Virginia Hambley is kin to Empress Zita

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hambley77 Virginia’s family is kin to the Habsburgs via her Cosse-Brissac relatives.

Vinzenz was 1,300th Knight of the Order of the Golden Fleece in Austria. From his first marriage (1981–1991) with Hélène de Cossé-Brissac (1960–) he had two daughters:
Princess Adelheid Marie Beatrice Zita (b. Vienna, 25 November 1981), married in Deutschfeistritz-Peggau on 31 January 2009 Count Dominic von(b. London, 7 October 1973), son of Count Hans Heinrich von Coudenhove Kalergi and wife Cornelia Carter Roberts
Princess Hedwig Maria Beatrice Hermine (b. Vienna, 28 November 1982), married in Schloss Waldstein on 10 May 2008 Comte Olivier de Quélen (b. Paris, 25 April 1980), son of Jean-Louis, Comte de Quélen and wife Nicole Cansou

Vincenz Liechtenstein

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Vincenz Liechtenstein (30 July 1950 in Graz – 14 January 2008 in Deutschfeistritz, Styria) was an Austrian politician (ÖVP). He was a grandson of Charles I of Austria, the last Austrian Emperor. He was born a Prince of Liechtenstein and never renounced his right of succession to that monarchy, but since the nobility in Austria was officially abolished in 1919, after the fall of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, he did not use his princely title or honorific (Serene Highness) in his Austrian civic life.

Ancestry

Born His Serene Highness Prince Vincenz Karl Alfred Maria Michael of Liechtenstein (Germ. Seine Durchlaucht der Prinz Vincenz Karl Alfred Maria Michael von und zu Liechtenstein), the first child of Prince Heinrich of Liechtenstein and Archduchess Elisabeth of Austria. Prince Heinrich was a son of Prince Alfred of Liechtenstein (himself a son of Prince Alfred of Liechtenstein) and Princess Theresia Maria of Oettingen-Oettingen. Vincenz was thus a male-line great-great-great-grandson of Johann I Joseph, Prince of Liechtenstein. Vincenz’ mother, Archduchess Elisabeth, was the youngest daughter of Charles I, the last Emperor of Austria, and his wife, Zita of Bourbon-Parma. Vincenz Liechtenstein is a female-line great-grandson of Robert I, the last sovereign Duke of Parma.

Marriage[edit]

Vinzenz was 1,300th Knight of the Order of the Golden Fleece in Austria. From his first marriage (1981–1991) with Hélène de Cossé-Brissac (1960–) he had two daughters:
Princess Adelheid Marie Beatrice Zita (b. Vienna, 25 November 1981), married in Deutschfeistritz-Peggau on 31 January 2009 Count Dominic von Coudenhove Kalergi (b. London, 7 October 1973), son of Count Hans Heinrich von Coudenhove Kalergi and wife Cornelia Carter Roberts
Princess Hedwig Maria Beatrice Hermine (b. Vienna, 28 November 1982), married in Schloss Waldstein on 10 May 2008 Comte Olivier de Quélen (b. Paris, 25 April 1980), son of Jean-Louis, Comte de Quélen and wife Nicole Cansou

He married Roberta Valeri Manera (1953–) in 1999 though the two had no children.

Career[edit]

Vincenz studied at the Bundesrealgymnasium in Graz (1960–1969) and subsequently studied law at the University of Graz (1969–1975). He worked at a forestry company before becoming a politician. He was co-founder of the 1974 JES students initiative. He was a member of the board of the Catholic Family Association and the Sudetendeutsche Landsmannschaft.

Vincenz was a member of the Nationalrat from 1988–1996 and again from 1997–2004. From 2004–2006 he was a member of the Bundesrat. He caused a mini-scandal in 2005 when he interrupted a Nationalrat meeting because of alleged drunkenness. He apologised shortly afterward.[1]

Liechtenstein died unexpectedly on 14 January 2008 at his house near Graz.[2]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_I_of_Austria

Attempts to reclaim throne of Hungary[edit]
Main article: Charles IV of Hungary’s conflict with Miklós Horthy
Encouraged by Hungarian royalists (“legitimists”), Charles sought twice in 1921 to reclaim the throne of Hungary, but failed largely because Hungary’s regent, Miklós Horthy (the last admiral of the Austro-Hungarian Navy), refused to support him. Horthy’s failure to support Charles’ restoration attempts is often described as “treasonous” by royalists. Critics suggest that Horthy’s actions were more firmly grounded in political reality than those of Charles and his supporters. Indeed, the neighbouring countries had threatened to invade Hungary if Charles tried to regain the throne. Later in 1921, the Hungarian parliament formally nullified the Pragmatic Sanction—an act that effectively dethroned the Habsburgs.

Charles I of Austria or Charles IV of Hungary (Karl Franz Joseph Ludwig Hubert Georg Otto Marie; 17 August 1887 – 1 April 1922) was, among other titles, the last ruler of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. He was the last Emperor of Austria, the last King of Hungary,[1] the last King of Bohemia and Croatia and the last King of Galicia and Lodomeria and the last monarch of the House of Habsburg-Lorraine. He reigned as Charles I as Emperor of Austria and Charles IV as King of Hungary from 1916 until 1918, when he “renounced participation” in state affairs, but did not abdicate. He spent the remaining years of his life attempting to restore the monarchy until his death in 1922. Following his beatification by the Catholic Church, he has become commonly known as Blessed Charles of Austria.

Charles was born on 17 August 1887 in the Castle of Persenbeug in Lower Austria. His parents were Archduke Otto Franz of Austria and Princess Maria Josepha of Saxony. At the time, his granduncle Franz Joseph reigned as Emperor of Austria and King of Hungary, and his uncle Franz Ferdinand became heir presumptive two years later.
As a child, Charles was reared a devout Roman Catholic. He spent his early years wherever his father’s regiment happened to be stationed; later on he lived in Vienna and Reichenau. He was privately educated, but, contrary to the custom ruling in the imperial family, he attended a public gymnasium for the sake of demonstrations in scientific subjects. On the conclusion of his studies at the gymnasium, he entered the army, spending the years from 1906-1908 as an officer chiefly in Prague, where he studied law and political science concurrently with his military duties.[2]
In 1907 he was declared of age and Prince Zdenko Lobkowitz was appointed his chamberlain. In the next few years he carried out his military duties in various Bohemian garrison towns. Charles’s relations with his granduncle were not intimate, and those with his uncle not cordial, the differences between their wives increasing the existing tension between them. For these reasons, Charles, up to the time of the murder of Franz Ferdinand, obtained no insight into affairs of state, but led the life of a prince not destined for a high political position.[2]
Marriage[edit]

The wedding of Zita and Charles, 21 October 1911.
In 1911, Charles married Princess Zita of Bourbon-Parma. They had met as children but did not see one another for almost ten years, as each pursued their education. In 1909, his Dragoon regiment was stationed at Brandeis an der Elbe (Brandýs nad Labem), from where he visited his aunt at Franzensbad.[3]:5 It was during one of these visits that Charles and Zita became reacquainted.[3]:5 Due to Franz Ferdinand’s morganatic marriage, his children were excluded from the succession. As a result, the Emperor severely pressured Charles to marry. Zita not only shared Charles’ devout Catholicism, but also an impeccably royal lineage.[4]:16 Zita later recalled,
“We were of course glad to meet again and became close friends. On my side feelings developed gradually over the next two years. He seemed to have made his mind up much more quickly, however, and became even more keen when, in the autumn of 1910, rumours spread about that I had got engaged to a distant Spanish relative, Jaime, Duke of Madrid. On hearing this, the Archduke came down post haste from his regiment at Brandeis and sought out his grandmother, Archduchess Maria Theresa, who was also my aunt and the natural confidante in such matters. He asked if the rumor was true and when told it was not, he replied, ‘Well, I had better hurry in any case or she will get engaged to someone else.'”[3]:8
Heir presumptive[edit]
Charles became heir presumptive after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo in 1914, the event which precipitated World War I. Only at this time did the old Emperor, moved by an innate sense of duty, take steps to initiate the heir-presumptive to his crown in affairs of state. But the outbreak of World War I interfered with this political education. Charles spent his time during the first phase of the war at headquarters at Teschen, but exercised no military influence.[2]
Charles then became a Generalfeldmarschall in the Austro-Hungarian Army. In the spring of 1916, in connection with the offensive against Italy, he was entrusted with the command of the XX. Corps, whose affections the heir-presumptive to the throne won by his affability and friendliness. The offensive, after a successful start, soon came to a standstill. Shortly afterwards, Charles went to the eastern front as commander of an army operating against the Russians and Romanians.[2]
Reign[edit]

King Charles taking his coronation oath at Holy Trinity Column outside Matthias Church, 30 December 1916

Portrait of the recently crowned King Charles IV and Queen Zita with their son Otto
Charles succeeded to the thrones in November 1916, after the death of Emperor Franz Joseph.
On 2 December 1916, he took over the title of Supreme Commander of the whole army from Archduke Frederick. His coronation occurred on 30 December. In 1917, Charles secretly entered into peace negotiations with France. He employed his brother-in-law, Prince Sixtus of Bourbon-Parma, an officer in the Belgian Army, as intermediary.

Charlotte Maria Benedikta Eleonore Adelheid Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein

F, #44521, b. 3 July 1953

Last Edited=26 Jul 2005

Charlotte Maria Benedikta Eleonore Adelheid Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein was born on 3 July 1953. She is the daughter of Heinrich Karl Prinz von und zu Liechtenstein and Elisabeth Charlotte Erzherzogin von Österreich. She married Pieter Van der Byl on 31 August 1979 at Waldstein.
She gained the title of Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein. Her married name became Van der Byl.

Children of Charlotte Maria Benedikta Eleonore Adelheid Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein and Pieter Van der Byl
1.Pieter Vincenz Van der Byl b. 1980
2.Valerian Van der Byl b. 1982
3.Casimir Van der Byl b. 27 Jul 1990

Helene de Cossé-Brissac

F, #44522, b. 26 September 1960

Last Edited=3 Nov 2007

Helene de Cossé-Brissac was born on 26 September 1960. She married Vincenz Karl Alfred Maria Michael Prinz von und zu Liechtenstein, son of Heinrich Karl Prinz von und zu Liechtenstein and Elisabeth Charlotte Erzherzogin von Österreich, on 5 March 1981 at Paris, France.

Children of Helene de Cossé-Brissac and Vincenz Karl Alfred Maria Michael Prinz von und zu Liechtenstein
1.Adelheid Marie Beatrice Zita Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein b. 25 Nov 1981
2.Hedwig Maria Beatrice Hermine Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein+ b. 28 Nov 1982

Adelheid Marie Beatrice Zita Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein

F, #44523, b. 25 November 1981

Last Edited=15 Feb 2011

Adelheid Marie Beatrice Zita Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein was born on 25 November 1981 at Vienna, Austria. She is the daughter of Vincenz Karl Alfred Maria Michael Prinz von und zu Liechtenstein and Helene de Cossé-Brissac. She married Dominik Cornelius Valentin Gerold Eugene Grad von Coudenhove-Kalergi on 31 January 2009.1
She gained the title of Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein.

Citations
1.[S3182] Isabelle Maltais, “re: van Oranje-Nassau,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 6 June 2008. Hereinafter cited as “re: van Oranje-Nassau.”

Hedwig Maria Beatrice Hermine Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein

F, #44524, b. 28 November 1982
Last Edited=15 Feb 2011

Hedwig Maria Beatrice Hermine Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein was born on 28 November 1982 at Vienna, Austria. She is the daughter of Vincenz Karl Alfred Maria Michael Prinz von und zu Liechtenstein and Helene de Cossé-Brissac. She married Comte Olivier de Quelen, son of Comte Jean-Louis de Quelen and Nicole Cansou, on 10 May 2008 at Schloss Waldstein bei Peggau, Steiermark, Austria.1
She gained the title of Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein. From 10 May 2008, her married name became de Quelen.1

Child of Hedwig Maria Beatrice Hermine Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein and Comte Olivier de Quelen
1.Maïwenn Marie Éléonore de Quélen de Quelen1 b. 23 Apr 2010

Citations
1.[S3182] Isabelle Maltais, “re: van Oranje-Nassau,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 6 June 2008. Hereinafter cited as “re: van Oranje-Nassau.”

Hildegard Peters

F, #44525, b. 12 February 1948
Last Edited=3 Feb 2004

Hildegard Peters was born on 12 February 1948. She is the daughter of Robert Max Josef Peters. She married Michael Karl Alfred Maria Felix Moritz Prinz von und zu Liechtenstein, son of Heinrich Karl Prinz von und zu Liechtenstein and Elisabeth Charlotte Erzherzogin von Österreich, on 31 January 1986 at Vaduz, Liechtenstein, in a civil marriage. Hildegard and Michael Karl Alfred Maria Felix Moritz were also married in a religious ceremony on 8 February 1986 at Baden-Baden, Baden-Württemburg, Germany.

Children of Hildegard Peters and Michael Karl Alfred Maria Felix Moritz Prinz von und zu Liechtenstein
1.Therese Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein b. 22 Feb 1987
2.Gisela Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein b. 26 Jun 1990

Therese Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein

F, #44526, b. 22 February 1987

Last Edited=26 Jul 2005

Therese Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein was born on 22 February 1987. She is the daughter of Michael Karl Alfred Maria Felix Moritz Prinz von und zu Liechtenstein and Hildegard Peters.
She gained the title of Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein.

Gisela Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein

F, #44527, b. 26 June 1990

Last Edited=27 Jul 2005

Gisela Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein was born on 26 June 1990 at Feldkirch, Vorarlburg, Austria. She is the daughter of Michael Karl Alfred Maria Felix Moritz Prinz von und zu Liechtenstein and Hildegard Peters.
She gained the title of Prinz von und zu Liechtenstein in 1991.

Pieter Van der Byl

M, #44528, b. 11 November 1923

Last Edited=29 Apr 2004

Pieter Van der Byl was born on 11 November 1923. He married Charlotte Maria Benedikta Eleonore Adelheid Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein, daughter of Heinrich Karl Prinz von und zu Liechtenstein and Elisabeth Charlotte Erzherzogin von Österreich, on 31 August 1979 at Waldstein.

Children of Pieter Van der Byl and Charlotte Maria Benedikta Eleonore Adelheid Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein
1.Pieter Vincenz Van der Byl b. 1980
2.Valerian Van der Byl b. 1982
3.Casimir Van der Byl b. 27 Jul 1990

Pieter Vincenz Van der Byl

M, #44529, b. 1980

Last Edited=29 Apr 2004

Pieter Vincenz Van der Byl was born in 1980 at Cape Town, Cape Province, South Africa. He is the son of Pieter Van der Byl and Charlotte Maria Benedikta Eleonore Adelheid Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein.

Casimir Van der Byl

M, #44530, b. 27 July 1990

Last Edited=29 Apr 2004

Casimir Van der Byl was born on 27 July 1990 at Cape Town, Cape Province, South Africa. He is the son of Pieter Van der Byl and Charlotte Maria Benedikta Eleonore Adelheid Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein.

http://www.geocities.com/henrivanoene/genliechtenstein3.html

http://lmathieu.wordpress.com/2011/09/29/le-dernier-empereur-dautriche-charles-1er-et-limperatrice-zita/

http://www.thepeerage.com/p4453.htm

In the 15th century, the structure was rebuilt by Pierre de Brézé, a wealthy chief minister to King Charles VII. During the reign (1515–47) of Francis I, the property was acquired by René de Cossé, who the king named as governor of Anjou and Maine.

During the French Wars of Religion, Château Brissac was made a possession in 1589 by the Protestant, Henry of Navarre. Severely damaged, the fortress was scheduled to be demolished. However, Charles II de Cossé sided with Henri of Navarre who soon was crowned King of France. In gratitude, King Henri gave him the property, the title Duc de Brissac and the money to rebuild the chateau in 1611. Its construction made it the highest château in France, its façade reflecting the influences of that century’s Baroque architecture. Through marriage, the Cossé-Brissac family also acquired the Château Montreuil-Bellay but later sold it.

In August 1620, Louis XIII and his mother, Marie de Medici, met to discuss their differences in the “neutral” territory of Château Brissac. A temporary truce between the two was reached but it did not last long and the Queen Mother was eventually banished.

The descendants of the Duc de Brissac maintained the château until 1792 when the property was ransacked during the Revolution. It lay in waste until a restoration program began in 1844 that was carried on during the 19th century by the Duke’s descendants.

Today, the Château Brissac is still owned by a de Cossé family member. It has seven storeys altogether, making it the tallest chateau in the Loire Valley. The chateau is open to tours and its luxurious gilded theater hosts the annual Val de Loire festival. It was also used as a location for Brazilian celebrity magazine “Caras” until recently.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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