Christian Cossacks vs. Chechen Terrorists

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cossacks2Putin arrested Greenpeace activists and let them go for the Olympics. Greenpeace surrounded the nuclear plant near the Sydney stadium to prevent it from being blown during the 2000 Olympics. I believe there exist a plan to oppress all news regarding terrorists threats to any Olympic event, that is now impossible since the attacks in Russia, and the bombing at the Boston Marathon.

Putin revived the Cossacks to defend his ideas for restoring the monarchy. These Cossacks are described as the last knights, and have been pressed into service to wipe out Muslim radicals and terrorists. Crusader Knights are the enemy of radical Islam who has to be aware of the idealogy these Cossacks and Putin are forcing on this part of the world. Did these Cossacks see Greenpeace as Leftist Radicals and Terrorists from America? If so, Putin is part of the extreme Christian-right that keeps drawing lines in the sand – for the sake of religion. Consider my posts on the Roza Mira.

For fifty years the John Birchers and Evangelicals have been identifying Russia as the Home of the Beast that will wage the War of Armageddon against the Army of Christ. But, don’t look now…..here come the Old Commie God Squad! Looks to me Putin founded his own Tea Party Patriots.

Jon Presco

“Mr. Gubenko, a lean man with a shaved head and a long, thick beard, who looks like a monk in forest camouflage, heads a community of 800 Cossacks in Mineralnye Vodi. He preaches an angry mix of piety and militarism to his followers.

Dismayed by Russia’s fall from great-power status, which he attributes to the waning influence of the Russian Orthodox Church, he encourages those under his command to do a tour in Chechnya as part of a regular Russian army unit.

Eight years ago, Mr. Gubenko led an all-Cossack unit that razed part of Grozny, capital of the breakaway Chechen republic. Its brutality shocked even battle-hardened Russian troops. Seen as uncontrollable, the unit was disbanded after just 2½ months.

The ataman’s office, tucked inside a walled compound filled with camouflage-clad men building a Cossacks-only church, is festooned with portraits of Nicholas II, the last Russian czar. He and most of his followers do not vote, he says. Instead, they pray for the return of the monarchy.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1196301/posts

Stavropol, a city of 300,000 surrounded by trouble spots such as Chechnya and Georgia, is one of a handful of Russian cities resurrecting the tradition of Cossacks as guardians of order. In an experiment, Cossack volunteers dressed in green camouflage uniforms rather than the dark blue overcoats of old are patrolling the streets alongside regular police.
Local Cossacks hope Mr. Putin will soon pass a law giving them special status as law enforcers, which they hope will come with a salary. Proponents say the presence of Cossack paramilitaries has already increased security, while at the same time restoring an important part of Russia’s culture.
“Kaiser Wilhelm II [of Germany] said the Cossacks were the last knights in Europe,” said Oleg Gubenko, the Cossack leader, or ataman, in the nearby city of Mineralnye Vodi. “Now we are bringing this back.”

http://news.nationalpost.com/2013/12/31/thousands-of-police-troops-tighten-security-in-russian-city-hit-by-2-suicide-bombings/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/08/31/my-letter-from-homeland-security/

”Australian and New Zealand officials played down the
seriousness of the threat to the research reactor, some 25 km (15 miles) from
the main Olympic stadium on the outskirts of Sydney and said the risk ofan attack
was low. New South Wales Police Commissioner Peter Ryan, who serves as head of
security for the Sydney Olympics stated in an interview with NBC on August 28
that the reported plot to blow up the reactor during the games had been
exaggerated and he did not think there was any threat.

He described the Afghan refugee group as an Islamic group allegedly involved so
far only in the illegal immigration of people, money laundering and other
activities, but “certainly not terrorism.”

However, Greenpeace activists, conservation groups and nearby residents were not convinced and converged on the site of Australia’s only nuclear reactor to protest that the plant was old,
leaky and long a security threat. The Sydney Morning Herald reported calls in
April last year for the Lucas Heights reactor to be shut down for the Sydney
Olympics, as Atlanta authorities did with a smaller research facility there
before the 1996 games in the United States. The Herald quoted a leading
anti-reactor campaigner assaying nuclear authorities in Australia acknowledged a
potential terrorism threat when they increased security at the Lucas Heights
reactor during the 1991 Gulf War.

Thousands of police, troops tighten security in Russian city hit by 2 suicide bombings
Eerily empty buses lumbered through the streets, police weighed down with body armour warily watched pedestrians near a fast-food restaurant, and members of Cossack units stood guard at bus stops. Volgograd was an ominous and jittery city on Tuesday, after two suicide bombings in two days that killed 34 people.
We get a feeling that a war has started
“People are afraid it will happen again; they’re trying not to go outside if they don’t have to,” said 20-year-old Yulia Kuzmina, a student. “We get a feeling that a war has started.”
That is a worry that extends far beyond Volgograd.

Officers and security guards carefully searched the purses of young women entering a shopping centre and waved metal detectors over both males and females.
The Cossacks guarding some bus stops added an unsettling note. Although these units are officially authorized volunteer patrols, they are descendants of the fierce horsemen who protected the czars and launched raids on Muslims in the Russian Caucasus, where the Islamist insurgency is now centred.
Volgograd authorities have cancelled mass events for New Year’s Eve, one of Russia’s most popular holidays, and asked residents not to set off fireworks. In addition, all movie theatres have been closed until Thursday. In Moscow, festivities were to go ahead, but authorities said security would be increased.

The revival of the Cossacks and their traditions began in 1989, during the Perestroika period. In 2005, Vladimir Putin, then President of Russia, introduced a bill approved at the State Duma that recognized the Cossacks not only as a distinct ethno-cultural entity, but also as a potent military force.
Today there are even special Cossack schools, where, along with the usual subjects like math and literature, students are taught Cossack traditions and history. Vast groups of Cossacks can now be found in the south of Russia and numerous Cossack groups inhabit the northwestern Caucasus, Kuban, Krasnodar and Stavropol regions.

Posted on ‎8‎/‎21‎/‎2004‎ ‎9‎:‎58‎:‎46‎ ‎AM by Destro

Russian Cossacks ride for country again

Once called the last knights in Europe, ethnic group aims to keep the peace in turbulent Caucasus region, MARK MacKINNON writes

By MARK MacKINNON

Saturday, August 21, 2004 – Page A11

STAVROPOL, RUSSIA — Once they were the outriders of the Russian empire, feared and fearless warriors who extended the Czar’s authority as far as their horses would carry them.

Now, modern-day Cossacks are doing the same for President Vladimir Putin, except the horses have been replaced with battered Lada sedans.

Suppressed for decades during the Soviet era, Russia’s Cossacks are staging a cultural comeback. Their dance troupes roam the world, displaying their signature athletic steps. The World Cossack Games are scheduled for next month in Stavropol, a city with a large Kuban Cossack minority, where dancers compete alongside riders and swordsmen eager to display they have acquired the skills that made their ancestors famous.

But most practically, the Cossacks are back, enforcing their version of the law in Russia’s unruly Caucasus region.

Stavropol, a city of 300,000 surrounded by trouble spots such as Chechnya and Georgia, is one of a handful of Russian cities resurrecting the tradition of Cossacks as guardians of order. In an experiment, Cossack volunteers dressed in green camouflage uniforms rather than the dark blue overcoats of old are patrolling the streets alongside regular police.

Local Cossacks hope Mr. Putin will soon pass a law giving them special status as law enforcers, which they hope will come with a salary. Proponents say the presence of Cossack paramilitaries has already increased security, while at the same time restoring an important part of Russia’s culture.

“Kaiser Wilhelm II [of Germany] said the Cossacks were the last knights in Europe,” said Oleg Gubenko, the Cossack leader, or ataman, in the nearby city of Mineralnye Vodi. “Now we are bringing this back.”

Cossacks — ethnic Russians who speak a distinct dialect — won their freedom in Czarist times in exchange for guarding the empire’s frontiers.

In the former Soviet republic of Georgia, the government complained this week that the chances of civil war in the breakaway region of South Ossetia have been heightened by a “third force” — units of Cossack troops that have repeatedly broken a negotiated ceasefire and killed several Georgian soldiers.

Though some Cossacks reside in South Ossetia, Georgia claims the troublemakers crossed the border from Russia as soon as hostilities broke out. There have also been reports of Cossack volunteers heading to Abkhazia, another breakaway Georgian province that, like South Ossetia, wants to reunite with Russia.

Viktor Yesaulov, who wears green fatigues and a military dog tag while running a cultural centre and museum in Stavropol, smiles under his classic Cossack mustache at the idea that his brethren are fighting once more on the other side of the Caucasus mountains.

“Why wouldn’t Cossacks go there to help the Ossetians?” he asks. “The Ossetians have a perfect attitude. They want to join Russia.”

Mr. Yesaulov recites an ancient Cossack pledge to be faithful to the czar, the motherland and the Russian Orthodox Church. He boasts that his own son served for 18 months in Chechnya, fighting against separatists seeking independence from Russia. His son-in-law died in that bloody conflict, he says proudly.

Going to war and being a Cossack are as thickly intertwined as they were 200 years ago.

Mr. Gubenko, a lean man with a shaved head and a long, thick beard, who looks like a monk in forest camouflage, heads a community of 800 Cossacks in Mineralnye Vodi. He preaches an angry mix of piety and militarism to his followers.

Dismayed by Russia’s fall from great-power status, which he attributes to the waning influence of the Russian Orthodox Church, he encourages those under his command to do a tour in Chechnya as part of a regular Russian army unit.

Eight years ago, Mr. Gubenko led an all-Cossack unit that razed part of Grozny, capital of the breakaway Chechen republic. Its brutality shocked even battle-hardened Russian troops. Seen as uncontrollable, the unit was disbanded after just 2½ months.

The ataman’s office, tucked inside a walled compound filled with camouflage-clad men building a Cossacks-only church, is festooned with portraits of Nicholas II, the last Russian czar. He and most of his followers do not vote, he says. Instead, they pray for the return of the monarchy.

There are more than 600,000 registered Cossacks in Russia, 20,000 of whom serve in the military. Many in Russia’s multiethnic and multireligious south view the Cossack resurgence with suspicion.

The Kavkaz Tsentr website, frequently used by Chechen rebels to communicate with the outside world, features complaints about Cossack chauvinism. “The Cossacks here, in the Caucasus, call all the Caucasus people foreigners, and consider only themselves to be the indigenous population,” a recent posting read. “This is a blatant incitement to interethnic discord.”

But Cossack parents are eager to enlist their children in the revival. Yesterday, 574 students aged 10 to 17 showed up for the first day of cadet school, where they will spend mornings in regular classes and afternoons learning how to fight and serve in the Russian army.

The academy is one of the few secondary schools in Russia where significant teaching time is spent on the war in Chechnya.

Students wear military uniforms in class.

“Since early times, Cossacks would go between different nationalities and keep the peace,” says deputy director Vladimir Vodolazkov. “When we stopped doing that, the conflicts began. Now we have to restore that role.”

My Letter to Peter DeFazio

The 2008 Olympic Trails are being held here in Eugene Oregon at Hayward Field.
The security is very tight. At the 2000 Olympics, Al-Qeda threatened to blow up
a nuclear plant near the Olympic stadium – tw0 montths before 911. Greenpeace
took the threat seriously while others played it down.

Security and Intelligence Organization (ASIO) was investigating claims that bin
Laden was trying to recruit members in t he city. Police were on alert following
allegations, which emerged in a court case in which an Iraqi national was
accused of attacking a family for refusing to join bin Laden’s extremist Muslim
group. Security agencies in the United States, Canada and Britain were also
looking into the possible plot, according to local newspapers.

Evangelicals and Republicans are associating Obama with suicide bombers. McCain
wants to build a hundred nuclear plants in America.

New South Wales Police Commissioner Peter Ryan, who serves as head of security
for the Sydney Olympics stated in an interview with NBC on August 28 that the
reported plot to blow up the reactor during the games had been exaggerated and he
did not think there was any threat. He described the Afghan refugee group as an
Islamic group allegedly involved so far only in the illegal immigration of
people, money laundering and other activities, but “certainly
not terrorism. ”However, Greenpeace activists, conservation groups and nearby
residents were not convinced and converged on the site of Australia’s only
nuclear reactor to protest that the plant was old, leaky and long a security
threat.

Dear Congressman DeFazio;

Here is the letter I received from the U.S. Department of Justice in regards to
my letter you forwarded to them about the threat to the 2000 Olympic games. The
FBI assured me there was not threat, and “contrary to media accounts, no arrests
were made because no crime was committed.” However, today I found several
articles which say there were arrests made, and indeed a trial in underway.

“Al-Qaeda targeted Olympics, Jews: court
By Martin Daly in Perth

May 20, 2004-Qaeda planned an attack during the Sydney Olympics and to target
the Jewish community, according to notes revealed during the trial of an
Australian man accused of plotting to bomb the Israeli embassy in Canberra.”What
concerns me is that Australian Prime Minster, Alexander Downer -played down the
discovery of Afghan veterans – is being blamed for the Niger documents that
alleged Saddam had WMD. Downer made deals with Comega, a French nuclear waste
firm, and thus must have known these documents were fakes.
In looking for a motive I am led to wonder if this has anything to the
allegations the Bush administration was holding secret meeting with the Taliban
over the Caspian Sea oil pipe being built through Afghanistan.

May 28,2004

“Dear Mr. Presco

By letter dated April 22nd,

Congressman Peter DeFazio forwarded your April 9th. e-mail regarding an alleged
threat to the 2000 Summer Olympic Games in Sydney, Australia, to the FBI’s
Office of Congressional Affairs. Your inquiry was referred to my office because
your concerns fall within the purview of the FBI’s Counterterrorism Division. We
appreciate the interest which prompted you to write. Regarding your concerns
that members of “Al-Qaeda were released after being caught with plans to blow up
a nuclear plant, “near the site of the 2000 Summer Olympic Games, I can assure
you that the Australian and U.S. authorities aggressively investigated initial
report of this potential threat. However, it was later determined that no threat
existed. Additionally, contrary to media accounts, no arrests were made because
no crime was committed. The security for the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games was very
well organized and communication with the U.S. Government was unprecedented. I
hope this information is helpful to you and will serve to allay some of your
concerns. Sincerely yours,

Gary M. Bald

Assistant Director Counterterrorism Division.1 -Honorable Peter DeFazio U.S.
House of Representatives Washington, DC 20515

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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