Alice, Ida, and Margaret de Tosny

Greg 1979 & Wife at their Weddingrenap0004

Greg 1975 ChristineAlice of Huntingdon was the mother of Margaret de Tosny who was the mother of Rosamond de Clifford. Alice is the descendant of the Kings of Norway, Sweden, and Denmark, and is kin to Kings of Scotland. Ralph de Tosny was the Standard Bearer for William the Conqueror who had an interest in being connected to Rollo and the Arthurian Legends in order to bring the Celts in England – whom he now ruled – to his side.

King Henry had an interest in forming a marriage pact with the above royalty who were sending Crusaders to the Holy Land. Were these Norseman inspired by the legend of King Arthur and Guinevere?

This morning I came across this name. Thyra HARALDSDÓTTIR Queen of Norway. I then saw
her kindred Haraldson and Erikson. I put the T back in this Nordic name which stands for the god, Thor. I suspect the name Haraldson was oroignally Tharaldson ‘Son of Thor’ which is the surname of my ex-wife, Mary Ann Tharaldson.

Godehildis was the first Queen of Jerusalem who married her kindred, Baldwin King of Jerusalem. Alice’s mother was mother was Judith Lens De Boulogne. It appears this lineage was a threat to rule the world. This is to say the Vikings and Danes were a threat to rule all of Christendom. This is an idea that Hitler entertained, as well as J.R. Tolkien. How about Winston Church of the British Empire? How many of the Norseman were Knights Templar who went to the Holy Land in search of the Norse Holy Grail as discribed by Robert Wace in his Roman de Rou?

Becket accused his friend Henry of practicing a pagan heresy. The grandfather of William de Tracy (William I de Tracy) who helped slay Becket, was an illegitimate son of King Henry I. This suggests Becket got in the way of Henry’s attempt to mend the White Ship disaster that might have been an attempt to scuttle the Norse Master Plan by the ancient families in Rome and Venice.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2013

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Ship

His grandson Raoul II took part with the premier barons in the court of William the Conqueror (1035–1087). He was the Normand standard bearer in 1054.

Narratives, more or less legendary, gathered around the family: the chroniclers report the exploits of Roger I, the Moor-Eater, in Hispania. His wife, Godehildis/Gotelina, was linked to a miracle at Sainte-Foy de Conques. At the start of the 12th century, the Norman chronicler Orderic Vitalis explains that the family was descended from Malahulce, uncle of Rollo.[3]

http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/3/2879.htm

Björn “the Old” ERIKSSON King of Sweden

http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/3/3160.htm

Margaret de Tosny

Father
Radulf II de Tosny b. circa 1078, d. circa 1126
Mother
Alice of Huntingdon b. circa 1072?
Margaret de Tosny was born in 1109 at Northumberland, England. She was the daughter of Radulf II de Tosny and Alice of Huntingdon. Margaret de Tosny married Walter, 1st Lord Clifford, son of Richard fitz Ponce, circa 1135. Margaret de Tosny died in 1185 at age 76 years.
Family
Walter, 1st Lord Clifford b. circa 1113, d. 1190
Children
Walter, 2nd Lord Clifford+ b. c 1140, d. 1222/23
Richard de Clifford b. c 11421
“Fair” Rosamund de Clifford+ b. c 1146, d. c 1176
Lucia de Clifford b. c 11481

http://www.mathematical.com/boulognelambert1020.html

Alice (Adeliza) Huntingdon
born Abt 1085 Of, Flamsted, Hertfordshire, England
died Aft 1126
married 1103 England

father:
*Waltheof Earl of Northumberland
born Abt 1046 Of Northumberland, England
died 31 May 1076
buried Jun 1076 Crowland, Lincolnshire, England

mother:
*Judith Lens De Boulogne
born 1054/1055 Of, Lens, Artois, France
married 1070 Of, Artois, France

siblings:
*Matilda (Maud) Huntingdon born Abt 1072 Of, Huntington, Huntingdonshire, England
died 23 Apr 1130/1131 Scotland buried 1130/1131 Scone, Perthshire, England

spouse:
*Ralph De Toeni (De Conches)
born Abt 1079 Of Flamsted, Hertfordshire, England
died Abt 1126 Conches, Seine-et-Marne, France

Thyra married Styrbjörn “Sterki” (the Strong) ÓLÁFSSON Prince of Sweden, son of Óláf “Mitkg” BJÖRNSSON King of Sweden and Ingeberg THRANDSDÓTTIR. (Styrbjörn “Sterki” (the Strong) ÓLÁFSSON Prince of Sweden was born in 922 and died in 984 in Fyrisval, Uppsala, Sweden.)

Thyra HARALDSDÓTTIR Queen of Norway

http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/3/2879.htm

http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/3/2861.htm

https://www.facebook.com/#!/maryann.tharaldsen?fref=ts

Halfdan FRODASSON

Godwulf

Ralph IV de Toni, Lord of Clifford (b. Abt. 1088, d. 1126)
Ralph IV de Toni, Lord of Clifford (son of Ralph III “Seigneur de Conches” de Toni and Elizabeth (Isabel) de Montfort)3014, 3015 was born Abt. 1088 in Of Clifford Castle, Herefordshire, England3015, and died 1126. He married Judith (Alice) de Huntingdon on Abt. 1113 in Of, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England3015, daughter of Waltheof II Earl of Huntingdon & Northumberland and Judith of Lens.

More About Ralph IV de Toni, Lord of Clifford:
Ancestral File Number: M579-CT.3015

More About Ralph IV de Toni, Lord of Clifford and Judith (Alice) de Huntingdon:
Marriage: Abt. 1113, Of, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England.3015

Children of Ralph IV de Toni, Lord of Clifford and Judith (Alice) de Huntingdon are:
+Margaret de Toni, b. Abt. 1118, Of, Flamstead, Herefordshire, England3015, d. 11853015.
+Roger III de Toni, b. Abt. 1120, Of Herefordshire, England3015.

Halfdan “le Vaillant” Snjalle (Haraldsson), PRINCE of Denmark, KING of Sweden (590 – 650) MP
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Danske sagnkonger – Legendary Danish kings
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Nicknames:
“Hálfdan snjalli”, “den vise”, “den voldsomme”, “the valiant”, “snälle”, “the Violent”, “den tapre”, “Halvdan Snjalle”, “Halfdan /Haroldsson/”, “‘the Violent'”
Birthdate:
590
Birthplace:
Jutland
Death:
Died 650 in Denmark
Occupation:
King of Skåne, King in Sweden & Denmark, Roi de Suède, King in Sweden, крал в Скауней, Швеция, King of Sweden, Konge i Sverige?, King of Roeskild, Kung av Roskilde, Kung i Danmark, Roi de Scanie, Kung av Sverige

http://www.geni.com/people/Halfdan-Haraldsson-the-Valiant-Sn%C3%A4lle-PRINCE-of-Denmark-KING-of-Sweden/5604954309240087415

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olaf_II_of_Norway

Coming from Île-de-France,[2] the Tosnys first based themselves in Normandy in the 10th century to collaborate with the descendants of the Vikings. They formed part of this new elite which appeared around dukes Richard I and Richard II at the turn of the 10th to 11th century. In 991, Raoul I of Tosny witnessed the first surviving international treaty in Normand history (an accord between Duke Richard I and the Anglo-Saxon king Ethelred II). As one of the top Normands, he set out to fight in southern Italy. His grandson Raoul II took part with the premier barons in the court of William the Conqueror (1035–1087). He was the Normand standard bearer in 1054.

Narratives, more or less legendary, gathered around the family: the chroniclers report the exploits of Roger I, the Moor-Eater, in Hispania. His wife, Godehildis/Gotelina, was linked to a miracle at Sainte-Foy de Conques. At the start of the 12th century, the Norman chronicler Orderic Vitalis explains that the family was descended from Malahulce, uncle of Rollo.[3]

[edit] A model aristocratic family

[edit] Formation of its power

As with several Norman families (such as the Beaumont), the origin of the house of Tosny’s power derived from two sources :
recovery of church goods. According to Lucien Musset, Hugues, archbishop of Rouen (942-989) split off lands from his cathedral’s lands and gave them to his brother Raoul I of Tosny
grants of land by the dukes of Normandy, notably Richard II

More unusually, the house of Tosny probably acquired part of its fortune from foreign adventures – Raoul I and Roger I fought in the County of Apulia and in Iberia in the first quarter of the 11th century.

[edit] The dangers in its history

Raoul II of Tosny participated in the Norman Conquest in 1066, and was rewarded with domains in England, most notably the two baronies of Flamstead (Hertfordshire) and Wrethamthorpe (Norfolk). Three other family members were also rewarded : Raoul’s brother Robert de Stafford, Robert de Beauvoir and his son Béranger, belonging to a collateral branch.[4] However, it seems that on the whole the Tosnys did not play an important role in England. In the Duchy of Normandy, they were particularly active during the troubles which followed William I’s death (1087) and the subsequent conflict between Empress Mathilda and Stephen (1135–1144). Nevertheless, the 12th century gives the impression of a decline in the Tosny family fortunes in comparison to some of the neighbouring houses in eastern Normandy, such as the houses of Beaumont-Meulan, Montfort and Harcourt.

In 1204 Roger IV of Tosny lost his continental fiefdoms as a result of his support for John and thus the family had to withdraw to England to begin again. In 1309, its male line became extinct.

[edit] The management of its goods

Like all Norman barons, the Tosnys had fiefdoms scattered throughout Normandy and England. In 1077, a marriage between Raoul II and Isabelle de Montfort allowed the Tosnys to direct the châtellenie of Nogent-le-Roi, which they held onto until around 1200. The family possessions thus stretched as far as the border of the duchy of Normandy.[5] Nevertheless, the heart of their continental lands was centred around Conches-en-Ouche. Part of their fiefdoms was let out to a small clientele of vassals.

The family made grants to abbeys, notably to those they had founded themselves (the Saint-Pierre de Castillon monastery c.1035).[6] After 1066, as Lucien Musset remarks, the Tosnys showed themselves especially liberal to their English fiefdoms but avoided diminishing their Norman lands.

The texts give little information on the administration of these lands, though we know prévôts were installed in the main centres.

[edit] The honour of Conches and of Tosny

With its two axes, Conches-en-Ouche and Tosny (in the bend of the Seine immediately upstream of Andelys), the barony of Tosny was a two-headed one.

According to the 1172 state of its fiefdoms, the “honneur”[7] amounted to 50 or 51 knights’ fiefs. The lands were mostly found in Haute-Normandie, more precisely between Risle and Iton. The vast forêt de Conches formed its centre. It also had scattered domains in the Eure valley (Fontaine-sous-Jouy, Cailly-sur-Eure, Planches, Acquigny), the Seine valley (Tosny, Villers-sur-le-Roule, Bernières-sur-Seine), in Vexin Normand (Vesly, Guerny, Villers-en-Vexin, Hacqueville, Heuqueville, Val de Pîtres), in Pays de Caux and Talou around Blainville-Crevon, Mortemer (Seine-Maritime, Mortemer-sur-Eaulne), Dieppe and Yerville.[8] Many of these lands were let out to vassals, notably les Clères.

Orderic Vitalis mentions four main castles in the barony in 1119 : Conches-en-Ouche, Tosny, Portes, Acquigny.
Ida de Tosny

Ida de Tosny
Spouse(s)
Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk
Noble family
de Tosny
Father
(likely) Ralph V de Tosny
Mother
(likely) Margaret de Beaumont
Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk was very likely a daughter of Ralph V de Tosny (died 1162) and his wife Margaret (born circa 1125 and living in 1185), a daughter of Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester. [1]

[edit] Relationship to Henry II

Ida de Tosny was a royal ward and mistress of King Henry II, by whom she was mother of one of his illegitimate sons – William Longespée, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, (b c. 1176-March 7, 1226). For many years, until the discovery of a charter of William mentioning “Comitissa Ida, mater mea” (engl. “Countess Ida, my mother”,[2] it was assumed that Rosamund Clifford, a previous mistress of Henry’s, was the mother, but painstaking genealogical detective work [3] has since shown otherwise. Ida was not the first English royal ward to be taken as mistress by a King who was her guardian; that honour probably belongs to Isabel de Beaumont (Elizabeth de Beaumont), daughter of Robert de Beaumont, who fought at the Battle of Hastings with the Conqueror. That king’s youngest son made Beaumont’s daughter his mistress.[4]

[edit] Marriage

Around Christmas 1181, Ida de Tosny was given in marriage to Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk by Henry II, together with the manors of Acle, Halvergate and South Walsham, which had been confiscated from his inheritance after his father’s death (Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk).[5] Ida and Roger had a number of children including:
Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206/ 1207, Maud Marshal, a daughter of William Marshal
William Bigod
Ralph Bigod
Roger Bigod
Margery, married William de Hastings
Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert

Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV, 2nd Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

[edit] Ida de Tosney in fiction

Ida de Tosny and her husband Roger are the main characters in Elizabeth Chadwick’s The Time of Singing (Sphere, 2008), published in the USA as For the King’s Favor. They appear as minor characters in other of her books set at the same time, notably To Defy a King, which concerns the marriage of their son Hugh to Maud, a daughter of William Marshal

Siward Digera Earl of Northumberland 23
Marriage: Unknown

General Notes:

Siward was allegedly a descendant of the Danish royal family whose ancestors may have arrived in England a few generations earlier as part of the Norse colonisation of Britain. Some historians suggest that Siward arrived in England with Canute and that Canute invested the title and position of Earl of York onto him in 1031.

In 1033 Siward married into the Northumbrian princely house, that of Bamburgh (after winning their admiration as a warrior) by taking Aelfled, granddaughter of Uchtred, former Earl of Northumbria, as his wife and thus strengthening his own position in that domain. Some sources say that through this marriage, Siward was then distantly related to Duncan, another version is that Siward’s own sister became wife of Duncan. This relation to the Scottish royal family would later affect the landscape of Scottish politics.

Siward was encouraged to settle disputes between his deputies Carl the Hold of York and Eadulf the Earl of Bamburgh but was ultimately unsuccessful. The dispute had started in 1016 when Uchtred the Bold was murdered by Carl’s father Thurbrand the Hold during the meeting with Canute. Eadulf had been Earl (only of Bernicia) since the death of his brother Ealdred, Earl of Bernicia, Uchtred’s oldest son, sometime after 1019. Ealdred had ended up killing Thurband the Hold to avenge his father and in turn Carl the Hold killed Ealdred.

In 1041 Eadulf III of Bernicia, the Earl of the North-East, was killed. The assailant was probably Siward who became Earl of Northumbria. Siward continued to rule all of Northumbria (including Bernicia) from 1041 until his death in 1055. His marriage produced two sons: Osbearne who died in battle in 1054 and Waltheof who eventually became Earl of Northumbria.

Through marriage Siward became either the uncle or the brother-in-law of Malcolm Canmore (one text erroneously calls him his grandfather). Following Macbeth’s defeat of Malcolm’s father Duncan I in 1040, the infant Malcolm was sent to Northumbria to be guarded by Siward. Siward provided protection, shelter and military training for the future Scottish ruler.

Siward served as a general to King Harthacanute (second son of King Canute) and Edward the Confessor and gained great renown for his skills as a soldier.

In 1053 Edward the Confessor agreed to assist the now adult Malcolm in taking the throne of Scotland and designated Siward as leader of the English army (over 10,000 strong).

In 1054 Siward led the English invasion of Scotland. He defeated Macbeth’s forces when the two armies clashed on July 27 (some historians suggest that Siward’s army disguised their attack by concealing themselves behind tree branches and wood “used as camouflage” from nearby Birnam forest). The Annals of Ulster reported that the Battle of Dunsinane left 3000 Scots and 1500 English dead. Thus the incursion was met with limited success even though it succeeded in capturing the fortress of Dunsinane.

Although Macbeth’s army suffered heavy losses, Macbeth himself managed to escape north and continued to rule for another three years until his final and decisive defeat in 1057 at the Battle of Lumphanan.

Siward’s oldest son, Osbearne, and his son-in-law were killed during the campaign in Scotland.

Siward died in York in early 1055 never seeing the final defeat of Macbeth. Siward himself deeply regretted ‘dying like a cow’ and not having been killed in battle. He is reputed to have risen from his death-bed and donned his armour to meet his end more fittingly. Siward is reputedly buried at St Olave’s Church, York, which he is said to have founded.

As Siward’s oldest son Osbearne had died in the Scottish campaign and Waltheof being only 10 at the time of father’s death, Tostig became Siward’s successor as Earl of Northumbria.

Rumoured to be a man of unusual strength and size (some referring to him as a “giant”) it was traditionally said that Siward’s grandfather was a bear and Siward himself was the dragon-slayer of Orkney.

In the 20th century excavations were made of Siward’s grave. Supposedly these revealed a skeleton of a man who would have been 6’7″ tall.

Siward’s only surviving son Waltheof, 1st Earl of Northampton, married Judith of Lens, a niece of William the Conqueror. William executed Waltheof in 1076 after finding out (from Judith) that he had been involved in two conspiracies against him. Waltheof was the only Anglo-Saxon noble to be executed by William the Conqueror.

Malcolm’s son, David I, would later marry Siward’s granddaughter Matilda, widow of Simon de St. Liz the elder. Siward’s descendants also included James I of England, although this was not fully known during James’ time.

Siward’s direct descendant and genealogically at the time senior most heir John Dudley, Viscount Lisle, Earl of Warwick, became Lord President of the Council and effective regent during the reign of Edward VI and was created 1st Duke of Northumberland.

It is also said that Siward was the forefather of the Armstrong Clan, a famous border reiver clan. 28

Margaret de Tosny
b. 1109, d. 1185
Margaret de Tosny|b. 1109\nd. 1185|p377.htm#i6984|Radulf II de Tosny|b. c 1078\nd. c 1126|p362.htm#i6999|Alice of Huntingdon|b. c 1072?|p57.htm#i7000|Ralph de Tosny of Flamstead|b. bt 1025 – 1030\nd. 24 Mar 1101/2|p356.htm#i18676|Isabel de Montfort-l’Amaury, dame de Nogent|b. c 1055?|p214.htm#i24145|Waltheof S., 1st Earl of Northumberland, Huntingdon and Northampton|b. b 1035\nd. 31 May 1076|p349.htm#i8095|Judith “the Countess” de Lens|b. 1054/55|p63.htm#i8094|
Father
Radulf II de Tosny b. circa 1078, d. circa 1126
Mother
Alice of Huntingdon b. circa 1072?
Margaret de Tosny was born in 1109 at Northumberland, England. She was the daughter of Radulf II de Tosny and Alice of Huntingdon. Margaret de Tosny married Walter, 1st Lord Clifford, son of Richard fitz Ponce, circa 1135. Margaret de Tosny died in 1185 at age 76 years.
Family
Walter, 1st Lord Clifford b. circa 1113, d. 1190
Children
Walter, 2nd Lord Clifford+ b. c 1140, d. 1222/23
Richard de Clifford b. c 11421
“Fair” Rosamund de Clifford+ b. c 1146, d. c 1176
Lucia de Clifford b. c 11481

Úlfr of Denmark
b. circa 950
Úlfr of Denmark|b. c 950|p76.htm#i9959|Shrotlingus of Denmark|b. c 925|p76.htm#i9960||||Ursus of Denmark|b. c 900|p76.htm#i9961||||||||||
Father
Shrotlingus of Denmark b. circa 925
Úlfr of Denmark was born circa 950. He was the son of Shrotlingus of Denmark.
Family

Children
Bjørn Úlfsson+ b. c 975
N. N. of Denmark+ b. c 980

http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/3/3160.htm

Björn “the Old” ERIKSSON King of Sweden

http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/3/3160.htm

Siward “Digera” BJORNSSON Earl of Northumbria

Halfdan “the Old” HRINGSSON King in Ringerik

Thorri SNAERSSON King in Kvenland

http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/3/2979.htm

Fornjotur King in Kvenland
Born: Abt 160, Finland

Baldwin I of Jerusalem, formerly Baldwin I of Edessa, born Baldwin of Boulogne (French: Baudouin de Boulogne), 1058?[1] – 2 April 1118, was one of the leaders of the First Crusade, who became the first Count of Edessa and then the second ruler and first titled King of Jerusalem. He was the brother of Godfrey of Bouillon, who was the first ruler of the crusader state of Jerusalem, although Godfrey refused the title of ‘king’ which Baldwin accepted.

Afterwards he lived in Normandy, where he married Godehilde (or Godvera) de Toeni, daughter of Raoul de Conches of a noble Anglo-Norman family (and formerly betrothed wife of Robert de Beaumont). He returned to Lower Lorraine in order to take control of the county of Verdun (previously held by Godfrey).

The House of Tosny[1] was an important noble family in 10th and 11th century Normandy, though it did not include any comtes or vicomtes. Its founder was Raoul I of Tosny (died after 1024).

Notable members
Coming from Île-de-France,[2] the Tosnys first based themselves in Normandy in the 10th century to collaborate with the descendants of the Vikings. They formed part of this new elite which appeared around dukes Richard I and Richard II at the turn of the 10th to 11th century. In 991, Raoul I of Tosny witnessed the first surviving international treaty in Normand history (an accord between Duke Richard I and the Anglo-Saxon king Ethelred II). As one of the top Normands, he set out to fight in southern Italy. His grandson Raoul II took part with the premier barons in the court of William the Conqueror (1035–1087). He was the Normand standard bearer in 1054.

Narratives, more or less legendary, gathered around the family: the chroniclers report the exploits of Roger I, the Moor-Eater, in Hispania. His wife, Godehildis/Gotelina, was linked to a miracle at Sainte-Foy de Conques. At the start of the 12th century, the Norman chronicler Orderic Vitalis explains that the family was descended from Malahulce, uncle of Rollo.[3]

[edit] A model aristocratic family
[edit] Formation of its power
As with several Norman families (such as the Beaumont), the origin of the house of Tosny’s power derived from two sources :
recovery of church goods. According to Lucien Musset, Hugues, archbishop of Rouen (942-989) split off lands from his cathedral’s lands and gave them to his brother Raoul I of Tosny
grants of land by the dukes of Normandy, notably Richard II
More unusually, the house of Tosny probably acquired part of its fortune from foreign adventures – Raoul I and Roger I fought in the County of Apulia and in Iberia in the first quarter of the 11th century.
[edit] The dangers in its history
Raoul II of Tosny participated in the Norman Conquest in 1066, and was rewarded with domains in England, most notably the two baronies of Flamstead (Hertfordshire) and Wrethamthorpe (Norfolk). Three other family members were also rewarded : Raoul’s brother Robert de Stafford, Robert de Beauvoir and his son Béranger, belonging to a collateral branch.[4] However, it seems that on the whole the Tosnys did not play an important role in England. In the Duchy of Normandy, they were particularly active during the troubles which followed William I’s death (1087) and the subsequent conflict between Empress Mathilda and Stephen (1135–1144). Nevertheless, the 12th century gives the impression of a decline in the Tosny family fortunes in comparison to some of the neighbouring houses in eastern Normandy, such as the houses of Beaumont-Meulan, Montfort and Harcourt.

In 1204 Roger IV of Tosny lost his continental fiefdoms as a result of his support for John and thus the family had to withdraw to England to begin again. In 1309, its male line became extinct.
[edit] The management of its goods

Like all Norman barons, the Tosnys had fiefdoms scattered throughout Normandy and England. In 1077, a marriage between Raoul II and Isabelle de Montfort allowed the Tosnys to direct the châtellenie of Nogent-le-Roi, which they held onto until around 1200. The family possessions thus stretched as far as the border of the duchy of Normandy.[5] Nevertheless, the heart of their continental lands was centred around Conches-en-Ouche. Part of their fiefdoms was let out to a small clientele of vassals.
The family made grants to abbeys, notably to those they had founded themselves (the Saint-Pierre de Castillon monastery c.1035).[6] After 1066, as Lucien Musset remarks, the Tosnys showed themselves especially liberal to their English fiefdoms but avoided diminishing their Norman lands.
The texts give little information on the administration of these lands, though we know prévôts were installed in the main centres.

[edit] The honour of Conches and of Tosny

With its two axes, Conches-en-Ouche and Tosny (in the bend of the Seine immediately upstream of Andelys), the barony of Tosny was a two-headed one.
According to the 1172 state of its fiefdoms, the “honneur”[7] amounted to 50 or 51 knights’ fiefs. The lands were mostly found in Haute-Normandie, more precisely between Risle and Iton. The vast forêt de Conches formed its centre. It also had scattered domains in the Eure valley (Fontaine-sous-Jouy, Cailly-sur-Eure, Planches, Acquigny), the Seine valley (Tosny, Villers-sur-le-Roule, Bernières-sur-Seine), in Vexin Normand (Vesly, Guerny, Villers-en-Vexin, Hacqueville, Heuqueville, Val de Pîtres), in Pays de Caux and Talou around Blainville-Crevon, Mortemer (Seine-Maritime, Mortemer-sur-Eaulne), Dieppe and Yerville.[8] Many of these lands were let out to vassals, notably les Clères.
Orderic Vitalis mentions four main castles in the barony in 1119 : Conches-en-Ouche, Tosny, Portes, Acquigny.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Tosny
Malahulc Haldrick Eysteinsson, Jarl of Norway (c.845 – 912

Malahule (Haldrick) (Malahulc) (Tresney) Eysteinsson
born about 0845 Maer, Nord Trondelag, Norway

father:
*Eystein “Glumra” Ivarsson Earl of More
born about 0800 Maer, Nord Trondelag, Norway

mother:
*Ascrida (Aseda) Rognvaldsdatter Countess of Oppland
born about 0804 Maer, Nord Trondelag, Norway
married about 0846 Maer, Nord Trondelag, Norway

siblings:
*Rognvald Eysteinsson Earl of More
born about 0830 Maer, Nord Trondelag, Norway died 0890/94 Orkney, Orkney Islands, Scotland
*Svanhild Eysteinsdatter born about 0850 Maer, Nord Trondelag, Norway
Sigurd I “the Mighty” Eysteinsson born about 0832 Maer, Nord Trondelag, Norway
died 0874 Orkney, Orkney Islands, Scotland buried Ekkialsbakki, Sydero, Dornoch Firth

spouse:
unknown

children:
*Richard I de Saint Sauveur
*Ralnulph Count of Bayeux born about 0895 Maer, Nord Trondelag, Norway

biographical and/or anecdotal:

notes or source:
http://www.mathematical.com/eysteinsonmalehule845.html

Sveide “The Sea King” Sviadrasson Viking Norse King
born Abt 0650 Of, Raumsdal, Norway
http://home.comcast.net/~homerbjames/HBJ/V01/V01_Viking.htm

5. Rognvald (Ragnvald) Eysteinsson of More, Earl of More (Count of Maerc, etc.), died 890, married Hilda (Hildir or Hildur), daughter of Rolf Nefio. They had two sons as follows:
1. Thoric, Count of Maerc, according to Crispin and Macary.
2. Rollo the Dane. See below.
According to Crispin and Macary, Rognvald also had a natural son, Hrollager, living in 896, who married Emina _______. They had a son, Hrolf Thurstan, living in 920, who married Gerlotte, daughter of Thibaut, Count of Blois and of Chartres. They were ancestors (five generations) of Hugh of Avranches, 1st Earl of Chester, who died in 1101, and who married Ermentrude, daughter of Hugh, Count of Clermont. See Table III in Crispin and Macary.
The following was obtained from Wikipedia on the Internet June 2006:
“Ragnvald “the Wise” Eysteinsson (830–890) (Old Norse: Rögnvaldr Mærajarl Norwegian: Ragnvald Mørejarl), was jarl (earl) of the Norwegian county today known as Møre og Romsdal. He died at the Orkney Islands.
He was son of King Eystein “Glumra (the Noisy)” Ivarsson of Oppland. His maternal grandfather was King Ragnvald the Mountain-High of Vestfold. One of his paternal great-grandfathers was King Halfdan the Old of Oppland.
His second wife was Ragnhild Hrolfsdottir (Raghldr (Hldr) Hrolfsdóttir), daughter of Hrolf Nefia (Hrolfr Nefjaa). Ragnvald was the father of Hrolf Ganger, the founder of Normandy, and Turf-Einar, ancestor of the jarls of Orkney.
He is a direct ancestor of William I of England, Edward III of England, James I of England, and Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. He is therefore an ancestor of most of the royal families of Europe.
The legend says he was the one to cut the hair of king Harald Hårfagre (Haraldr hinn hárfagri) after he became high king over all of Norway.”
6. Rollo Rognvoldsson the Dane, also known as Hrolf or Rollon, 1st Duke of Normandy from 911 to 927, called also Rolf the Walker, because, being so tall, he preferred to go afoot rather than ride the little Norwegian horses. Also shown as Rollon, Row, or Robert, originally a Norse Viking, he was noted for strength and martial prowess. In the reign of Charles II, the Bald, he sailed up the Seine River and took Rouen, which he kept as a base of operations. He gained a number of victories over the Franks, and extorted the cession of the province since called Normandy. By the famous treaty which Charles the Bald and Rollo signed the latter agreed to adopt Christianity. He was born about 846 and died in 932, and was buried in the Cathedral at Rouen. He married (1) Gisla, daughter of Charles the Simple, King of France, no issue; (2) Lady Poppa of Valois, (means puppet or little doll), daughter of Pepin de Senlis de Valois, Count Berenger (Berenarius) of Bretagne, Count of Bayeux, and sister of Bernard of St. Liz (Senlis), also recorded as Berengar, Count of Bayeux. Rollo lived with her for some time before the marriage. There were two children as follows:
1. William Longsword. See below.
2. Gerlotta, married William, Duke of Aquitaine, and Count of Poitou.
See elsewhere under the Dukes of Aquitaine in this volume.

http://home.comcast.net/~homerbjames/HBJ/V01/V01_Aquitaine.htm

Skilfings or Skjöldungs
Skilfir was king of Vörs (Vǫrs, modern Voss in northern Hordaland in southwestern Norway. Skelfir was father of Skjöld (Skjǫldr), father of Eirík, father of Alrek (Alrekr), father of Eirík the Eloquent, father of Alrek the Bold (Alrekr inn frækni), father of Víkar (Víkarr), father of Vatnar (Vatnarr), father of two sons: Ímald (Ímaldr) and Eirík, this Eirik being father of Gyda (Gyða) who was one of the wives of Harald Fairhair. They were called the Skilfing lineage or Skjöldung lineage. For commentary on this lineage and variant traditions on those listed here as belonging to it see Scylfing and Víkar.

http://home.comcast.net/~homerbjames/HBJ/V01/V01_Viking.htm

Waltheof Siwardsson, 1st Earl of Northumberland, Huntingdon and Northampton

b. before 1035, d. 31 May 1076

Father

Siward Digera, Earl of Northumbria1,2,3 b. circa 980, d. 1055

Mother

Ælfflæd of Northumbria1,2

Waltheof Siwardsson, 1st Earl of Northumberland, Huntingdon and Northampton was the father of Maud of Huntingdon; eldest daughter and heiress of Waltheof, Earl of Huntingdon, by Judith, niece of William the Conqueror.4 Waltheof Siwardsson, 1st Earl of Northumberland, Huntingdon and Northampton was younger, but only surving son of Siward, by his first wife Elfleda.2 Also called Waltheof Comes.3 He was born before 1035. He was the son of Siward Digera, Earl of Northumbria and Ælfflæd of Northumbria.1,2,3 Waltheof Siwardsson, 1st Earl of Northumberland, Huntingdon and Northampton was underage at the time of his father’s death, leaving him unable to take over the earldom of Northumbria, in 1055.5 He became Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton on the banishment of Earl Tostig in October 1065.6 1st Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton at England in October 1065.2,1,6 He was not known to have opposed the Conqueror in 1066.6 He was taken to Normandy in 1067.6 He joined the Danes in their descent on Yorkshire, distinguishing himself in the attack on the city of York in 1069.6 He was the successor of Gospatric fitz Maldred, Earl of Northumberland; Earl of northern Northumbria, beyond the Tees.7,8,1,9 Waltheof Siwardsson, 1st Earl of Northumberland, Huntingdon and Northampton married Judith “the Countess” de Lens, daughter of Lambert, comte de Boulogne and Adelaide de Normandie, in 1070.1,10,11 Waltheof Siwardsson, 1st Earl of Northumberland, Huntingdon and Northampton submitted himself, when the Danes left England, to William, and was restored to his Earldom of Huntingdon in January 1070.6 1st Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton at England between January 1070 and 1076.6 He was became Earl of Northumberland after Gospatrick, following, at last, his father to the Earldom, but only to the northern portion of it, in 1072.2 Earl of northern Northumberland, beyond the Tees at England between 1072 and 29 April 1075.1,2 He was a witness where 1st Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk Ralph de Gaël entered into a conspiracy against King William with his brother-in-law, Roger, 2nd Earl of Hereford, in 1075 at spring or summer.12 Waltheof Siwardsson, 1st Earl of Northumberland, Huntingdon and Northampton witnessed the marriage of 1st Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk Ralph de Gaël and Emma of Hereford in 1075 at spring or summer, Exning, Suffolk, England; His 2nd.13,12 Waltheof Siwardsson, 1st Earl of Northumberland, Huntingdon and Northampton attended the wedding of Ralph de Gael, Earl of Norfolk, and was enticed to join the conspiracy of the Earls of Norfolk and Hereford to seize England for themselves in 1075 at spring or summer, Exning, Suffolk, England.10 He was a witness where Roger de Bréteuil, 2nd Earl of Hereford entered into a conspiracy against King William with his brother-in-law, Ralph de Gael, Earl of Norfolk, in 1075.12 Waltheof Siwardsson, 1st Earl of Northumberland, Huntingdon and Northampton repented his decision to rebel and taking Lanfranc’s advice, went to Normandy and asked pardon of the King, who initially gave it, treating the matter lightly at the time.10 He was brought to trial on Christmas for joining the conspiracy on 25 December 1075 at Winchester, England.10 He imprisoned until the trial resumed in May 1076 at Winchester, England.10 He died on 31 May 1076 at St. Giles Hill, Winchester, Hampshire, England. Condemned and beheaded on the Feast of St. Petronella, for conspiring against the King William. s.p.m.2,14,10 He was the predecessor of Bishop of Durham Walcher of Durham; Earl of northern Northumberland, beyond the Tees.2 Waltheof Siwardsson, 1st Earl of Northumberland, Huntingdon and Northampton was buried in Lincolnshire, England. A fortnight later, the Abbot Ulfketel, at Judith’s request, and by the King’s permission, removed his body to Crowland, where it was honorably entombed. This place was hallowed ground, the burial place of St. Guthlac, to which Waltheof was a benefactor in life, and where, in death, he was said to have performed posthumous miracles.14,10 He was the predecessor of Simon de St. Liz I, 2nd Earl of Huntingdon; 2nd Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton.15

Family

Judith “the Countess” de Lens b. 1054/55

Children

◦Alice of Huntingdon+ b. c 1072?16,17
◦Maud of Huntingdon+ b. 1072, d. 113018,19

Rolf is a male given name. It originates in the Germanic name Hrolf, itself a contraction of Hrodwulf (Rudolf), a conjunction of the stem words hrod (“renown”) + wulf (“wolf”). The Old Norse cognate is Hrólfr.

The name “Rollo” is a Latin translation from the Old Norse name Hrólfr, modern Icelandic name Hrólfur and Scandinavian name Rolf (cf. the latinization of Hrólfr into the similar Roluo in the Gesta Danorum), but Norman people called him by his popular name Rou(f) (see Wace’s Roman de Rou).[2] Sometimes his name is turned into the Frankish name Rodolf(us) or Radulf(us) or the French Raoul, that are derived from it.[Note 1]

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/01/07/rosamond-and-the-earls-of-orkney/

He engaged in conflict with Henry II of England over the rights and privileges of the Church and was murdered by followers of the king in Canterbury Cathedral. Soon after his death, he was canonised by Pope Alexander III.

His grandfather, William I de Tracy (d. circa 1136), was an illegitimate son of King Henry I.

Henry I (c. 1068 – 1 December 1135), also known as Henry Beauclerc, was King of England from 1100 to 1135. Henry was the fourth son of William the Conqueror and was educated in Latin and the liberal arts. On William’s death in 1087, Henry’s older brothers William Rufus and Robert Curthose inherited England and Normandy respectively, but Henry was left landless

Relations between Henry, Matilda and Geoffrey became increasingly strained in the last few years of the King’s life. Matilda and Geoffrey suspected that they lacked genuine support in England, and proposed to Henry in 1135 that the king should hand over the royal castles in Normandy to Matilda whilst he was still alive and insist on the Norman nobility swearing immediate allegiance to her, thereby giving the couple a much more powerful position after Henry’s death.[302] Henry angrily declined to do so, probably out of a concern that Geoffrey would try to seize power in Normandy.[303] A fresh rebellion broke out amongst the barons in southern Normandy, led by William.

Whatever Henry said, it was interpreted as a royal command, and four knights,[9] Reginald fitzUrse, Hugh de Morville, William de Tracy, and Richard le Breton,[1] set out to confront the Archbishop of Canterbury.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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2 Responses to Alice, Ida, and Margaret de Tosny

  1. Ben Toney says:

    Very interesting, Greg. According to my records, Godehildis de Toney was neverr queen of Jerusalem. She died while Baldwin was warring in Edessa, before they arrived in Jerusalem. Also, the name “Toney” has had over 30 different spellings. Before the Norman conquest the name was usually spelled “Toeni”. Then at the time of Domesday, the spelling “Toesny”showed up. The French modified this to Tosny, and finally the name came down to Tony, Taney, and Toney. All the Toney manors now use the modern spelling, Saham Toney, Newton Toney, Stafford Tony, Walthamstowe Toney, and Zeal Tony.

  2. Reblogged this on rosamondpress and commented:

    Alice of Huntingdon was the mother of Margaret de Tosny who was the mother of Rosamond de Clifford. Alice is the descendant of the Kings of Norway, Sweden, and Denmark, and is kin to Kings of Scotland. Ralph de Tosny was the Standard Bearer for William the Conqueror who had an interest in being connected to Rollo and the Arthurian Legends in order to bring the Celts in England – whom he now ruled – to his side.

    King Henry had an interest in forming a marriage pact with the above royalty who were sending Crusaders to the Holy Land. Were these Norseman inspired by the legend of King Arthur and Guinevere?

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