Sleeping Beauty Heart

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Christine 1975 1

Jeanette Hart, a heart-breaker to be sure...

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Sarah in Hebrew means “princess” or “queen”. If Simon Bolivar had married Jeannette Hart, one of the most beautiful women in America, then she would have been the Queen of the Americas. Instead, her remains lie forgotten and disgraced in a grave that is shrouded in mystery. I suspect, because Jeannette converted to Catholicism, her Puritancial kindred (who were famous Reverends) would not let her be buried anywhere near her Protestant cousins whose bones were everywhere.

It is alleged Jeannette bought her own plot to bury her negro slave, Sarah, next to her, but, I suspect this is her stillborn child who may have been aborted when this American Princess beheld the love of her life in a victory parade with his mistress. Bolivar tried to get the remains of this child buried in his homeland, believing it was his child. Simon was a Liberator. I am reminded of the fight over the Heirs of my late sister, the world famous artist ‘Rosamond’.

There is another grave that is un-marked. I suspect Ann Hart Hull is buried here, she too a convert to Catholicism. Did Ann adhore the ostracism her sister suffered, and took her side completely, even after being threatened with excommunication from her famous relatives who in the end – did not have a heart? Jessie Benton, the daughter of Thomas Hart Benton, was ostracised when whe delcred she was an Abolitionist.

Did Ann have a child, or, children by Commodor Isaac Hull, who under great family pressure, turned their back on their mother, their father, and their aunt, who lived together? Jeannette, never married. How tragic. Her great beauty had gone to waste – until now!

To think what could have been! Here is your Sleeping Beauty kingdom. Here is the equal to the legends of Fair Rosamond, who could have been a queen. That Jeannette is kin to Princess Diana, and her two sons who are Princess’ of the realm – who may rule as Kings someday – is astounding. The seven Hart sisters, their beautiful constellation, is in the Windsor family tree! At home, they are seven liberated stars found in a field of blue.

Then there is the legend of Sarah, alleged daughter of Jesus and Mary Magdalene, who founded a sleeping kingdom, that in our time has awoken – if you believe!

This morning, I have been looking at the Hart family DNA project so I can turn a Rosamond Family Legend into real genealogical and royal history, for Royal Rosamond’s claim that he descends from Ann and Isaac Hull was made before the Harts formed blood ties to the Spencer and Windsor family. Did I not promise my grandson, Tyler Hunt, a kingdom? Now, add the lineage of Thomas Hart Betnon to the Hart family of Cambridge, and one has to ask who is directing this coming together of two Hart lines formed when Christine Rosamond Presco, married Paul Garfield Benton?

From this union was born Drew Benton, who has been living with her aunt, Vicki Presco, for seven months. Drew in kin to two Signers of the Constitution, John Hart, and John Witherspoon, and counless politicians and statesmen who made this Democracy great. If there was American Royalt, then Drew is a Princess.

Then there is my recent discovery of a book that installs the Arthurian Legends in a family that will go un-named for now, but, this real Grail Legend includes Fair Rosamond, and Princess Diana Spencer. This blog that is a genelogical story of the Rosamonds in American, and the world, has come across the waters to Britain and its royal people, who I need not prove are my kindred to own this story, but need only ask;

“What is in a name?” and “Where does my heart lie?”

Rene D’Anjou Duke of Bar set out to retrieve his heart that was stolen in the dead of night. The Captain of the Enterpise was like the Knight Cueur to the seven Hart sisters, this dashing Captian taking them on cruises aboard the U.S.S. Constitution, because, there’s a great big widw world out there! Unfortunately, much of it is captured in the little minds of bigotted people, who hate beauty, and go out of their way to destroy it.

Need I point out the importance of Sarah being Jeannette’s black slave, this slave buried in the land of American Blue Bloods and Patriots – the alleged Lovers of Freedom! But, only one Hart……was true! Only one Hart soars with the wings of Eagles!

I am going to take a month off from blogging so I can finish my book and get it published. I will be contacting the History Channel, and Histories Mysteries to see if they want to see if there are two beautiful Hart sister buried side by side – waiting to be forgiven, and reborn. Or, if the Hart and Hull family were abolitionists when it came to equal rights in the eyes of God, when we all take that last voyage, and venture to hither side.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2013

http://www.guice.org/bklvntr2.html

Rene the King and Poet, is asleep, in a magical night scene he sees himself and the figures in his dream: Amour, God of Love, is standing beside his bed and with both hands plucks the heart from Rene’s breast, giving it to the Page, Ardent Desire, who stands with hands outstretched ready to receive it. It will have to remain on the power of Ardent Desire until it finds favor with the lady of Rene’s dreams, Sweet Grace. It is not Rene himself who starts off on a journey of adventure with the Page, but his heart, personified as the Knight Cueur.

Oh ye noble and engaging hearts,
longing to win sweet favors and Joyful gratitude
from the God of Love and your Lady,
do not waver In your resolution,
never abandon your first love but be true to her,
Unchanging from one day to the next……..

When Capt. Elisha Hart (1758-1844), the wealthy Saybrook merchant and trader, married Janet McCurdy (1765-1815), of the well-known and well-off Lyme family, he looked forward to having sons to carry on his thriving businesses but fate, and “x” chromosomes, provided one daughter after another:

First there was Sarah born in 1787, then Ann in 1790, then Mary Ann in 1792, then Jeanette in 1794, Elizabeth in 1796, Amelia in 1799, and finally Harriet Augusta in 1804 – the seven beautiful Hart sisters.

The girls enjoyed the pleasant and pampered life of their prominent family. They were sent to “finishing schools,” including the highly respected Miss Pierce’s School in Litchfield, and their exposure to the ways of the world expanded beyond small town Saybrook. Lively, attractive, charming and sophisticated, they attracted many suitors.

When Ann attended school in Philadelphia she and her classmates visited the ship commanded by Isaac Hull. He showed them about and Ann had many questions and displayed an unusual knowledge in seafaring life which she gained from her father.

She commented on the neatly coiled rolls of tarred ropes and how she enjoyed the odor of tar. A few days later she received a delicate chain made from tarred rope that was sent by Hull. She wrote thanking him for the gift and so began a correspondence that led to their marriage in 1813.

Hull was born in Derby, the second of seven sons, and grew up along the shores of the Housatonic River. He developed a flair for the sea and signed on to a coastal schooner when he was 14. He studied navigation and by 20 was a master in the merchant service. In 1798 he entered the U.S. Navy.

When the War of 1812 began, 39-year-old Hull was placed in command of the frigate U.S. Constitution. Receiving orders to seek and destroy British warships between Nantucket and Halifax, he set sail. Spotting the English frigate Guerriere, he ordered all hands to prepare for action. When he was almost alongside the Guerriere, Hull gave the order: “Now boys! Pour it into them.”

Although she had many suitors, Jeannette never married. She lived in Philadelphia with her sister Ann and Isaac Hull and spent many summers in Saybrook. She and her sister Sarah converted to Catholicism.Tragic life of Frances Shand KyddLast updated at 19:52 03 June 2004

A descendant of Stephen HART is
Diana Spencer, the Princess of Wales.
Here is the way:
1.Stephen Hart 1602/3-1682/3
2.Mary Hart abt 1630-1710 +John Lee 1620-1690
3.Tabitha Lee 1677-1750 +Preserved Strong 1679/80-1765
4.Elizabeth Strong 1704-1792 +Joseph Strong Jr 1701-1773
5.Benajah Strong 1740-1809 +Lucy Bishop 1747-1783
6.Joseph Strong 1770-1812 +Rebecca Young 1779-1862
8.Ellen Wood 1831-1877 +Frank Work 1819-1911
9.Frances Ellen Work 1857-1947 +James Boothby Burke-Roche 1851-1920
10.Edmund Maurice Burke-Roche 1885-1955 +Ruth Sylvia Gill 1980-
11.Frances Ruth Burke-Roche 1936- +Edward John Spencer 1924-
12.Diana Spencer HRH The Princess of Wales 1961- + Charles HRH
The Prince of Wales 1948-
Source:Gen History of Deacon
Stephen Hart and his descendants – Andrews and a book by
Gary Boyd Roberts, through Nancy Bainter
on the net bainter@esdsdf.dnet.ge.com

When Capt. Elisha Hart (1758-1844), the wealthy Saybrook merchant and trader, married Janet McCurdy (1765-1815), of the well-known and well-off Lyme family, he looked forward to having sons to carry on his thriving businesses but fate, and “x” chromosomes, provided one daughter after another:

First there was Sarah born in 1787, then Ann in 1790, then Mary Ann in 1792, then Jeanette in 1794, Elizabeth in 1796, Amelia in 1799, and finally Harriet Augusta in 1804 – the seven beautiful Hart sisters.

The girls enjoyed the pleasant and pampered life of their prominent family. They were sent to “finishing schools,” including the highly respected Miss Pierce’s School in Litchfield, and their exposure to the ways of the world expanded beyond small town Saybrook. Lively, attractive, charming and sophisticated, they attracted many suitors.

When Ann attended school in Philadelphia she and her classmates visited the ship commanded by Isaac Hull. He showed them about and Ann had many questions and displayed an unusual knowledge in seafaring life which she gained from her father.
She commented on the neatly coiled rolls of tarred ropes and how she enjoyed the odor of tar. A few days later she received a delicate chain made from tarred rope that was sent by Hull. She wrote thanking him for the gift and so began a correspondence that led to their marriage in 1813.

Hull was born in Derby, the second of seven sons, and grew up along the shores of the Housatonic River. He developed a flair for the sea and signed on to a coastal schooner when he was 14. He studied navigation and by 20 was a master in the merchant service. In 1798 he entered the U.S. Navy.

When the War of 1812 began, 39-year-old Hull was placed in command of the frigate U.S. Constitution. Receiving orders to seek and destroy British warships between Nantucket and Halifax, he set sail. Spotting the English frigate Guerriere, he ordered all hands to prepare for action. When he was almost alongside the Guerriere, Hull gave the order: “Now boys! Pour it into them.”

Thomas Hart Benton (April 15, 1889 – January 19, 1975) was an American painter and muralist. Along with Grant Wood and John Steuart Curry, he was at the forefront of the Regionalist art movement.

Benton was born in Neosho, Missouri, into an influential family of politicians and powerbrokers. Benton’s father, Maecenas Benton, was a lawyer and U.S. congressman. His namesake, great-uncle Thomas Hart Benton, was one of the first two United States Senators elected from Missouri

“*Nathaniel G. Hart, in honor of whom Hart County, Ky., received its name, was a son of Colonel Thomas Hart, who was an immigrant from Maryland to Kentucky in pioneer days. Nathaniel G. Hart was born at Hagerstown, Md., and came to Kentucky when he was but a few years old. He was a brother-in-law of Hon. Henry Clay and Hon. James Brown, they having married his sisters. He was about twenty-four years of age at the time of his marriage to Anna E. Gist. At the breaking out of the War of 1812 he was in command of a volunteer company called the “Lexington Light Infantry,” and with his company enrolled for service in the Northwest. He served through the winter campaign of 1812-13, a portion of the time as staff officer. He was taken prisoner at the Battle of the River Raisin.

Legend has it that, in the mid-1800’s, Cypress’ beautiful wrought iron fence along the sidewalk of College Street was “donated” by Jeanette Hart to the Association in return for the burial of Hart’s beloved slave, Sarah, in the Hart family plot. At that time, the Assoication was likely incensed at the idea of a “mixed” cemetery plot. But, in return for the fence, the Assoication acquiesced as long as Sarah’s plot was unmarked. The unmarked grave still exists today.

That isn’t the end of the story, however. Not far from the unmarked stone in the Hart plot is another stone inscribed with the name “Sarah”. The question remains, if Jeanette Hart defied the wishes of the Association, then why is there an unmarked stone in the Hart plot?

One explanation has Jeanette and her two sisters travelling to South America in 1824. Jeanette, unmarried, was said to have enjoyed a full and much publicized romance with Chile’s “liberator”, Simon Bolivar. While in South America, Jeanette’s sister Elizabeth was said to have given birth to a still-born child. Upon bringing the baby home for burial for her sister (reportedly encased in a wine basket for the purpose of preservation), Jeanette buried the child in the Hart plot. The question of which stone – the unmarked stone or the one inscribed “Sarah” – still lingers. In bringing the baby back to Connecticut, Jeanette was said to have enraged her “latino lover” and, as a result, didn’t end up marrying him as he originally proposed.

http://www.cypresscemeteryosct.org/harts_sarah.html

He returned to England when he was 33 years old and married Agnes Harris, with whom he had three children: Elizabeth, Sarah and Samuel. Upon his death in 1640, William Spencer was a wealthy man. He owned acreage in Cambridge, Concord and Hartford, as well as property in England. Many years later, a descendant, also named William Spencer, was described in a book about New York’s elite society as a “wealthy and fashionable naval officer . . . a descendant of William Spencer, a landed proprietor of Hartford.”

Agnes married five years after Spencer’s death a man named William Edwards. With that marriage she became the matriarch of the Edwards’ family which included Jonathan Edwards, the man who once gave the powerful sermon entitled “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God,” and Aaron Burr.
Sources:

“Town Records, left” From The Records of the Town of Cambridge, from The History of Cambridge, by Abiel Holmes, A.M.Printed by Samuel Hall, in Boston. Bicentennial Edition, 8001-2001, Harvard Square Library Cambridge, Massachusetts.

The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Volumes I-III (Online database: NewEnglandAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2002) Orig. Pub. New

England Historic Genealogical Society. Robert Charles Anderson, The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Volumes I – III, 3 vols., 1995).

1601 — 1640Lieutenant William Spencer— Dame Sally Gronauer
— Dame Peggy DeStefano
— Dame Mary Sikora

Lieutenant William Spencer
— Dame Sally Gronauer
— Dame Peggy DeStefano
— Dame Mary Sikora
William Spencer emigrated from Stotfold, Bedfordshire, England, in 1631 to New Town (later called Cambridge). Like so many early New Englanders, Spencer provided many services for the Massachusetts Bay Colony where he lived for nearly eight years. And, he appeared to be indispensable.

He was a Deputy from Cambridge to the General Court and he served as the Cambridge Town Clerk, and as a Cambridge selectman. He served on a committee on the codification of laws, and a committee on Colony debts. In 1636, he was appointed Lieutenant of the Military Company of New Town and a founder of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company.

When he migrated to Hartford, Connecticut, where his brother Thomas lived, he continued to serve. Almost immediately he became the Deputy for Hartford to the Connecticut General Court, a member of the committee to inspect arms, and provide powder for Hartford in ’39. He also served as the town Clerk of Hartford in 1639. He is considered to be a Founder of Hartford— a most prestigious position, even today.

William SPENCER (b. Oct 11, 1601, d. May 1640)
William SPENCER (son of Gerrard Spencer and Alice Whitebread)2263 was born Oct 11, 1601 in Stotfold, Bedfordshire, ENG, and died May 1640 in Hartford, Hartford, CT. He married Agnes HARRIS on 1633 in Cambridge, Middlesex, MA, daughter of Bartholomew Harris and Elizabeth Collamore.

Notes for William SPENCER:
[Easton&Baker.FTW]

ORIGIN: Stotfold, Bedfordshire
MIGRATION: 1631
FIRST RESIDENCE: Cambridge
REMOVES: Hartford 1639
CHURCH MEMBERSHIP: Admission to a Massachusetts Bay church (probably Watertown) prior to 4 March 1632/3 implied by freemanship.
FREEMAN: 4 March 1632/3 [MBCR 1:367].
EDUCATION: Cambridge town clerk, 1632-1635 [CaTR vi (with facsimile of a page of records in his hand facing CaTR 9)]. Wrote a well-reasoned and well-spelled letter to Winthrop in 1638 [WP 4:74-75].
OFFICES: Deputy from Cambridge to the General Court, 9 May 1632, 4 March 1634/5, 3 March 1635/6, 8 September 1636, 18 April 1637 (as “Lieut. Spencer”), 17 May 1637, 26 September 1637, 12 March 1637/8 [MBCR 1:95, 135, 164, 178, 191, 194, 204, 220].
Observer to committee on bounds between Cambridge & Watertown, 4 March 1634/5 [MBCR 1:139]. Committee on bounds between Boston & Charlestown, 28 March 1636 [MBCR 1:162]. Committee to “set out bounds of the new plantation above Charles Ryver,” 3 March 1635/6 [MBCR 1:166]; report of above committee rendered on 13 April 1636 [MBCR 1:173]. Committee on colony debts, 8 September 1636 [MBCR 1:179, 184]. Committee on compensation of soldiers who made the expedition to Block Island, 9 March 1636/7 [MBCR 1:188]. Committee to “view Shaushin, & to consider whether it be fit for a plantation,” 1 August 1637 [MBCR 1:200]. Committee on “plantation upon the river which runs to Concord,” 20 November 1637 [MBCR 1:210]. Committee on codification of laws, 12 March 1637/8 [MBCR 1:222].
Cambridge town clerk, 1632-1635 [CaTR vi]. Committee to “survey the town lands and enter [mutilated] a book appointed for that purpose,” 3 February 1634/5 [CaTR 12]. On 27 October 1636 “Newe Towne presented a book of their records under the hands of Will[iam] Andrews, constable, John Beniamin, & Will[iam] Spencer” [MBCR 1:182]. A Cambridge general meeting ordered that “William Spencer and Georg[e] Steele should measure all the meadow ground undivided belonging to the Newtowne” and allot “to every man his proportion,” 20 August 1635 [CaTR 12]. Cambridge selectman, 23 November 1635 [CaTR 13].
Lieutenant of the Cambridge train band, 9 March 1636/7 [MBCR 1:190]. Charter member of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company [HAHAC 1:40; MBCR 1:250-51].
Deputy for Hartford to Connecticut General Court, 11 April 1639, 8 August 1639, 10 September 1639, 16 January 1639/40, 9 April 1640 [CCCR 1:27, 29, 34, 41, 46].
Surveyor of “armor and other military provisions” for Hartford, 8 August 1639 [CCCR 1:30].
ESTATE: Granted three roods for a cowyard in Cambridge, 5 August 1633 [CaTR 5]. Granted “the swamp on the other side the creek,” 2 March 1633/4 [CaTR 7]. Granted “that corner of ground by Joseph Myat’s between the swamps,” 1 December 1634 [CaTR 10]. Received a proportion of 2½ in the undivided meadow, 20 August 1635 [CaTR 13]. In the list of houses in Cambridge, William Spencer was credited with two in the Westend, 8 February 1635/6 [CaTR 18].
In the Cambridge land inventory on 1 May 1635 William Spencer held at least eleven parcels (entry partially mutilated): “one dwelling house with other outhouses and a garden and backside, about one rood”; “more in old field about five acres and a half”; “more on small lot hill about three acres”; “more in the neck about seven acres”; “more in Long Marsh about fifteen acres”; “more in Great Marsh about nine acres”; “more in the Great Marsh about two acres”; “more in the Great Marsh about two acres”; “[mutilated] west end one house with other [mutilated] houses garden backside and other [mutilated] about three acres”; “more by the pine swamp about six acres”; and “more in Cowyard Row about one rood” [CaBOP 5-6].
On 1 April 1636 William Spencer of New Towne acknowledged that he had sold to Nicholas Danforth his right in three and a half acres [CaBOP 38]. In an undated record, Symon Crosby purchased from William Spencer one house with three acres of ground [CaBOP 58].
On 20 November 1637 “[t]hose that are to view the new plantation of Watertowne are to view the place which Mr. Spencer desireth, & if it be convenient, to certify the Court” [MBCR 1:211]. On 2 May 1638 “Mr. Willi[am] Spencer is granted 300 acres of ground beyond Concord, by the Alewife Ryver” [MBCR 1:228].
In the Hartford land inventory in 1640 William Spencer held six parcels: two acres “on which his dwelling house now standeth with other outhouses, yards & gardens … which he bought of John Halles”; sixty-three acres in the Middle Oxpasture “part whereof he bought of Edward Stebing & another part he bought of William Kelse & another part thereof he bought of Thomas Spenser”; four acres in the Pine Field “which he bought of John Halles” (annotated “sold [to] Jno. Moris”); ten acres in the Pine Field “part whereof he bought of Edward Stebing & another part of John Beddell”; eleven acres and two roods of meadow and swamp in the North Meadow; and ten acres of meadow and swamp on the east side of the Great River (annotated “mead sold [to] Calsey” and “swamp sold [to] Barding & Pantry”) [HaBOP 352-53].
In his nuncupative will, dated 14 March and 4 May 1640 and 4 March 1640/1, William Spencer bequeathed that
the estate that he hath in New England, and also that which may come to his wife hereafter, that is, any part of his wife’s portion if any do come, that all the estate be divided as followeth: …to my wife one third part of all my estate … to my son Samuel one third part … to my two daughters Sarah and Elizabeth one third part … the children to be brought up with the improvement of the whole estate that I leave both to my wife and children. Also my mind is my Cousin Matthew Allyn, my brother John Pratt and John Taylcoate, that these three parties or any two of them shall have the oversight of my estate, and in case that they shall see in their judgement the estate to be wasted, that they shall have power to take the children and their portions [blank] for their bringing up, and to pay the children their portions that remain at the several times above written. Also my mind is that my wife shall have no power to alienate or make sale of my house or any part of my land I leave without the consent of two of the parties that are to oversee my estate [CCCR 1:449-50; Manwaring 1:36-37].
The undated “inventory of the estate of the said Will[iam] Spenser” totalled £67 12s. 2d. in moveables; there were “several debts … owing in the Bay, the which the most of them are denied, and those that are confessed are very doubtful whether much of it will be paid, being in the hands of some of his kindred that are poor.” The supplement to this inventory also included “the house and houselot containing about 2 acres, with some outhouses; also several parcels of upland lots, to the value of [blank] 74 acres, as may appear by the records to that purpose, whereof, besides the right which he had in any other lands to be divided”; “also, eleven acres of meadow and swamp, lying in the North Meadow”; “also, one parcel lying on the east side of the Great River, containing ten acres”; “also, there is land yet remaining at Concord in the Bay, which while he lived he esteemed at £120” [CCCR 1:450-51].
It was agreed that if any of the children died before they came of age, “the survivor & survivors shall receive it at the time when it should have been paid to the deceased, if he or she had lived, and if they all die before the said time, then it shall be paid to Agnes Edwards or her lawful attorney of the said Agnes, the mother of the said children” [Manwaring 1:37].
The estate of William Spencer, deceased, was brought to court 24 June 1650 and, “with the information of the overseers in the presence of Thomas Spencer, brother to the said William, with the consent of the wife of William Edwards, they do judge that £30 is as much as the estate here will bear to be sequestered for the use of the children, which is to be paid to them according to the will of the said William Spencer … provided also that whatsoever shall be paid here or in England of any estate due to the wife of the said William Spencer while she was the wife of William Spencer, or that shall come from Concord, two thirds thereof shall be and remain to the proper use of the children aforesaid” [RPCC 85-86].
BIRTH: Baptized Stotfold, Bedfordshire, 11 October 1601, son of Gerrard and Alice (Whitbread) Spencer [TAG 27:162].
DEATH: Hartford after 4 May 1640 [Manwaring 1:36-37] and probably before 22 May 1640 [Aspinwall 141].
MARRIAGE: By about 1633 Agnes Harris, baptized Barnstaple, Devonshire, 6 April 1604, daughter of Bartholomew and Elizabeth (Collamore) Harris. She married (2) Hartford 11 December 1645 William Edwards [TAG 63:33-45].
CHILDREN:
i ELIZABETH, b. say 1633; m. (1) by about 1650 William Wellman [TAG 37:7-9]; m. (2) by 1672 Jacob Joy (Jacobus gives the date of marriage as 23 May 1671 and McCracken as 23 May 1672, in Killingworth, but the Killingworth vital records do not contain an entry for this event [TAG 37:7-9; FOOF 1:348]).

ii SARAH, b. about 1635 (of full age [18] in the year 1653 [Manwaring 1:37]); m. by 1656 John Case [TAG 34:66-69].

iii SAMUEL, b. about 1639 (of full age [21] in the year 1660 [Manwaring 1:37]); m. by about 1668 Sarah _____ (estimated b. of first child [TAG 27:165-66]).

ASSOCIATIONS: William Spencer was brother of THOMAS SPENCER of Cambridge and Hartford, and of Michael Spencer and Gerard Spencer of Lynn [TAG 27:79-87, 161-65].
COMMENTS: William Spencer appeared on a list of early inhabitants of Cambridge, apparently dated 1632 [CaTR 2].
On 29 November 1638 William Spencer wrote from Hartford to John Winthrop asking why Winthrop had made suggestions regarding arguments to support the union between the Bay and “the plantations here,” and yet when men came to treat with him regarding it, many using the very arguments suggested by Winthrop at Spencer’s prompting, all were met with “a prejudice in the spirits of some men” and forced to go away unsatisfied [WP 4:74-75].
On 4 July 1648 Aspinwall certified “copies of five letters unto Edmund Angier – 3 letters from John Talcot & John Pratt, one dated 22 May 1640, another August 10th 1640, & another 15th June 1641, a fourth from Anne Spenser dated 2 May 1642 and the fifth from W[illia]m Edw[ards] no date. Also unto a copy of a writing under W[illia]m Spencer’s name dated 3 July 1639. Also to a letter [of] attorney from Ed[mund] Angier to Joseph Mayet dated 5 July 1648” [Aspinwall 141]. From the chronology and the persons involved, it would seem that these letters pertained to the estate of William Spencer in England.
BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE: In 1988 Douglas Richardson ably demonstrated the identity of Agnes Harris, wife of William Spencer [TAG 63:33-45].

[Robert Charles Anderson. The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633 [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000.]

More About William SPENCER and Agnes HARRIS:
Marriage: 1633, Cambridge, Middlesex, MA.

Children of William SPENCER and Agnes HARRIS are:
i. +Sarah SPENCER, b. Mar 7, 1636, Cambridge, Middlesex, MA2264, d. Nov 3, 1691, Simsbury, Hartford, CT.
ii. +Samuel SPENCER, b. Abt. 1639, Cambridge, Middlesex, MA2264, d. date unknown.
The Spencer-Case Family of England and Connecticut
The first Spencer I have on my ancestor chart is Michael born ca 1533 in Edworth, Bedfordshire, ENG. He m. Elizabeth ? ca 1563 there and d. aft 1599 probably in Stotfold, Bedfordshire, ENG. Elizabeth died in Nov 1599 in Stotfold. I have no more information on this couple, do you? Does anyone have the family of Elizabeth? I would like to be able to add to this lineage.

Gerard SPENCER was born in May 1576 in Stotfold and he m. Alice WHITBREAD on 10 Nov 1600 in St. Giles, Upper Gravenhurst in Bedfordshire (d. 20 May 1646 Stotford). Gerard d. before 1646 there. Alice was the dau. of John WHITBREAD and Eleanor RADCLIFFE who were married ca 1570 in Welwyn Hertfordshire and he d. 28 Nov 1598 in Upper Gravenhurst. Eleanor died on 20 Nov 1628 in Elstow, Beds.

One of their sons was William SPENCER bpt. 11 Oct 1601 in Stotfold and he m. Agnes HARRIS in 1633 there. AS far as I know, they are our IMMIGRANT FAMILY.
Agnes was the d/o Bartholomew HARRIS (ca 1560-10 Oct 1615) and Elizabeth COLLAMORE (ca 1566-?)

William and Agnes had a daughter – Sarah SPENCER who is my direct ancestress. She was b. 1635 in Simsbury, Hartford Co., CT and m. John CASE ca 1656 in Hartford Co., CT. He was b. in Aylsham, Norfolkshire, ENG and d. 21 Feb 1703/04 in Simsbury, CT.

This is the information that I have on William SPENCER and Agnes HARRIS. I hope if you have more or any corrections of my notes that you will contact me. I would like to hear any comments at all.

William was one of the four founders of the Military Co. of MA, that is now called The Ancient and Honorable Artillery Co., in which he initially held the rank of Lieut. However he is referred to as Lieut. Spencer only twice in civil or political records in the MA Bay and none in the CT. Colony records.

At the time of William’s birth, English rule suppressed the freedom loving Puritan people and the Spencers were among the group who wanted changes in the rituals and laws of the Church of England. They agreed there should only be one church in England and that the church should be supported by the state. The beliefs, laws and rituals of the church were controlled by the English rulers and were changed in accordance to their ideas, thoughts and experiences by the particular king or queen in power at the time.
The clergy was expected to comply with the ritual and laws set forth but were expected to study the Bible and preach their own sermons. Their spiritual direction often caused Puritan Clergy to refuse to carry out the orders of the bishops. When this happened they were taken before the High Commission for a trial of all their religious offenses. Some of the principal ministers withdrew to Holland and others remained in England, feeling hopeless, as they saw no sign of relief in the future.
William was christened 11 Oct 1601 in Stotfold, Bedfordshire, ENG. He was appointed Deputy to Massachusetts General Court, 1634 through 1637, and representative to Connecticut General Court from 1639 to 1640.

According to Tepper’s “Passengers to America”, Will was on the “Mary & John” which left England on 24 Mar 1633. He was back in England for perhaps a year and evidently did not return to Newe Towne until the summer of 1633. It was a year later that his name again appeared in the General Court records. He arrived with the group from Essex, ENG.
In 1629 a royal charter was obtained under the name of the “Governor and Company of Massachusetts Bay in New England”. This was like a trumpet call to the Puritans of England. They began at once to prepare for emigration to the new land of promise. Five ships sailed in the spring of 1629, the “Mary & John” sailed the following spring with a total of seventeen ships with 16 or 17 Hundred immigrants.
Brothers Gerrard, Michael, Thomas and William Spencer probably were among these people or they may have sailed with the group of Essexshire in 1632. This group came mostly from the area of the towns of Braintree, Colchester and Chelmsford, stopped first at Mt. Wallaston, now known as Quincy. They would have been followers of the Rev. Thomas Hooker, who was in Holland at the time but joined them the following year.

William was one of the first emigrants to New England with the Winthrop group arriving there (ca 1630) before 4 March 1632 when he took the oath of Freeman. So he must have arrived in Boston at least by 1631. The early ships from England had uniformly left their home ports in April and arrived in N.E. in mid-summer. This was found in the Boston Evening Transcript newspaper. It listed William and his three brothers and where they settled. William settled in Cambridge, MA and then Hartford, CT. William was 30 at the time he left England and was the best prepared from the standpoint of his education at Cambridge, from where he graduated. He is listed in the Newtowne town record books.
William played a special role in the activities of the MA Bay Co and was a co-founder of both Cambridge (Newe Towne) and Hartford, CT.

William died testate at Harford, CT between 4 May and 22 May 1640 at the age of 39.

William Spencer (1601-1640) & Agnes Harris (bpt. 1604-1680+); m2 William Edwards; m. bef. 1633 Cambridge, MA. [TAG 63:41]
Source: Torrey’s New England Marriages.

In Dec 1630 the governor and most of the party agreed to build a town between Roxbury and Boston. After thinking about a place of more safety, they chose a place on the Charles River, and called it New Town, which became Cambridge.

While William was in MA, he was appointed by Gov. Winthrop to serve as judge in Ipswich and Newberry in order that he might hold the courts in those precincts.
The name of William does not appear again in the General Court until March of 1634 in Newe Town (Cambridge).
1 May 1635, “William in town has one dwellinge house with other out howses and a garden and Backside”….
26 Mar 1636 – He was on committee to decide on the bounds between Boston and Charles Towne on the east side of the Misticke Ryver”.
25 May 1636 – Member of committee to determine the value of property in the town to be reported at a meeting in Boston in June.
8 Sep 1636 – Mr. Wm.Spencer was part of committee of three to examine accounts of persons the county owes money unto.

All three children were born at Newe Towne before the family moved to Hartford in 1639.

Records of events happening in Hartford in 1637 written in the hand-writing of William Spencer.
“North-side Plantation book containing all the important orders in force in Hartford” such as Providing a guard during public worship – a proper precaution after the Pequot War (May 1637).”
“Each inhabitant to have a ladder to reach the roof of his house, doubtless in case of fire. Forbidding the taking of stones at the fall, near the home of Thomas Lord – Settlers were extensively engaged in house building.”

William died a short time later on 4 May 1640 at the age of 38 years old. He made his will on 4 May 1640 and died at Hartford that year. He divided his estate into thirds: to his son, Samuel 1/3, to his widow Agnes 1/3 and to his two daughters Sarah and Elizabeth 1/3. He was the ancestor of Honorable Joshua Spencer and Honorable Judge John C. Spencer of the state of New York. He was designated as one of the first Puritan settlers of Hartford.

Another historical event for William was being appointed by the Gov. Winthrop with four others to raise a military company for the protection of the people of the colony. In 1638, he was one of the founders of “The Ancient & Honorable Artillery Co. of Boston” which continued to be the oldest military organization in America. In March 1638, he was appointed “Lieutenant of the Military Co. of Newton.”

After moving to Hartford, he was immediately selected as one of the representations in that colony. He was selected to prepare the first Code of Laws for CT, along with Mr. Wyllis and Mr. Webster. On 26 Dec 1639, he was elected as a townsman, who was described as a person chosen to order the affairs of the town.
The death of William Spencer must have been a great loss to the city of Hartford and the state of CT. No records have been found as to the exact date of his death or the cause. In his will, which was probated 4 Mar 1641, he partitioned his estate, giving 1/3 to his wife, son Samuel, and to each daughter, Elizabeth and Sarah. The inventory of the estate taken after his death, reveals the fact that he had accumulated a large fortune of those times.
After William’s death, Agnes married 2nd to William Edwards, making Agnes Spencer, the maternal ancestor of not only the Case family and the Aldermans, but also the great Edwards family of CT and New England. The Edwards gave to the world, scholars, authors, ministers, college presidents and professors. Williams life was short (39 years) but filled with adventure, courage and leadership.

The Spencer ancestry in England dates from the Norman invasion of 1066 A.D. and the Battle of Hastings. Over the centuries, there were several lines of Spencer descendants but this group had lived in Bedfordshire for many generations, especially in the towns of Edworth and Stotfold. All of the siblings were in their early adult years in the early 1600’s so were most eligible for a new life in New England. The Spencer lineage descends from Charlemagne.
“Order of the Crown of Charlemagne in the United States”

All of the Spencer children seem to have embraced the Puritan faith as evidenced by their membership in the church and for the males, the attainment of freemanship in the political hierarchy.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~fesschequy/Spencer.html

The Spencer Genealogy
By Jared L. Olar
October 2007-January 2013
The English surname of “Spencer” derives from the Latin word dispensator, which means a storekeeper or shopkeeper. In medieval times, a feudal lord would employ a dispensator to have charge of his possessions and to oversee distribution and sale of supplies to the serfs, peasants, and tenant farmers who worked his land. In essence, a dispensator was something like a steward. This Latin term gave rise to the occupational family names of “Dispenser,” “Spencer,” “Spenser,” “Spence,” “Spens,” “Spender,” etc. Since there must have been thousands of dispensatori, there are naturally a large number of unrelated Spencer families. Even though he was the servant of a feudal lord or a king, a dispensator often himself would be of noble or knightly rank. The two best known medieval English families bearing a form of this surname were the Dispensers, Earls of Winchester, and the Spencers of Althorp, Northamptonshire, ancestors of the present Earls Spencer, who were the family of the late Diana, Princess of Wales, formerly known as Lady Diana Spencer. The Earls Spencer are also closely related to the Spencer-Churchill family, which includes the famous British Prime Minister Sir Winston Spencer-Churchill. During the Renaissance, an unscrupulous herald manufactured a spurious genealogy tracing the Spencers of Althorp back to the Dispensers of Winchester, but that fictitious genealogy was long ago debunked — there is no proof nor any reason to believe that the Spencers of Althorp had anything to do with the old Earls of Winchester.
In the United States, a very large number of Spencers are descendants of “the Four Spencer Brothers” — William Spencer (1601-1640), Thomas Spencer (1607–1687), Michael Spencer (1611–1653), and GERARD SPENCER (1614–1685), sons of Gerard Spencer and Alice Whitbred. The Four Spencer Brothers belonged to a family that came from Stotfold in Bedfordshire, England. The brothers left England in the 1600s and settled in New England. Our own Spencer family is descended from Gerard, youngest of the Four Spencer Brothers. Donald Lines Jacobus wrote the landmark study on this family, “The Four Spencer Brothers — Their Ancestors and Descendants,” (The American Genealogist, 27:79-87, April 1951). A subsequent study on our Spencers was prepared by George E. McCracken, entitled “Spencers in Wyoming Valley 1772-1830” (The American Genealogist 43:139-145, July 1967). The family history of our Spencers is also presented on the late George R. Spencer’s genealogical website and the Long Island Surnames website. Christopher Kile’s database also includes the genealogy of our Spencers, though with various omissions and errors.

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