House of Stuart in America

The Stewart family took hold in America with the Marriage of Hon. Mary Stewart of Mountjoy to Phineas Preston whose line continues in the Breckenridge and Benton family.

Jon PrescoCharles_Coote,_1st_Earl_of_Bellamont

Charles_Stewart,_1681-1741

(c) Castell Coch; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/TNGWebsite/getperson.php?personID=I702&tree=CC

Walter FitzAlan, 3rd High Steward

Walter FitzAlan, 1st Hereditary High Steward of Scotland[1]
  – 1177

Flaad (Flathead), Hereditary Steward of Dol[

Alan Alan ‘Dapifer’, Hereitary Steward of Dol[1,

http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/TNGWebsite/getperson.php?personID=I42293&tree=CC

Hon., “Mary of Montjoy”
Born Abt 1677 Mountjoy, Co Tyrone, Ulster, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location
Gender Female
Other-Begin 24 Aug 1734 Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location
Countess of Granard
◦As a result of her marriage, Hon. Mary Stewart was styled as Countess of Granard on 24 August 1734.

Death 4 Oct 1758 Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location
Died 4 Oct 1765 Ulster Co, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location
Notes
◦Hon. Mary Stewart was born circa 1677.[2] She was the daughter of William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy and Hon. Mary Coote.[1],[2]

She married, firstly, Phineas Preston in 1692 at Mountjoy, Ireland.[2],[1]

She married, secondly, Vice-Admiral George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard, son of Arthur Forbes, 2nd Earl of Granard and Mary Rawdon, in 1709.[1]

She died on 4 October 1765.[1] She was also reported to have died on 4 October 1758.[2]

From 1692, her married name became Preston.[2]

From 1709, her married name became Forbes. As a result of her marriage, Hon. Mary Stewart was styled as Countess of Granard on 24 August 1734.

Children of Hon. Mary Stewart and Phineas Preston

1. Jane Preston+[2] b. c 1690, d. a 12 Nov 1746
2. Mary Preston [2] b. 1696, d. 1749
3. Colonel John Preston+[2] b. 1699, d. 1747
4. Nathaniel Preston [2] b. c 1700

Children of Hon. Mary Stewart and Vice-Admiral George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard

1. Lady Mary Forbes [1] d. 27 Nov 1797
2. Lt.-Gen. George Forbes, 4th Earl of Granard+[1] b. 15 Mar 1710, d. 16 Oct 1769
3. Admiral Hon. John Forbes+[1] b. 1714, d. 10 Mar 1796

Citations

1. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1628. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
2. [S2664] Liberty unknown, “re: Preston Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 5 February 2008. Hereinafter cited as “re: Preston.”

http://www.geni.com/people/Hon-Mary-Forbes-Stewart-Countess-of-Granard/6000000002979384193

Person ID I53321 Roots
Last Modified 23 Jul 2013

Father William* Stewart, b. 1653, d. 24 Aug 1692
Mother Mary* Coote, b. Abt 1650, d. Aft 1678
Married Abt 1675
Family ID F18540 Group Sheet

Family 1 Phineas (Archibald)* (or John) Preston, b. 1672, Tara, Ardsallagh Townland, Co Meath, Leinster,Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location, d. Bef 28 Apr 1703, Ulster, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location

Married 1692 Mountjoy, Co Tyrone, Ulster, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location
Children
> 1. Jane* Preston, b. Abt 1690, Newtown Limavady, Limavady, Co Londonderry, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location, d. Aft 12 Nov 1746, Fishersville, Tinkling Spring, Augusta Co, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location
2. Mary Preston, b. 1693, Northern Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 23 Jun 1742, Augusta Co, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location
3. Phineas Preston, b. 1695, of, Tara and Ardsallagh, Meath, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location, d. Aft 1730
4. Robert Preston, b. Abt 1697, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location, d. Aft 1750, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location
> 5. Margaret Preston, b. Abt 1698, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location, d. Bef 1742
> 6. John Preston, b. 1700, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 1747, Fishersville, Tinkling Spring, Augusta Co, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location
> 7. Elizabeth Preston, b. 1702, Co Donegal, Ulster, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 1780, Fishersville, Tinkling Spring, Augusta Co, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location
8. James Preston, b. Abt 1704, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location, d. Aft 1720

Last Modified 23 Jul 2013
Family ID F2460 Group Sheet

Family 2 George Forbes, b. 21 Oct 1685, Leinster, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 29 Oct 1765, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location
Married 1701 Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location
Children
1. George Forbes, b. 15 Mar 1710, d. 16 Oct 1769
2. John Forbes, b. 17 Jul 1714, Minorca, Balaeric Islands, Spain Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 10 Mar 1796, England Find all individuals with events at this location

Mary Stewart. She was the daughter of William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy and Hon. Mary Coote.1,2 From 1692, her married name became Preston.2 From 1709, her married name became Forbes. As a result of her marriage, Hon. Mary Stewart was styled as Countess of Granard on 24 August 1734.
Children of Hon. Mary Stewart and Phineas Preston
Jane Preston+2 b. c 1690, d. a 12 Nov 1746
Mary Preston2 b. 1696, d. 1749
Colonel John Preston+2 b. 1699, d. 1747
Hon. Mary Stewart was born circa 1677.2 She married, firstly, Phineas Preston in 1692 at Mountjoy, Ireland.2,1 She married, secondly, Vice-Admiral George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard, son of Arthur Forbes, 2nd Earl of Granard and Mary Rawdon, in 1709.1 She died on 4 October 1765.1 She was also reported to have died on 4 October 1758.2

She was the daughter of William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy and Hon. Mary Coote.1,2 From 1692, her married name became Preston.2 From 1709, her married name became Forbes. As a result of her marriage, Hon. Mary Stewart was styled as Countess of Granard on 24 August 1734.
Children of Hon. Mary Stewart and Phineas Preston
Jane Preston+2 b. c 1690, d. a 12 Nov 1746
Mary Preston2 b. 1696, d. 1749
Colonel John Preston+2 b. 1699, d. 1747
Nathaniel Preston2 b. c 1700

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/04/15/kin-to-the-stewarts-and-windsors/
Phineas Preston

About Mary Forbes (Stewart)
From Darryl Lundy’s Peerage page on Mary Stewart:
http://thepeerage.com/p2792.htm#i27914
Hon. Mary Stewart [1]
F, #27914,
b. circa 1677,
d. 4 October 1765
Last Edited=19 Jan 2009
Hon. Mary Stewart was born circa 1677.[2] She was the daughter of William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy and Hon. Mary Coote.[1],[2]
She married, firstly, Phineas Preston in 1692 at Mountjoy, Ireland.[2],[1]
She married, secondly, Vice-Admiral George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard, son of Arthur Forbes, 2nd Earl of Granard and Mary Rawdon, in 1709.[1]
She died on 4 October 1765.[1] She was also reported to have died on 4 October 1758.[2]
From 1692, her married name became Preston.[2]
From 1709, her married name became Forbes. As a result of her marriage, Hon. Mary Stewart was styled as Countess of Granard on 24 August 1734.
Children of Hon. Mary Stewart and Phineas Preston
1. Jane Preston+[2] b. c 1690, d. a 12 Nov 1746
2. Mary Preston [2] b. 1696, d. 1749
3. Colonel John Preston+[2] b. 1699, d. 1747
4. Nathaniel Preston [2] b. c 1700
Children of Hon. Mary Stewart and Vice-Admiral George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard
1. Lady Mary Forbes [1] d. 27 Nov 1797
2. Lt.-Gen. George Forbes, 4th Earl of Granard+[1] b. 15 Mar 1710, d. 16 Oct 1769
3. Admiral Hon. John Forbes+[1] b. 1714, d. 10 Mar 1796

Vice-Admiral George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard [1]
M, #106716,
b. 21 October 1685,
d. 29 October 1765
Last Edited=10 Apr 2011
Consanguinity Index=0.0%
Vice-Admiral George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard was born on 21 October 1685.[2] He was the son of Arthur Forbes, 2nd Earl of Granard and Mary Rawdon.[2]
He married Hon. Mary Stewart, daughter of William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy and Hon. Mary Coote, in 1709.[2]
He died on 29 October 1765 at age 80.[2]
Career:
He was commissioned before 1706, in the service of the Royal Navy.[2]
He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) [Ireland] in 1721.[2]
He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Whig) for Queenborough, Kent between 1723 and 1727.[2] On 27 February 1725/26 he was called up to the House of Lords as Lord Forbes, although his father did not possess this title.[2]
He was Commander-in-Chief of the Caribbean between September 1729 and December 1729.[2]
He held the office of Plenipotentiary to the Court of Muscovy in 1733.[2]
He gained the rank of Rear-Admiral in 1734.[2]
He succeeded to the title of 4th Baronet Forbes, of Castle Forbes, Co. Longford, Ireland [N.S., 1628] on 24 August 1734.[2] He succeeded to the title of 3rd Baron Clanehugh, co. Longford [I., 1675] on 24 August 1734.[2] He succeeded to the title of 3rd Earl of Granard [I., 1684] on 24 August 1734.[2] He succeeded to the title of 3rd Viscount of Granard, co. Longford [I., 1675] on 24 August 1734.[2]
He gained the rank of Vice-Admiral in 1735.[2]
He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Whig) for Ayr Burghs between 1741 and 1747.[2]
He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.[3]
Children of Vice-Admiral George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard and Hon. Mary Stewart
1. Lady Mary Forbes [1] d. 27 Nov 1797
2. Lt.-Gen. George Forbes, 4th Earl of Granard+[1] b. 15 Mar 1710, d. 16 Oct 1769
3. Admiral Hon. John Forbes+[2] b. 1714, d. 10 Mar 1796

http://thepeerage.com/p10672.htm#i106715
Admiral Hon. John Forbes [1]
M, #106715,
b. 1714,
d. 10 March 1796
Last Edited=10 Apr 2011
Consanguinity Index=3.13%
Admiral Hon. John Forbes was born in 1714. He was the son of Vice-Admiral George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard and Hon. Mary Stewart.[3],[1]
He married Lady Mary Capell, daughter of William Capell, 3rd Earl of Essex and Lady Jane Hyde, on 25 August 1758.[4]
He died on 10 March 1796.[3]
He gained the rank of General in the service of the Royal Marines.[3] He gained the rank of Admiral of the Fleet.[3]
Children of Admiral Hon. John Forbes and Lady Mary Capell
1. Maria Eleanor Forbes+[5] d. 18 Mar 1844
2. Katherine Elizabeth Forbes+[1] b. c 1760, d. 23 Oct 1851
Citations
1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume IX, page 240. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
2. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, “re: Penancoet Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as “re: Penancoet Family.”
3. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1628. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
4. [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition, volume 1, page 1348.
5. [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition, volume 1, page 798.
———————
From the Dictionary of the National Biography:
http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Forbes,_John_(1714-1796)_(DNB00)
FORBES, JOHN (1714–1796), admiral of the fleet, second son of George, third earl of Granard [q. v.], was born in Minorca on 17 July 1714, and first went to sea in May 1726, on board the Burford, commanded by his uncle, the Hon. Charles Stewart, in the Mediterranean.
In 1729 he followed Stewart to the Lion, went out with him to the West Indies, and was made a lieutenant by him in 1731. He afterwards served in that rank on board the Britannia, with Sir John Norris, at Lisbon, and in 1737 was promoted by him to be captain of the Poole.
In 1738 he commanded the Port Mahon on the Irish station; in 1739 commanded the Severn of 50 guns in the Channel; in 1740 was moved into the Tiger; and in 1741 into the Guernsey, in which he went out to the Mediterranean. In 1742 he was appointed by Admiral Mathews to the Norfolk of 80 guns, in which ship he took an honourable part in the ill-managed action off Toulon on 11 Feb. 1743–4. In September 1745, ‘there being no appearance of service in the Mediterranean, he quitted the fleet and returned by land to England to take care of his health that was very much impaired’ (Memoirs of the Earls of Granard, p. 173).
In the following year he was a witness at the court-martial on Vice-admiral Lestock, against whom his testimony bore heavily; and in 1747, being promoted to be rear-admiral of the blue, he went out overland ‘through Germany and Italy to serve in the fleet in the Mediterranean under Vice-admiral Byng.’ In 1749 he was left commander-in-chief in the Mediterranean; and in 1754, ‘being then at the German Spa, he was offered the command of the squadron preparing for the East Indies; but his health being very imperfect he thought it his duty to decline the service’ (ib. p. 174); and for the same reason he refused the government of New York.
He was still in feeble health in 1755 when war with France again broke out; and, being unable to serve at sea, he accepted, in December 1756, a seat at the admiralty, which, with the exception of two months in 1757, he occupied till April 1763. His name is, perhaps, now best known for his honest and sturdy, though curiously illogical, refusal to sign the warrant for the execution of Admiral Byng. In consequence of this disagreement with his colleagues Forbes retired from the board on 6 April, but was reappointed on 29 June 1757.
In 1755 he had been promoted to the rank of vice-admiral, and in January 1758 to be admiral of the blue. On quitting the admiralty in 1763 he was appointed general of marines.
In 1751 he had been returned to the Irish parliament as member for the borough of St. Johnstown; he was now in 1761 returned for Mullingar. ‘He consented to these returns, the first time to preserve peace in the county, and the second, to support family interest; for he was ever disinclined to be in parliament, and therefore made it a condition when he accepted a place at the admiralty board that he should not be brought into the British parliament’ (ib. p. 175).
From this time he took no active part in public business, though he is said to have been frequently consulted on naval affairs. He describes himself as spending much time in reading, his wretched health permitting him little other solace; he, however, wrote a ‘Memoir of the Earls of Granard,’ the manuscript of which, dated in 1770, was published by the Earl of Granard in 1868.
In 1770 he was made admiral of the white; and on the death of Lord Hawke in 1781 was advanced to the high rank of admiral of the fleet, which he held till his death on 10 March 1796.
A story is told—but with a suspicious want of detail—that the government (at some unfixed date), being desirous of conferring the generalship of marines on ‘a noble lord, very high in the naval profession, and very deservedly a favourite of his sovereign and his country,’ offered Forbes a pension of 3,000l. a year and a peerage to descend to his daughter, in compensation for the resignation which they requested; but that Forbes refused, saying that the generalship of marines was a military employment, and that he would not accept of a pension nor bargain for a peerage; but would lay the generalship of marines and his rank in the navy at the king’s feet, ‘entreating him to take both away, if they could forward his service’ (Gent. Mag. vol. lxvi. pt. i. p. 260).
It is difficult to see the peculiar nobility of refusing to accept a pension in lieu of a sinecure. And if this had been a military employment the case would have been even worse; since, as we are told, ‘for the last 20 years of his life he was never able to stand; nor could he scarce turn himself in bed without assistance, being lame in both hands and feet. He was a singular instance of longevity accompanied by so much infirmity’ (ib.)
His portrait by Romney, now in the Painted Hall at Greenwich (to which it was given by his daughters), corro- borates this miserable account. It shows the face of a man not yet old, but worn and pinched.
Forbes married, in 1758, Lady Mary Capel, daughter of William, third earl of Essex, and by her had two daughters, twins;
1. one of whom, Catherine Elizabeth, married the Hon. William Wellesley-Pole, afterwards third Earl of Mornington;
2. the other, Maria Elinor, married the Hon. John Charles Villiers, afterwards third Earl of Clarendon.

Hon. Charles Stewart, in the Mediterranean
http://www.geni.com/people/Phineas-Preston/6000000004018446901

Viscount Windsor is a title that has been created twice.
The first creation came in the Peerage of Ireland in 1699 when the Honourable Thomas Windsor was made Viscount Windsor, of Blackcastle. He was the younger son of Thomas Hickman-Windsor, 1st Earl of Plymouth, and notably represented Droitwich, Bramber and Monmouthshire in the House of Commons. In 1712 he was created Baron Mountjoy in the Peerage of Great Britain. Windsor was a descendant of Andrew Windsor, 1st Baron Windsor and the Honourable Elizabeth Blount, sister of Edward Blount, 2nd Baron Mountjoy, hence his choice of title (see also Baron Mountjoy). He was succeeded by his son, the second Viscount. He sat as Member of Parliament for Cardiff. On his death in 1758 the titles became extinct. His daughter and heiress, the Honourable Charlotte Jane Windsor, married John Stuart, 4th Earl of Bute. In 1796 he was created Viscount Mountjoy, Earl of Windsor and Marquess of Bute.
The second creation came in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1905 when Robert Windsor-Clive, 14th Baron Windsor, was made Viscount Windsor, of St Fagans in the County of Glamorgan. He was made Earl of Plymouth at the same time. For more information on this creation of the viscountcy, see the latter title.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Stuart,_1st_Marquess_of_Bute

Charles Stewart was born in 1681, the fifth son of Sir William Stewart later 1st Viscount Mountjoy.[1][2] His mother was Mary, the eldest daughter of Richard Coote, 1st Baron Coote.[2] Charles entered the navy at an early age, and was involved in the Nine Years’ War. In 1697, at the age of 16, his ship was involved in an engagement with a French warship off Dover, and Stewart was injured, losing his right hand.[2] He was granted a pension of £100 for his injury in 1699.[2] Recovering from the injury, he continued in the service and was promoted to lieutenant. He served on several ships at this rank until being promoted to captain and given command of the frigate HMS Falcon on 1 December 1704.[1] After some time in command of this ship, he was transferred to the 50-gun HMS Panther and served in the Mediterranean under Sir John Leake. He was one of the officers involved in the court-martial of Sir Thomas Hardy in October 1707, aboard HMS Albemarle at Portsmouth.[a][3]

Charlotte Jane Windsor, daughter of the 2nd Viscount Windsor and 2nd Baron Mountjoy, married the 4th Earl of Bute, and that nobleman was created Marquess of Bute, Earl of Windsor and Viscount Mountjoy in the Isle of Wight in 1796, in the Peerage of Great Britain. These titles remain extant.

Viscount Windsor is a title that has been created twice.
The first creation came in the Peerage of Ireland in 1699 when the Honourable Thomas Windsor was made Viscount Windsor, of Blackcastle. He was the younger son of Thomas Hickman-Windsor, 1st Earl of Plymouth, and notably represented Droitwich, Bramber and Monmouthshire in the House of Commons. In 1712 he was created Baron Mountjoy in the Peerage of Great Britain. Windsor was a descendant of Andrew Windsor, 1st Baron Windsor and the Honourable Elizabeth Blount, sister of Edward Blount, 2nd Baron Mountjoy, hence his choice of title (see also Baron Mountjoy). He was succeeded by his son, the second Viscount. He sat as Member of Parliament for Cardiff. On his death in 1758 the titles became extinct. His daughter and heiress, the Honourable Charlotte Jane Windsor, married John Stuart, 4th Earl of Bute. In 1796 he was created Viscount Mountjoy, Earl of Windsor and Marquess of Bute.
The second creation came in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1905 when Robert Windsor-Clive, 14th Baron Windsor, was made Viscount Windsor, of St Fagans in the County of Glamorgan. He was made Earl of Plymouth at the same time. For more information on this creation of the viscountcy, see the latter title.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Stuart,_1st_Marquess_of_Bute

Though at Christmas 1639, Newport participated with the King in the extravagant masque on the theme of Philogenes, royal “lover of the People”,[4] with the return of the Long Parliament the next year, Newport by degrees joined the forces of opposition in the House of Lords.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mountjoy_Blount,_1st_Earl_of_Newport

Hon., “Mary of Montjoy” 

Born 
Abt 1677 
Mountjoy, Co Tyrone, Ulster, Ireland  
Gender 
Female 
Other-Begin 
24 Aug 1734 
Ireland  

Countess of Granard 

As a result of her marriage, Hon. Mary Stewart was styled as Countess of Granard on 24 August 1734.
Death 
4 Oct 1758 
Ireland  
Died 
4 Oct 1765 
Ulster Co, Ireland  
Notes 
Hon. Mary Stewart was born circa 1677.[2] She was the daughter of William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy and Hon. Mary Coote.[1],[2]

She married, firstly, Phineas Preston in 1692 at Mountjoy, Ireland.[2],[1]

She married, secondly, Vice-Admiral George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard, son of Arthur Forbes, 2nd Earl of Granard and Mary Rawdon, in 1709.[1]

She died on 4 October 1765.[1] She was also reported to have died on 4 October 1758.[2]

From 1692, her married name became Preston.[2]

From 1709, her married name became Forbes. As a result of her marriage, Hon. Mary Stewart was styled as Countess of Granard on 24 August 1734.

Children of Hon. Mary Stewart and Phineas Preston

1. Jane Preston+[2] b. c 1690, d. a 12 Nov 1746
2. Mary Preston [2] b. 1696, d. 1749
3. Colonel John Preston+[2] b. 1699, d. 1747
4. Nathaniel Preston [2] b. c 1700

Children of Hon. Mary Stewart and Vice-Admiral George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard

1. Lady Mary Forbes [1] d. 27 Nov 1797
2. Lt.-Gen. George Forbes, 4th Earl of Granard+[1] b. 15 Mar 1710, d. 16 Oct 1769
3. Admiral Hon. John Forbes+[1] b. 1714, d. 10 Mar 1796

Citations

1. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1628. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
2. [S2664] Liberty unknown, “re: Preston Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 5 February 2008. Hereinafter cited as “re: Preston.”

http://www.geni.com/people/Hon-Mary-Forbes-Stewart-Countess-of-Granard/6000000002979384193
Person ID 
I53321 
Roots
Last Modified 
23 Jul 2013 

Father 
William* Stewart,   b. 1653,   d. 24 Aug 1692 
Mother 
Mary* Coote,   b. Abt 1650,   d. Aft 1678 
Married 
Abt 1675 
Family ID 
F18540 
Group Sheet

Family 1 
Phineas (Archibald)* (or John) Preston,   b. 1672, Tara, Ardsallagh Townland, Co Meath, Leinster,Ireland ,   d. Bef 28 Apr 1703, Ulster, Ireland  
Married 
1692 
Mountjoy, Co Tyrone, Ulster, Ireland  
Children 
>
1. Jane* Preston,   b. Abt 1690, Newtown Limavady, Limavady, Co Londonderry, Ireland ,   d. Aft 12 Nov 1746, Fishersville, Tinkling Spring, Augusta Co, Virginia
 
2. Mary Preston,   b. 1693, Northern Ireland ,   d. 23 Jun 1742, Augusta Co, Virginia
 
3. Phineas Preston,   b. 1695, of, Tara and Ardsallagh, Meath, Ireland ,   d. Aft 1730
 
4. Robert Preston,   b. Abt 1697, Ireland ,   d. Aft 1750, Kentucky
>
5. Margaret Preston,   b. Abt 1698, Ireland ,   d. Bef 1742
>
6. John Preston,   b. 1700, Ireland ,   d. 1747, Fishersville, Tinkling Spring, Augusta Co, Virginia
>
7. Elizabeth Preston,   b. 1702, Co Donegal, Ulster, Ireland ,   d. 1780, Fishersville, Tinkling Spring, Augusta Co, Virginia
 
8. James Preston,   b. Abt 1704, Ireland ,   d. Aft 1720

Last Modified 
23 Jul 2013 
Family ID 
F2460 
Group Sheet

Family 2 
George Forbes,   b. 21 Oct 1685, Leinster, Ireland ,   d. 29 Oct 1765, Ireland  
Married 
1701 
Ireland  
Children 
 
1. George Forbes,   b. 15 Mar 1710,   d. 16 Oct 1769
 
2. John Forbes,   b. 17 Jul 1714, Minorca, Balaeric Islands, Spain ,   d. 10 Mar 1796, England

William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy (1653 – 24 August 1692), was an Anglo-Irish peer and soldier.
Stewart was born in 1653, the son of Sir Alexander Stewart, 2nd Baronet, of Ramelton. He married the Honourable Mary Coote, daughter of Richard Coote, 1st Lord Coote, Baron Coloony. They had six sons and two daughters.
He was appointed Master-General of the Ordnance and colonel of a regiment of foot and in 1682 was raised to the Peerage of Ireland as Viscount Mountjoy and Baron Stewart for services during the Irish Rebellion. In 1686 he served in Hungary at the siege of Buda, where he was twice dangerously wounded, and on his return to Ireland was made a brigadier-general. Macaulay styled him “a brave soldier, an accomplished scholar.” In Dublin he was the centre of a small circle of learned and ingenious men, who had, under his presidency, formed themselves into a Royal Society.[1]
In 1688 he commanded a portion of the royal army of the Catholic King James II stationed at Londonderry. But as he was a Protestant, the Duke of Tyrconnell, Lieutenant Governor of the Irish Army, feared he might be influenced in favour of the Protestant William of Orange and sent him at the outbreak of Irish hostilities on a diplomatic mission to France, secretly intimating that his detention would be desirable. He was accordingly thrown into the Bastille, and kept confined there until 1692. During his period of confinement, the Parliament of Ireland passed a bill of attainder requiring Stewart and two to three thousand others to report to Dublin for sentencing; Stewart in particular was directed to break out of the Bastille in order to report, under pain of being drawn and quartered.[2]
On his release, he did indeed switch loyalties and joined William’s army in Flanders as a General, losing his life at the battle of Steenkerque on 24 August 1692, aged about 39.
On his death in 1692 his title passed to his eldest son Sir William Stewart, 2nd Viscount Mountjoy. His fifth son, Charles became an officer in the Royal Navy and a Member of Parliament.

http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/TNGWebsite/getperson.php?personID=I702&tree=CC

Walter FitzAlan, 3rd High Steward

Walter FitzAlan, 1st Hereditary High Steward of Scotland[1]
  – 1177

Flaad (Flathead), Hereditary Steward of Dol[

Alan Alan ‘Dapifer’, Hereitary Steward of Dol[1,

http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/TNGWebsite/getperson.php?personID=I42293&tree=CC

Mary Stewart[1, 2, 3]
 1692 – 1758
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Birth 
Bef 1692  [1] 
Gender 
Female 
Died 
4 Oct 1758  [3] 
Person ID 
I42293 
Clan current
Last Modified 
20 Nov 2007 20:08:00 
 
Father 
William Stewart, of Ramelton, 3rd Baronet, 1st Viscount Mountjoy, b. Oct 1650, Ireland  
Mother 
Mary Coote 
Family ID 
F11751 
Group Sheet
 
Family 
George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard, b. 1685 
Married 
Y  [1, 2, 3] 
Children 
 
1. Mary Forbes
>
2. George Forbes, 4th Earl of Granard, b. 1710
>
3. John Forbes, b. Bef 1745

http://fabpedigree.com/s098/f328692.htm

http://fabpedigree.com/s072/f259087.htm

The Breckinridge family is a family of public figures from the United States. The family has included six members of the United States House of Representatives, two United States Senators, a cabinet member, two Ambassadors, a Vice President of United States and an unsuccessful Presidential candidate. Breckinridges have served as college presidents, prominent ministers, soldiers, theologians and in important positions at state and local levels. The family was most notable in the State of Kentucky and most prominent during the 19th century, during nearly one-third of which a member of the family served in the Congress of the United States. Below is a list of members.
Alexander Breckenridge (1686–1743), First Breckenridge in New World, emigrated to Philadelphia PA c. 1728. Married to Jane Preston in 1695 in County Londonderry, Ireland. She was sister of Robert Preston, first Speaker of Kentucky State House of Representatives . Robert Breckenridge, Sr. (1720–1773), here termed Colonel Robert Breckenridge, Captain in Virginia militia during the French and Indian War and officer in the Revolutionary Army.[dubious – discuss] Son of Alexander Breckenridge I. Married first Sarah Poage. After his first wife’s death Breckenridge married second, his first cousin Letitia Preston.[1] Alexander Breckenridge, son of Robert Breckenridge and Sarah Poage, here termed Captain Alexander Breckenridge. Married wealthy widow Jane Buchanan Floyd whose son John Floyd was Governor of Virginia.[1] James Douglas Breckinridge, son of Captain Alexander Breckenridge (d. 1849), member of Kentucky House of Representatives (1809–11) and the U.S. House of Representatives (1821–23).[1]

Robert Breckenridge (1754–1833), son of Col. Robert Breckenridge and Sarah Poage, Revolutionary War General. Ratifier of the U.S. Constitution. Kentucky State Representative 1792–1795. Speaker of the Kentucky House of Representatives. Brother of Captain Alexander Breckenridge; half-brother of John Breckinridge and James Breckinridge. Robert Breckenridge never married. Nota Bene: During his lifetime Colonel Robert Breckenridge spelled his surname as shown here, as did his father Alexander Breckenridge I. His sons by Leticia Preston, (i.e. James and John) began spelling the family name ‘Breckinridge’.[2]
James Breckinridge (1763–1833), Virginia House Delegate 1789–1802 1806–1808 1819–1821 1823–1824, member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Virginia 1809–1817. Brother of John Breckinridge, Son of Robert Breckinridge and Letitia Preston.[3]
John Breckinridge (1760–1806), Member of House of Burgesses, U.S. District Attorney of Kentucky 1793–1794, Attorney General of Kentucky 1793–1797, Kentucky State Representative 1788–1790 1799–1801, delegate to the Kentucky Constitutional Convention 1799, U.S. Senator from Kentucky 1801–1805, Attorney General of the United States under Jefferson 1805–1806. Married Mary Hopkins Cabell in 1785. Half-brother of Alexander and Robert Breckenridge, brother of James Breckinridge, Son of Colonel Robert Breckinridge and Letitia Preston.[4] Letitia Breckinridge, Daughter of John Breckinridge. Married first to Alfred William Grayson in 1804. Graduate of Cambridge University, lawyer, son of Senator William Grayson of Virginia. Died in 1810. Married second to Peter B. Porter (1773–1844), New York Assemblyman 1802 and 1828, U.S. Representative from New York 1809–1813 and 1815–1816, New York Secretary of State 1815–1816, U.S. Secretary of War 1828–1829.[5] General John Breckinridge Grayson (1806–1862) Born at Cabell’s Dale, Fayette County, Kentucky. Son of Letitia Preston Breckinridge and Alfred William Grayson. Graduated West Point Military Academy, 1826. Lieutenant Colonel U.S. Army at outbreak of Civil War, resigned in 1861, enterest C.S.A. and commissioned Brigadier General. Died while in command of the coastal defenses of Georgia and Florida, in Tallahassee 1862.[6]
Colonel Peter A. Porter (1827–1864), New York Assemblyman 1861–62, Colonel of the 129th New York State Volunteers, killed in action, 1864, Only son of Peter Buell Porter. Married cousin Mary Cabell Breckinridge in 1852. Peter A. Porter (1853–1925), member of the New York Legislature, U.S. Representative from New York 1907–1909. Son of Peter Augustus Porter and Mary Cabell Breckinridge, Grandson of Peter Buell Porter.[7]

Joseph “Cabell” Breckinridge I (1788–1823), Major in War of 1812. Kentucky State Representative 1817–1818, Speaker of the Kentucky House of Representatives. Kentucky Secretary of State 1820–1823. Married Mary Clay Smith, daughter of Samuel Stanhope Smith, President of Princeton University. Son of John Breckinridge.[8] John Cabell Breckinridge (1821–1875) Member Kentucky House of Representatives 1849–51. U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1851–55. Delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1856. Vice President of the United States 1857–61. Candidate for President of the United States 1860. United States Senator from Kentucky 1861. Confederate States Secretary of War 1865. Son of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge I.[9] Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, II (1844–1906) Major in the C.S.A. Married Sallie Frances Johnson, daughter of Robert Ward Johnson in 1869. Son of Hon. John Cabell Breckinridge.[10] John Cabell Breckinridge, II (1870–1941) Prominent New York attorney. Married to Isabella Goodrich (1874–1961), daughter of B.F. Goodrich. Son of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge. Grandson of John Cabell Breckinridge.[11] Mary Marvin Breckinridge (1905–2002), Photojournalist, cinematographer, and philanthropist. Daughter of John Cabell Breckinridge, II and Isabella Goodrich. Great-granddaughter or John Cabell Breckinridge and granddaughter of B.F. Goodrich.

Clifton Rhodes Breckinridge (1846–1932), U.S. Representative from Arkansas 1883–1889 1890–1895, U.S. Minister to Russia 1894–1897, delegate to the Arkansas Constitutional Convention 1917. Married Katherine Breckinridge Carson in 1876. Son of Hon. John Cabell Breckinridge.[12] James Carson Breckinridge (1877–1942) Lieutenant General, USMC, Married Dorothy Throckmorton Thompson, 1922. Son of Clifton Rhodes Breckinridge.[13]
Mary Breckinridge (1881–1965), Founder of the Frontier Nursing Service. Married Richard Thompson. Daughter of Clifton Rhodes Breckinridge, sister of James Carson Breckinridge.

John Witherspoon Owen Breckinridge (1850–1892) Member of California State Assembly 1884–85. Son of Hon. John Cabell Breckinridge. Married to Louise Tevis, daughter of Lloyd Tevis, First President of Wells Fargo Bank.[14] John Cabell Breckinridge, Sr. (1879–1914) Prominent San Francisco businessman. Son of John Witherspoon Owen Breckinridge. Married Adelaide Murphy, daughter of Samuel Green Murphy, President of the First National Bank of San Francisco, California.[15] John Cabell “Bunny” Breckinridge, Jr. (1903–1996) Actor and drag queen. Son of John Cabell Breckinridge, Sr.[15]

Rev. John Breckinridge, D. D. (1797–1841) Born at Cabell’s Dale, son of John Breckinridge. Presbyterian Minister. Graduated Princeton College 1818, Princeton Theological Seminary 1821. Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives. Married in 1823 Margaret, daughter of Rev. Samuel Miller D. D.[6] Mary Cabell Breckinridge (1826–1854) Married cousin Colonel Peter A. Porter in 1852. Daughter of Rev. John Breckinridge.
Samuel Miller Breckinridge (1828–1891) Member of Missouri legislature 1854–1855. Became Circuit Court judge in 1859. Elder in the Presbyterian Church and a leading member of its General Assembly. Married Virginia Harrison Castleman. Son of Rev. John Breckinridge.[16] Margaret Miller Breckinridge (1851–1919) Married St. Louis, Missouri businessman William Strudwick Long. Daughter of Samuel Miller Breckinridge.[17] Samuel Miller Breckinridge Long (1881–1958) lawyer and diplomat. Graduated Princeton in 1904. Advisor to Presidents Woodrow Wilson and Franklin Delano Roosevelt. U.S. Ambassador to Italy 1933–36. U.S. delegate to Dumbarton Oaks Conference. Son of Margaret Miller Breckinridge and William Strudwick Long.[18]

Robert Jefferson Breckinridge (1800–1871), Kentucky State Representative 1825–1828, Kentucky Superintendent of Public Instruction 1849–1853, candidate for delegate to the Kentucky Constitutional Convention 1849. Son of John Breckinridge. Married Ann Sophonisba Preston in 1823.[19] Mary Cabell Breckinridge, (born 1828) Daughter of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge. Married to William Warfield. Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield (1851–1921), Presbyterian theologian, principal of Princeton Theological Seminary. Son of Mary Cabell Breckinridge and William Warfield.[6]
Ethelbert Dudley Warfield (1861–1936) Graduate of Princeton, Oxford, and Columbia Law School. President of Miami University and Lafayette College, author, Director of Princeton Theological Seminary. Son of Mary Cabell Breckinridge and William Warfield.[6]

Robert Jefferson Breckinridge, Jr. (1834–1915), Confederate States Representative from Kentucky 1862–1865, Colonel in the Confederate States Army, Kentucky Common Pleas Court Judge 1876. Son of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge. Married Katharine Morrison in 1856.[20]
Marie Lettice Preston Breckinridge (born 1836), married Rev. William Collins Handy in 1857. L. Irving Handy (1861–1922), U.S. Representative from Delaware 1897–1899, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1904. Son of Marie Lettice Preston Breckinridge and Rev. William Collins Handy. Nephew of William Campbell Preston Breckinridge.[21]

William Campbell Preston Breckinridge (1837–1904), delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1876, U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1885–1895. Married Lucretia Hart Clay, granddaughter of Henry Clay. Son of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge.[22] Desha Breckinridge (1867–1935), editor and publisher of the Lexington Herald. Married Madeline McDowell Breckinridge, great-granddaughter of Henry Clay in 1898. Son of W.C.P. Breckinridge. Brother of Sophonisba Breckinridge.
Sophonisba Preston Breckinridge (1886–1948), Lawyer, Activist involved in Women’s rights, Civil Rights, Labor, and Pacifist movements; namesake of Breckinridge House, a dormitory of the University of Chicago. Daughter of W.C.P. Breckinridge. Sister of Desha Breckinridge.

Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Sr. (1842–1921), General in the U.S. Army. Married Louise Ludlow Dudley, daughter of Ethelbert Ludlow Dudley, 1868. Son of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge.[23] Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Jr. (1872–1898), U.S. Naval officer, drowned. Namesake of USS Breckinridge. Son of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Sr.[24]
Ethelbert Ludlow Dudley Breckinridge (1875–1914) Graduated Princeton 1898, Captain in U.S. Army, wounded in the Philippine-American War. Son of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Sr. Married Genevieve Pearson Mattingly (1878–1957).[25] William Mattingly Breckinridge (1905–1996) Major General, U.S. Army. Chief of the U.S. Army Security Agency. Married Frances Naylor. Son of Ethelbert Ludlow Dudley Breckinridge.[26]

Scott Dudley Breckinridge, Sr. (1882–1941) Physician in Lexington, Kentucky, author, U.S. Fencing Champion (Foil), 1906 and 1914. Competed in 1912 Olympic Games in Stockholm. Married Gertrude Ashby Bayne. Son of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Sr.[27] John Bayne Breckinridge (1913–1979), Colonel in U.S. Army during World War II. Kentucky State Representative 1956–59, Attorney General of Kentucky 1960–64, 1968–1972, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1960, U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1973–79. Son of Scott Dudley Breckinridge, Sr.[28]
Scott Dudley Breckinridge, Jr. (1917–2000) Deputy Inspector General of the C.I.A., author. Married Helen Virden Babbit. Son of Scott Dudley Breckinridge, Sr.[29]

Henry Skillman Breckinridge (1886–1960), Colonel in U.S. Army, United States Assistant Secretary of War, prominent attorney, U.S Fencing Champion (Épée), 1924. Son of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Sr. Married Ruth Bradley Woodman in 1910, member of prominent New England Perkins Family. Elizabeth Foster Breckinridge (1911–2005), Prominent Washington, D.C. socialite and philanthropist. Daughter of Henry Skillman Breckinridge. Married to John Stephens Graham, attorney, Assistant U.S. Secretary of Treasury, Commissioner of U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Commissioner of Internal Revenue, brother of Katherine G. Howard.

Rev. William Lewis Breckinridge, D. D. (1803–1876) Born at Cabell’s Dale, Fayette County, Kentucky. Presbyterian minister for 45 years. Moderator of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Council. Son of John Breckinridge. Married Frances Prevost in 1823, Granddaughter of President Samuel Stanhope Smith of Princeton University.[30]

Francis Preston (1765–1736), Virginia House Delegate 1788–1789 1812–1814, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1793–1797, Virginia State Senator 1816–1820. Cousin of John Brown, John Breckinridge, and James Breckinridge, Grandson of Robert Preston.[31] William Campbell Preston (1794–1860), South Carolina State Representative 1828–1834, U.S. Senator from South Carolina 1833–1842. Son of Francis Preston.[32]
William Ballard Preston (1805–1862), Virginia House Delegate 1830–1832 1844–1845, Virginia State Senator 1840–1844, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1847–1849, U.S. Secretary of War 1849–1850, Delegate to the Confederate States Congress from Virginia 1861–1862, Confederate States Senator from Virginia 1862. Nephew of Francis Preston.[33]
William Preston (1816–1887), delegate to the Kentucky Constitutional Convention 1849, Kentucky State Representative 1850 1868–1869, Kentucky State Senator 1851–1853, U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1852–1855, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1856, U.S. Minister to Spain 1859–1861. Nephew of Francis Preston.[34]

John Brown (1757–1837), Virginia State Senator 1784–1788, Delegate to the Continental Congress from Virginia 1787–1788, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1789–1792, U.S. Senator from Kentucky 1792–1805. Brother of James Brown, Cousin of John Breckinridge, James Breckinridge, and Francis Preston.[35] B. Gratz Brown (1826–1885), Missouri State Representative 1852–1858, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1860, U.S. Senator from Missouri 1863–1867, Governor of Missouri 1871–1873, candidate for Vice President of the United States 1872. Grandson of John Brown.[36]

James Brown (1766–1835), U.S. District Attorney in Kentucky 1791, Kentucky Secretary of State 1792–1798, Secretary of the Territory of Orleans 1804, U.S. District Attorney in Louisiana 1805–1808, U.S. Senator from Louisiana 1813–1817 1819–1823, U.S. Minister to France 1823–1829. Brother of John Brown, Cousin of John Breckinridge, James Breckinridge, and Francis Preston.[37] Thomas H. Clay (1803–1871), U.S. Minister to Nicaragua 1863, U.S. Minister to Honduras 1863. Father-in-law of William Campbell Preston Breckinridge.[38]

Henry Donnel Foster (1808–1880), U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1843–1847 1871–1873, Pennsylvania State Representative 1857, candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania 1860. Cousin of John C. Breckinridge.[39]

NOTE: Peter B. Porter was also uncle of U.S. Senator Augustus S. Porter.[40] Thomas H. Clay was also son of Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives Henry Clay,[41] brother of U.S. Representative James Brown Clay,[42] third cousin of U.S. diplomat Brutus Clay,[43] fourth cousin of U.S. Senator Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr.,[44] first cousin twice removed of U.S. Representative Matthew Clay[45] and Kentucky State Senator Green Clay,[46] third cousin once removed of U.S. Senator Clement Comer Clay,[47] and second cousin once removed of Alabama State Senator Matthew Clay,[48] U.S. Representative Brutus J. Clay,[49] and U.S. diplomat Cassius M. Clay.[50]

The Spencers were an established landed family who descended from the great John Churchill, Duke of Marlborough and from King Charles II. Diana had no less than four descents from Charles II, through his illegitimate offspring. These include James Scott, Duke of Monmouth, Charles’ eldest son by his mistress Lucy Walter, in a bid for the crown, Monmouth led a rebellion against his uncle James II, and was later executed, Henry Fitzroy, Charles’ son by Barbara Villiers, Duchess of Cleveland, Charles Beauclerk, the king’s son by his most famous mistress, the actress Nell Gwyn and Charles Lennox, his son by his French mistress, Louise de Kerouaille.

http://www.englishmonarchs.co.uk/stuart_3.htm

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to House of Stuart in America

  1. Reblogged this on Rosamond Press and commented:

    Erskine Caldwell is the New King of the New South that rejects the fake rednecks and neo-Confederates.

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