De Bourmont of Anjou and de Bar

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hammbb4“Victor de Bourmont is a member of one of the largest Angevin aristocratic families. He was born 1907 in Pontivy and died in March 1945 in Pomerania near Kolberg (Korlin). It comes down to many aristocratic families the region and Brittany, including de Cossé-Brissac, and Rohan. Many of his ancestors were under the former Regime, presidents or advisors of the Chamber of Auditors from Brittany and Normandy. Married in 1938, he left behind him, to his death four young children.”

Virginia’s grandmother is a Craven, and her grandfather is Joseph C M De Ghaisne De Bourmont.

“The term Angevin Empire is a modern term describing the collection of states once ruled by the Angevin Plantagenet dynasty.
The Plantagenets ruled over an area stretching from the Pyrenees to Ireland during the 12th and early 13th centuries, located north of the kingdoms of Navarre and Aragon. This “empire” extended over roughly half of medieval France, all of England, and some of Ireland.”

Angevin is Anjou. Rene de Anjou was the Duke of Bar. The Bourmonts appear to be kin to the Kings of Jerusalem and Godfrey de Boullon. Here is his genealogy that ends with the Habsburgs, and almost begins with them. Above is a phot of Bourmont Castle.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dukes_of_Lorraine_family_tree

In the de Bourmont cote of arms we see a blue field with fish that represent the Dukes of Bar. Johanne de Ferrette and Rougemont has blood ties to the Duke’s of Bar. Virginia Hambley and I are related – if it is true that the name Rosamond comes from Rougemont in the Alsace, and I am kin to Johanne. The chances that Virginia is “of the blood” is very high. We talked about having children, I sensing she was “the one”. If my daughter had not come into my life, we would have been childless together. I disowned my daughter who called me “insane” because of my study.

Rene de Anjou, and members of the de Bar family, are considered by some to be Grand Masters of the Priory de Sion. Until I have better proof, I suspect we are looking at another legend that certain people who falsly claimed they were Sinclairs, have attachted themselves to. Below is Denis de Rougemont’s essay on a United Europe.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2013

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duchy_of_Bar

England & Wales, Marriage Index, 1916-2005

Birth, Marriage & Death, including Parish

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PreviewName: Joseph C M De Ghaisne De Bourmont
Inferred County: Middlesex

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Name: Joseph C M De Ghaisne De Bourmont
Spouse: Craven
Marriage: date – city, Middlesex
Other: mm year

http://www.pro-europa.eu/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=32:denis-de-rougemont-europe-unites&catid=11:the-struggle-for-the-union-of-europe&Itemid=17

Europe Unites
by Denis de Rougemont
A Lecture on “The History of the Ideal for a United Europe”. From: The Meaning of Europe, translated by Alan Braley,F.I.L.; published by Sidgwick & Jackson, London 1965; © Denis de Rougemont
TAKEN ONE by one, the vital organs of our society appear to me to be in quite good condition. It remains to discover whether the subject of our inquiry, Europe, still possesses a sufficient will to live to be able to fulfil the new functions which from now on are allotted to it in the world. I shall now endeavour to show that in practice, Europe’s will to live means her will to unite.

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2011/11/30/companion-of-jeanne-de-rougemont/

In the middle of the 10th century, the territory of Bar formed a dependency of the Holy Roman Empire. The first dynasty of Bar were in fact dukes of Upper Lotharingia out of the house of the counts of the Ardennes, descendants of count palatine Wigeric of Lotharingia. They chose their seat at Bar, which was subsequently called Bar-le-Duc. This Ardennes-Bar dynasty became extinct with Duke Frederick III (died 1033) and his sister Countess Sophia of Bar (died 1093).
In the 11th century the lords of Bar were only counts of Bar. They belonged to the house of Mousson-Montbéliard-Ferrette.

The House of Anjou, usually referred to simply as the Angevins (pron.: /ændʒvɪns/), was a noble family of Frankish origin that emerged as the rulers of the Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Kingdom of England in the 12th century. Founded by Ingelger in the Carolingian Empire during the 9th century, the Angevins emerged as part of the minor feudal nobility in the French province of Gâtinais, rising to become viscounts of Angers. Under Ingelger’s son, Fulk the Red, the family’s territory was expanded to create the County of Anjou, a fief of the Kingdom of France. The reigns of the early counts of Anjou were marked by power struggles with neighbouring provinces such as Normandy and Brittany for regional supremacy, resulting in Angevin influence extending into Maine and Touraine. In the early 12th century, Fulk the Younger went on crusade, forging valuable links with the Knights Templar and eventually inheriting the Kingdom of Jerusalem through marriage to Baldwin II’s daughter Melisende in 1131.

Geoffrey Plantagenet, Fulk’s eldest son by his first wife, succeeded to Anjou in 1129 upon his father’s departure for Jerusalem, whilst Baldwin III, Fulk’s eldest son with Melisende, inherited Jerusalem after Fulk’s death in 1143. The Jerusalem branch of the family continued until the demise of Isabella in 1205, though briefly interrupted by the turbulence around the fall of Jerusalem and the Third Crusade. The senior line of the family, through the marriage of Geoffrey to the Empress Matilda, received control of England and Normandy by 1154, and marriage of Geoffrey’s son Henry Curtmantle to Eleanor of Aquitaine expanded the family’s holdings into what was later termed the Angevin Empire. After John lost the Angevins’ continental territory along with Anjou itself to the Capetians in 1204, the family became known as the House of Plantagenet,[1] adopting Geoffrey’s nickname and ruling England until the reign of Richard II, after which the succession was disputed by two cadet branches, the House of Lancaster and the House of York.

Nestled in a thick Grove of Anjou and Brittany markets, Bourmont Castle opens its doors for the heritage days. It was a unique opportunity to discover this high place of the Chouannerie.

The lordship of Bourmont seems to be incorporated fairly late, in the 14th century, replacing the original seigneury of Warsaw. Is the Castle built in the 15th century, not physically that is the Earth full surrounded by a moat once in water, the Tower of the northern corner and bases South tours & South West, reworked in the 19th century. 99-Hectare park, was enclosed by walls from 1788 to 1791. The two buildings of the common portals South and East, the portal of the vegetable garden and the Orangery are from the 18th century. The Châtelet, which includes the manorial chapel Saint Christophe was rebuilt in 1882. The logis was rebuilt between 1892 and 1894 by the architect Le Diberder, from Nantes. The Manor House of the estate, which stands to the East of the Castle, keeps two towers, probably from the 15th century. Agricultural parts and dependencies, which include a clotheshorse, a pigsty, & a water tower were built or rebuilt in the heart of the fourth quarter of the nineteenth century.
Château de Bourmont 49440 Warsaw, private property, does not visit!

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_de_personnes_n%C3%A9es_en_Anjou

Louis Auguste Victor de Ghaisne de Bourmont, born and died in Warsaw (1773 – 1846), Marshal of France. Son of Louis Marie Eugène de Ghaisne de Bourmont and Josephine Sophie Marie of Coutances, he was born into an old family Angevin (Flanders) who has given several centuries of brilliant officers in the France.

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2012/11/29/ursule-she-bear-de-bar-rougemont/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2012/12/06/capturing-beauty-the-prick/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2011/12/15/the-ferrette-habsburg-line/

http://ferrette.mvnet.at/eng-ferrette/menue/about.htm#society

List of people born in Anjou

Map of the historic Anjou

Summary
[hide]
1 . General presentation
2 Middle ages
3 Renaissance
4 Ancien régime and French Revolution
5 Modern
6 Modern times
7 Internal links
Overview[Edit]
Chronological presentation of historical figures and celebrities born within the boundaries of the historicAnjou .
The limits of the historic Anjou go beyond that of the current of the Maine-et-Loire Department and include the territories of Angevin Mayenne or South-Mayenne Château-Gontier et Craon, Maine Anjou, part of the Department of the former angevin Sarthe (La Flèche and Le Lude), the Anjou Touraine, western part of theIndre-et-Loire ( Château-la-VallièreandBourgueil ), the northern part of the Department of Vienna (Loudun and Mirebeau) as well as the fringe of the Deux-Sèvres Department along the Maine-et-Loire and the municipality Boissière-du-Doré , in the Loire-Atlantique.
Middle ages[Edit]

Good King René and his wife Jeanne de Laval
Counts and Dukes of Anjou
House Ingelger, Viscounts of Angers
The Plantagenet dynasty
Family Cossé-Brissac.
Family de Craon, former family of France, known as XIe century.
Stuffed Jean (1424-1506) statesman French born in Château-Gontier (Angevin Mayenne), died in his castle of Plessis-stuffed.
Fulk III, known as Fulk Nerra, black, born circa 965/970, died 1040.
Fulk V of Anjou, the younger, born about 1091 in Angers, died on 10 November 1143 or 1144 in Acre (Palestine).
Geoffroy V d’Anjou said the Bel or Plantagenet (1113-1151, Chateau-du-Loir).
Geoffroy of the Tour-Landry (1330-1402/1406) born into a noble Angevin family, Knight and writer.
Marie of Anjou (1404 Angers-1463), daughter of Louis II of Anjou and wife of Charles VII.
René i. (said the good King René) (1409-1480), Duke of Anjou, of Lorraine and Bar, count of Provence, King of Naples, Sicily and Jerusalem.
Guillaume des Roches born in 1165 or 1170 at Longué-Jumelles in Anjou. Seneschal of anjou.
Renaissance[Edit]

Joachim du Bellay
Jean Al-Shehri, Prosecutor of the King to the election of Angers and Mayor of Angers.
Pierre Ayrault, born in Angers in 1536, died in Angers in 1601 or 1602, criminal lieutenant to the présidial of Angers.
Pierre II Al-Shehri (Angers 1576 – 1626Angers), criminal lieutenant to the présidial of Angers and Mayor of Angers.
René Ayrault, (1503-1561), lawyer, Crown Prosecutor and Mayor of Angers during the Renaissance.
Joachim du Bellay (1522-1560), Joachim du Bellay, poet and writer, was born around 1522 to read, in Anjou, the Castle of the Turmeliere. He stayed regularly in Angers to get in another family house the Château de Gizeux located within the old boundaries of the historic Anjou, North of Bourgueil. He died in Paris in 1560.
Jean Bodin (1529, Angers -1596, Laon), jurist, Economist, philosopher, political adviser. He is the inventor of the concept of sovereignty of the State.
Jacques Bruneau de Tartifume, (1574-1636), columnist, writer, artist, lawyer and president of the présidial of Angers.
Rent Pierre, sieur of the brush, famous demonographe, born in 1550 in oil, Anjou village, near Durtal.
François the Proust of Ronday, (1548-1615), jurist and historian, author of the town and Château de Loudun, the land of Loudunois and the inhabitants of the city and the country, was born and died in Loudun (Anjou).
Julien Peleus, also known as Julien Pilieu (1550, Angers – 1625, Paris), was a lawyer, historian, writer and French poet.
Clamp Christophe, born in 1507, the Seneschal of Anjou criminal lieutenant, Seneschal and Mayor of Angers.
Hervé de clip, Alderman, teacher, doctor of law and Mayor of Angers.
Jean’s pinched (1480-1538) Criminal Lieutenant of the Seneschal of Anjou and Mayor of Angers.
Clip Mathurin, bailiff and Mayor of Angers.
Pinched stone (1455-1511) angevin noble, maître d ‘ Hôtel of the King, Mayor of Angers and poet.
Guillaume Poyet, (Angers 1473- April 1548), magistrate and French lawyer engaged in Angers and Paris.
Pierre de La Primaudaye, said the Dove (born around 1546, died in 1620), Member of a large family of Protestant Angevins, is a writer distinguished by the end of the XVI centurye .
Ancien régime and French Revolution[Edit]

Charles Melchior Artus de Bonchamps

The writer Gilles Ménage
Moses Amyraut, born in 1596 in Bourgueil, died 1664 in Saumur, was a French protestant theologian . He held an important place in the history of the reformed theology of e century XVII.
François Bernier(born in 1620, played, in Anjou – died in 1688, Paris), philosopher epicurean and French traveller.
Gilles Blonde Bagneux (1729-1800), Mayor of Saumur and member of Parliament for the city of Saumur in the Assembly of the third estate in 1789.
Charles Melchior Artus de Bonchamps, born in 1759 in Juvardeil in Anjou, died in 1793. Commander of the vendéan during the insurrection of royalists.
François Bontemps born in 1753 at Saumur, and died in the same city in 1811), baron of Abaumont, was a French, including general of brigade, and then baron of the Empire.
Prégent Brillet Villemorge (born in Angers in 1770), Knight of Villemorge and Lord of the Menil, Royal, Deputy Army officer and Mayor of Angers.
Thomas-Marie-Gabriel Desai, (1743-1818), magistrate and former member of the Anjou and Maine-et-Loire.
Aristide Aubert Du Petit-Thouars, Captain (n), (brother of Louis Marie), born in 1760, (Château de Boumais), near Saumur died in 1798 at Aboukir.
Louis Marie Aubert Du Petit-Thouars (brother of Aristide Aubert), French botanist, born in 1758 (Boumais Castle), near Saumur and died in 1831 in Paris.
Louis Auguste Victor de Ghaisne de Bourmont, born and died in Warsaw (1773 – 1846), Marshal of France. Son of Louis Marie Eugène de Ghaisne de Bourmont and Josephine Sophie Marie of Coutances, he was born into an old family Angevin (Flanders) who has given several centuries of brilliant officers in the France.
John Frain du Tremblay, Jean Frain, angevin writer, Lord of the Tremblay (born and died in Angers (1641 – 1724), angevin author, French writer.)
Louis-Marie de La Révellière-Lépeaux spelled also Larevelliere (born in a family of landowners ofAnjou, on 24 August 1753 – died 27 March 1824 in Paris), Deputy of the third estate to theconstituent Assembly.
Gilles household, (Angers, 15 August 1613-Paris, 23 July 1692), grammarian and French writer.
Charles II Montault-Désilles (Bishop of Angers) (1755 – 1839) born in Loudun died in Angers.
Pierre Montault-Désilles (born in Loudun in 1751), first prefect of the département of Maine-et-Loire.
Anselme François René Pachori de La Verrie, ( 1770- 1856Saumur Angers), officer of the National Guard, former Mayor of Angers and member of the Maine-et-Loire in the National Assembly.
Joseph Louis Proust, born September 26, 1754 in Angers , died July 5, 1826, in Angers, was a French chemist.
François Raimbault (1641-1702), lawyer, banker and Mayor of Angers.
Théophraste Renaudot, (1586-1653), inventor of French written press , doctor, journalist, philanthropist, was born in Loudun (Anjou).
René Robert des Marchais or René Robert Lord walked, (1673-1753), Squire, University, Dean and Mayor of Angers.
Pierre Charles Trémolières, born in Cholet in 1703, died in Paris in 1739. Angevin painter.
Claude François du Verdier of the Soriniere, born in 1702, angevin writer.
Volney Constantin-François Chassebœuf La Giraudais, count Volney, said Volney, born February 3 1757 at Craon in The of Angevin Mayenne and died on 25 April 1820 in Paris, is a philosopher and orientalist French. It is considered the precursor of ethnologists, anthropologists, and sociologists of the XXe century [2].
Modern times[Edit]
David d’Angers (Pierre-Jean David says) (1788-1856), sculptor.
Pierre Auguste Béclard, (1785, Angers – 1825 , Paris), French anatomist and physician.
Jean-François Bodin (1766-1829) writer and historian.
Eugène Chevreul (1786-1889), chemist
Léo Delibes was a French composer born in arrow (Haut-Anjou of the Sarthe) in 1836 and died in Paris in 1891.
Paul de Farcy, (1841 – Château-Gontier – 1918 Angers), historian.
Marie-Sophie Leroyer de Chantepie, born in 1800 in Château-Gontier died at Angers in 1888, French writer.
Martin Michaud, born in 1975, love of French writer.
Contemporary era[Edit]

The Angevin Empire is a neologism defining the lands of the Plantagenets: Henry II and his sons Richard I and John. Another son Geoffrey II, Duke of Brittany ruled Brittany and established a separate line there. As far as historians know, there was no contemporary term for the region under Angevin control; however, descriptions such as “our kingdom and everything subject to our rule whatever it may be” were used.[1] The term Angevin Empire was coined by Kate Norgate in her 1887 publication, England under the Angevin Kings.[2] In France, the term Espace Plantagenêt (Plantagenet Area) is sometimes used to describe the fiefdoms the Plantagenets had acquired.[3]
The adoption of the Angevin Empire label marked a re-evaluation of the times, considering that both English and French influence spread throughout the dominion in the half century during which the union lasted. The term Angevin itself is the adjective applied to the residents of Anjou and its historic capital, Angers; the Plantagenets were descended from Geoffrey, Count of Anjou, hence the term.[4]
The use of the term Empire has engendered controversy among some historians, as the area was a collection of the lands inherited and acquired by Henry. It is unclear whether or not these dominions shared any common identity.[5][6][7] Some historians argue that the term should be reserved solely for the Holy Roman Empire, the only Western European political structure actually named an empire at that time.[8] Other historians argue that Henry II’s empire was neither powerful, centralised, nor large enough to be seriously called an empire.[9] There was no imperial title, as implied by the term Angevin Empire.[10] However, even if the Plantagenets themselves did not claim any imperial title some chroniclers, often working for Henry II himself, did use the term empire to describe this assemblage of lands.[11] In essence the highest title was “king of England”, to which were added the titles of dukes and counts held in France that were completely and totally independent from the royal title, and not subject to any English royal law.[12] Because of this some historians prefer the term commonwealth to empire, emphasising that the Angevin Empire was more of an assemblage of seven fully independent, sovereign states loosely bound to each other.[13]

The term Angevin Empire is a modern term describing the collection of states once ruled by the Angevin Plantagenet dynasty.
The Plantagenets ruled over an area stretching from the Pyrenees to Ireland during the 12th and early 13th centuries, located north of the kingdoms of Navarre and Aragon. This “empire” extended over roughly half of medieval France, all of England, and some of Ireland. However, despite the extent of Plantagenet rule, they were defeated by the King of France, Philip II Augustus of the House of Capet, which left the empire split in two, having lost the provinces of Normandy and Anjou. This defeat, after which the ruling Plantagenets retained their English territories and the French province of Gascony, set the scene for the Saintonge and the Hundred Years’ War.

The House of Anjou, usually referred to simply as the Angevins (pron.: /ændʒvɪns/), was a noble family of Frankish origin that emerged as the rulers of the Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Kingdom of England in the 12th century. Founded by Ingelger in the Carolingian Empire during the 9th century, the Angevins emerged as part of the minor feudal nobility in the French province of Gâtinais, rising to become viscounts of Angers. Under Ingelger’s son, Fulk the Red, the family’s territory was expanded to create the County of Anjou, a fief of the Kingdom of France. The reigns of the early counts of Anjou were marked by power struggles with neighbouring provinces such as Normandy and Brittany for regional supremacy, resulting in Angevin influence extending into Maine and Touraine. In the early 12th century, Fulk the Younger went on crusade, forging valuable links with the Knights Templar and eventually inheriting the Kingdom of Jerusalem through marriage to Baldwin II’s daughter Melisende in 1131.
Geoffrey Plantagenet, Fulk’s eldest son by his first wife, succeeded to Anjou in 1129 upon his father’s departure for Jerusalem, whilst Baldwin III, Fulk’s eldest son with Melisende, inherited Jerusalem after Fulk’s death in 1143. The Jerusalem branch of the family continued until the demise of Isabella in 1205, though briefly interrupted by the turbulence around the fall of Jerusalem and the Third Crusade. The senior line of the family, through the marriage of Geoffrey to the Empress Matilda, received control of England and Normandy by 1154, and marriage of Geoffrey’s son Henry Curtmantle to Eleanor of Aquitaine expanded the family’s holdings into what was later termed the Angevin Empire. After John lost the Angevins’ continental territory along with Anjou itself to the Capetians in 1204, the family became known as the House of Plantagenet,[1] adopting Geoffrey’s nickname and ruling England until the reign of Richard II, after which the succession was disputed by two cadet branches, the House of Lancaster and the House of York.

The House of Anjou, usually referred to simply as the Angevins (pron.: /ændʒvɪns/), was a noble family of Frankish origin that emerged as the rulers of the Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Kingdom of England in the 12th century. Founded by Ingelger in the Carolingian Empire during the 9th century, the Angevins emerged as part of the minor feudal nobility in the French province of Gâtinais, rising to become viscounts of Angers. Under Ingelger’s son, Fulk the Red, the family’s territory was expanded to create the County of Anjou, a fief of the Kingdom of France. The reigns of the early counts of Anjou were marked by power struggles with neighbouring provinces such as Normandy and Brittany for regional supremacy, resulting in Angevin influence extending into Maine and Touraine. In the early 12th century, Fulk the Younger went on crusade, forging valuable links with the Knights Templar and eventually inheriting the Kingdom of Jerusalem through marriage to Baldwin II’s daughter Melisende in 1131.
Geoffrey Plantagenet, Fulk’s eldest son by his first wife, succeeded to Anjou in 1129 upon his father’s departure for Jerusalem, whilst Baldwin III, Fulk’s eldest son with Melisende, inherited Jerusalem after Fulk’s death in 1143. The Jerusalem branch of the family continued until the demise of Isabella in 1205, though briefly interrupted by the turbulence around the fall of Jerusalem and the Third Crusade. The senior line of the family, through the marriage of Geoffrey to the Empress Matilda, received control of England and Normandy by 1154, and marriage of Geoffrey’s son Henry Curtmantle to Eleanor of Aquitaine expanded the family’s holdings into what was later termed the Angevin Empire. After John lost the Angevins’ continental territory along with Anjou itself to the Capetians in 1204, the family became known as the House of Plantagenet,[1] adopting Geoffrey’s nickname and ruling England until the reign of Richard II, after which the succession was disputed by two cadet branches, the House of Lancaster and the House of York.

Contents
 [hide] 
1 Origins
1.1 Angevin Counts
2 Monarchs of Jerusalem and Monarchs of England
2.1 Angevins of Jerusalem
2.2 Lists of Monarchs of Jerusalem
3 See also
4 References
[edit] Origins
The first documented member of the Angevins was an obscure 9th century Frankish nobleman named Ingelger.[2] Later generations of his family believed Ingelger or Ingelgarius was the son of Tertullus (Tertulle) and Petronilla.[3] Around 877 he came into possession of lands in accordance with the Capitulary of Quierzy which Charles the Bald had issued. These included Château-Landon in beneficium, and he was a casatus in the Gâtinais and Francia. Contemporary records refer to Ingelger as a miles optimus, a great military man.[4]
By Louis II of France, Ingelger was appointed viscount of Orléans, which city was under the rule of its bishops at the time.[4] At Orléans Ingelger made a matrimonial alliance with one of the leading families of Neustria, the lords of Amboise. He married Adelais, whose maternal uncles were Adalard, Archbishop of Tours, and Raino, Bishop of Angers. Later Ingelger was appointed prefect (military commander) at Tours, then ruled by Adalard.[4]
At some point Ingelger may have been appointed Count of Anjou, at a time when the county stretched only as far west as the Mayenne River. Later sources credit his appointment to his defence of the region from Vikings,[5] but modern scholars have been more likely to see it as a result of his wife’s influential relatives.[4] He was buried in the church of Saint-Martin at Châteauneuf-sur-Sarthe and was succeeded by his son Fulk the Red.[5] The County of Anjou passed down in the dynasty founded by Ingelger until in 1060 Geoffrey II Martel died childless, and the county passed to his nephew, Geoffrey III the Bearded, son of Geoffrey of Gâtinais by a sister of Martel.
[edit] Angevin Counts
Ingelger (870–898), father of
Fulk I the Red (898–941), father of
Fulk II the Good (941–960), father of
Geoffrey I Greymantle (960–987), father of Fulk III
Fulk III the Black (987–1040), father of
Geoffrey II Martel (1041–1060), maternal uncle of
Geoffrey III the Bearded (1060–1067), brother of
Fulk IV the Ill-Tempered (1067–1109, jointly with his son Geoffrey IV) (1098–1106), father of
Fulk V the Young (1106–1129), also king of Jerusalem as Fulk I
[edit] Monarchs of Jerusalem and Monarchs of England
[edit] Angevins of Jerusalem
By 1127 Fulk was preparing to return to Anjou when he received an embassy from King Baldwin II of Jerusalem. Baldwin II had no male heirs but had already designated his daughter Melisende to succeed him. Baldwin II wanted to safeguard his daughter’s inheritance by marrying her to a powerful lord. Fulk was a wealthy crusader and experienced military commander, and a widower. His experience in the field would prove invaluable in a frontier state always in the grip of war.
However, Fulk held out for better terms than mere consort of the Queen; he wanted to be king alongside Melisende. Baldwin II, reflecting on Fulk’s fortune and military exploits, acquiesced. Fulk abdicated his county seat of Anjou to his son Geoffery and left for Jerusalem, where he married Melisende on June 2, 1129. Later Baldwin II bolstered Melisende’s position in the kingdom by making her sole guardian of her son by Fulk, Baldwin III, born in 1130.
Fulk and Melisende became joint rulers of Jerusalem in 1131 with Baldwin II’s death. From the start Fulk assumed sole control of the government, excluding Melisende altogether. He favored fellow countrymen from Anjou to the native nobility. The other crusader states to the north feared that Fulk would attempt to impose the suzerainty of Jerusalem over them, as Baldwin II had done; but as Fulk was far less powerful than his deceased father-in-law, the northern states rejected his authority.

The death of Fulk, as depicted in MS of William of Tyre’sHistoria andOld French Continuation, painted in Acre, 13C. Bib. Nat. Française.
In Jerusalem as well, Fulk was resented by the second generation of Jerusalem Christians who had grown up there since the First Crusade. These “natives” focused on Melisende’s cousin, the popular Hugh II of Le Puiset, count of Jaffa, who was devotedly loyal to the Queen. Fulk saw Hugh as a rival, and in 1134, in order to expose Hugh, accused him of infidelity with Melisende. Hugh rebelled in protest and secured himself to Jaffa, allying himself with the Muslims of Ascalon. He was able to defeat the army set against him by Fulk, but this situation could not hold. The Patriarch interceded in the conflict, perhaps at the behest of Melisende. Fulk agreed to peace and Hugh was exiled from the kingdom for three years, a lenient sentence.
However, an assassination attempt was made against Hugh. Fulk, or his supporters, were commonly believed responsible, though direct proof never surfaced. The scandal was all that was needed for the queen’s party to take over the government in what amounted to a palace coup. Author and historian Bernard Hamilton wrote that the Fulk’s supporters “went in terror of their lives” in the palace. Contemporary author and historian William of Tyre wrote of Fulk “he never attempted to take the initiative, even in trivial matters, without (Melisende’s) consent”. The result was that Melisende held direct and unquestioned control over the government from 1136 onwards. Sometime before 1136 Fulk reconciled with his wife, and a second son, Amalric was born.
In 1143, while the king and queen were on holiday in Acre, Fulk was killed in a hunting accident. His horse stumbled, fell, and Fulk’s skull was crushed by the saddle, “and his brains gushed forth from both ears and nostrils”, as William of Tyre describes. He was carried back to Acre, where he lay unconscious for three days before he died. He was buried in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Though their marriage started in conflict, Melisende mourned for him privately as well as publicly. Fulk was survived by his son Geoffrey of Anjou by his first wife, and Baldwin III and Amalric I by Melisende.
Baldwin III ascended the throne with his mother as co-ruler, in 1143. His early reign was laced with squabbles with his mother over the possession of Jerusalem, till 1153, when he took personal hold of the government. He died in 1162, without heirs, and the kingdom passed to his brother, Amalric I, although there was some opposition among the nobility to Agnes; they were willing to accept the marriage in 1157 when Baldwin III was still capable of siring an heir, but now the Haute Cour refused to endorse Amalric as king unless his marriage to Agnes was annulled. The hostility to Agnes, it must be admitted, may be exaggerated by the chronicler William of Tyre, whom she prevented from becoming Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem decades later, as well as from William’s continuators like Ernoul, who hints at a slight on her moral character: “car telle n’est que roine doie iestre di si haute cite comme de Jherusalem” (“there should not be such a queen for so holy a city as Jerusalem”).
Nevertheless, consanguinity was enough for the opposition. Amalric agreed and ascended the throne without a wife, although Agnes continued to hold the title Countess of Jaffa and Ascalon and received a pension from that fief’s income. The church ruled that Amalric and Agnes’ children were legitimate and preserved their place in the order of succession. Through her children Agnes would exert much influence in Jerusalem for almost 20 years. Almaric was succeeded by his son by Agnes, Baldwin IV.

The marriage of Amalric I of Jerusalem and Maria Comnena at Tyre
Almaric’s wives, Agnes of Courtenay, now married to Reginald of Sidon, and Maria Comnena, the dowager Queen, who had married Balian of Ibelin in 1177. His daughter by Agnes, Sibylla, was already of age, the mother of a son, and was clearly in a strong position to succeed her brother, but Maria’s daughter Isabella had the support of her stepfather’s family, the Ibelins.
In 1179, Baldwin began planning to marry Sibylla to Hugh III of Burgundy, but by spring 1180 this was still unresolved. Raymond III of Tripoli attempted a coup, and began to march on Jerusalem with Bohemund III, to force the king to marry his sister to a local candidate of his own choosing, probably Baldwin of Ibelin, Balian’s older brother. To counter this, the king hastily arranged her marriage to Guy of Lusignan, younger brother of Amalric, the constable of the kingdom. A foreign match was essential to bring the possibility of external military aid to the kingdom. With the new French king Philip II a minor, Guy’s status as a vassal of the King and Sibylla’s first cousin Henry II of England – who owed the Pope a penitential pilgrimage – was useful.

William of Tyre discovers Baldwin’s first symptoms of leprosy (MS ofL’Estoire d’Eracles (French translation of William of Tyre’s Historia), painted in France, 1250s.British Library, London.)
By 1182, Baldwin IV, increasingly incapacitated by his leprosy, named Guy as bailli. Raymond contested this, but when Guy fell out of favour with Baldwin the following year, he was re-appointed bailli and was given possession of Beirut. Baldwin came to an agreement with Raymond and the Haute Cour to make Baldwin of Montferrat, Sibylla’s son by her first marriage, his heir, before Sibylla and Guy. The child was crowned co-king as Baldwin V in 1183 in a ceremony presided by Raymond. It was agreed that, should the boy die during his minority, the regency would pass to “the most rightful heirs” until his kinsmen – the Kings of England and France and Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor – and the Pope were able to adjudicate between the claims of Sibylla and Isabella. These “most rightful heirs” were not named.
Baldwin IV died in spring 1185, and was succeeded by his nephew. Raymond was bailli, but he had passed Baldwin V’s personal guardianship to Joscelin III of Edessa, his maternal great-uncle, claiming that he did not wish to attract suspicion if the child, who does not seem to have been robust, were to die. Baldwin V died during the summer of 1186, at Acre. Neither side paid any heed to Baldwin IV’s will.
After the funeral, Joscelin had Sibylla named as her brother’s successor, although she had to agree to divorce Guy, just as her father had divorced her mother, with the guarantee that she would be allowed to choose a new consort. Once crowned, she immediately crowned Guy. Meanwhile, Raymond had gone to Nablus, home of Balian and Maria, and summoned all those nobles loyal to Princess Isabella and the Ibelins. Raymond wanted instead to have her and her husband Humphrey IV of Toron crowned. However, Humphrey, whose stepfather Raynald of Châtillon was an ally of Guy, deserted him and swore allegiance to Guy and Sibylla.
[edit] Lists of Monarchs of Jerusalem
Melisende and Fulk (1131–1153)
Fulk lost influence after 1136, and died in 1143. Melisende continued to reign by right of law
Baldwin III (1143–1162, crowned as co-ruler and heir of Melisende 1143; claimed full power in 1153. Melisende – Regent and advisor, 1154–1161)
Amalric I (1162–1174)
Baldwin IV (1174–1185, Raymond III of Tripoli – Regent, 1174–1177, Guy of Lusignan, Regent, 1183–1184)
Baldwin V (1185–1186), Raymond III of Tripoli (Regent, 1185–1186)
Sibylla and Guy (1186–1190)
Jerusalem was lost in 1187; Sybilla died in 1190, but Guy refused to cede the crown; kingship disputed until 1192, after which kings ruled over a narrow coastal strip.
Isabella I (1192–1205)
With Conrad I (1192)
With Henry I (1192–1197)
With Amalric II (1197–1205)
The Angevins of Jerusalem became extinct with the death of Isabella of Jerusalem. There were several disputes over the throne of Jerusalem, until the conquering of it by the Saracens. However, although Outremer (Jerusalem’s name under the crusaders) was lost to the Saracens, the claim to the title of King of Jerusalem continued to be passed down through several generations, until almost every monarch in Europe used the title.
[edit] See also
Angevin Empire
House of Plantagenet or first Angevin dynasty
Capetian House of Anjou or second Angevin dynasty
Valois House of Anjou or third Angevin dynasty
Brienne claim to the Kingdom of Jerusalem

René of Anjou (Rei Rainièr in Occitan) (16 January 1409 – 10 July 1480), also known as René I of Naples and Good King René (French Le bon roi René), was Duke of Anjou, Count of Provence (1434–1480), Count of Piedmont, Duke of Bar (1430–1480), Duke of Lorraine (1431–1453), King of Naples (1435–1442; titular 1442–1480), titular King of Jerusalem (1438–1480) and Aragon (1466–1480) (including Sicily, Majorca, Corsica). He was the father of the English queen Margaret of Anjou, wife of King Henry VI of England and a key figure in the Wars of the Roses.

René of Anjou (Rei Rainièr in Occitan) (16 January 1409 – 10 July 1480), also known as René I of Naples and Good King René (French Le bon roi René), was Duke of Anjou, Count of Provence (1434–1480), Count of Piedmont, Duke of Bar (1430–1480), Duke of Lorraine (1431–1453), King of Naples (1435–1442; titular 1442–1480), titular King of Jerusalem (1438–1480) and Aragon (1466–1480) (including Sicily, Majorca, Corsica). He was the father of the English queen Margaret of Anjou, wife of King Henry VI of England and a key figure in the Wars of the Roses.

Contents
 [hide] 
1 Life
2 The arts
3 Marriages and issue
4 Cultural references
5 Arms
6 Ancestry
7 See also
8 References
9 External links
[edit] Life

The Castle of Angers, René’s birthplace.
René was born in the castle of Angers, and was the second son of Louis II of Anjou, King of Sicily (i.e. King of Naples), and of Yolande of Aragon. He was the brother of Marie of Anjou, who married the future Charles VII of France and became Queen of France.
Louis II died in 1417, and his sons, together with their brother-in-law, afterwards Charles VII of France, were brought up under the guardianship of their mother. The elder, Louis III, succeeded to the crown of Sicily and to the duchy of Anjou, René being known as the Count of Guise. By his marriage treaty (1419) with Isabella, elder daughter of Charles II, Duke of Lorraine, he became heir to the Duchy of Bar, which was claimed as the inheritance of his mother Yolande, and, in right of his wife, heir to the Duchy of Lorraine.
René, then only ten, was to be brought up in Lorraine under the guardianship of Charles II and Louis, cardinal of Bar, both of whom were attached to the Burgundian party, but he retained the right to bear the arms of Anjou.
He was far from sympathizing with the Burgundians, and, joining the French army at Reims in 1429, was present at the coronation of Charles VII. When Louis of Bar died in 1430 René came into sole possession of his duchy, and in the next year, on his father-in-law’s death, he succeeded to the duchy of Lorraine. But the inheritance was claimed by the heir-male, Antoine de Vaudemont, who with Burgundian help defeated René at Bulgneville in July 1431. The Duchess Isabella effected a truce with Antoine de Vaudemont, but the duke remained a prisoner of the Burgundians until April 1432, when he recovered his liberty on parole on yielding up as hostages his two sons, John and Louis of Anjou.

Louis I, Duke of Bar

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Coat of arms
Louis I of Bar (between 1370 and 1375 – 26 June 1430) was a French bishop of the 15th century.
[edit] Life
He was a son of Robert I of Bar and his wife Marie Valois, (daughter of John II of France). As the couple’s fifth son, he was destined for a career in the church. He was Bishop of Poitiers from 1391 to 1395 (also being made a cardinal in 1391) before becoming Bishop of Langres (1397–1413), and then Bishop of Châlons-sur-Marne (1413–30). At the same time, he acted as bishop-administrator of Verdun (1419–23 and 1424–30).
He played an important role in French politics after the assassination of the Duke of Orleans in 1407. In 1409, he attended the Council of Pisa with Guy of Roye, Archbishop of Reims, and Peter of Ailly, Bishop of Cambrai. At Volti, near Gênes, a quarrel between the marshals of the town and the Archbishop of Reims degenerated into a riot, with the archbishop being killed and Louis missing-presumed dead. The cardinals, arriving at Pisa, pronounced the decline of popes Benedict XIII of Avignon and Gregory XII of Rome, and elected Pope Alexander V, putting an end to the Great Western Schism.
On the death of his brother Edward III, Duke of Bar at the Battle of Agincourt in 1415, Louis inherited the dukedom and successfully defended his claim to it against that of his brother-in-law Adolphe, Duke of Juliers and of Berg, who felt that, as a clergyman, Louis was not suited to inherit the dukedom and its revenues. In 1419, in order to put an end to the differences that had existed for several centuries between the dukes of Bar and Lorraine, Louis negotiated the marriage of his great-nephew René of Anjou to Isabella, Duchess of Lorraine (daughter and heiress of Charles II, Duke of Lorraine), and entrusted them with ruling the Duchy of Bar in the 1420s.

The Duchy of Bar was a historic duchy of both the Holy Roman Empire and the crown of France, though later totally incorporated with Lorraine into France in 1766. The duchy of Bar includes the “pays” of Barrois.

Contents
 [hide] 
1 History
2 Rulers of Bar and Pont-à-Mousson
2.1 Counts of Bar
2.2 Dukes of Bar
2.3 Marquises of Pont-à-Mousson
3 References
[edit] History
In the middle of the 10th century, the territory of Bar formed a dependency of the Holy Roman Empire. The first dynasty of Bar were in fact dukes of Upper Lotharingia out of the house of the counts of the Ardennes, descendants of count palatine Wigeric of Lotharingia. They chose their seat at Bar, which was subsequently called Bar-le-Duc. This Ardennes-Bar dynasty became extinct with Duke Frederick III (died 1033) and his sister Countess Sophia of Bar (died 1093).
In the 11th century the lords of Bar were only counts of Bar. They belonged to the house of Mousson-Montbéliard-Ferrette.
Theobald I of Bar was an ally of Philip Augustus, as was also his son Henry II of Bar, who distinguished himself at the Battle of Bouvines in 1214. But sometimes the counts of Bar bore arms against France. In 1301 Henry III of Bar, having made an alliance with Edward I of England, whose daughter he had married, was vanquished by Philip the Fair, who forced him to do homage for a part of Barrois, situated west of the Meuse River, which was then called Barrois mouvant. Since then the duchy of Bar was both part of the Crown of France (for the west of the Meuse River) and part of the Holy Roman Empire (for the rest of the duchy).[1]
In 1354 Robert of Bar, who married a princess of France, was made Marquis of Pont-à-Mousson by the Emperor Charles IV and took the title of Duke of Bar. Hereafter, the title of “Marquis of Pont-à-Mousson” was used by the dukes of Bar or their heirs-apparent. His successor, Edward III of Bar, was killed at Agincourt in 1415.
In 1419 Louis of Bar, brother of the last-named cardinal and bishop of Châlons-sur-Marne, gave the duchy of Bar to René, Duke of Anjou and king of Naples, the grandson of his sister Yolande, who married Isabella, Duchess of Lorraine. Yolande of Anjou, who in 1444 had married Frederick, Count of Vaudémont, became heiress of Nicholas of Anjou, duke of Calabria and of Lorraine, in 1473, and of René of Anjou, duke of Bar, in 1480; thus Lorraine, with Bar added to it, once more returned to the family of its ancient dukes.
United with Lorraine to France in 1634, the duchy of Bar remained, except for short intervals, part of the royal domain. It was granted in 1738 to Stanislaus Leszczynski, ex-king of Poland, and on his death in 1766 was once more attached to the crown of France.
[edit] Rulers of Bar and Pont-à-Mousson
[edit] Counts of Bar
House of the Ardennes (Wigerics)
Frederick I (959–978), son of count palatine Wigeric of Lotharingia
Thierry I (978–1026/1027), son
Frederick II (1026/1027), son
Frederick III (1026/1027–1033), son
Sophie of Bar (countess of Bar 1033; d.1093), daughter of Frederick II
House of Montbelliard
Theodoric II of Bar (1093–1105), son of Sophia of Bar (+1093) and count Louis of Montbelliard (+1071).
Reginald I of Bar, the One-eyed (r. 1105–1150)
Reginald II of Bar (r. 1150–1170)
Henry I of Bar (r. 1170–1189)
Theobald I of Bar (r. 1189–1214)
Henry II of Bar (r. 1214–1239)
Theobald II of Bar (r. 1239–1291)
Henry III of Bar (r. 1291–1302)
Edward I of Bar (r. 1302–1337)
Henry IV of Bar (r. 1337–1344)
Edward II of Bar (r. 1344–1352)
[edit] Dukes of Bar
Robert of Bar (r. 1352–1411)
Edward III of Bar (r. 1411–1415)
Louis of Bar (r. 1415–1431)
René I, king of Naples and Duke of Lorraine (r. 1431–1480)
Yolande (r. 1480–1483)
René II, Duke of Lorraine (r. 1483–1508)
Hereafter united with the Duchy of Lorraine.
[edit] Marquises of Pont-à-Mousson
Robert of Bar (r. 1354–1411
Edward III of Bar (r. 1411–1415)
Louis of Bar (r. 1415–1419)
René of Anjou (r. 1419–1441)
Louis of Anjou (r. 1441–1443)
René of Anjou (again) (r. 1443–1444)
John, Duke of Lorraine (r. 1444–1470)
Nicholas, Duke of Lorraine (r. 1470–1473)
vacant (1473–1480)
René II, Duke of Lorraine (r. 1480–1508)

René II, Duke of Lorraine

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René II, Duke of Lorraine

René II of Lorraine
Spouse(s)
Phillipa of Guelders
Noble family
House of Vaudémont
Father
Frederick II of Vaudémont
Mother
Yolande of Lorraine
Born
(1451-05-02)2 May 1451
Angers
Died
10 December 1508(1508-12-10) (aged 57)
Fains
René II (2 May 1451 – 10 December 1508) was Count of Vaudémont from 1470, Duke of Lorraine from 1473, and Duke of Bar from 1483 to 1508. He claimed the crown of the Kingdom of Naples and the County of Provence as the Duke of Calabria 1480–1493 and as King of Naples and Jerusalem 1493–1508. He succeeded his uncle John of Vaudémont as Count of Harcourt in 1473, exchanging it for the county of Aumale in 1495. He succeeded as Count of Guise in 1504.

Contents
 [hide] 
1 Life
2 Family and children
3 See also
4 Sources
[edit] Life
He was born in Angers, the son of Yolande of Lorraine and Frederick, Count of Vaudémont.
René spent his youth in the court of his grandfather René I of Anjou between Angers and Provence, succeeding to his father in Vaudémont in 1470 and, three years later, to his uncle as captain of Angers, senechal and governor of Anjou. In the same year he became Duke of Lorraine, which was at the time under the pressure of both Louis XI of France and Charles the Bold of Burgundy, with whom he initially allied. When the latter began to establish garrisons in Lorraine, however, René secretly allied with Louis (1474). Charles invaded the duchy and René was forced to quit Nancy (30 November 1475). He regained the city on 5 October the following year and moved to Switzerland to hire an army of Swiss mercenaries; with this force René defeated Charles at the Battle of Nancy (5 January 1477). In 1476, upon the death of his grandmother, he became sole Count of Harcourt and Baron of Elbeuf.
Later, René got to bad terms with Louis, who had taken most of his heritage. He moved to Italy and defeated the Duke of Ferrara in the Battle of Adria as an ally of the Republic of Venice.
When his mother Yolande died in 1483, he succeeded as Duke of Bar, and in her claims to the kingdoms of Naples and Jerusalem.

René married Phillipa of Guelders, daughter of Adolf, Duke of Guelders, in Orléans on 1 September 1485 and had the following children:
Charles (b. 17 August 1486, Nancy), d. young
François (5 July 1487, Pont-à-Mousson) (died at birth)
Antoine, Duke of Lorraine (1489–1544)
Nicholas (9 April 1493, Nancy), d. young
Claude, Duke of Guise (1496–1550), first Duke of Guise
John, Cardinal of Lorraine and Bishop of Metz (1498–1550)
Louis, Count of Vaudémont (1500–1528)
Francis, Count of Lambesc (1506–1525)
Anne (19 December 1490, Bar-le-Duc – 1491)
Isabelle (2 November 1494, Lunéville – bef. 1508)
Claude and Catherine (twins) (24 November 1502, Bar-le-Duc), d. young

Margaretha van Bauffremont Vrouwe Van Vauvry From Lady Margaret of Bauffremont Vauvry
????-1350 ?? -1350
Johan Til-Châtel En Ruffey Heer Van Rougemont Johan Til-Châtel Ruffey And Lord Of Rougemont
Johanna van Vienne Johanna of Vienne
Guy II Til-Châtel En Ruffey Heer Van Rougemont Guy II Til-Châtel And Ruffey Lord of Rougemont
1365-???? 1365 -??
x. 1390 x. 1390
Johanna van Sombernon Johanna Sombernon
1370-???? 1370 -??
Margaretha van Rougemont Margaret of Rougemont
1390-???? 1390 -??
Marguerite de Bauffremont / de Vauvry
Parents
Père: Liebaud IV de Bauffremont Sire de Bauffremont
Mère: Beatrice de Vauvry
Marriages
Henri de Vienne, seigneur de Mirebel
Enfants
Vauthier de Vienne, seigneur de Mirebel Jeanne de Blonay, dame de Joux
Jean de Vienne N
Achillande de Vienne Jean III. de Montfaucon * de Vuillafans, d’ Orbe, d’Echallens
Jeanne de Vienne-Mirebel Jean de Rougemont, seigneur de Rougemont, de Tilchâtel et de Ruffey Edouard de Dampierre * de St.-Dizier, de Vignory et de Venilly Jean de Vergy / de Fouvent

The arts

Detail of the Burning Bush triptych, showing René and his second wife, Jeanne de Laval.
The King of Sicily’s fame as an amateur painter[1] formerly led to the optimistic attribution to him of many paintings in Anjou and Provence, in many cases simply because they bore his arms. These works are generally in the Early Netherlandish style, and were probably executed under his patronage and direction, so that he may be said to have formed a school of the fine arts in sculpture, painting, goldsmith’s work and tapestry. He employed Barthélemy d’Eyck as both painter and varlet de chambre for most of his career.
Two of the most famous works formerly attributed to René are the triptych of the Burning Bush of Nicolas Froment of Avignon, in the cathedral of Aix, showing portraits of René and his second wife, Jeanne de Laval, and an illuminated Book of Hours in the Bibliothèque nationale, Paris. Among the men of letters attached to his court was Antoine de la Sale, whom he made tutor to his son, the Duke of Calabria. He encouraged the performance of mystery plays; on the performance of a mystery of the Passion at Saumur in 1462 he remitted four years of taxes to the town, and the representations of the Passion at Angers were carried out under his auspices.
He exchanged verses with his kinsman, the poet Charles of Orléans. René was also the author of two allegorical works: a devotional dialogue, Le Mortifiement de vaine plaisance (The Mortification of Vain Pleasure, 1455), and a love quest, Le Livre du Cuer d’amours espris (The Book of the Love-Smitten Heart, 1457). The latter fuses the conventions of Arthurian romance with an allegory of love based on the Romance of the Rose. Both works were exquisitely illustrated by his court painter, Barthélémy d’Eyck. Le Mortifiement survives in eight illuminated manuscripts. Although Barthélémy’s original is lost, the extant manuscripts include copies of his miniatures by Jean le Tavernier, Jean Colombe, and others. René is sometimes credited with the pastoral poem Regnault and Jeanneton, but this was more likely a gift to the king honoring his marriage to Jeanne de Laval.

Watercolour, probably by Barthélemy d’Eyck, from King René’s Tournament Book.
Le Livre des tournois (“tournament book”; Traicte de la Forme de Devis d’un Tournoi) ca. 1460 describes rules of a tournament. The most famous, and earliest, of the many manuscript copies is kept in the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris (MS Fr 2695). This is, unusually for a de luxe manuscript, on paper, and painted in watercolour. It may represent drawings by Barthélemy d’Eyck, intended as preparatory only, which were later illuminated by him or another artist. There are twenty-six full and double page miniatures.
The description given in the book is different from that of the pas d’armes held at Razilly and Saumur; conspicuously absent are the allegorical and chivalresque ornamentations that were in vogue at the time. René instead emphasizes he is reporting on ancient tournament customs of France, Germany and the Low Countries, combining them in a new suggestion on how to hold a tournament. The tournament described is a melee fought by two sides. Individual jousts are only briefly mentioned.
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Theodoric I, Count of Montbéliard

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Theodoric I (French: Thierry) (ca. 1045 – 2 January 1105) was a Count of Montbéliard, Count of Bar and lord of Mousson (as Theodoric II) and Count of Verdun. He was the son of Louis de Scarpone, Count of Montbéliard, and Sophie, Countess of Bar and Lady of Mousson.
After his father’s death, he claimed the estate of the Duchy of Lorraine, which his father had already claimed. The claim was dismissed by Emperor Henry IV, confirming the duchy to Theodoric the Valiant. In retaliation, he ravaged the diocese of Metz, but he was defeated by Adalbéron III, bishop of Metz, and the Duke of Lorraine Theodoric the Valiant. Reconciled with the Church, he founded an abbey in 1074 in Haguenau and rebuilt the church at Montbéliard in 1080. He did not participate at the Council of Clermont in 1095, or the Crusades, but rather sent his son Louis in the Crusades. In 1100, the Bishop of Verdun gave the county to Thierry for life, but the relationship between the spiritual and temporal powers were turbulent.
He married Ermentrude of Burgundy (1055–1105), daughter of William I, Count of Burgundy, and Stephanie, in 1065 and had the following issue:
Theodoric II (1081–1163), Count of Montbéliard
Louis, who became a crusader, returned in 1102 and was assassinated in 1103
Frederick I († 1160), Count of Ferrette and Altkirch
Reginald I (1090–1150), Count of Bar and lord of Mousson
Stephen (†1162), bishop of Metz
William, who died before 1105
Hugh, cited in 1105, probably religious, because he did not share his father’s possessions
Gunthilde (†1331), abbess of Biblisheim
Agnes, married in 1104 (†1136)

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