Beauvau-Craon Du Temple de Rougemont

minnieb

guy_de_rougemont_04-3Beauvau2

Beauvau-Craon33

Beauvau-Craon-House2

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Beauveau-Craon_(Nancy)Laure de Rougemont married Marc de Beauvau-Craon, and thus it is possible Virginia Hambley and I are kindred. This poor translation appears to say the Rougemonts descend from a “modest line” and descends from Maria Theresa von Habsburg of Austria, paired with the Duchy of Lorraine.

“It is 29 years that Laure de Rougemont, a descendant of a “modest” line, in the words of his brother, married Marc de Beauvau-Craon. This last, twenty years her senior, bears the name of an illustrious family descendant of Maria Theresa of Austria, paired with the Duchy of Lorraine.”

The Rosamond name has been traced to Rougemont in the Alsace that was ruled by the Habsburgs. Above are photos of Craon castle.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A2teau_d’Harou%C3%A9

Laure de Rougemont Beauvau-Craon President of Sothebys is the brother of the famous artist, Gue de Rougemont who descends from the famous artist, Louis-François, baron Lejeune. We are looking at the most cultured family in France.

What is truly exciting, Virginia may be related to Yolande de Aragon Duchess de Anjou who may have employed Jean of Arc in saving the House of Anjou.

Jon Presco

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/09/26/guy-de-rougemont-of-the-academy-of-fine-arts/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/09/18/de-bourmont-and-the-ordre-du-croissant/

http://www.thestylesaloniste.com/2010/07/la-vie-de-chateau-elegance-and.html

Haroué, in northeastern France near Nancy, has been in the Beauvau-Craon family since it was completed in 1732. The current proprietor, Princess Minnie de Beauvau-Craon, is a direct descendant of Prince Marc de Beauvau-Craon who in 1720 commissioned the architect Germain Boffrand to build it in the remote countryside near the Moselle and Meurthe rivers.

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/09/19/the-house-of-beauvau/

Guy de Rougemont, born 23 April 1935 in Paris, is a painter and sculptor French, Member of the Académie des beaux-arts. He is the son of general Jean-Louis du Temple de Rougemont.

Louis-François, baron Lejeune On 2 September 1821 he married Louise Clary, sister of general Marius Clary and niece of Désirée Clary, queen of Sweden by her marriage with Jean-Baptiste Bernadotte.

In this struggle, Yolande played a prominent role in surrounding the young Valois king with advisors and servants associated with the House of Anjou. She maneuvered John VI, Duke of Brittany, into breaking an alliance with the English, and was responsible for a soldier from the Breton ducal family, Arthur de Richemont, becoming Constable of France in 1425. Yolande’s early and strong support of Joan of Arc, when others had doubts, suggests her possible larger role in orchestrating Joan’s appearance on the scene. Yolande unquestionably practiced realistic politics.

The château de Craon, also known as the château d’Haroué or palais d’Haroué is a French château located in a small valley in the centre of the village of Haroué, in the Saintois, in the département of Meurthe-et-Moselle and the région of Lorraine. It was built between 1720 and 1732 by Germain Boffrand during the period when Lorraine was independent of France, for Marc de Beauvau, prince de Craon, viceroy of Tuscany and constable of Lorraine.

Jean-Louis du Temple de Rougemont (10 June 1910, Paris – 1St October 1990, Fontainebleau) was a French general.

Pupil of theÉcole de cavalerie de Saumur, he was captain in 1942, when he participated in the Organization of the resistance in the South-West of the France, or he commanded the Pyrenean area. He became Lieutenant Colonel and first Deputy head of the Corps Franc Pommiès[1].

Head of the intelligence division of the general Secretariat of national defence (SGDN), he was sent by general de Gaulle in Washington to check according to a defected from the KGB about Soviet spies that is would be infiltrated in governing bodies[2].
He was promoted lieutenant-general in 1968 and appointed commander in Chief of the French in Germany Forces in 1969.
He was commander of the Légion d’honneur and palmes académiques, grand officer of thenational order of merit, Grand Cross of theorder of Malta and decorated with the Cross of war 1939-1945, military Valor cross and the Medal of the Resistance.

He is president of the Polo de Paris from 1982 to 1985.
Son-in-law of Edgard, baron Lejeune, he is the father of Guy and Laure, wife of prince Marc de Beauvau-Craon and President of Sotheby’s France[3].

Louis-François, baron Lejeune (3 February 1775 in Strasbourg – 26 February 1848 in Toulouse), was a painter, engraver and general French of the period of the First Empire.

He studied painting at Pierre-Henri de Valenciennes with Jean-Victor Bertin but left the workshop and part as a volunteer in 1792 in the company of the Arts of Paris. He received his baptism of fire at the battle of Valmy in 1792. Named 1er Arsenal battalion Sergeant, happening in 1793 in the artillery in La Fère, attends the seats of Landrecies, le Quesnoy and Valenciennes, where he was aid-de-camp to general Jacob then made the campaigns of 1794 in the Netherlands and 1795 as lieutenant-Assistant Engineer,.

After an initial grant in Hanover in 1808, and a second in Westphalia in 1810, he was made a baron d’Empire in 1810. Already a member of the cross of the Order of Leopold, Lejeune was made a knight of St Louis by Louis XVIII and in 1823 a commander of the Légion d’honneur. He returned to the army (now under the Bourbons) from 1818 to 1824, becoming commander of Haute-Garonne in 1831. On 2 September 1821 he married Louise Clary, sister of general Marius Clary and niece of Désirée Clary, queen of Sweden by her marriage with Jean-Baptiste Bernadotte. In 1824 the king of Sweden conferred on Lejeune the grand-cross of the Order of the Sword. In 1837 he became director of the École des beaux-arts et de l’industrie in Toulouse, a city of which he became mayor in 1841 and in which he died of a heart attack aged 73.

Bernardine Eugénie Désirée Clary (8 November 1777 – 17 December 1860), one-time fiancée of Napoleon Bonaparte, was a French woman who became Queen of Sweden and Norway as the consort of King Charles XIV John, a former French General and founder of the House of Bernadotte. She officially changed her name there to Desideria, a Latin name[1] which she did not use herself.[2]

Charles XIV & III John, also Carl John, Swedish and Norwegian: Carl Johan (26 January 1763 – 8 March 1844) was King of Sweden (as Charles XIV John) and King of Norway (as Charles III John) from 1818 until his death. Before he became king, he was also the Sovereign Prince of Pontecorvo, in Southern Italy, between 1806 and 1810.

He was born Jean Bernadotte,[1] distinguished subsequently from a namesake brother by the addition of Baptiste and had the full name of Jean Baptiste Jules Bernadotte[2] by the time Carl also was added upon his Swedish adoption in 1810. He did not use Bernadotte in Sweden but founded the royal dynasty there by that name.

French by birth, Bernadotte served a long career in the French Army. He was appointed as a Marshal of France by Napoleon I, though the two had a turbulent relationship. His service to France ended in 1810, when he was elected the heir-presumptive to the Swedish throne because the Swedish royal family was dying out with King Charles XIII. Baron Carl Otto Mörner (22 May 1781 – 17 August 1868), who was a Swedish courtier, and obscure member of the Diet, advocated for the succession.[3]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_XIV_John_of_Sweden

Marc de Beavau-Craon, Prince de Beavau-Craon
M, #93613, b. 1921, d. 1982

Marc de Beavau-Craon, Prince de Beavau-Craon was born in 1921 at Paris, France. He married Maria Cristina Patiño y de Borbón, daughter of Don Antenor Patiño y Rodrigues and Maria Cristina de Borbón y de Bosch-Labras, Duquesa de Durcal, in 1952 at Paris, France. He and Maria Cristina Patiño y de Borbón were divorced in 1958. He died in 1982.

He gained the title of Prince Marc de Beavau-Craon.
Children of Marc de Beavau-Craon, Prince de Beavau-Craon and Maria Cristina Patiño y de Borbón
Minnie de Beavau-Craon, Princesse de Beavau-Craon+ b. 1953
Diane de Beavau-Craon, Princesse de Beavau-Craon b. 1955

Marc de Beauvau-Craon (1921-1982)

Marc Charles Louis Joseph Marie de Beauvau-Craon, born in Paris on 3 February 1921, died in the Castle of Haroué on 21 November 1982, was the last prince of Beauvau-Craon.

He married his first wife on 9 December 1952 dona Albina Christina Laetitia Patiño y Borbón, daughter ofAntenor Patiño, ‘King ofTin’ and María Cristina de Borbón y Bosch Labrus, Duchess of Dúrcal, (born in Madrid on August 2, 1932) who gave him two daughters. They divorced November 26, 1958.
He married civilly on 11 January 1972 Laure Odette Charlotte du Temple de Rougemont (born in Tarbes on September 15, 1942, daughter of the general Jean-Louis du Temple de Rougemont), without posterity, former President of Sotheby’s France.
Of its first union are two daughters:
1. Marie Isabella Cristina Adèle Gracie, known as Minnie, Princess of Beauvau-Craon, born in Boulogne-Billancourt on 6 November 1953, wife of Xavier Botana.
2. Marie Diane Christina Isabella, Princess of Beauvau-Craon, born in Boulogne-Billancourt on 20 August 1955, wife of Ahmed Mohamadialal.

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2011/11/09/of-the-temple-rougemont/

http://geneagraphie.com/getperson.php?personID=I251813&tree=1

Guy de Rougemont

Portrait of Guy de Rougemont
Guy de Rougemont, born 23 April 1935 in Paris, is a painter and sculptor French, Member of theAcadémie des beaux-arts. He is the son of general Jean-Louis du Temple de Rougemont.

After completing the course of Gromaire in theÉcole nationale supérieure des Arts Décoratifs of Paris, Guy de Rougemont spent two years at the Casa de Velázquez, from 1962 to 1964.
In 1965, he participated in the Biennale de Paris and the following year at the may Salon.

After a trip to the United States and a long work in the Studio, he committed his research on the integration of the shapes and colours of the environment. Abolishing the border between sculpture and painting, he works on many sites where his monumental works are located at all times: public spaces, squares, square, streets, highways.

His many achievements include theSt. Louis hospital, the the Marne RER station la – Vallée, the courtyard of the Musée d’Orsay, theHakone Open Air Museum in Japan, or even the place Albert-Thomas in Villeurbanne, theHofgarten in Bonn, the Metropolitan of Quito in EcuadorPark, central reception and care of Nanterre, where he made a mural of 300 meters long…
In addition to his monumental achievements, Rougemont continues its pictorial work and participates in numerous exhibitions both in France and abroad.

He started including in lithography and production of objects such as furniture, lamps and other design objects, thus giving a place to the ‘minor’ so-called arts, expressing thus its complete freedom of creation and his concern to relate the art on a daily basis.

Charles Louis

Titres: prince de Beauvau-Craon (6e)

Né le 5 mai 1878 (dimanche)
Décédé le 15 septembre 1942 (mardi) , à l’âge de 64 ans
Parents
Marc René , prince de Beauvau-Craon (5e) , né le 29 mars 1816 (vendredi) – Paris , décédé le 30 mars 1883 (vendredi) à l’âge de 67 ans
Marié le 30 septembre 1875 (jeudi) , Paris, avec
Marie Jeanne Louise Caroline Adèle Diane de Gontaut-Biron , née le 5 septembre 1848 (mardi) – Saint-Blancard , décédée le 31 décembre 1938 (samedi) – Paris à l’âge de 90 ans
Union(s), enfant(s) et les petits enfants
Marié le 27 mars 1920 (samedi) avec Mary Grace Gregorini , née le 20 septembre 1896 (dimanche) , décédée le 19 août 1970 (mercredi) à l’âge de 73 ans dont
Marc , prince de Beauvau-Craon 1921-1982  marié le 11 décembre 1952 (jeudi), Paris, avec María Cristina Patiño , duchesse de Dúrcal 1932  dont
Marie de Beauvau-Craon 1953  mariée le 1er juillet 1978 (samedi), Haroué, Meurthe-et-Moselle, France, avec Duncan Mac Laren
Marie de Beauvau-Craon 1953  mariée le 9 décembre 1986 (mardi), London, avec Javier Botana
Diane de Beauvau-Craon 1955  mariée le 24 juin 1979 (dimanche), Tanger, Maroc, avec Ahmed Mohammadialal
Marc, prince de Beauvau-Craon 1921-1982  marié le 11 janvier 1972 (mardi) avec Laure du Temple de Rougemont 1932-
Relation avec Marthe Lucie Lahovary , née le 28 janvier 1886 (jeudi) – Bucarest , décédée le 28 novembre 1973 (mercredi) – Paris à l’âge de 87 ans (Parents : Jean Lahovary  &  Emma Smaragda Mavrocordato 1860-1920 )
Frères et sœurs
Henriette de Beauvau-Craon 1876-1931 Mariée le 2 septembre 1896 (mercredi) , Paris, avec Charles Félix Marie , comte d’Harcourt 1870-1956

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/09/19/the-house-of-beauvau/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marc_de_Beauvau-Craon_(1679-1754)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Juste_de_Beauvau,_Prince_of_Craon

Charles Juste de Beauvau, Prince of Craon (10 September 1720 – 21 May 1793), 2nd Prince of Craon (1754), Marshal of France (1783) was a French scholar, nobleman and general. The son of Marc de Beauvau, he was also brother of the fam ous Madame de Boufflers and through her uncle to the poet Stanislas de Boufflers.

Contents
 [hide] 
1 Personal and public life
2 Issue
3 References
4 External links
Personal and public life[edit source | edit]
Charles Juste was born at the Hôtel de Craon, Lunéville in the capital of the Duchy of Lorraine. His family were the most powerful in Lorraine after the ruling Duke of Lorraine.
His mother, Anne Marguerite de Ligneville, was the mistress of Leopold, Duke of Lorraine, husband of Élisabeth Charlotte d’Orléans (niece of Louis XIV). He was the thirteenth of twenty children.
He married twice; firstly on 3 April 1745 to Marie Charlotte de La Tour d’Auvergne (20 December 1729–6 September 1763), daughter of Emmanuel Théodose de La Tour d’Auvergne and his last wife Louise Henriette Françoise de Lorraine. The couple had one child who married into the Noailles family. His first wife Marie Charlotte died of Smallpox aged 33.

Marie Charlotte died in 1763. The next year, on 14 March, he married again; this time to Marie Charlotte Sylvie de Rohan-Chabot, a cousin of Charles, Prince of Soubise. The couple had no children Marie Charlotte Sylvie outliving her husband till 1807.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duke_of_Lorraine

Her husband became King John I of Aragon in 1387.[1] He was often ill, and Violante wielded considerable administrative power on his behalf. She transformed the Aragonese court into a center of French culture. She especially cultivated the talents of Provençal troubadours (poet-musicians).[1]

On 29 April 1417, Louis II of Anjou died of illness, leaving Yolande, at age 33, in control of the House of Anjou. She acted as regent for her son because of his youth. She also had the fate of the French royal house of Valois in her hands. Her young son-in-law, the Dauphin Charles, was exceptionally vulnerable to the designs of the English King, Henry V, and to his older cousin, John the Fearless, the Duke of Burgundy. Charles’ nearest older relatives, the Dukes of Orléans and of Bourbon, had been made prisoners at the Battle of Agincourt and were held captive by the English. With his mother, Queen Isabeau, and the Duke of Burgundy allied with the English, Charles had no resources to support him other than those of the House of Anjou and the smaller House of Armagnac.

In this struggle, Yolande played a prominent role in surrounding the young Valois king with advisors and servants associated with the House of Anjou. She maneuvered John VI, Duke of Brittany, into breaking an alliance with the English, and was responsible for a soldier from the Breton ducal family, Arthur de Richemont, becoming Constable of France in 1425. Yolande’s early and strong support of Joan of Arc, when others had doubts, suggests her possible larger role in orchestrating Joan’s appearance on the scene. Yolande unquestionably practiced realistic politics.

The contemporary chronicler Jean Juvenal des Ursins (1433–44), Bishop of Beauvais, described Yolande as “the prettiest woman in the kingdom.” Bourdigné, chronicler of the house of Anjou, says of her: “She who was said to be the wisest and most beautiful princess in Christendom.” Later, King Louis XI of France recalled that his grandmother had “a man’s heart in a woman’s body.” A twentieth-century French author, Jehanne d’Orliac, wrote one of the few works specifically on Yolande, and noted that the duchess remains unappreciated for her genius and influence in the reign of Charles VII. “She is mentioned in passing because she is the pivot of all important events for forty-two years in France”, while “Joan [of Arc] was in the public eye only eleven months.”

Yolande retired to Angers, and then to Saumur, where she died at the Château de Tuce-de-Saumur on 14 December 1443.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yolande_of_Aragon

Yolande of Aragon

http://www.salon.com/2012/04/02/the_queen_and_the_maid_joan_of_arcs_secret_backer/

http://www.salon.com/2012/04/02/the_queen_and_the_maid_joan_of_arcs_secret_backer/

http://jean-claude.colrat.pagesperso-orange.fr/2anjou.htm

Attention, “Game of Thrones” fans: The most enjoyably sensational aspects of medieval politics — double-crosses, ambushes, bizarre personal obsessions, lunacy and naked self-interest — are in abundant evidence in Nancy Goldstone’s “The Maid and the Queen: The Secret History of Joan of Arc.” Goldstone’s premise, innovative but not outlandishly so, is that Joan’s rise from poor, illiterate farmer’s daughter to mystical champion of French nationalism during the Hundred Years’ War was largely orchestrated by Yolande of Aragon. Yolande, who was the Duchess of Anjou and Countess of Maine as well as the Queen of Aragon (among other titles), was also the mother-in-law of the dauphin, Charles, whose military triumph over the occupying English and coronation in Reims were the two great causes espoused by the saintly, if warlike, Joan. As Goldstone sees it, Yolande’s political genius goes under-recognized.

The House of Beauvau was a historic family originating in Anjou. The Beauvau du Rivau branch was rooted in Brittany and produced two bishops of Nantes, whilst the Craon (Prince of Craon)branch was established in Lorraine later enjoying great intimacy with the then reigning ducal family.

As with the comtes d’Anjou, the Beauvaus served the kings of France right up to the 18th century. In 1454, the family allied itself to the royal house of France by the marriage of Isabeau de Beauvau with Jean de Bourbon,Count of Vendôme.
Of knightly extraction, has proofs of its nobility going back as far as 1265. The title of marquis of Beauvau was granted to the head of the family by Louis XIV in 1664. The family also had rights to the pretigious title of “cousin du Roi”, reserved for a few families with an alliance with the royal house.
Marc de Beauvau, Prince of Craon (1679–1754) was entitled prince of the Holy Roman Empire in 1722, and it was under this title that the family was admitted to the “honneurs de la Cour” in 1775.

Princes of Craon

This article does not cite any references or sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (March 2011)
The princely title of Prince of Craon was a title used by the Beauvau family using their status as Prince of the Holy Roman Empire which was gained in 1722 which was later fully recognised by Louis XV of France in 1755 and was inherited by male offsprings. It became extinct in 1982.
List of princes of Beauvau-Craon[edit source | edit]
1722–1754: Marc, Prince of Craon (1679–1754), also a Grandee of Spain
1754–1793: Charles Juste, Prince of Craon (1720–1793), also Marshal of France
1793–1849: Marc, Prince of Craon (1773–1849)
1849–1864: Charles Juste, Prince of Craon (1793–1864)
1864–1883: Marc, Prince of Craon (1816–1883)
1883–1942: Charles Louis, Prince of Craon (1878–1942)
1942–1982: Marc, Prince of Craon (1921–1982)

This house, very old, is a native of Anjou. The Beauvau (Craon name was added to the end of the fifteenth century) served as the kings of France and the dukes of Lorraine (the family settled in the duchy in the sixteenth century). Louis XIV granted them the same coveted title of King’s cousin, and the marquis de Beauvau (1664).

One of the most famous was Beauvau Marc (1679-1754), a friend and favorite of Duke Leopold, who gave him the title of Marquis de Lorraine Craon and Haroué. He also made high constable of Lorraine (the sword, the symbol of this charge is always kept in the castle) and he was awarded the title of prince of the Holy Roman Empire and the first prince of Craon through the Holy Roman Emperor in 1722 .

The aristocracy counts a lot for it. “It is surely very attached to this tradition, but as a social distinction of quality which implies especially certain duties ‘, tempers his elder brother, the painter Guy de Rougemont. “She was not born a Princess, but she did everything for the future. “Today, the question arises even more: she is Princess ‘, says one of its competitors.

It is 29 years that Laure de Rougemont, a descendant of a “modest” line, in the words of his brother, married Marc de Beauvau-Craon. This last, twenty years her senior, bears the name of an illustrious family descendant of Maria Theresa of Austria, paired with the Duchy of Lorraine.

At the age of 40, she finds herself widow. She keeps the grand appartement overlooking the banks of the Seine, decorated without pomp of the family furniture and her husband a few objects that she collects in dilettante, as well as the castle in Lorraine. Child was not there. And loneliness she made a companion she has experienced. “Did I not fear, she says without bravado, otherwise I’d never launched me in the battle for the opening of the French market.” “She found herself very isolated and has never let go of the piece”, said Diana Brooks, who presides today the multinational and has this cry from the heart: ‘ She’s a lady (it is a real Lady), but what strength of character! She indeed met with widespread skepticism, policy has always protected the feudal privileges of the auctioneers. Itself expressed surprise by the resistance of French conservatism, having sometimes learned at his own expense that she could meet more understanding “and intelligence” with socialist ministers and notables of his own environment.

Breast of Sotheby’s, support is not unanimous. Hub of the art market in London, some see a very bad look a shift of activities to Paris, brighter, more welcoming city. In New York, managers complain that Laure de Beauvau to be a woman of burst shots, paying little attention to the administration. «It is not a collection of prestige enough from time to time, every day that it is presenting tables the experts», maugrée one of them. The Princess has cure, it has direct access to the big boss, which she is girlfriend since almost twenty years.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to Beauvau-Craon Du Temple de Rougemont

  1. Reblogged this on rosamondpress and commented:

    In America, our Bohemian Ranches as bastions of culture. In Europe, artists have ancient castles.

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