Military and Hospital of Saint-Lazare

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There is a fight between two factions who claim the throne of France over control of the Military and Hospital of Saint-Lazare. The Children of Elizabeth de Bourmont are kin to de Cosse Brissac family who has produced a Grand Master. This is the real thing, a battle for the throne of France involving an order of Knights. There is a Templar connection which I will post on next.

There are hundreds of books that claim there exist an order of knights doing secretive things in order to establish one profound thing after another. If Virginia Hambley de Bourmont had not gotten down on one knee and proposed marriage to me, then this amazing revelation would remain a secret to just a few – who might be taking my claim to the Louisiana Territory – seriously!

I am considering founding my own Lazarus order in America who will dedicate themselves to restoring the Bourbon rule.

Deposed in 1969, the Duke of Nemours is replaced by Pierre de Cossé Brissac, elected grand master 47th and Michel d ‘ Orléans who is coadjutor until 1973. All this causes a schism and gives birth to the branch known as “Paris”.

Victor de Bourmont is a member of one of the great Angevin aristocratic families. He was born 1907 in Pontivy and died in March 1945 in Pomerania near Kolberg (Korlin). It descends many aristocratic families of the region and of Brittany, including the Cossé-Brissac, and Rohan. Many of her forebears were under the former Regime, presidents or advisors of the Chamber of Auditors of Brittany and Normandy.

The de Bourmonts are Anjou Legitimists who are in contention with the Orléanists for throne of France when, and if, the French Monarchy returns. If this happens, then all the de Bourmonts, even in America, will be line for the French Throne. The question is, are Clark and Elizabeth’s children and grandchildren being watched, looked after?

This is the real Game of Thrones, and the real ‘Pan’s Labyrinth’

Jon Presco

Copyright 2013

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/09/13/de-cosse-brissac/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/09/18/house-of-cosse-brissac/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/09/17/de-bourmont-anjou-legitimists/

In 1930 don Francisco de Borbón y de La Torre, Duke of Seville, Grand Bailiff of the Order in Spain was appointed as lieutenant-general of the Grand Magistracy and in 1935 he was elected as Grand Master re-establishing the office, vacant since 1814.[10] There has since been a Spanish Borbon grand master at the helm of the Order.

The Order of Saint Lazarus has the protection of Henri d’Orléans, Count of Paris.[7][15] In 2004, the count of Paris allowed his nephew Prince Charles Philippe, Duke of Anjou to take the position of 49th Grand Master of the order.

In Spain the order has received recognition from the State through a number of legal documents. King Juan Carlos I of Spain allowed his kinsman don Carlos Gereda y de Borbon to accept the position of Grand Master of the order in 2008. Within the Kingdom of Spain many nobles are members of the order and the Cronista de Armas de Castile y León allows the use of the cross and insignia of the Order of Saint Lazarus when certifying coats of arms to members of the order.

Henri d’Orléans, Count of Paris, Duke of France (Henri Philippe Pierre Marie d’Orléans; born on 14 June 1933), is a member of the former French ruling dynasty of the House of Bourbon, and one of the current pretenders to the defunct French crown as Henry VII. A descendant of King Louis-Philippe (ruled 1830–1848), he is the current head of the Orléans line of the Bourbon dynasty. As such he is recognized as the legitimate claimant to the throne by those French royalists who adhere to the succession of Louis-Philippe (“Orléanists”), as well as by the “Unionist” faction that rejects Louis-Philippe’s title but recognizes his grandson Philippe, Count of Paris (1838–1894), as the heir of the rival claimant Henry, Count of Chambord, the last direct agnatic descendant of King Louis XV. Henri of Orléans is a former military officer as well as an author and painter.

Military and hospital of Saint-Lazare

There is an military and hospital of Saint-Lazare de Jerusalem from a Chancery of theorder of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem, created in Paris in 1910, under the protection of the Patriarch ofAntioch and of all Greek-melkite East, of Alexandria and Jerusalem.

2 Grand Masters of the order 2.1 Obedience known as «Malta»
2.2 So-called Paris obedience
2.3 So-called “Malta” obedience and «Paris» reunited
2.4 So-called ‘d’Orleans’ obedience

Today several orders or obediences themselves the heirs of the order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem history.

In 1930, François de Paule de Bourbon accepts the governance of the order with the title of lieutenant-general. On December 15, 1935, he became the 44th grand master. Following his death in 1952, his son, François de Paule de Bourbon, was named lieutenant-general before becoming the 45th grand master in 1958. Unable to devote himself entirely to the order, the grand master appoints Pierre de Cossé Brissac Deputy in 1956. Under his leadership, the 45th grand master is “filed” and Charles-Philippe d ‘ Orléans, Duke of Nemours ‘, was elected grand master 46th. The order of Saint Lazarus has two masters, a Bourbon and an Orleans.

Deposed in 1969, the Duke of Nemours is replaced by Pierre de Cossé Brissac, elected grand master 47th and Michel d ‘ Orléans who is coadjutor until 1973. All this causes a schism and gives birth to the branch known as “Paris”. In 1970, the great mastery transferred the headquarters of the order in Malta where the branch name so-called ‘ Malta ‘. In 1973, François de Paule de Bourbon became the 47th grand master of this branch.

In 2004, the so-called obediences ‘of Malta and Paris’ met in the election of François de Paule de Bourbon, Duke of Seville as grand master of both obediences1. This order is represented in France by the French association of hospital works of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem known as grand Bailiwick of Boigny2. The election of the grand master in 2004, the candidacy of Charles-Philippe d’Orleans is not retained. The ” Duke of Anjou then creates the new obedience” of Orléans. It is placed under the protection of the “head of the Royal House of France”, Henri d ‘ Orléans, count of Paris “,”Duke of France “.3 and spiritual protection of the Emeritus Primate of Hungary, cardinal László Paskai4.

All of these orders or faiths exist today in the form of associations. They practice all humanitarian or health assistance.

http://aftermathnews.wordpress.com/2008/10/13/military-and-hospitaller-order-of-st-lazarus-initiates-new-grand-master/

Charles-Philippe, Duke of Anjou
Prince Charles-Philippe Marie Louis d’Orléans, Petit-fils de France, Duke of Anjou, was born in Paris, France on March 3, 1973. He is the eldest of two sons of Prince Michel Joseph Benoît Marie d’Orléans, fils de France, comte d’Evreux, and his wife the former Béatrice Pasquier de Franclieu. His paternal grandfather was the late Henri, Count of Paris who was the Orléanist pretender to the French throne as Henry VI. As such, Charles-Philippe would have the status of petit-fils de France with the style of Royal Highness.
In 2004, Prince Charles-Philippe was elected Grand Master of a branch of the Military and Hospitaller Order of St. Lazarus of Jerusalem, an Order of Chivalry that dates back to the 11th century Crusades.
Charles-Philippe recently founded the St Lazare Foundation financed by the World Society, an international think tank whose mission, inspired by the Count of Paris, is to rationalise the problem of the planet’s future needs for water.

Times of Malta | Oct 12, 2008
The installation of the new Grand Master of the Military and Hospitaller Order of St Lazarus of Jerusalem recently took place at the Anglican Cathedral of Manchester, UK.
Don Carlos Gereda de Borbon, Marquis of Almazan was elected by a chapter general of the Order worldwide. Delegations represented Priories, Bailiwicks and Commanderies from Britain, European countries and also from USA, Canada, Australia, Mexico, Japan and South Africa.
The Grand Priory of the Maltese Islands Grand Cross Chev. Joseph R. Pace headed an eight-man delegation that participated throughout the event.

Don Carlos Gereda y de Borbón, Marqués de Almazán, 49th Grand Master of the Military and Hospitaller Order of St. Lazarus of Jerusalem (Malta branch), was born on 24 January 1947 in Montevideo, Uruguay to Don Nicolás Gereda y Bustamante and his wife Dona María Luisa de Borbón y Pínto. He is the 5th great grandson of King Carlos IV of Spain (d. 1819).[1]

Grand Masters of the order[change the code]
1935-1952: François de Paule de Bourbon, consort of Seville Duke
1952-1967: Francis of Paola of Bourbon
1967-1969: Charles-Philippe d ‘ Orléans, Duke of Nemours . »
1969-1973: Pierre de Cossé Brissac, Duke of Brissac

Obedience so-called ‘ Malta ‘.[change the code]
1973-1995: François de Paule de Bourbon
1996-2004: François de Paule de Bourbon, Duke of Seville

Obedience so-called ‘ Paris ‘.[change the code]
1973-1986: Pierre de Cossé Brissac, Duke of Brissac
1986-2004: François de Cossé-Brissac, marquis, then Duke of Brissac

So-called obedience “of Malta” and “Paris” reunited
2004-2008: François de Paule de Bourbon, Duke of Seville
2008: Don Carlos Gereda y Borbon, marquis of Almazán

Obedience “of Orléans.[change the code]
2004-2010: Charles-Philippe d ‘ Orléans, Duke of Anjou . »
2010: Jan, County Dobrzenský of Dobrženicz

Prince Michel of Orléans, Fils de France, Count of Évreux (Michel Joseph Benoît Marie; born 25 June 1941, Rabat, Morocco) is the son of the late Prince Henri, Count of Paris (the Orleanist claimant to the French throne from 1940 until his death) and Princess Isabelle of Orléans-Braganza. He is styled as the Count of Évreux.

He was dating Princess Irene of Greece and Denmark when he met Béatrice Marie Pasquier de Franclieu,[2] whom he married on 18 November 1967 in Casablanca, Morocco, without his father’s consent.[3] Born Béatrice Marie Guillemine Huguette in Neuilly-sur-Seine on 24 October 1941, the daughter of Count Bruno Marie Emilien Pasquier de Franclieu (Lyon, 4 March 1914 – Paris, 15 September 1944) of a noble family, and his wife Jacqueline Françoise Marie Thérèse Irène Térisse (Rambouillet, 7 September 1918 – 2006) who had married in Lormes on 29 April 1938.

The marriage was not regarded as dynastic, nor were his wife and children accorded traditional Orléanist royal titles. On 10 December 1976, Béatrice was allowed by her father-in-law to share ad personam her husband’s style, viz., “Her Royal Highness Princess Michel of Orléans, comtesse d’Evreux”.[4] Subsequent to the accession as head of the House of Orléans and pretender by his brother Prince Henri, Count of Paris, Duke of France in 1999, his wife and children were recognized as fully dynastic members of the royal house[3] with commensurate styles and titles.

The family lived in Morocco, Germany and England. Their children attained adulthood in Spain. According to the prince’s wife, her work as a fashion consultant for Women’s Wear Daily and Dior, combined with her husband’s lack of a career, imposed strains upon the marriage.[1] Michel and Beatrice were separated in 1994 and he left their home,[1] although there were no plans to terminate the marriage.[2] They had four children (and several grandchildren):[2]
Princess Clotilde Jacqueline Charlotte Marie d’Orléans 4 December 1968
Princess Adélaïde Jeanne Marie d’Orléans b. 11 September 1971
Charles-Philippe, Duke of Anjou b. 3 March 1973
Prince François Charles Frédéric Bruno Marie d’Orléans b. 10 February 1982

Order of Saint Lazarus

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Military and Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem

Grandes armes OSLJ.svg

Abbreviation
OSLJ

Motto
Atavis et armis (With ancestors and arms)

Formation
After 1098

Type
Chivalric order

Purpose/focus
To uphold and defend the Christian faith, to assist and help the sick and vulnerable, to promote and uphold the Christian principles of chivalry and to work for Christian unity

Location
Jerusalem

Region served
Worldwide

Membership
On invitation only, ecumenical

Main organ
Grand Magistry, Governing Council, Chapter General

Website

http://www.st-lazarus.net (Malta) http://www.orderofsaintlazarus.com (Orléans)
http://www.oslj.org (Paris)

The Military and Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem (Ordo Militaris et Hospitalis Sancti Lazari Hierosolymitani) is an order of chivalry originally founded at a leper hospital after 1098 by the crusaders of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem. It was established to treat leprosy, its knights originally being lepers themselves.[1] It is possible that king Baldwin IV of Jerusalem was a knight of this order or was, at least, assisted by it.

The symbol of the Order is a green eight-pointed Maltese Cross. It is believed to have given rise to the use of the green cross as the universal symbol for retail pharmacies worldwide. The word lazarette, in some languages being synonymous with hospital, is believed to also be derived from the hospitaller Order of St Lazarus.

After several centuries, the order went into decline and ceased to perform its original function. Starting with Pope Innocent VIII, attempts were made to merge it with the Knights of St. John. Eventually the order in Italy was merged with the Order of St. Maurice and in France with the Order of Our Lady of Mount Carmel.[2]

In the Holy Land

From its foundation in the 11th century, members of the Order of Saint Lazarus dedicated themselves to two ideals:[3]
1.aid to those suffering from the disease of leprosy
2.the defense of the Christian faith

The first mention of the order in surviving sources dates from 1106-16. The order was initially founded as a leper hospital outside the city walls of Jerusalem, but hospitals dependent on the Jerusalem hospital were established all across the Holy Land, notably in Acre, and Europe. It is unknown when the order became militarised but militarisation probably occurred before the end of the twelfth century due to the large numbers of Templars and Hospitallers sent to the leper hospitals for treatment. The four classes of members – brothers, knights, clerics and donors – of the Brothers of Saint Lazarus in Jerusalem were acknowledged by Pope Gregory IX in a Bull of 1227. However, definite evidence of their active participation in military campaigns is only documented in 1234 when Pope Gregory IX made a general appeal for aid to the Order to clear debts contracted in the defence of the Holy Land. The Ordinis Fratrum & Militum Hospitalis Leprosorum S. Lazari Hierosolymitani under Augustinian Rule was confirmed by Papal Bull Cum a nobis petitur of Pope Alexander IV in April 1255. The order established “Lazar houses” across Europe to care for lepers, and was well supported by other military orders which compelled brethren in their rule to join the order on contracting leprosy.[4]

The order remained primarily a hospitaller order but it did take part in a number of battles, including the Battle of La Forbie on 17 October 1244 (where all of the lazar brethren who fought died) and the Battle of Al Mansurah on 8–11 February 1250. The leper knights were protected by a number of able-bodied knights but in times of crisis the leper knights themselves would take up arms. The order quickly abandoned their military activities after the fall of Acre in 1291 and the dissolution of the Templars due to expense, being a relatively poor order.[5]

Royal House of France

Louis XVIII (1755–1824) with the Order of Saint Lazarus grand cross

Peter Ludwig von der Pahlen (1745–1826) with the Order of Saint Lazarus knight cross
In 1154, King Louis VII of France gave the Order of Saint Lazarus a property at Boigny near Orléans which was to become the headquarters of the Order outside of the Holy Land. Later, after the fall of Acre in 1291 the Knights of St. Lazarus left the Holy Land and moved first to Cyprus, then Sicily and finally back to Boigny which had been raised to a barony in 1288. In 1308 King Philip IV of France established the order under his temporal protection. Again, in 1604 Henry IV of France declared protectorate of French Crown over the French branch and in 1608 the order was merged in union with Order of Our Lady of Mount Carmel into Royal, Military and Hospitaller Order of Our Lady of Mount Carmel and St. Lazarus of Jerusalem. This amalgamation eventually received canonical acceptance on 5 June 1668 by a bull issued by Cardinal Legate de Vendôme under Papal authority of Clement IX. While being a French Royal Order, the Order remained under apostolic authority.

During the French Revolution a decree of 30 July 1791 suppressed all royal and knightly orders. Another decree the following year confiscated all the Order’s properties. Louis, Count of Provence, Grand Master of the Order, who later became Louis XVIII, continued to function in exile and continued admitting various dignitaries to the Order.[6] Scholars differ in their views regarding the extent to which the order remained intact after the French Revolution. In fact, in different museums there are preserved a number of paintings of Russian and Baltic nobles, adopted to the Order after 1791. In this list are general John Lamb, Prince Suvorov, count Pahlen, count Sievers etc. Some of the new knights are even listed in Almanach Royal from 1814 to 1830. King Louis XVIII, the order’s late protector, and the duc de Châtre, the order’s lieutenant-general, both died in 1824. These were followed by Charles X and Henry V as protectors of the order until 1830 with Jean-Louis Beaumont d’Autichamp acting as governing commandeur. While after 1830, the order lost its royal protection, it continued to remain under apostolic authoriity since the Holy See did not promulgate any contrarius actus in respect to either of the two Orders during the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The French fons honorum was renewed in 2004 by HRH Prince Henri d’Orléans, Count of Paris, as a claimant to the headship of the Royal House of France.,[7][8]

Royal House of Savoy[edit]

In 1572, Pope Gregory XIII merged the Italian foundation of the Order of Saint Lazarus with the Order of Saint Maurice (founded in 1434) as the Order of Saints Maurice and Lazarus. This became a national order of chivalry on the unification of Italy in 1861, but has been suppressed by law since the foundation of the Republic in 1946. King Umberto II did not abdicate his position as fons honorum however, and the head of the former Royal House of Savoy remains the Grand Master of the Italian foundation of the order today.

The Order after 1830[edit]

After 1830 the French foundation of the Order of Saint Lazarus continued under the governance of a council of officers[9] who in 1841 invited the Patriarch of the Melkite Greek Catholic Church Maximos III Mazloum to become Spiritual Protector of the order, thence re-establishing a tangible connection with the Order’s early roots in Jerusalem. Regardless of whether the order continued or was revived, by 1850, under the authority of the patriarch the order had consolidated and numbered about twenty knights supporting the rebuilding of the Mount Carmel Monastery in Haifa, Israel. In the years that followed new knights were admitted including in 1853 admiral Ferdinand-Alphonse Hamelin and admiral Louis Édouard Bouët-Willaumez; in 1863 comte Louis François du Mesnil de Maricourt (d. 1865), comte Paul de Poudenx (d.1894); in 1865 the Order admitted comte Jules Marie d’Anselme de Puisaye who was followed in 1875 by the vicomte de Boisbaudry; baron Yves de Constancin in 1896, who was later to become commander of the Hospitaller Nobles of Saint Lazarus, a knight of the Order of Isabella the Catholic and of Order of Saint Anna of Russia. In 1880 comte Jules Marie d’Anselme de Puisaye was admitted to the order as a hospitaller while living in Tunisia. The order continued to attract members from the French nobility and by the early 20th century it was attracting knights from further afield notably Spain and Poland. In 1910, a new statute was drawn up. This statute explicitly placed the governance of the order in the hands of the Magistracy whose decisions were sovereign and irrevocable, thus laicizing the Order. His Beatitude the Patriarch of Antioch, of All the East, of Jerusalem and of Alexandria, and was re-confirmed as the Supreme Pontiff.

In 1930 don Francisco de Borbón y de La Torre, Duke of Seville, Grand Bailiff of the Order in Spain was appointed as lieutenant-general of the Grand Magistracy and in 1935 he was elected as Grand Master re-establishing the office, vacant since 1814.[10] There has since been a Spanish Borbon grand master at the helm of the Order.

In 1961 Col. Robert Gayre of Gayre and Nigg, was appointed Bailiff and Commissioner-General for the Order in the English-speaking world with responsibility for expanding the Order’s membership in that area. Up to then, non-Catholic Christians had been accepted only as affiliate members of the order. Gayre accepted the appointment on condition that henceforth Protestants would be eligible for full membership. The Paris authorities reluctantly agreed and Gayre, took as a model to emulate the Most Venerable Order of St. John.[11] From this time the Order began to identify itself as an Oecumenical Order of Chivalry although the majority of its members and clergy remained Roman Catholic.

Charity work[edit]

The purpose of the Order is to uphold and defend the Christian faith, to assist and help the sick and vulnerable, to promote and uphold the Christian principles of chivalry and to work for Christian unity. In recent years the Order participate in worldwide humanitarian efforts. For example, it has been engaged in a major charitable program to revive Christianity in Eastern Europe: Russia, Ukraine, Armenia, Georgia, and the Near East: Lebanon, Syria, and the Palestinian territories. Millions of dollars worth of food, clothing, medical equipment and supplies have been distributed in Poland, Hungary, Romania and Croatia. Because of this experience, the European Community commissioned the order to transport more than 21.000 tons in food to the hungry in Russia. The order organized food-aid and managed reconstruction-projects after the Tsunami Catastrophe in Indonesia.[12][13][14]

Recognition and Prominent Members[edit]

The Order of Saint Lazarus has the protection of Henri d’Orléans, Count of Paris.[7][15] In 2004, the count of Paris allowed his nephew Prince Charles Philippe, Duke of Anjou to take the position of 49th Grand Master of the order.

In Spain the order has received recognition from the State through a number of legal documents.[citation needed] King Juan Carlos I of Spain allowed his kinsman don Carlos Gereda y de Borbon to accept the position of Grand Master of the order in 2008. Within the Kingdom of Spain many nobles are members of the order and the Cronista de Armas de Castile y León allows the use of the cross and insignia of the Order of Saint Lazarus when certifying coats of arms to members of the order.

The Vatican State can only formally recognise orders of chivalry that are under papal jurisdiction or that of the Holy See.[citation needed] This does not preclude Catholic prelates from joining the order. A number of prominent Catholic prelates have acted as chaplains to the order. Most notably cardinal Paskai former Primate of Hungary who is the spiritual protector to the Paris/Orléans obedience of the order.[16] Previously cardinal Basil Hume was a member of the Order in England as is his successor cardinal Murphy O’Connor. The catholic archbishop of Sydney cardinal George Pell[17][18] is a former national chaplain and member of the Order in Australia. The Malta obedience enjoys the spiritual protection of the Melchite Patriarch of Jerusalem. The Order has also been recognised by the Catholic primate of Spain.[citation needed] Cardinal Dominik Duka is Chaplain General and a Grand Cross of the Orléans obedience.[19]

In the United Kingdom the order has counted several senior aristocrats among its membership. The Rt. Hon. Earl Ferrers was the grand prior of England and Wales (Malta obedience) until March 2012 when he was replaced by the 22nd Earl of Shrewsbury. The Baron of Fetternear is grand prior of Great Britain (Orléans obedience). In Scotland Viscount Gough is head of the grand bailiwick of Scotland. The grand priory of Australia is under the patronage of the governor general Quentin Bryce.[20] In New Zealand the governor general sir Jerry Mateparae, is both a knight and patron of the order and the Māori King Te Arikinui of The Kīngitanga is a knight commander of the order. In 2007, king Kigeli V Ndahindurwa of Rwanda accepted the honour of knight grand cross in the order.

In Ireland, the O’Conor Don, Prince of Connacht, successor to the High Kingship of Ireland is a knight of justice in the Order as well as Juge d’Armes of the Grand Priory of Ireland.[21] Other noble families are also represented among the Order’s membership in Ireland including O’Morchoe, Bunbury and Guinness.

The Order is also recognised by the governments of the Czech Republic,[22] the Republic of Croatia, the Republic of Hungary and South Africa.[23]

Membership[edit]

Membership of the Order of Saint Lazarus is by invitation only and is an honour granted by the Grand Magistry of the order. The order include among their members people of the European nobility, academics, politicians and senior clergy. Membership in the order is divided into two classes, knights of justice and knights of magistral grace, the former is restricted to members of families with noble titles. All members of the order are invested in one of the following ranks, regardless of whether they qualify for justice or magistral grace:
Knight (GCLJ) or dame (GCLJ) grand cross
Knight (KCLJ) or dame (DCLJ) commander
Knight (KLJ) or dame (DLJ)
Paris/Orléans: serving brother (SBLJ) or serving sister (SSLJ), Malta: commander (CLJ)
Paris/Orléans: brother (BLJ) or Sister (SLJ), Malta: officer (OLJ)
Malta: member (MLJ)

Gentlemen who are invested in the rank of knight (KLJ) or higher are entitled to the prenominal Chevalier and women invested in the rank of Dame or higher are entitled to the prenominal Dame. Clergy may be admitted into the Order in one of the ranks as assistant chaplain, chaplain, senior chaplain, ecclesial commander and ecclesial grand cross. There is also a companionate which is often used to honour individuals who have supported the work of the order or who have made a significant contribution to society.[24][25]

Vestments and insignia[edit]

For the Order of Saint Lazarus ceremonial occasions, such as investitures, the members wear distinctive vestments and insignia. The mantle of the order is a black cloak with a green velvet collar and the cross of the order sewn onto the left side. The mantle is always worn at religious ceremonies. In addition to the mantle and insignia members of the order normally wear white gloves and ladies may also wear a mantilla in church.

The insignia of a knight is a badge with military trophy pendant from a green neck ribbon, and a golden breast star. Dames of the order wear the badge with wreath of laurel and oak springs from a ribbon bow and a golden breast star. A green button hole rosette may also be worn on a business suit by gentlemen of the order.[26]

Other Lazarus Organizations[edit]

Apart from The Military and Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem there are other organisations based on the Lazarus tradition. These include The Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem (United Grandpriories) founded 1995 inspired by the original order[27] and the Corps Saint Lazarus International (CSLI).[28] While these organizations also have a well recognized charity work they are not recognised by the Military and Hospitaller Order of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem and do not enjoy the protection of the Royal Houses of France, Spain or Savoy.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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