Brian, Christine, Liza, and Liz

LAST1

loveband4When my friend Bryan McLean died fourteen years ago I said to myself; “I’am the only one left! They are gone – the three gifted artists God put in the world to accompany the Gifts God gave me.”

I was all alone in my struggle to author the truth. The two Rosamond biographies that were published slandered my family – and the world famous artist, Rosamond. The outsiders could not give this trash away. They are my families paprazzi, parasite who attached themselves to Rosamond’s daughters.

Here are the four artists that loved one another, and make up the Rosamond Artistic Legacy.

Bill Arnold
Bryan McLean
Christine Rosamond Benton
John Presco

Bryan was in love with my sister Christine, but, he had other women that he loved as well. When Bryan came to me for advice, the advice I gave him became a song.

Bryan had dated Liza Minnelli before Christine. They had sang show tunes together as Liza played the piano. They saw each other again in New York, and resumed their relationship for awhile. Then, Bryan was gone, he dying of a heart attack on Christmas Eve.

Yesterday I found a couple of articles about the ‘Last Man Standing’ photo wherein we find my kindred, Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor, Michael Jackson, Liza Minelli, and Whitney Houston.

In my next post I will go into great detail about how outsiders pretended to be ‘Like Family’ and charetakers of Rosamond’s Art, but they were secretly going after THE MOVIE. This is why they disapeared Christine’s autobiogrpahy and got rid of the ghost writer Sandra Faulkner because in the claim I filed I said Christine’s words were Intillectual Property that belonged to the two Heirs, my nieces. No way could you sell a movie if the Heirs wanted %50 percent of the profit.

I assume this is the fate of the screenplay my kindred, Carrie Fisher, authored. Bryan learned to swim in Elizabeth Taykor’s pool. The outside pretenders did not know Liz and Carrie are in my family tree. I kept it a secret!

This morning what I saw coming, arrived. Ryan’s girfriend, Jessica Hallock, has had it with Ryan who is fighting her for his son – along with Ryan’s family. Ryan is the father of my grandson, Tyler Hunt. Tyler’s grandmother, Holly Hunt, is a Baby Collector, and a Grandbaby Collector. She condones her son concieving children out of wedlock because they are destined for her loving arms. This woman is sick, and more then likely addicted to having children. Her son destroyed the happy ending to my biography when he got my daughter pregnant and abandoned Heather and Tyler. He does not get to do a command performance with another mother-victim. Ryan is in my family tree – and Drew Bentons – the most famous Tree in America.

I now include Brody, Jessica’s beautiful boy, and Tyler’s brother in the Legacy I leave behind. Along with my two nieces, Shannon Rosamond, and Drew Benton, Tyler and Brody Hunt will recieve proceeds from my book and movie, that will have these two beautiful brothers walking into the sunset with their arms around each other. Here is an Anthem of Love for the Dawn of a New Day.

Jon Pregory Presco

Copyright 2012

There is a notable photograph of four very close Hollywood friends from many years ago. In it and smiling back are Elizabeth Taylor, Liza Minnelli, Michael Jackson and Whitney Houston, all of them at the top of their game and among the most powerful people in the entertainment world. But that was then, and now only Liza Minnelli is the only one of the four who’s still alive.
On “The Rosie Show” (Weeknights, 7 p.m. ET on OWN), Minnelli described what it’s like to be the last surviving member of that close group of friends. Certainly, she couldn’t have imagined outliving all of them, and certainly not seeing them all gone so soon.
“It’s weird, it’s really weird,” she said. She then went on to talk about how she felt she was different from the other three, never really getting into what she called “the pomp and the circumstance” of the lavish lifestyle their wealth and fame made possible.
“I’d seen all that when I was little,” she said, referring of course to growing up the daughter of Judy Garland. “What impressed me was people who were funny and talented and adored life … And that’s what I wanted to be like.”

Bryan MacLean’s father was an architect to the Hollywood stars and his mother an artist and a dancer. Neighbor Frederick Loewe, of the composers Lerner & Loewe, recognized him as a “melodic genius” at the age of three as he doodled on the piano. His early influences were Billie Holiday and George Gershwin, although he confessed to an obsession with Elvis Presley. During his childhood he wore out show music records from Guys and Dolls, Oklahoma, South Pacific and West Side Story. His first girlfriend was Liza Minnelli and they would sit at the piano together singing songs from The Wizard of Oz. He learned to swim in Elizabeth Taylor’s pool and his father’s good friend was actor Robert Stack. He appears in the 1957 Cary Grant film An Affair to Remember singing in the Deborah Kerr character’s music class.

Bryan MacLean originally wrote the song, then called “Alone Again”, in 1965 for Love’s debut album. However, he did not complete it until the recording of “Forever Changes” in the summer of 1967. The song was inspired by his memory of waiting for a girlfriend, and the melody drew loosely on Prokofiev’s Lieutenant Kije Suite.[2] The essence of the song is the contrast between the positivity of the tune and the bleakness of the lyrics, with the chorus “And I will be alone again tonight, my dear” finishing with a lone acoustic guitar, closing the song with the opening melody that sounds anything but ecstatic,[3] ending with an E-minor plus 2 chord.

Finally, for the third time.
Elizabeth Taylor died Wednesday at age 79. Taylor’s publicist, Sally Morrison, confirmed that she died of congestive heart failure at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where she had been hospitalized for six weeks.
The actress’ four children (Michael and Christopher Wilding, Liza Todd and Maria Burton) were by her bedside as she passed.

Says Michael: “My Mother was an extraordinary woman who lived life to the fullest, with great passion, humor and love. We know, quite simply, that the world is a better place for Mom having lived in it. Her legacy will never fade, her spirit will always be with us, and her love will live forever in our hearts.”
I remember, back in the early ’80s when I was writing my book Liza! Liza!, the unauthorized biography of Liza Minnelli that The New York Times would later name “One of the Best Books of the Year.”
I asked Liz for an interview. She said no. I then sent her a copy of a photo of she and Liza Minnelli that I was using in the book. It was a loving pose of Liz and Liza on the set of “Father of the Bride,” the film in which Liza’s dad, Vincente Minnelli, was directing Liz.
She struck a deal: If I made her a copy of the photo for her personal files, she’d grant an interview.
Success!

She talked about how she felt like Liza was her own child and all kinds of gooey stuff like that.
A few years ago, I asked Liza about her work with AIDS and she decided it was time to set the record straight . . . And that she, and not Liz, was the first to jump on the bandwagon.
Liza said:

I introduced Elizabeth to AIDS. There was an event at which she was getting an award. I thought, “I’m going to ask Rock Hudson if he wants to come.’ I called him and he said, ‘I’d love to—I haven’t seen you and Elizabeth or anyone in years.’ This was really early during the AIDS crises. I picked him up and Rock didn’t look good at all. At all. I thought, ‘Oh no! He’s wasting; he looks like he got it.’ Rock got up to go to the men’s room and Elizabeth said, ‘Rock looks awful!’ I said, ‘There’s something that’s starting to be called AIDS. Elizabeth asked me what it was. I told her about it—how it was being called a ‘gay disease,’ how nurses were afraid of taking care of patients, how people were afraid of getting it, how nobody was caring for people who had it, how everyone was scared. I told her about Mathilda Krim. Elizabeth said, ‘This is terrible! Somebody’s got to do something.’ I said, ‘I know, that’s why I am telling you.’ I was the one who really introduced her to the cause.”

Liz Taylor taught me how to live my life: Liza Minnelli pays a moving tribute to her friendBy Richard Barber
UPDATED: 09:37 EST, 17 June 2011
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Skittish at 65: Liza Minnelli has got her mojo back as she prepares for some British dates to back up her intimate new album
Liza Minnelli takes a drag on her umpteenth Marlboro Lite of the day (‘Absolutely my only vice’), casts a practised eye around the perfectly serviceable, if a little impersonal, hotel reception room and makes a decision.

‘Let’s go to my suite, darling,’ she says.

The vocal delivery has changed since last we met. The ‘s’ comes out more like ‘sh’ these days — ‘Let’sh go to my shuite’ — and it’s also a bit huskier.

There’s something different about her face, too. For a start, the upper lip looks plumper than when I last saw her.

But as we emerge from the lift, it’s clear she’s in skittish form. A scarlet jacket with billowing sleeves and Nehru collar adds a shot of drama to the black body, slacks and ankle-boots she’s wearing.

It’s clear that, despite all her troubles — physical and matrimonial — Liza’s got her mojo back; and apparently in more or less full working order.

‘People say to me, “So you’re 65,” and I want to blow a raspberry and say: “Yeah, and I’m still here”.’

She duly thumbs her nose, blows that raspberry and dissolves into raucous laughter.

A decade ago, today’s picture of sunny good health would never have seemed possible.

Viral encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) caused by an infected mosquito bite left Liza unable to walk and talk.

Two years later, in 2002, she embarked upon her fourth (‘and my last’) marriage to music producer David Gest, the mention of whose name, I know, would see me ejected from the suite.

The wedding, with Elizabeth Taylor, Michael Jackson and Martine McCutcheon as witnesses, and the stomach-turning post-vows kiss in which Gest all but swallowed Liza whole, set the seal on the marriage that followed.

It ended in 2007 amid lurid and unsubstantiated allegations of abuse on both sides.

He claimed she beat him up, and she accused him of plotting to have her dog put down.

That apart, she’s notched up two hip replacements and, more recently, a new knee.

What a guest list: Minnelli’s wedding to David Guest included Michael Jackson, Elizabeth Taylor and singer Diana Ross
‘I like to say that on the top half I’m the daughter of Dorothy; on the bottom, I’m the daughter of the Tin Man.’

And yet here she is, those fathomless black eyes round with astonishment at the suggestion that she’s reached the sort of age when most people start thinking about retirement.

‘I like what I do. Why would I want to retire from fun?’ she asks. ‘Anyway, I haven’t lost my curiosity.

‘People ask what I could possibly do next that I haven’t done already, and I always answer the same way: I’d like to do it all again, please, only this time better.’

Her new album, Confessions, just released on Decca, is something of a departure from her familiar sock-it-to-’em, big band style.

An intimate collection of mostly lesser-known standards, it’s at once languid and surprisingly sexy.

‘I always go to bed at ten,’ purrs Liza on one track, ‘and then go home at four.’

Recovering from the knee operation, she made the record with her long-time pianist collaborator, Billy Stritch — in her bedroom.

‘So maybe that’s why it sounds intimate,’ she suggests.

Family tied: Minnelli gets bored of questions about her mother, the late actress Judy Garland,pictured her with her other children Joey, 9 and Lorna Luft, aged 12
British audiences will be able to judge for themselves when Liza tours at the end of the month, with concerts at the Royal Albert Hall, in the open-air in North London at Kenwood, in Manchester, and finally in Glasgow on July 6.

She enjoys touring, but has made it a personal rule that she’s never away from her spacious New York apartment for more than three weeks at a time. Quite apart from anything else, she’d miss her puppies.

She walks the three schnauzers — Emelina, Oscar and Blaise — every day she’s in town.

‘Why wouldn’t I?’ she says.

‘I live in a nice neighbourhood where everyone knows everyone else. People shout, “Hi, Liza!” and I shout right back.

‘I tell you something: if anyone wants to understand the real me, they should meet my dogs. They’re calm and loving, and they don’t bark. Now where do you think they get all that from?’

She is, she says, ‘bored, bored, bored’ with talking about her mother, the fabulously flawed Judy Garland, who died, aged 47, from a cocktail of pills and drink, 42 years ago next Wednesday.

Liza has achieved so much in her life: three Tony awards, an Emmy, two Golden Globes, a Grammy Legend award and an Oscar (for Cabaret).

a May Minnelli (born March 12, 1946) is an American actress and singer, often referred to as The Queen of Broadway and/or Hollywood.[2][3][4] She is the daughter of singer and actress Judy Garland and film director Vincente Minnelli.
Already established as a nightclub singer and musical theatre actress, she first attracted critical acclaim for her dramatic performances in the movies The Sterile Cuckoo (1969), and Tell Me That You Love Me, Junie Moon (1970); Minnelli then rose to international stardom for her appearance as Sally Bowles in the 1972 film version of the Broadway musical Cabaret, for which she won the Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role. She later co-starred in Arthur (1981), starring with Dudley Moore (in the title role) and Sir John Gielgud, who won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor as Arthur’s snobbish but loveable butler.

Vincente Minnelli (February 28, 1903 – July 25, 1986) was an American stage director and film director, famous for directing such classic movie musicals as Meet Me in St. Louis, The Band Wagon, and An American in Paris. In addition to having directed some of the most famous and well-remembered musicals of his time, Minnelli made many comedies and melodramas.[1] He was married to Judy Garland from 1945 until 1951; they were the parents of Liza Minnelli.

Joseph Herman Pasternak (September 19, 1901 – September 13, 1991) was a Hungarian-born American film producer in Hollywood.
Born to a Jewish family in Szilágysomlyó, Austria-Hungary (now Şimleu Silvaniei, Sălaj County, Romania), Pasternak was a successful film producer in Germany and Austria by the time he was 28 years old.
Pasternak worked for Universal Pictures in Europe, where he made German-language musicals for the international market. He hit upon a successful formula, building light musical comedies around an adolescent soprano (Franciska Gaal). Following the establishment of the Nazi regime, Pasternak emigrated to Universal’s Hollywood studio in 1936. He adapted his usual format for English-speaking audiences, casting 14-year-old Canadian singer Deanna Durbin in Three Smart Girls. The film became a huge hit and saved Universal from bankruptcy. Pasternak produced a string of Durbin musicals, and soon discovered another talented soprano, Gloria Jean. who began her own successful series in 1939. Pasternak proved to be a real asset for the studio, generating a number of popular films through 1941, including Destry Rides Again and Seven Sinners.
In 1941 Pasternak moved to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, where he continued to produce operetta films, featuring the rich singing voices of Kathryn Grayson, Jane Powell, and Mario Lanza. His biggest MGM success came with The Great Caruso. He continued to make musicals for MGM into the 1960s, with Elvis Presley or Connie Francis.
His career as a film producer spanned 40 years and earned him two Oscar nominations and three Golden Globe Award nominations. He retired in 1968, having produced more than ninety feature-length films as well as three Academy Award shows. For his contribution to the motion picture industry, Joe Pasternak has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1541 N. Vine Street.

There is a notable photograph of four very close Hollywood friends from many years ago. In it and smiling back are Elizabeth Taylor, Liza Minnelli, Michael Jackson and Whitney Houston, all of them at the top of their game and among the most powerful people in the entertainment world. But that was then, and now only Liza Minnelli is the only one of the four who’s still alive.
On “The Rosie Show” (Weeknights, 7 p.m. ET on OWN), Minnelli described what it’s like to be the last surviving member of that close group of friends. Certainly, she couldn’t have imagined outliving all of them, and certainly not seeing them all gone so soon.
“It’s weird, it’s really weird,” she said. She then went on to talk about how she felt she was different from the other three, never really getting into what she called “the pomp and the circumstance” of the lavish lifestyle their wealth and fame made possible.
“I’d seen all that when I was little,” she said, referring of course to growing up the daughter of Judy Garland. “What impressed me was people who were funny and talented and adored life … And that’s what I wanted to be like.”

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to Brian, Christine, Liza, and Liz

  1. Reblogged this on Rosamond Press and commented:

    The Hollywood crowd.

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