Landry Family Were Kin to Merovingians

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brissacThe Landry family were Major Domos to the Frankish Kings. They served them as Mayors of the Palace. The Comte de Bourmont and his ancestors served the Kings of France and did everything to restore the House of Bourbon to the throne. A Landry married a Merovingian Princess.

The Da Vinci Code was taken from this real investigation that led me home, and back to Virginia, whom I love, and who loves me. For sixteen years we have loved one another.

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Copyright 2013

Origin of the Name “Landry”

The family name “Landry” derives originally from an old Germanic baptismal name “Land-rik”, a composite name meaning “powerful land.”1 “Rik” has also been interpreted as meaning “ruler” or “king.”2

The name later evolved into the personal name “Landry,” popular in France during the medieval period.3 “Landry” as a personal name meant “Lord of the manor.”4

Early forms of the name “Landry” included “Landri” and a regional variant “Landru.”5 After surnames first began to be used in the early Middle Ages, “Landry” also became a surname, meaning simply “son of Landry.”6

Landri, Advisor to Clotaire II

Clovis had founded the French monarchy and its first ruling family, the Merovingian dynasty.7 When Clovis died in 511, his realm was divided among his four sons: Theodoric I (Soissons), Chlodomer (Paris), Childebert I (Metz), and Chlothar (Orleans).8 In 558, Clovis’ youngest son, Lothair (Chlothar), acquired the whole kingdom after he had murdered two nephews and eliminated one rebellious son by burning him and his family alive.9 In this manner Chlothar I reunited the kingdom of the Franks.10 However, Clotaire I died just three years later in 561, after which his kingdom was divided among his sons Charibert, Guntram (Burgundy), Sigebert (Austrasia), and Chilperic (Neustria).11

Sigebert and Chilperic went to war in 572.12 Sigebert died about 575, leaving his son, Childebert, king of Austrasia.13 Chilperic died in 584, leaving his son, Chlothar II (Clotaire II), king of Neustria.14 Chilperic’s Queen Fredegund had a lover by the name of Landeric, who was Mayor of the Palace; after Fredegund had her husband Chilperic killed in 583-84, she ruled as regent for her infant son Lothair II with the help of Landeric.15

Book of the Knight of La Tour-Landry : compiled for the instruction of his daughters : translated from the original French into English in the reign of Henry VI
Geoffroy de La Tour-Landry

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/c/cme/KntTour-L/1:2?rgn=div1;view=fulltext

Thomas Wright

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Page [vii]
INTRODUCTION, BY THE LATE THOMAS WRIGHT.

THE feudal castle of La Tour-Landry, from which the author of the following book received his name, stood between Chollet and Vezins, in the part of the old province of Anjou which lay between Poitou and Brittany, where its ruins are still visible, consisting of a great donjon, or keep, said to date from the twelfth century. The family of our Knight appears to have been established there at least as early as that date. In the year 1200, a Landry de la Tour, lord of this place, is found engaged in a lawsuit relating to lands; and the names of different members of the family are met with not unfrequently during the thirteenth century. M. de Montaiglon, the editor of the original text of the Knight’s “Book,” who has investigated this question with laborious care, considers that the father of our author was Geoffroy de la Tour, spoken of at the beginning of the fourteenth century as lord of La Tour-Landry, Bourmont, La Galonière Loroux-Bottereau, and Cornouaille, and who, under the banner of the Count of Anjou in 1336, distinguished himself by his courage in the war with the English.

This Geoffroy de la Tour had two sons, our Geoffroy, who was the eldest, and another named Arquade, who is supposed to have been much younger than his brother. The latter, our Geoffroy de la Tour-Landry, appears from his own account to have been present at the seige of Aguillon in 1346. His name again appears in a military muster in 1363. We know that he married Jeanne de Rougé, younger daughter of Bonabes de Rougé, lord of Erval, vicomte of La Guerche, and chamberlain to the king, but we are unacquainted with the date of this marriage, though in 1371 and 1372, when he composed the following book, he must have been married a sufficient length of time to have sons and daughters of an age to require instruction of this kind.
Page viii
The name of Geoffroy de la Tour occurs several times between the date of the compilation of his book and the end of the century. In 1378 he sent his contribution of men to the army employed in the siege of Cherbourg, but he did not serve in person on that occasion. In the document recording this fact, he is described as a knight banneret. In 1380 Geoffroy served in the war in Brittany, and we find him again in active service in the September of the year 1383. We learn from another document, that at this last date Geoffroy’s first wife, Jeanné de Rougé, was still living; but she must have died within a few years afterwards, for at a subsequent date, which M. de Montaiglon places in 1389, he contracted a second marriage with Marguerite des Roches, lady of La Mothe de Pendu, the widow of Jean de Clerembault, knight. This is the latest mention of the name of our Knight which has yet been discovered among contemporary records; the date of his death is quite unknown, but it probably occurred at some period towards the end of the fourteenth century.

The descendants of Geoffrey de la Tour-Landry appear to have been all active in the turbulent times during which they lived, and through one of them the name became again rather curiously connected with literary history. The Knight of La Tour tells us that he had sons (in the plural); for at the beginning of the book now published he tells us in the original that he had compiled two books, “l’un pour mes filz, et l’autre pour mes filles*. [“Et pour ce ….ay-je fait, deux livres, l’un pour mes filz, et l’autre pour mes filles pour aprendre à rommancier.”—, edited by M. de Montaiglon, p. 4. “And therfor y haue made .ij. bokes, one for my sones, an other for my doughtres, forto lerne hem to rede.”—, English translation, p. 4 of the present, volume.];” and in two other passages of the present book, addressing his daughters, he refers to the book he had compiled for their brothers, “ou livre de voz frères*. [“Comme vous le trouverez plus à plain ou livre de voz frères.”—, chap. lxxxix. p. 175. “Si comme vous le trouverez ou livre que j’ai fait à voz frères.” “As ye shal finde it more pleinly in the boke of youre bretheren.”—, chap. Ixxxix. p. 115 of the present volume.].” Caxton, in his printed translation, has given us at the Page ixconclusion a little more precise information on the subject, when he makes the good Knight refer his daughters to the other book in the words, “as hit is reherced̛ in the booke of my two sonnes *. [See the present volume, p. 205.].” The passage represented by these words of Caxton is not found in the known manuscripts of the French text; but we may be tolerably certain, from Caxton’s known exactness, that it existed in the manuscript of which he made use, and we are justified in assuming that, at the time when Geoffroy de la Tour-Landry compiled this book, that is, in 1371, he had two sons. He has in no instance mentioned the number of his daughters, but the manuscripts of the original text are ornamented with illuminations, and in these the Knight is always represented as attended by three daughters, for which number the illuminators had no doubt satisfactory authority. Of the history of these daughters we know very little. One of them, Marie de la Tour-Landry, married, on the 1st of November, 1391, Gilles Clerembault, the son of her father’s second wife by her former husband. Marie de la Tour left no issue, and died before 1400, as in that year Gilles Clerembault married a second wife.

This intermarriage of the two families appears to have been favourite idea of Geoffroy de la Tour-Landry, and was perhaps a mere question of family interest. Charles de la Tour-Landry, who was Geoffroy’s eldest son, was married first to Jeanne de Soudé, but this union appears not to have lasted long, for, after her death, Charles married in January, 1389, Jeanne Clerembault, the daughter of his step-mother, and sister of his brother-in-law. Charles de la Tour-Landry was slain at the battle of Azincourt, in October, 1415. There is some confusion in the family history at this time, through the imperfection of the genealogies; but a Geoffroy de la Tour, who was at the siege of Parthenay in 1419, and a Hervé de la Tour, who served in the wars near the same period (his name occurs in 1415 and 1416), are conjectured to have been sons of the author of our book. Charles de la Tour-Landry Page xhad five sons. The name of the eldest is uncertain, but he is said to have been with his father at Azincourt, and to have died of his wounds soon after the battle. As he died childless, his brother Pontus, the second son of Charles, remained the head of the family. The three other sons, Thibaud, Raoulet, and Louis, died without children. They had at least one sister, who formed a rather high matrimonial connection.

The family appears now to have been at its greatest height of prosperity and glory. Pontus de la Tour-Landry is cited as knight, lord of La Tour-Landry, of Bourmont, and of Loroux-Bottereau, and baron of Bouloir in the Vendômois; he appears in a record of the year 1424 as giving to the prior and convent of St. Jean of Anvers the tithe of grain in his estate of Cornouaille, and he seems to have held other considerable territories in Brittany and elsewhere. He was not unfrequently employed in public affairs, and was present at the battle of Formigrey in 1450. It is only necessary on the present occasion to say that Pontus had a daughter and a son, and that the latter, who was named Louis, had four sons, none of whom left issue; so that with them the male line of La Tour-Landry became extinct.

All the older great feudal families prided themselves on tracing their descent to the chieftains of the fabulous ages of society; and usually each of them had his family romance, which told the story of the primeval heroes of his house, and which was no doubt frequently read by his clerk or chaunted by his minstrel for the edification of his family and his guests. These formed what were called the Chansons or Romans de Geste, which were so numerous in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the period when feudalism had reached its greatest development. As feudalism was gradually falling from its original character, the composition of such family romances went out of fashion, and we know of but a small number of instances at periods subsequent to those just mentioned. Thus, at a much later date, in the latter half of the fourteenth century, the family of Lusignan gratified its pride by employing a writer Page xinamed Jean d’Arras to compile the romance of Melusine, according to which the lords of Lusignan derived their descent from the marriage of one of their great chiefs of early times with a fairy, named Melusine, who every Saturday took the form of a serpent. Pontus de la Tour-Landry was one of the very latest who imitated this example. Ambitious, probably, of rivalling the fame of the Lusignans, he appears to have employed some “clerk” like Jean d’Arras to compile the Roman de Ponthus, intending especially to glorify his own particular name. It is a romance of little merit, but appears to have been at one time rather popular, as it was often printed. Pontus is represented as having been the son of the king of Galicia and of his amours with the fair Sidonia, daughter of the king of Brittany, where part of the ancestral possessions of the lords of La Tour lay. Most of the distinguished companions of Ponthus came from this side of France, and the first of them, and the one who figures most prominently, bears the significant name of Landry de la Tour. The scene is laid in Galicia, Brittany, and England. It is curious now chiefly as forming an incident in the literary history of the Middle Ages.

Far differently interesting is the book which the great grandfather of the real Ponthus, our Geoffroy de la Tour-Landry, compiled himself for the instruction of his daughters. Its interest is the greater from the care its author has taken to make us acquainted with the circumstances and feelings under which it was composed. The good Knight had, as already stated, three daughters, who had been left motherless, and for whose success in the world he naturally felt anxiety. He undertook, therefore, to write a treatise for the purpose of instructing them in all those mental qualities which, in the fourteenth century, were looked upon as constituting the character of a pure and perfect lady. His care to inform his readers in all the particulars relating to the origin of his book is, indeed, quite curious. He lets us know the date when he began it, and that at which it was ended. Page xiiHe says that the idea of it came into his head as he was indulging in somewhat melancholy pensiveness in his garden at the close of the month of April in the year 1371 *. [See p. 1 of the present volume.]; and we learn from two other incidental statements in the original text that it was completed in the year 1372. In the forty-ninth chapter he tells an anecdote which, he says, happened in the same year in which he was writing —en cest an, qui est l’an mil trois cens lxxij*. [P. 103 of M. de Montaiglon’s edition; it is omitted in the translation we here publish.]; and in another passage he speaks of the battle of Crécy as having taken place twenty-six years ago—il y a xxvj ans; which, as that battle was fought on the 26th of August, 1346, would give us the same date of 1372. He further tells us in his introduction that he employed in compiling it two priests and two clerks *. [See p. 3 of the present volume.], whose work appears to have consisted in collecting illustrative examples and anecdotes from different writers. Every one aquainted with medieval literature knows how general was this pratice of teaching morals and religion through popular stories and short historical narratives. M. de Montaiglon has further pointed out the fact that the author had commenced his book in the intention of following another practice which was very popular in the literature of this period—that of composing books of instruction in verse. He has shown that in the original the prologue was written in verse, and that the rhythm, and even in great part the rhymes of this verse, are preserved almost perfectly in writing it as prose, until nearly the end of this prologue, when the Knight suddenly tells his readers that it is his design to write it, not in verse, but in prose, that he might be able to write less diffusely, and more simply and easier to be understood: “que je ne veulx point mettre en rime, ainçoys le veulz mettre en prose, pour l’abrégier et mieulx entendre,” or, as our English translation expresses it, “but y wolde not sette it in ryme, but in prose, forto abregge it, and that it might be beter and more Page xiiipleinly to be understond̛ *. [See p. 3 of the present volume.].” A very large proportion of the stories given by Geoffroy de la Tour-Landry are taken from the Scriptures and from the lives of saints and other similar productions; but, like other moralists of his age, he adopted the stories of the fabliaux, and the tales of the popular conteur, whenever they seemed to suit his purpose, and in his choice he has not rejected some which were better fitted by their want of delicacy to the ears of his contemporaries than to those of modern times. There then existed very little of refinement in word or thought, and, in the best society, both sexes often conversed in terms and on subjects which are in strange discordance with our modern sentiments.

No doubt under the pretext of instructing his own daughters, Geoffroy’s design was to write a treatise on the domestic education of women, and his plan appears to have extended still further, and to have been intended to embrace the other sex also. We learn positively from several passages in the present book, that he had already compiled a similar book for the use of his sons, and, from the way in which he speaks of it, the compilation of this other work must have preceded the book for the instruction of his daughters by some years. “And therefor,” he says at the end of his prologue, “y have made .ij. bokes, one for my sones, an other for my doughtres *. [See p. 205 of the present volume.].” In another place, in warning his daughters against drunkenness, he says, “as ye shal finde it more pleinly in the boke of youre bretheren *. [See p. 115 of the present volume.];” and again, at the close of the book, in Caxton’s translation, the knight is made to say, “as hit is reherced in the booke of my two sonnes *. [See p. 4 of the present volume.].” At least one other allusion to this book is found in the French text; yet, strange to say, nobody has ever heard of the existence of a copy of this treatise for the instruction of the Knight’s sons, nor has any trace of it ever been discovered except in the mention of it in the book of which the translation is now published.
Page xiv
The book which Geoffroy de la Tour-Landry compiled for the instruction of his daughters, on the contrary, appears to have become extremely popular. Nearly a dozen copies of the original text are known to exist in manuscript, of which seven are in the Bibliothèque Impériale in Paris, and one in the Library of the British Museum. One or two of them date at least as far back as the beginning of the fifteenth century, and two are adorned with illuminations. In the year 1514, the first printed edition of the French text was published in Paris, by Guillaume Eustace, the king’s printer. A second appeared no long time afterwards printed by the Veuve Jehan Trepperel, apparently copied from the edition of Guillaume Eustace. Both are very incorrect.

No other edition of the original text of this Book of the Knight of La Tour-Landry was printed in French until it was included in 1854 by Jannet in the series so well known as the Bibliothèque Elzévirienne. This critical edition was produced under the care of one of the well-known scholars of the medieval literature of France, M. Anatole de Montaiglon, now Secretary of the École des Chartes. M. de Montaiglon has given us, in a very portable and convenient form, a good and correct text, formed chiefly upon the oldest of the manuscripts preserved in the Bibliothèque Impériale and upon the manuscript in the British Museum (MS. Reg. 19 C vii), collated more or less with the others. It is accompanied with notes, and with a rather elaborate introduction, to which I gladly refer my readers.

The popularity of this book soon extended to foreign lands, and it was translated into several languages. The two earliest printed translations appeared in Germany and England very nearly at. the same date. The German translation, made by a knight named Marquard vom Stein, was first printed in a folio volume at Bâle in 1493, under the title of Der Ritter vom Turn, von den Exempeln der Gotsforcht und Erberkeit (The Knight of the Tower, of Examples of Piety and Honour). It forms a large and very handsome volume, with a great number of engravings Page xvon wood. The Book of the Knight of the Tower seems to have taken greatly in Germany, and it went through rather numerous editions between the date of this of Bâle and the middle of the sixteenth century. It has been reproduced much more recently, in fact so late as 1849, edited by Professor O. L. B. Wolff, as one of the Volumes of popular romances published by the bookseller Otto Wigand of Leipzig. The first edition in English, as we are informed in the colophon at the end, was translated by our first printer, William Caxton, and printed by him. He tells us himself, in this colophon, that the translation was finished on the first of June, 1483, and that the printing was completed on the last day of January, in the first year of the reign of King Richard III. As Richard III ascended the throne on the 26th of June, 1483; as the January in which the book was printed must have followed the June in which the translation was completed; and as we know that in the reckoning of this time the days from the 1st of January to the 25th of March were considered as belonging nominally to the former year and not to the year following, it means, of course, that Caxton’s translation was printed and ready for publication on the 31st of January, 1484; so that the publication of the German translation had preceded it. I enter into these particulars merely because it has been asserted that the date of publication of Caxton’s translation of the Knight of the Tower was January, 1483, and not January, 1484. It is a very singular circumstance that, although Caxton’s translation of the Book appears to have been widely read in England in the sixteenth century, it was never reprinted.

There existed, however, an English translation of the Book of Geoffroy de la Tour-Landry long anterior to that of Caxton, though it was never printed. It is anonymous, and we have no means whatever of ascertaining the name of the author, or, in fact, anything whatever of its history. It is contained in a manuscript in the Harleian collection in the British Museum (MS. Harl. No. 1764) forming a large thin volume, in double columns, Page xviin a good formal writing of the reign of King Henry VI, so that it is not only part of a manuscript made for a person of some rank and importance, but of a volume which no doubt contained other treatises. This translation is in many respects superior to that of Caxton. The latter is so strictly and often so nakedly literal, that in following the words Caxton has sometimes lost the sense of the original, and this is carried to such a degree that it would be easy to identify the particular manuscript which Caxton followed if it were in existence. The anonymous translation of our manuscript, on the contrary, displays much more freedom, and is more correct. This earlier translation, moreover, furnishes a far more elegant and interesting monument of the English language in the fifteenth century. It is for these reasons that I have chosen it for the text of the present volume. Unfortunately, it is an imperfect manuscript, for there are one or two lacunæ in the body of the work, and it is truncated at the end by nearly one-fifth of the whole. Under these circumstances, the only resource was to supply from Caxton’s text the parts which are wanting in the inedited manuscript.

In other respects, I have endeavoured to give as good an edition of the original manuscript as I could, and I have added a few illustrative notes to such points as seemed to require explanation. In forming my text, I cannot but acknowledge with thanks the assistance I have received from the excellent transcript and collation made by William Rossiter, Esq., to whom also the reader owes the side-notes and head-lines

THOMAS WRIGHT. Sydney Street, Brompton,July 13, 1867

Marie-Hélène de Maillé de La Tour-Landry
Titres: dame de Bourmont et de la Cornuaille, comtesse de Ghaisne

Née en 1670
Décédée le 22 février 1752 – château de Bourmont, Freigné, Anjou, France , à l’âge de 82 ans
Inhumée en 1752 – en l’église de Freigné, Maine-et-Loire
Parents
Charles , marquis de Maillé de La Tour-Landry 1636-1701
Marie-Madeleine de Broc , marquise de Jalesnes 1629-1713
Union(s) et enfant(s)
Mariée le 19 novembre 1697 , Vernantes, avec Marie-Henry , comte de Ghaisne 1662-1710 (Parents : Pierre IV de Ghaisne , seigneur du Gesnetay 1629-1674 & Perrine du Rocher †1688 )  (témoins : Charles , marquis de Maillé de La Tour-Landry 1636-1701 , Marie-Madeleine de Broc , marquise de Jalesnes 1629-1713 , Georges de Maillé , marquis de La Tour-Landry 1665- , Marie-Anne Frézeau de La Frézellière , Charles de Maillé de La Tour-Landry , capitaine de Vaisseaux du Roi ) dont
Louis I de Ghaisne de Bourmont 1699-1701
Louis II de Ghaisne de Bourmont , comte de Ghaisne 1705-1782 marié en 1736 avec Marie de Valory , comtesse de Bourmont 1714-1766
Frères et sœurs
Georges de Maillé , marquis de La Tour-Landry 1665-
André de Maillé de La Tour-Landry
Charles de Maillé de La Tour-Landry , capitaine de Vaisseaux du Roi
Suzanne de Maillé de La Tour-Landry
Michel de Maillé de La Tour-Landry , chevalier de Malte 1674-
Michelle de Maillé de La Tour-Landry

http://gw.geneanet.org/tdeguerdavid?lang=fr;p=marie+helene;n=de+maille+de+la+tour+landry

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=cme;cc=cme;rgn=main;view=text;idno=KntTour-L

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=cme;cc=cme;rgn=main;view=text;idno=KntTour-L

Geoffroy IV de la Tour Landry

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Geoffrey IV de la Tour Landry (c. 1320 – 1391) was a nobleman of Anjou who compiled Livre pour l’enseignement de ses filles for the instruction of his daughters, in 1371–1372. A similar book he had previously written for his sons, according to his opening text, has disappeared. The work became the most popular educational treatise of the Late Middle Ages. It was translated into German, as Der Ritter vom Turn, and at least twice into English, once by William Caxton, who printed it as The Book of the Knight of the Tower in 1483.[1]

La Tour Landry stands (a ruin today) between Chollet and Vezins. Geoffroy fought in the Hundred Years War; he was at the siege of Aguillon in 1346 and was in the war as late as 1383. His name again appears in a military muster in 1363. He married Jeanne de Rougé, younger daughter of Bonabes de Rougé, sieur of Erval, vicomte de La Guerche, and chamberlain to the king. In 1378, as a “knight banneret”, he sent a contingent of men to join the siege of Cherbourg, but he did not serve in person. In 1380 Geoffroy was fighting in Brittany, and was last mentioned in 1383. He made a second marriage with Marguerite des Roches, dame de La Mothe de Pendu, the widow of Jean de Clerembault, knight.[2]

Contents
[hide] 1 Work
2 Family
3 Cultural references
4 Notes
5 External links
6 Further reading

Work[edit source]

“Geoffroy de la Tour Landry offering his book to his daughter”, woodcut of Albrecht Dürer, from the German adaptation, Der Ritter vom Turn, Basel, Michael Furter, 1493
The Livre pour l’enseignement de ses filles served as a tutorial for De la Tour Landry’s daughters on proper behavior when visiting the royal court, which, the knight warns, is filled with smooth-talking courtiers who could potentially disgrace them and embarrass the family. The author was a widower, and concerned for his daughters’ welfare. He takes a strong moral stance against the behavior of his peers and warns his daughters about the dangers of vanity.

Family[edit source]

Landricus Dunesis is the name of the first known member of the De La Tour Landry family; his name appears in a charter dated from c. 1061. He built a tower and fortress that were destroyed at the end of the eleventh century. The site of the subsequently rebuilt castle still stands in the canton of Chemillé, Maine-et-Loire. De la Tour Landry’s grandfather, Geoffroy III de la Tour Landry, had married Olive de Belleville, the daughter of a neighboring grand seigneur. She is mentioned in the Livre as enjoying the company of minstrels, and lauded for her generosity and piety.

In the fifteenth century, Pontus de la Tour Landry commissioned[citation needed] the romance of Pontus et la belle Sidonie, glamorizing the family’s origins in the train of Pontus, the son of the king of Galicia who fell in love with the fair Sidonia, daughter of the king of Brittany, where part of the ancestral possessions of the lords of La Tour lay.

Cultural references[edit source]

In the novel The Once and Future King, by T.H. White, a reference is made that states that “before King Arthur had made his chivalry, the Knight of the Tower Landry had been compelled to warn his daughter against entering her own dining hall in the evening unaccompanied – for fear of what might happen in the dark corners.”[3]

In the novel Timeline, by Michael Crichton, a reference is made which states that “As the Professor left, Marek said, “I pray God look with favor upon your journey and deliver you safe back.” That was what he always said to departing friends. It had been a favorite phrase of the Count Geoffrey de la Tour, six hundred years before.” [4]

Ch. 1. Origins of the Name “Landry”

Origin of the Name “Landry”

The family name “Landry” derives originally from an old Germanic baptismal name “Land-rik”, a composite name meaning “powerful land.”1 “Rik” has also been interpreted as meaning “ruler” or “king.”2

The name later evolved into the personal name “Landry,” popular in France during the medieval period.3 “Landry” as a personal name meant “Lord of the manor.”4

Early forms of the name “Landry” included “Landri” and a regional variant “Landru.”5 After surnames first began to be used in the early Middle Ages, “Landry” also became a surname, meaning simply “son of Landry.”6

Landri, Advisor to Clotaire II

Clovis had founded the French monarchy and its first ruling family, the Merovingian dynasty.7 When Clovis died in 511, his realm was divided among his four sons: Theodoric I (Soissons), Chlodomer (Paris), Childebert I (Metz), and Chlothar (Orleans).8 In 558, Clovis’ youngest son, Lothair (Chlothar), acquired the whole kingdom after he had murdered two nephews and eliminated one rebellious son by burning him and his family alive.9 In this manner Chlothar I reunited the kingdom of the Franks.10 However, Clotaire I died just three years later in 561, after which his kingdom was divided among his sons Charibert, Guntram (Burgundy), Sigebert (Austrasia), and Chilperic (Neustria).11

Sigebert and Chilperic went to war in 572.12 Sigebert died about 575, leaving his son, Childebert, king of Austrasia.13 Chilperic died in 584, leaving his son, Chlothar II (Clotaire II), king of Neustria.14 Chilperic’s Queen Fredegund had a lover by the name of Landeric, who was Mayor of the Palace; after Fredegund had her husband Chilperic killed in 583-84, she ruled as regent for her infant son Lothair II with the help of Landeric.15

In 593, Landri was an adviser to Clotaire II and the leader of his forces against his cousin Childebert. 16 After the death of Gundrum in 593, a Duke Wintero attacked Soissons, and the force sent to deal with Duke Wintero was led by Fredegund and Landri, Mayor of the Palace of Neustria.17

In 596, Childebert invaded the area of Soissons; Fredegund summoned Landri, Mayor of the Palace, war leader, and her lover, who marched an army with Fredegund into Champagne to counter the Austrasian’s attack.18

In 604, Chlotar sent Merovech and Landri against the forces led by Bertoald, Mayor of the Palace of Burgundy; Bertoald and his followers were killed by Landri’s men in December 604.19

In the winter of 605, Theuderic fought against a force under the nominal leadership of Merovech, Chlotar’s son, but the real commander was Landri.20

In 613, Clotaire II was proclaimed master of Neustria, Austrasia, and Burgundy and thus Merovingian King.21 He reigned until 629.22

By 618, each of the three parts of the kingdom of the Franks – Austasia, Neustria, and Burgundy – had a “mayor of the palace” who presided over the royal court.23

Saint Landry of Belgium

In 641, Landericus, upon entering the priesthood, became a missionary priest in the region of Brussels, particularly in Meltis Costellun (Hainaut, Belgium), and in the region of Haumont (Nord, France, now Melsbrock, Belgium), where he served until 650.24 He may have been bishop of the See of Metz or Meaux.25

In 677, Saint Landry’s father died, and Saint Landry resigned as bishop of Meaux and succeeded his deceased father as abbot of the monastery at Soignies and of the monastery at Aumont.26

Saint Landry died around 700; his body was buried in Soignies and his grave became famous for that miracles that took place there.27

Saint Landry of Paris

In 650, during the reign of Clovis II, Saint Landericus succeeded Audobertus as Bishop of Paris.28 During the famine of 650-51, Saint Landericus sold all of his personal possessions, as well as some of the furniture and sacred vessels of the church, to feed the poor.29 In 651, during the great famine, Saint Landri, Bishop of Paris, founded a hospital, dedicated to St. Christopher, near the Cathedral of Notre Dame (which hospital later developed into the Hotel-Dieu de Paris). 30

Bishop Landericus of Paris asked a monk, named Marculf, to draw up a formulary of documents for use in legal and administrative matters, resulting in Marculf’s Formulas, which were dedicated by the author to Saint Landry.31

In 652 or 653, at the synod of Clichy, Saint Landericus and 23 other bishops signed the foundation charter, granted by King Clovis, for the newly established abbey of St. Denis, which was to be exempt from episcopal jurisdiction.32 In the later seventh century, Bathild, wife of Clovis II and later regent, founded monasteries and supported the reform of old monasteries, including St.-Denis, along new principles, including that of independence from the local bishop.33 The new privilege of St.-Denis ensured that the bishop of Paris would no longer be able to exact payment for his liturgical duties or dip into the monastic funds when he needed; Landeric of Paris acquiesced, saying “the request of the king is for us like a command which it is extremely difficult to resist.”34

Saint Landry built the original church of St. Germain l’Auxerrios, which became the parish of the kings of France.35

Saint Landericus served as Bishop of Paris until his death, which occurred in 656 or 661.36

Saint Landry of Savoy

Saint Landericus was born at Bonneval or Lanslevillard; while a Benedictine monk of Novalise in Savoy, he was sent from the monastery of Saint Benoit to be pastor at Lanslevillard.37 Saint Landericus’ task was difficult, as the area was occupied by Muslims for a long time, and around 1050 malcontents whom he had reprimanded murdered him, piercing his body with an arrow with his reprimands attached and then throwing it into the River Arc.38 His body was retrieved by his faithful followers,39 brought to the sacristy of the church where he lived, and rests in the chapel of St. Joseph in Lanslevillard.40

Landru the Fat

In the eleventh century, Landru the Fat, apparently a feudal lord having control over some land near Langres, wrote:

I, Landru the Fat, seduced and tempted by the greed that often creeps into the hearts of worldly men, admit that I have stopped the merchants of Langres who passed through my domain. I took their merchandise from them and kept it until the day when the Bishop of Langres and the Abbot of Cluny came to me to demand reparation. I had kept for myself a part of what I had taken and restored the rest. The merchants to obtain this remainder, and to be able in the future to cross my land without fear, consented to pay me a certain sum for tribute. This first sin suggested to me the idea of a second, and I undertook to impose and to cause to be imposed by my officers, an exaction called a toll on all those who crossed my territory for business or for pilgrimmage. The monks of Cluny, knowing that my predecessors had never levied a tax of this kind, complained strongly and asked me, through my brother Bernard, Chamberlain of their abbey, to give up this unjust exaction, hateful in the eyes of God. To buy it off and assure safety to travelers, they have given me the sum of three hundred sous.41

Landry, Seigneur de Joux

About 1050, the Sires de Joux were among the most powerful of the mountain lords of Burgundy.42 The Chateau (fortress) de Iou was the ancient seat of the Sires de Iou.43 Landry was a Seigneur de Joux who founded the Abbey of Montbenoit in 1100 and went on a Crusade.44

Bishop Landri de Durnes

Bishop Landri de Durnes served as bishop of the diocese of Lausanne, Geneva and Fribourg from 1159 until his resignation in 1177.45 In 1160, Bishop Landry built the Castle of Glerolles, which served as the residence of bishops for seven centuries.46

The Knights of the Tower Landry

Landricus Dunesis built La Tour Landry in the eleventh century on a site located in what is now a small town of the same name in the canton of Chemille, Maine-et-Loire.47 Later there were four generations of men named Geoffroy de la Tour Landry (I – IV).48 Geoffroy II married Olive de Belleville, the daughter of a neighboring grand seigneur.49

Geoffroy IV was present as a young soldier at the siege of Aiguillon in 1346.50 Also in 1346, he was among the troops of Charles de Blois at the battle of Auray, in which the French were defeated, Charles de Blois was killed, and du Guesclin was taken prisoner.51 Sometime between 1352 and 1360, Geoffroy IV married Jeanne de Rouge, who was from a rich and influential Breton family, and became seigneur of Bourmont of la Cornuaille, where he often resided, and seigneur of Plessis de Coesmes.52 In his own right he was seigneur of la Tour Landry and of la Galloure.53 Geoffroy IV and Jeanne de Rouge apparently had two sons, Charles and Gaston Paris, and three daughters, Jeanne, Anne and Marie.54 In 1378 Geoffroy IV was associated again with du Guesclin, now Constable of France, at the siege of Cherbourg.55 By 1378, he held the rank of “chevalier banneret.”56

After Jeanne’s death between 1381 and 1391, Geoffroy IV married Marguerite des Roches, “dame de la Motte du Pendu et Genetay,” the rich widow of Jeanne Clerembault, seigneur du Plessis-Clerembault et la Plesse, et de la Touche-Gelee, and the mother of the spouses of two of Geoffroy’s children.57

Geoffroy IV, the Chevalier de la Tour Landry, an Angevin nobleman, wrote Le Livre du Chevalier de la Tour Landry pour l’Enseignement de ses Filles, a book of instruction on courtship to his daughters.58 In the book, Landry wrote of a strange order of amorous men and women of noble birth, called Galois and Galoises, who existed in Poitou and elsewhere, in Landry’s youth.59

Geoffroy IV died sometime between 1402 and 1406.60

Charles de la Tour Landry, the oldest son of Geoffroy IV, succeeded his father in the seigneuries of la Tour Landry, Bourmont, and la Gallouere, married Jeanne Clerembault in 1390 and later died at Aincourt in 1415.61

Geoffroy IV’s second son is believed to be Arcades de la Tour, who fought in the seige of Orleans and accompanied the king and Joan of Arc to Rheims in 1429.62

Geoffroy IV’s daughters Jeanne and Anne both married a son of Louis Vicomte of Rochechouart, counsellor and chamberlain to King Charles V; his third daughter, Marie, married Giles Clerembault in 1391, and died before 1400. 63

A “Tour Landri” appears on the map of “GALLIA” first published by Blaeus in 1631; it is located directly above the “I” in “POICTOU,” about 9 gallic miles south of the town of Angiers (which is on the Loire river) and 15 gallic miles west-northwest of the town of Poictiers.

Origins of the Acadian Dialect

The Acadian dialect indicates that their place of origin was in the neighborhood of the Bay of Biscay and the mouth of the River Loire.64 The Cajun patois of today is full of nautical terms and antique usages from Brittany of 1515, as well as a number of grammatical and other linguistic evidences of Celtic influence.65

FOOTNOTES

1Historical Research Center certificate.

2Loughead, F., Dictionary of Given Names (2d ed. 1966), p. 12.

3Historical Research Center certificate.

4Loughead, p. 69.

5Historical Research Center certificate.

6Historical Research Center certificate.

7 Kagan, et al., The Western Heritage to 1715 (1979), p. 240.

8 Grun, The Timetables of History: A Horizontal Linkage of People and Events (1979), p. ___.

9 McKay, et al., A History of Western Society (3d ed. 1987), p. 232. After King Clodomir was slain in the battle of Veseruntia (Vezeronce) in 524 (by Godomar, brother of Sigismund), Clotaire and Childebert divided between them the inheritance of their older brother. “St. Clothilda,” Catholic Encyclopedia (1997) [internet]. Although Clotaire’s mother, St. Clothilda, took the late King Clodomir’s three young sons under her care, Clotaire and Childebert withdrew the children by means of a ruse and slew the two older ones; however the third, Clodoald, escaped and entered a cloister, where he became Saint Cloud. Id. Later, Clotaire and Childebert began to quarrel, and engaged in serious warfare. Id. Clotaire, closely pursued by Childebert, who had been joined by Theodebert, son of Thierry I, took refuge in the forest of Brotonne, in Normandy, where he feared that he and his army would be exterminated by the superior forces of his adversaries. Id. Then, says Gregory of Tours, Saint Clothilda threw herself on her knees before the tomb of St. Martin, and besought him with tears during the whole night not to permit another fraticide to afflict the family of Clovis. Id. Suddenly a frightful tempest arose and dispersed the two armies which were about to engage in a hand-to-hand struggle; thus, says the chronicler, did the saint answer the prayers of the afflicted mother. Id.

10 Grun, p. ____.

11 Grun, p. ___; “St. Germain,” Catholic Encyclopedia (1997) [internet].

12 Grun, P. ____.

13 See Landry, Donald, The History of the Surname Landry from Clovis to the Present (1999), Vol. I, p. 3 (genealogy of the Merovingians); see also Grun, p. ____ (giving the date as 578).

14 Grun, p. ___.

15 Landry, Donald, The History of the Surname Landry from Clovis to the Present (1999), Vol. I, p. 6, quoting Nelson, J.L., Queens and Jexabels (_____), p. 67, and The Birth of France, Warriors, Bishops and Long Haired Kings (_____), p. __ (“Fredegund, habitually disloyal to her husband, took a lover named Landeric, who was Mayor of the Palace.”).

16 See Landry, Donald, The History of the Surname Landry from Clovis to the Present (1999), Vol. I, p. 5; cf. Historical Research Center certificate (referring to Landri, adviser to Clotaire I in the late 6th century, and leader of forces against the latter’s brother, Childebert, in 593).

17 Landry, Donald, The History of the Surname Landry from Clovis to the Present (1999), Vol. I, p. 5, citing Merovingian Military Organization (481-751), p. 74. Presumably Fredegund was Clotaire II’s mother.

18 Landry, Donald, The History of the Surname Landry from Clovis to the Present (1999), Vol. I, p. 5-6.

19 Landry, Donald, The History of the Surname Landry from Clovis to the Present (1999), Vol. I, p. 6, citing Tours, Gregory, Historia Francorum, Book 2, pp. 194-99.

20 Id.

21 See Landry, Donald, The History of the Surname Landry from Clovis to the Present (1999), Vol. I, p. 5 (stating that in 613 Clotar II, son of Chilperic and Fredegonda, was proclaimed Merovingian King and master of Neustria, Austrasia, and Burgundy).

22 See Landry, Donald, The History of the Surname Landry from Clovis to the Present (1999), Vol. I, p. 3 (genealogy of the Merovingians).

1. Geoffroi IV DE LA TOUR-LANDRY †1391 sgr de Bourmont

http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=fr&u=http://www.de-bric-et-de-broc.com/France/tourlandry.html&prev=/search%3Fq%3D1.%2BGeoffroy%2BIV%2BDE%2BLA%2BTOUR-LANDRY%2B%25E2%2580%25A01391%2Bsgr%2Bde%2BBourmont%26biw%3D1011%26bih%3D466

Hugues II de BOURMONT
(Hugues de BOURMONT)
Titres: seigneur de Bourmont

Parents
Hugues Ier , seigneur de Bourmont
Lancenna de DARNEY
Union(s) et enfant(s)
Marié vers 1095 avec Luca N dont
Gérard , seigneur de Bourmont †1180/
Fratrie
Hugues II , seigneur de Bourmont
N de BOURMONT
Notes
Notes individuelles
Bourmont (88)
Arbre d’ascendance Arbre de descendance Aperçu de l’arbre

Hugues Ier , seigneur de Bourmont
 
Lancenna de DARNEY
|
2
 
|
3

|
Hugues II , seigneur de Bourmont

http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=fr&u=http://www.de-bric-et-de-broc.com/France/tourlandry.html&prev=/search%3Fq%3D1.%2BGeoffroy%2BIV%2BDE%2BLA%2BTOUR-LANDRY%2B%25E2%2580%25A01391%2Bsgr%2Bde%2BBourmont%26biw%3D1011%26bih%3D466

Ponthus the Tour-Landry
(1381-1447) (1381-1447)
chevalier Knight
seigneur de la Tour landry Lord of landry Tour
de Bourmont Bourmont
du Loroux-Bottereau the Loroux-Bottereau
baron de Bouloir en Vendomois Baron Bouloir in Vendomois
ép. thick. N, Sidoine (v.1380-?) N, Sidoine (v.1380-?)

Arquade de Rouge
(?-?) (-?)
ép. thick. Anne de la Haye-Passavant Anne Hague-Passavant
fille de Briand de la Haye et daughter Briand Hague and
de Mahaut de Rougé Mahaut de Rouge

The Knights of the Tower Landry
Landricus Dunesis built La Tour Landry in the eleventh century on a site located in what is now a small town of the same name in the canton of Chemille, Maine-et-Loire.47 Later there were four generations of men named Geoffroy de la Tour Landry (I – IV).48 Geoffroy II married Olive de Belleville, the daughter of a neighboring grand seigneur.49
Geoffroy IV was present as a young soldier at the siege of Aiguillon in 1346.50 Also in 1346, he was among the troops of Charles de Blois at the battle of Auray, in which the French were defeated, Charles de Blois was killed, and du Guesclin was taken prisoner.51 Sometime between 1352 and 1360, Geoffroy IV married Jeanne de Rouge, who was from a rich and influential Breton family, and became seigneur of Bourmont of la Cornuaille, where he often resided, and seigneur of Plessis de Coesmes.52 In his own right he was seigneur of la Tour Landry and of la Galloure.53 Geoffroy IV and Jeanne de Rouge apparently had two sons, Charles and Gaston Paris, and three daughters, Jeanne, Anne and Marie.54 In 1378 Geoffroy IV was associated again with du Guesclin, now Constable of France, at the siege of Cherbourg.55 By 1378, he held the rank of “chevalier banneret.”56

Charles de la Tour Landry, the oldest son of Geoffroy IV, succeeded his father in the seigneuries of la Tour Landry, Bourmont, and la Gallouere, married Jeanne Clerembault in 1390 and later died at Aincourt in 1415.

Françoise de La Tour-Landry
Titres: dame de La Tour-Landry

——————————————————————————–

Parents
•Louis II , seigneur de La Tour-Landry, de Bourmont, de La Gallonnère et de Cornouaille
Marié avec
◦Catherine Gaudin

Union(s), enfant(s), les petits enfants et les arrière-petits-enfants
•Mariée le 30 juillet 1494 (lundi) avec Hardouin X de Maillé , seigneur de Benais, de Fontenay l’Abattu et de La Forêt d’Estampes , né en 1462 , décédé le 25 janvier 1525 (dimanche) à l’âge de 63 ans (Parents : H Hardouin IX , baron de Maillé ca 1420-1487 & F Antoinette de Chauvigny , vicomtesse de Brosse 1428-1473 ) dont ◾H Jean I de Maillé , baron de La Tour-Landry 1512-1563 marié avec Anne Chabot , dame de Bouloire dont
•F Gabrielle de Maillé de La Tour-Landry mariée en 1538 avec François II d’Estuer de Caussade , comte de Saint-Mégrin
◾F Antoinette de Maillé de La Tour-Landry , dame de Saint-Mars de La Jaille †1585 mariée le 23 février 1557 (samedi) avec Claude de La Trémoille , baron de Noirmoutier †1566 dont :
◾H François de La Trémoille , marquis de Noirmoutier 1566-1608

◾F Anne de Maillé de La Tour-Landry mariée le 20 décembre 1543 (lundi) avec Payen d’Averton , seigneur de Belin dont :
◾F Renée d’Averton , dame de Belin 1545-1603

◾H Jean de Maillé de La Tour-Landry , seigneur de Dun-le-Palleteau †1597 marié avec Marie de Barjot de La Pallu dont :
•H Jean de Maillé de La Tour-Landry , seigneur de La Bouloüere
•F Françoise de Maillé de La Tour-Landry

•H René de Maillé de La Tour-Landry , seigneur d’Ampoigné marié avec Andrée du Verger
◾H François de Maillé , baron de La Tour-Landry 1540-1598 marié le 3 février 1564 (lundi) avec Françoise de Rohan-Gié , dame de Gillebourg †1585 dont :
•H Charles de Maillé , baron de La Tour-Landry †1605
◦H Louis de Maillé de La Tour-Landry †1583
◾H Jean II de Maillé , baron de La Tour-Landry †1635
•F Anne de Maillé , baronne de La Tour-Landry †1622
◾F Madeleine de Maillé de La Tour-Landry †1627
◦H François de Maillé de La Tour-Landry †1624
◾F Diane Françoise de Maillé de La Tour-Landry

◦H Louis de Maillé de La Tour-Landry , seigneur de La Fosse
◦F Vincente de Maillé de La Tour-Landry

•F Anne de Maillé de La Tour-Landry mariée le 15 décembre 1517 (samedi) avec François I d’Estuer de Caussade , vicomte de Saint-Mégrin

Frères et sœurs
◾F Marguerite de La Tour-Landry Mariée avec René Bourré , seigneur de Jarzé
Marguerite de La Tour-Landry Mariée avec Louis du Bellay , seigneur de Langeais †1522

Catherine Gaudin

Union(s), enfant(s), les petits enfants et les arrière-petits-enfants
Mariée avec Louis II , seigneur de La Tour-Landry, de Bourmont, de La Gallonnère et de Cornouaille (Parents : Louis I de La Tour-Landry , seigneur de Bourmont  &  Jeanne Quatrebarbes , dame de La Touche-Quatrebarbes †1459 ) dont
Françoise , dame de La Tour-Landry  mariée le 30 juillet 1494 (lundi) avec Hardouin X de Maillé , seigneur de Benais 1462-1525  dont
Jean I de Maillé , baron de La Tour-Landry 1512-1563  marié avec Anne Chabot , dame de Bouloire  dont :
Gabrielle de Maillé de La Tour-Landry
Antoinette de Maillé de La Tour-Landry , dame de Saint-Mars de La Jaille †1585
Anne de Maillé de La Tour-Landry
Jean de Maillé de La Tour-Landry , seigneur de Dun-le-Palleteau †1597
René de Maillé de La Tour-Landry , seigneur d’Ampoigné
François de Maillé , baron de La Tour-Landry 1540-1598
Louis de Maillé de La Tour-Landry , seigneur de La Fosse
Vincente de Maillé de La Tour-Landry
Anne de Maillé de La Tour-Landry  mariée le 15 décembre 1517 (samedi) avec François I d’Estuer de Caussade , vicomte de Saint-Mégrin
Marguerite de La Tour-Landry  mariée avec René Bourré , seigneur de Jarzé
Marguerite de La Tour-Landry  mariée avec Louis du Bellay , seigneur de Langeais †1522  dont
Guillaume du Bellay , seigneur de Langeais 1491-1543  marié avec Anne de Créquy
Jean du Bellay 1492-1560
Martin du Bellay , seigneur de Langey 1494-1559  marié le 25 juin 1533 (dimanche) avec Isabelle Chenu , princesse d’Yvetot 1518-1589  dont :
Marie du Bellay , princesse d’Yvetot †1611
René du Bellay 1500-1546

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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2 Responses to Landry Family Were Kin to Merovingians

  1. Reblogged this on rosamondpress and commented:

    On Saturday I will be taking two Hambley sisters, Virginia and Caroline to breakfast. Their mother is Elizabeth de Bourmont a descendant of Geoffrey La Tour-Landry, of Bourmont,

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