possibly a log cabin)[1] in what is now Pineville, North Carolina in Mecklenburg County, just outside Charlotte.[3] His father, Samuel Polk, was a slaveholder, successful farmer and surveyor of Scots-Irish descent. His mother, Jane Polk (née Knox), was a descendant of a brother of the Scottish religious reformer John Knox. She named her firstborn after her father James Knox.[3] Like most early Scots-Irish settlers in the North Carolina mountains, the Knox and Polk families were Presbyterian. While Jane remained a devout Presbyterian her entire life, Samuel (whose father, Ezekiel Polk, was a deist) rejected dogmatic Presbyterianism. When the parents took James to church to be baptized, the father Samuel refused to declare his belief in Christianity, and the minister refused to baptize the child.

http://www.linnparks.com/pages/museums/historymuseum.html

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/f/l/u/Cindy-Fluri/GENE10-0007.html

http://www.carolana.com/SC/Revolution/patriot_military_sc_captains.htm

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2011/07/04/patriot-samuel-rosamond/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/07/17/jews-land-plantation/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/07/10/living-museum-of-the-holy-democratic-grail/

Yesterday I took a train trip to Salem Oregon that I had signed up for month earlier. I did not know what our destination was the Willamette Heritage Center until I arrived at Mill. I was blown away because this mill looked like the Rosamond Mill in Almonte Canada. When I began to question the woman at the desk, I felt faint, because she is telling me Marion County was named after Marion Francis the Swamp Fox. I had her repeat this so I could capture this amazing fact on camera, for, here is the core of my blogs, and search for the Rose of the World Grail. I told this woman my grandfather Frank Rosamond was named after Francis, as were other Rosamonds because James and his brother, Samuel Rosamond, fought alongside Francis. Also, the Witherspoon family named their descendents after Francis. According to the historian at the Marion County historical Society located next to the mill, early settlers had read the book the ‘Life of General Francis Marion. Unbelievable! What is going on here? Here is the marriage of the Rosamond and Benton family history that also came together when Christine Rosamond Presco married Garth Benton. There is a Benton County.

In 1195, Richard I (“the Lionheart”) of England commissioned certain knights to preserve the peace in unruly areas. They were responsible to the King for ensuring that the law was upheld, and preserved the “King’s peace”, and were known as “keepers of the peace”.[1]

An Act of 1327 had referred to “good and lawful men” to be appointed in every county in the land to “guard the peace”; such individuals were first referred to as conservators of the peace, or wardens of the peace. The title “Justice of the Peace” derives from 1361,[2] in the reign of King Edward III Plantagenet.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheriff

Noniamus Nathaniel Rosamond: Gwen Rosamond Forrester one of our cousins who also descends from Benjamin F. Rosamond and Susannah Hill, provided the follwing info.

Earlier this year my husband Mark and I with three of my sisters, Sarah Jo, Evelyn and Gail drove to Newton County, Arkansas to meet Vernon Rosamond and his family. Virl Rosamond drove up from Dardanelle, AR., Shirley Rosamond and sister Rose Cotner of Oklahoma drove over to Vernon’s house to meet with us too. We all had the most enjoyable day. That afternoon they took us around the countryside and showed us the location where Nonimus’ home place was where he was killed and the Rosamond Cemetery where he is buried and the Tarleton Cemetery.

Shirley stated that Nonimus was living in Chicago, Illinois in 1878 when he married Rosalia “Rosie” Augustus Bennett. They later moved to Bradleyville, Taney County, Missouri where in Nov 1892 Nonimus homesteaded 120 acres. It was located near Swan Creek near Forsyth, Missouri. On March 12, 1894, Nonimus and Rosie sold this 120 acres to Joe Fletcher for $145.00. All Nonimus’ children were born in Missouri, except Shirley didn’t know about the first two, Zora and Sarah Frances.
It is believed that Nonimus and his family moved to Newton County, Arkansas in 1899 – 1900. They first settled on Highway 16 toward Ben Hur from Pelsor. Samuel, son of N.N., and his wife Delia both were barely 15 years old when they got married. The built a little cabin in a hollow in the woods near Nonimus’ home. It became known as the Sam Rosamond Hollow. Virl contracted to cut timber in Sam’s hollow. Samuel later moved to Lurton and built a log house there, I believe Virl said this is the cabin Nonimus lived in when he was murdered. (I’ve got to get my tapes out again and listen to them).
The story your grandmother told about the murder of Nonimus is basically the same story that Virl told us, except he didn’t mention Yates trying to burn the house. Virl stated that Flora, who was 11 years old at the time of the murders, was living with her father and grandmother Mrs.
Overtruf. They lived about a mile over the hill from Nonimus. There was a trail that went from their place to the Rosamonds. Mrs. Overtruf and Flora had went over to spend the night with the Rosamonds the night before the murders. Flora was raised by her father until she married Fred Rosamond (Nonimus’ son).
Virl said he was about one year old when his mothers, Flora, father died.
Vernon and Virl said they remember seeing the bullet holes in the door and staircase (two hit the staircase). A Prince Albert Tobacco cans was flattened out and nailed over the holes in the door. This is such a sad thing that happened to this family. So sad!

State of South Carolina ) Abbeville District
On this twenty-third day of Octr 1832 personally appeared in open court before the honorable Richard Gantt Presiding Judge of the Court of Common Pleas & General Sefsions

(in old writing, an ‘f’ was used when there was a double “s”.) for the said State & District now sitting John Hodges a resident of Abbeville District in the State of South Carolina aged sixty seven years who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declarations in order to obtain the benefit of the act Congrefs passed June 7th 1832.

‘That he entered the service of the United States at the age of fifteen as a volunteer and private on or about the first day of April One thousand seven hundred and eighty and was enrolled as such under the command of Capt. Samuel Rosamond who commanded a beat or militia company in the then District of ninety-six, now Abbeville in the State of South Carolina that he was marched in the said company from Ninetysix l)istrict to a place called Beach Island in this State near Augusta in the State ol Georgia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gadsden_flag

Christopher Gadsden was an American patriot if ever there was one. He led Sons of Liberty in South Carolina starting in 1765,

http://www.scd5patriots.org/dont_tread_on_me

http://sarsat.org/HistoricalAccounts/patriotbiographies/johnhodges.htm

He sent Lt. Col. Lemuel Benton with sixteen men to seize the pass over Horse Creek. Horry’s men stumbled over a sentry who fired a shot, and they quickly rushed Sumter’s home with Col. Marion’s remaining 134 men closely behind them. In a brief fight, they killed or captured 22 British Regulars and two Loyalists. One of the Continental prisoners, Capt. Perry Benson of the 5th MD Regiment, was wounded as well.

http://www.carolana.com/SC/Revolution/revolution_battle_of_great_savannah.html

Rosamond, Samuel Ninety-Six District Regiment 1777 1782 A Captain under Col. Robert Anderson at Siege of Ninety-Six (1781) (Upper Ninety-Six District Regiment). A Lieutenant under Capt. Adam Crain Jones during 1782. Also at battle of Kettle Creek (GA). Aka Samuel Roseman.

Benton, Lemuel Cheraws District Regiment 1775 1777 Promoted to Major in 1777. Promoted to Lt. Col. In 1780, then Colonel in 1781.

Witherspoon, Gavin Berkeley County Regiment 1780 1782 From Williamsburg District. A Captain under Col. Richard Richardson, Jr. (aka Richardson’s Regiment) Pee Dee Swamp w/4 men, Tearcoat Swamp, Halfway Swamp #1, Georgetown #6, Wiboo Swamp, Witherspoon’s Ferry, Fort Motte, Quinby’s Bridge, Shubrick’s Plantation, Eutaw Springs, Videau’s Bridge, Wadboo Swamp

Witherspoon, James SC Light Dragoons 1779 1782 1779-1780, a Captain under Maj. Hezekiah Maham, Col. Daniel Horry. 1781-1782, a Captain under Lt. Col./Col. Peter Horry (Kingstree Regiment, Horry’s Light Dragoons, and SC 4th Regiment of State Dragoons). From Williamsburg District. Georgetown #6, Eutaw Springs

Witherspoon, John Lower Craven County Regiment 1777

From Williamsburg District. Earlier, a Lieutenant. A Captain under Col. Hugh Giles.

http://www.carolana.com/SC/Revolution/revolution_wambaw_bridge.html

http://www.pierces.org/gen/5530.htm

http://wardepartmentpapers.org/searchresults.php?searchClass=fulltextSearch&fulltextQuery=Lemuel+Benton

Terry Lipscomb, “South Carolina Revolutionary Battles – Part Ten (MS H-2-2)”, unpublished, p.29:

Benton personally led his troops in a second skirmish higher up on Black Creek, which is believed to be the Battle of Williamson’s Bridge mentioned in local tradition; this corresponds to the present bridge on state secondary road 35 in Darlington County, four miles southeast of Darlington. Alexander Gregg, D.D., History of the Old Cheraws, Richardson And Company, 1867, pp.387, Another skirmish took place about this time, higher up on Black Creek, Colonel Benton commanding. The Tories were routed and fled, but being overtaken and surrounded, were forced to make a hand to hand fight, suffering very severely. Colonel Benton had no fire arms except his pistols. One man, pressed by the colonel, turned about, and was in the act of firing his musket, but, before he could do so, Benton discharged his pistol at him, missing him, however, then threw it at him and knocked him from his horse to the ground. JP: Black Creek Skirmishes 1 & 2 seem to have taken place in the last half 1781 or early 1782

Samuel BENTON “the Immigrant” ABT 1720 – 1770 ID Number: I99600

RESIDENCE: England and Granville Co. NC BIRTH: ABT 1720, Worcester, England DEATH: 1770, Granville Co, North Carolina RESOURCES: See: [S3615]

Family 1 : Francis KIMBROUGH MARRIAGE: Craven County, (now Johnston Co.) North Carolina 1. +Lemurel BENTON 2. +Jesse BENTON Sr. Notes

Native of England (probably Worcester County). Was appointed Justice of Granville County Court in 1746. Sheriff in 1764. Member of House of Commons from 1760 to 1768. Registrar of the County from 1761 until his death in 1770. Clerk of Court of Common pleas and Quarter Sessions from 1764 to 1770. Lt. Col. of militia under Gov. Wm. Tyron in 1768 during some of the Regulator troubles. Gave land for new courthouse at Oxford Plantation – part of 1,000 acres he owned. Before 1763, was responsible for erecting St. George’s Chapel in Granville, South Carolina. Buried in family cemetary on plantation, Oxford Granville Co SC.

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2011/09/22/jessie-benton-vs-judah-benjamin/

http://www.jpost.com/Diplomacy-and-Politics/Mystified-US-slams-Israeli-defense-minister-Yaalons-criticism-of-Obama-345809

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Politics_of_Oregon

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_K._Polk

He threatened war with Britain over the issue of which nation owned the Oregon Country, then backed away and split the ownership of the region with Britain. When Mexico rejected American annexation of Texas, Polk led the nation to a sweeping victory in the Mexican-American War, which gave the United States most of its present Southwest.

His father, Samuel Polk, was a slaveholder, successful farmer and surveyor of Scots-Irish descent. His mother, Jane Polk (née Knox), was a descendant of a brother of the Scottish religious reformer John Knox. She named her firstborn after her father James Knox.[3] Like most early Scots-Irish settlers in the North Carolina mountains, the Knox and Polk families were Presbyterian. While Jane remained a devout Presbyterian her entire life, Samuel (whose father, Ezekiel Polk, was a deist) rejected dogmatic Presbyterianism. When the parents took James to church to be baptized, the father Samuel refused to declare his belief in Christianity, and the minister refused to baptize the child.[3][4]

Another campaign issue, also related to westward expansion, involved the Oregon Country, then under the joint occupation of the United States and the United Kingdom. The Democrats had championed the cause of expansion, informally linking the controversial Texas annexation issue with a claim to the entire Oregon Country, thus appealing to both Northern and Southern expansionists. (The slogan “Fifty-four Forty or Fight”, often incorrectly attributed to the 1844 election, did not appear until later; see Oregon boundary dispute.) Polk’s consistent support for westward expansion—what Democrats would later call “Manifest Destiny”—likely played an important role in his victory, as his opponent Clay hedged his position.

Slavery

President Polk (d. 1849), 1858 portrait by George Healy

During his presidency, many abolitionists harshly criticized him as an instrument of the “Slave Power”, and claimed that spreading slavery was the reason he supported annexing Texas and later war with Mexico.[48] Polk stated in his diary that he believed slavery could not exist in the territories won from Mexico,[49] but refused to endorse the Wilmot Proviso that would forbid it there. Polk argued instead for extending the Missouri Compromise line to the Pacific Ocean, which would prohibit the expansion of slavery above 36° 30′ west of Missouri, but allow it below that line if approved by eligible voters in the territory. William Dusinberre has argued that Polk’s diary, which he kept during his presidency, was written for later publication, and does not represent Polk’s policy.

Polk was a slaveholder for his entire life. His father, Samuel Polk, had left Polk more than 8,000 acres (32 km²) of land, and divided about 53 slaves to his widow and children after he died. James inherited twenty of his father’s slaves, either directly or from deceased brothers. In 1831, he became an absentee cotton planter, sending slaves to clear plantation land that his father had left him near Somerville, Tennessee. Four years later Polk sold his Somerville plantation and, together with his brother-in-law, bought 920 acres (3.7 km²) of land, a cotton plantation near Coffeeville, Mississippi. He ran this plantation for the rest of his life, eventually taking it over completely from his brother-in-law. Polk rarely sold slaves, although once he became President and could better afford it, he bought more. Polk’s will stipulated that their slaves were to be freed after his wife Sarah had died. However, the 1863 Emancipation Proclamation and the 1865 Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution freed all remaining slaves in rebel states long before the death of his wife in 1891.[50]

Foreign policy

Polk strongly supported expansion. Democrats believed that opening up more land for yeoman farmers was critical for the success of republican virtue. (See Manifest Destiny.) Like most Southerners, he supported the annexation of Texas. To balance the interests of North and South, he wanted to acquire the Oregon Country (present-day Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and British Columbia) as well. He sought to purchase California, which Mexico had neglected.

Oregon territory

Main article: Oregon boundary dispute

The Oregon Territory, established by the Oregon Treaty

Polk put heavy pressure on Britain to resolve the Oregon boundary dispute. Since 1818, the territory had been under the joint occupation and control of the United Kingdom and the United States. Previous U.S. administrations had offered to divide the region along the 49th parallel, which was not acceptable to Britain, as they had commercial interests along the Columbia River. Although the Democratic platform asserted a claim to the entire region, Polk was willing to compromise. When the British again refused to accept the 49th parallel boundary proposal, Polk broke off negotiations and returned to the Democratic platform’s “All Oregon” demand (which called for all of Oregon up to the 54-40 line that marked the southern boundary of Russian Alaska). “54-40 or fight!” now became a popular rallying cry among Democrats.[51]

Polk wanted territory, not war, so he compromised with the British Foreign Secretary, Lord Aberdeen. The Oregon Treaty of 1846 divided the Oregon Country along the 49th parallel, the original American proposal. Although there were many who still clamored for the entire territory, the treaty was approved by the Senate. By settling for the 49th parallel, Polk angered many midwestern Democrats. Many of these Democrats believed that Polk had always wanted the boundary at the 49th, and that he had fooled them into believing he wanted it at the 54th parallel. The portion of the Oregon Territory acquired by the United States later formed the states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, and parts of the states of Montana and Wyoming.

http://rosamond.com/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/08/20/philip-boileau-magazine-beauties/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/07/23/dame-rosemond-and-american-peerage/

Children: 2 Samuel BENTON , Jr. b: ABT 1740 + UNKNOWN b: ABT 1740 2 Lemuel BENTON b: 23 Oct 1754 d: 18 May 1818 + Elizabeth KIMBROUGH b: ABT 1774 d: ABT 1855 2 Jesse BENTON , Sr. b: 1747 d: Aug 1791 + Ann (Nancy) GOOCH b: 1758 d: 3 Jan 1838 2 Joseph BENTON b: ABT 1740

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mysouthernfamily/myff/d0062/g0000031.html#I45174

Jesse BENTON Sr. 1747 – Aug 1791 ID Number: I99602

RESIDENCE: Granville and Orange Cos. NC BIRTH: 1747, Granville Co. North Carolina DEATH: Aug 1791, Orange Co. North Carolina RESOURCES: See: [S3615] Father: Samuel BENTON “the Immigrant” Mother: Francis KIMBROUGH

Family 1 : Ann (Nancy) GOOCH 1. +Thomas Hart BENTON Notes

Member of the Assembly 1781. Owned a plantation on Eno River (Hartford) which was purchased from Thomas Hart III. See info. in Patriot Index, Vol. I (DAR Papers p. 55). Children: 2 Mary BENTON b: 1780 d: 1817 2 Thomas Hart BENTON b: 14 Mar 1782 d: 10 Apr 1858 + Elizabeth MCDOWELL b: 1794 d: Sep 1854 2 Jesse BENTON , Jr. b: 1783 d: Sep 1843 + Mary CHILDRESS b: ABT 1783 + Barnissa BENSON b: ABT 1783 2 Samuel BENTON b: 1785 + Mary HUNTER b: ABT 1785 2 Nathaniel BENTON b: 1786 + Unknown BRANCH b: ABT 1786 2 Margaret BENTON b: 1788 d: 1806 2 Ann “Nancy” BENTON b: 1788 d: 1807 2 Susannah BENTON b: 1791 d: 1811

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mysouthernfamily/myff/d0075/g0000066.html#I99602

Col. Lemurel BENTON 23 Oct 1754 – 18 May 1818 ID Number: I45174

TITLE: Col. OCCUPATION: Rev War Marion’s Brigade RESIDENCE: NC and Cheraw Dist. Darlington Co. SC BIRTH: 23 Oct 1754, Granville Co. North Carolina DEATH: 18 May 1818, Stoney Hill Estate, Darlington Co. South Carolina RESOURCES: See: [S1631] [S3615] Father: Samuel BENTON “the Immigrant” Mother: Francis KIMBROUGH

Family 1 : Elizabeth KIMBROUGH 1. +Penelope BENTON 2. +Gilly Hinton BENTON Notes

Lemuel Benton, (1754-1818), served in Marion’s Brigade until the close of the war. In 1783 he was a delegate from St. David’s Parish to the Legislature. He was born in Granville Co., N. C.; died in Darlington District, S. C. Children: 2 John BENTON b: ABT 1794 2 Lemuel BENTON , Jr. b: ABT 1794 2 Buckleigh (Buckley) K. BENTON b: abt 1794 d: 1836 + UNKNOWN b: abt 1794 2 Alfred BENTON b: ABT 1794 2 Clarissa BENTON b: ABT 1794 + William Little THOMAS b: ABT 1794 2 Gillie Hinton BENTON b: ABT 1794 + Isaiah DUBOSE b: ABT 1794 2 Charlotte BENTON b: ABT 1794 + Laurence PRINCE b: ABT 1794 2 Elizabeth BENTON b: ABT 1794 + George BRUCE b: ABT 1794 2 Penelope BENTON b: ABT 1794 + William BROCKINTON b: ABT 1794

“Married his first cousin on his mother’s side. He and his brother, Jesse, signed the “Redressor Papers” in protest of the Regulator movement in NC before emigrating to SC. Then he moved to SC and settled in section of Cheraw District that is now Darlington Co SC. There he became a planter and acquired extensive landholding. During the Revolution, he attained the rank of Colonel and served under General Francis Marion as commander of the PeeDee force, retaining his commission until he resigned in 1794. He was a member of the legislature in 1781-84 and 1787.

He was Darlington Co Court Justice 1785-1791. He was Escheator of Cheraw District 1789-91. He was delegate to State Constitutional Convention in1790 and the 1788 Convention in Charleston that ratified the federal Constitution. He was elected the first congressional representative from the PeeDee District. He served as a Democrat in the 3rd, 4th and 5th Congresses 1793-99. He opposed the administration of John Adams and was defeated for re-election. He was buried on his estate, Stoney Hill. He and Elizabeth had 4 sons and 4 daughters. Only 1 son survived to reach manhood.”

http://ncpedia.org/biography/benton-lemuel

http://ncpedia.org/history/colonial/regulator-movement

Lemuel Benton (1754 – May 18, 1818) was an American planter and politician from Darlington County, South Carolina. He represented South Carolina in the United States House of Representatives from 1793 until 1799. Colonel Benton resided on Stoney Hill Farm, located in Darlington County near Mechanicsville. Stoney Hill is currently owned by the Burns family.

http://gaz.jrshelby.com/blackcreek2.htm

Other names: Williamson’s Bridge What: Skirmish, *Lt. Col. Lemuel Benton vs. unknown British (or allied) commandeer. Unknown date, 1780 (last half 1781?). Where: 34.2707096 -79.7867283 Black Creek 2, Williamson’s Bridge Maps: [map notes] 34.2707096 -79.7867283 Black Creek 2, Williamson’s Bridge ACME Mapper. National Map Google GNIS record for Williamsons Bridge. Note mapping options. Confidence: 5 Sources:

Terry Lipscomb, “South Carolina Revolutionary Battles – Part Ten (MS H-2-2)”, unpublished, p.29: Benton personally led his troops in a second skirmish higher up on Black Creek, which is believed to be the Battle of Williamson’s Bridge mentioned in local tradition; this corresponds to the present bridge on state secondary road 35 in Darlington County, four miles southeast of Darlington. Alexander Gregg, D.D., History of the Old Cheraws, Richardson And Company, 1867, pp.387, Another skirmish took place about this time, higher up on Black Creek, Colonel Benton commanding. The Tories were routed and fled, but being overtaken and surrounded, were forced to make a hand to hand fight, suffering very severely. Colonel Benton had no fire arms except his pistols. One man, pressed by the colonel, turned about, and was in the act of firing his musket, but, before he could do so, Benton discharged his pistol at him, missing him, however, then threw it at him and knocked him from his horse to the ground. JP: Black Creek Skirmishes 1 & 2 seem to have taken place in the last half 1781 or early 1782

http://wardepartmentpapers.org/searchresults.php?searchClass=fulltextSearch&fulltextQuery=Lemuel+Benton

of Granville County, North Carolina As a young man he moved to the Pee Dee section of Cheraw District, South Carolina. In 1789, he was granted 1,940 acres in Cheraw where he established his plantation, Stony Hill. Later he received grants for 659 acres at the fork of Saltketcher River in Colleton county and 89 acres on the Great Pee Dee River in Darlington District, South Carolina. [2, 6]

MILI He was commander of Pee Dee Reg’t., Francis Marion Brigade His first public service was in the militia during the American Revolution. He was commissioned a lieutenant (1775-1776), served as a captain (1776) and a major (1777), and was promoted to lieutenant colonel in command of the Cheraw militia (1781-1782). His regiment was allied with Francis Marion’s Brigade from 1781 until the end of the war, and his unit often confronted Tories in Black Creek skirmishes. After Yorktown, he continued to serve as colonel of the Cheraw Regiment until 1794 when he resigned his commission due to the appointment of Tristram Thomas as brigadier general of the Cheraw Brigade. [2, 6] Occupation 1st member of Congress (1790’s) elected from Upper Pee Dee; planter; sheriff of Cheraw District (1789, 1791); Darlington County court judge (1785, 1791), and commissioner, to superintend the opening of navigation of the Great Pee Dee River (1805) [2, 7]

http://www.singletonfamily.org/getperson.php?personID=I11821&tree=1

Lemuel Benton

Note for: Lemuel Benton, 23 OCT 1754 – 18 MAY 1818 Index

Residence: Place: Cheraw Dist. (Darlington County, SC)

Individual Note: Married his first cousin on his mother’s side. He and his brother, Jesse, signed the “Redressor Papers” in protest of the Regulator movement in NC before emigrating to SC. Then he moved to SC and settled in section of Cheraw District that is now Darlington Co SC. There he became a planter and acquired extensive landholding. During the Revolution, he attained the rank of Colonel and served under General Francis Marion as commander of the PeDee force, retaining his commission until he resigned in 1794. He was a member of the legislature in 1781-84 and 1787. He was Darlington Co Court Justice 1785-1791. He was Escheator of Cheraw District 1789-91. He was delegate to State Constitutional Convention in1790 and the the 1788 Convention in Charleston that ratified the federal Constitution. He was elected the first congressional representative from the PeDee District. He served as a Democrat in the 3rd, 4th and 5th Congresses 1793-99. He opposed the administration of John Adams and was defeated for reelection. He was buried on his estate, Stoney Hill. He and Elizabeth had 4 sons and 4 daughters. Only 1 son survived to reach manhood.

FROM: http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=B000396 BENTON, Lemuel, (great-grandfather of George William Dargan), a Representative from South Carolina; born in Granville County, N.C., in 1754; as a young man moved to that section of Cheraw District which is now Darlington County, S.C.; engaged as a planter and subsequently became an extensive landowner; elected major of the Cheraw Regiment in 1777 and served throughout the Revolutionary War, being promoted to the rank of colonel in 1781; resigned his commission in 1794; member of the State house of representatives 1782-1788; county court justice of Darlington County in 1785 and 1791; escheator of Cheraw District (composed of what is now Chesterfield, Darlington, and Marlboro Counties) in 1787; delegate to the State convention at Charleston that ratified the Federal Constitution in 1788; sheriff of Cheraw District in 1789 and 1791; delegate to the State constitutional convention at Columbia in 1790; elected to the Third Congress and reelected as a Republican to the Fourth and Fifth Congresses (March 4, 1793-March 3, 1799); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1798 to the Sixth Congress; resumed agricultural pursuits; died in Darlington, Darlington County, S.C., May 18, 1818; interment on his estate, “Stony Hill,” near Darlington, S.C.

http://www.e-neva.com/ghtout/np12.html

Even though he was a Continental officer Marion had been elected to the South Carolina General Assembly as the senator for the Parish of St. John Berkeley. He left Horry in charge of his brigade while he was at the general assembly in Jacksonboro. Hezekiah Maham still considered his unit totally independent and would only take orders from General Greene, not Peter Horry. On the advice of Marion, Horry moved the brigade to Wambaw Creek near the Santee River. The forage was more available there and it had better protection from the British troops. Colonel Benjamin Thompson, a Loyalist from Massachusetts, learned that Marion was at the general assembly and that there was a breakdown in communications between Marion’s two colonels. Thompson decided to attack the partisans while their guard was down. Thompson had put together a cavalry force that consisted of all the mounted units in Charlestown. He wrote that “the principal objects of the expedition were to practice the Cavalry in marching in Regular order in the Enemy’s Country, and to accustom them to act with the mounted militia, who will be very useful in covering our flanks. They are all armed with rifles as well as Swords, and are perhaps the best marksmen in the world for shooting on horse back.” Horry was on the other side of the Santee River visiting his plantation and had left Colonel Archibald McDonald in command while he was gone. Marion had told Horry that if he had to absent himself for any reason the command should go to Maham, however Maham was with Marion at the assembly. On the morning of February 24th Colonel Thompson set out from Daniel’s Island and rode towards Marion’s camp. Colonel Lemuel Benton held a position at Durant’s Plantation. Benton’s men 33 Patrick O’Kelley consisted of two regiments of “six month’s men” and were made up of “reformed Tories.” These men had come in under Governor Rutledge’s amnesty proposal. Major William Benison commanded the scouts in St. Thomas’s and told Benton that the British were approaching his position. Benison proceeded to Colonel McDonald’s headquarters and also told him of the approaching enemy. Many of the officers there were eating dinner and most of the Patriot officers did not believe that the British were going to attack. Colonel Benton was one of the few who did believe the reports and rode to Durant’s plantation only to encounter the advance of Thompson’s army. Major John Doyle did not wait for the rest of the cavalry force to arrive and charged Marion’s men at Wambaw Bridge. Major William Young wounded Benton as he was about to cut down Lieutenant Simon Jones, Thompson’s adjutant. Benton’s dragoons fled and raced across the Wambaw Bridge. The stress was too much for the old bridge and it broke under the weight of men and horses. Many of Benton’s men tried swimming across and a few drowned. The men who had not fled across the bridge hid themselves in thickets. This saved them from capture and death because the British were giving no quarter. Major James had two British dragoons try to cut him down, but he kept them at a distance with his pistols. He leapt the twenty foot chasm in the bridge and rode to safety. The rest of Marion’s Brigade fell back to Mrs. Tydiman’s Plantation in between Echaw and Wambaw. Thompson continued to raid the countryside and was able to capture and parole Charles Cotesworth Pinckney.25 Beaufort, South Carolina Skirmish 24 February 1782 Colonel Robert Barnwell and his St. Helena Volunteer Militia Company attempted to cross the Savannah River at Beaufort to burn the British stores in Georgia. He was attacked by the Beaufort Loyalist militia under the command of Major Andrew Deveaux and 34

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