Duke of Cambridge In Texas

After Jefferson, Texans embraced General Lee and slavery. Slavery is not a Democracy.

Romney is now saying Obama won because he offered extraordinary gifts to his nurmerous young voters. Romeny offered trillions to the very rich – who are very few in numbers! What a moron! What a go getter! And this guy is a genius when it comes to numbers and captitalism?

The Germans who make up the House of Windsor had a colony in Texas, and wanted it to be their nation in America. Friedrich Wilhelm Carl Ludwig Georg Alfred Alexander, Prince of Solms, Lord of Braunfels, was kin to Queen Charlotte who founded Berlin Way, and is kin to the Duke of Cambridge, a title William Windsor holds. My patriotic Rosamond kindred fought against the British in the Revolutionary War – and won!

During the Civil War, Jessie Benton and her Scouts kept an eye on the Windsor family ties in Texas that President George W. Bush nutured. Britain backed the South – but was against slavery. Why? Because they had bloodties in the South, such as the Breckenridge family who I have shown are kin to the Stuarts, who also held the title Duke of Cambridge. Princess Diana descends from King Charles Stuart.

My ignorant daughter threw her and my grandson’s heritage away for a moron, and for seditious traitors who rewrite history before our eyes in order to make outragious claims to things that do not belong to them like the State of Texas – and the title ‘Patriots’. These grabby trailer-trash killed soldiers of the Union in order to keep their slaves – and their ignorance! My daughter believes her love for an angry white bigot is full of pixie dust that overcomes truth and real history.

That the Stuttmeister name is also Charlotte, as well as my grandmother’s middle name, suggests we may be the kindred of these Texas Pioneers found in the Peerage.

Jon

In anticipation of his marriage to Maria Josephine Sophie, Prince Solms formed plans to build “Sophie’s Castle”, laying the cornerstone in New Braunfels, Texas in 1845.[9] Sophie refused to leave Germany, and Carl never returned to Texas after his marriage to her on December 3, 1845.

In 1797 she and her cousin Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge, seventh son of King George III of Great Britain by his wife Queen Charlotte (Frederica’s paternal aunt), were unofficially engaged. The Duke of Cambridge asked the consent of his father to the marriage, but the King, under pressure from his wife, refused.

The Prince Adolphus, 1st Duke of Cambridge (Adolphus Frederick; 24 February 1774 – 8 July 1850), was the tenth child and seventh son of George III and Queen Charlotte. He held the title of Duke of Cambridge from 1801 until his death. He also served as Viceroy of Hanover on behalf of his brothers George IV and William IV. His granddaughter, Mary of Teck, was Queen consort of the United Kingdom and paternal grandmother of the current monarch, Elizabeth II.

Duke of Cambridge is a title (named after the city of Cambridge in England) which has been conferred upon members of the British royal family several times. It was first used as a designation for Charles Stuart (1660–1661), the eldest son of James, Duke of York (later James II), though he was never formally created Duke of Cambridge. The title was most recently bestowed upon Prince William on 29 April 2011.

“”The fact of the matter is, that there cannot be a union between those that esteem the principles of Karl Marx over the principles of Thomas Jefferson. Here in Texas, we esteem those principles of Thomas Jefferson — that all political power’s inherent in the people,” Daniel Miller, president of the Texas Nationalist Movement, said Tuesday on Fox News. “What we have seen given on Tuesday was that a majority of the people in the United States, and the states in which they reside, esteem the principles of Karl Marx over those principles.”

Peter Morrison, treasurer of the Hardin County Republican Party in Texas, suggests in his newsletter that the state should have an “amicable divorce” from the “maggots” who re-elected Obama.
Morrison posted on his Facebook page his post-election thoughts: “We must contest every single inch of ground and delay the baby-murdering, tax-raising socialists at every opportunity. But in due time, the maggots will have eaten every morsel of flesh off of the rotting corpse of the Republic, and therein lies our opportunity.”
“Texas was once its own country, and many Texans already think in nationalist terms about their state,” Morrison continued. “We need to do everything possible to encourage a long-term shift in thinking on this issue. Why should Vermont and Texas live under the same government? Let each go her own way in peace, sign a free trade agreement among the states and we can avoid this gut-wrenching spectacle every four years.”

SOLMS-BRAUNFELS, PRINCE CARL OF

SOLMS-BRAUNFELS, PRINCE CARL OF (1812–1875). Friedrich Wilhelm Carl Ludwig Georg Alfred Alexander, Prince of Solms, Lord of Braunfels, Grafenstein, Münzenberg, Wildenfels, and Sonnenwalde, the first commissioner-general of the Adelsverein and imperial field marshal, was born at Neustrelitz on July 27, 1812, the youngest son of Prince Friedrich Wilhelm of Solms-Braunfels and Princess Friederike of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. Prince Carl’s illustrious connections included Prince Frederick of Prussia, Queen Victoria, Czar Alexander I of Russia, King Leopold I of Belgium, and Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. Not only well connected, but also handsome, highly spirited, and romantic, the trilingual Carl was educated both as soldier and courtier. Because of his connections, he secured prestigious military assignments, awards, and knightships, even though in 1839 he was sentenced by a Prussian court martial to four months in prison as a result of having absented himself from his command without leave. An early morganatic marriage, which had commenced in secret in 1834, dimmed his prospects after it became known, until, under duress from all sides, Carl consented in 1841 to the putting away of his wife, pensioned as the Baroness Luise “von Schönau,” and his three children by that marriage. That same year Carl became a captain of cavalry in the imperial army of Austria, progressing though prominent assignments in the Balkans, Bohemia, and the Rhineland. While stationed at the imperial garrison at Biebrich, he read Charles Sealsfield’s novel about Texas (see POSTL, CARL ANTON), William Kennedyqv’s geography of Texas, and G. A. Scherpf’s guide to immigrants to Texas. As one of the twenty-five members of the Adelsverein, organized initially in 1842 and reorganized in 1844, Carl worked tirelessly to promote the growth, finances, administration, and political acceptance of the society. He lobbied his many relatives, traveled incognito through France and Belgium to the Isle of Wight, where he may have met with Prince Albert, and, along with other members, secured the covert support of England, France, and Belgium for the Texas colonial project, which was at once philanthropic, mercantile, and political.
In 1844 Carl was appointed commissioner-general for the first colony that the society proposed to establish in Texas. Provisioned with two cannons, table linens, and twelve place settings, he traveled to London, where his assistant’s diary suggests there was a royal audience, then to the United States, and westward down the Ohio and Mississippi to the Republic of Texas, where they arrived in Galveston on July 1, 1844. A series of letters, subsequently turned into formal reports, trace the route and detail Carl’s growing comprehension of North American culture, commerce, and geopolitics. Seeing himself at the head of a migration of German artisans and peasants to what one of his colleagues called “the new Fatherland on the other side of the ocean,” the visionary Carl wrote, “The eyes of all Germany, no, the eyes of all Europe are fixed on us and our undertaking: German princes, counts, and noblemen…are bringing new crowns to old glory while at the same time insuring immeasurable riches for their children and grandchildren.” In preparation to receive the German settlers and to protect them from what he considered the bad influences of the Anglo-American frontier, Carl purchased land on Matagorda Bay for the establishment of a port of debarkation named Carlshafen, or Indianola. He also traveled extensively throughout Texas and advised the Adelsverein, which already owned the right to settle Germans in the remote Fisher-Miller Land Grant, to buy even larger expanses reaching southward from the Llano River to Corpus Christi Bay and westward to the Rio Grande. Further, he communicated to Texas officials the threat of possible war with Britain, France, Russia, and Mexico should annexation occur. After the arrival in December 1844 of the society’s first settlers, some of whom he left at Indianola, or Carlshafen, the prince led the first wagon train into the interior of Texas. Near Victoria, he left the immigrants and proceeded to San Antonio in order to conclude the purchase from Juan Martín Veramendi and Raphael C. Garza of a fertile, well-watered tract on the Guadalupe and Comal rivers. The immigrant train reached this tract on Good Friday, March 21, 1845, and founded the settlement of New Braunfels, named for the Solms ancestral castle on the Lahn River, southwest of Wetzlar. Before Prince Carl left New Braunfels for Germany on May 15, 1845, he saw the work on the Zinkenburg, a stockade on a bluff on the east bank of Comal Creek, almost completed and work well underway on the Sophienburg, a fort on the Vereinsberg, a hill overlooking the old residential section of New Braunfels.
After he returned to Germany, Carl resumed his military service, from which he had been given a year’s leave, and on December 3, 1845 at Bendorf, he married Sophie, the widowed princess of Salm-Salm and the daughter of the reigning prince of Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rochefort. In 1846 he published Texas, a clear and succinct geography and guide to Texas. During this time Carl also wrote a fifty-nine-page memoir, transmitted to Queen Victoria in 1846, in which he explained that Europe and the westering United States were on a collision course to dominate world trade. America would likely win this race, Carl told the queen, if the United States reached the Pacific. He offered containment through colonization, the establishment of a powerful monarchy in Mexico, and the emancipation of the slaves as England’s surest policy. Carl remained active in his support of the Adelsverein, in which his family had heavily invested. In 1847, for example, he helped to recruit the Forty, an idealistic fraternity of students that eventually settled in the Fisher-Miller Land Grant.
His checkered military career continued. He left the Austrian army and became a colonel in the cavalry of the Grand Duchy of Hesse in 1846. An attempt to rejoin the Prussian army failed. In 1850 the Austrian army accepted him again, and by 1859 he had become a brigadier with command of dragoons on Lake Constance. In 1866, having also drawn Hanover into the conflict, he took part in the unsuccessful war of Austria against Prussia. As commander of an imperial corps, Carl failed, was recalled and reprimanded, but acquitted by court martial. He retired as a field marshal in 1868 to his residence at the estate of Rheingrafenstein near Kreuznach on the Nahe River. Prince Carl died seven years later, on November 13, 1875, at the age of sixty-three, at Rheingrafenstein. He was interred in the city cemetery of Bad Kreuznach. Sophie died the next year. They were the parents of five children, four of whom survived them. Characterized by one of his German contemporaries in Texas as a “Texan Don Quixote” and by an eminent German historian as the last knight of the Middle Ages, Carl is a complex character, more romantic and individualistic than practical and accommodating. His two fixed passions, for which he was acknowledged to have had an expert eye, were fine horses and ruined castles-to which, in the early 1840s, he added empire-building.
BIBLIOGRAPHY: 
Chester William and Ethel Hander Geue, eds., A New Land Beckoned: German Immigration to Texas, 1844–1847 (Waco: Texian Press, 1966; enlarged ed. 1972). Theodore Gish, “Carl, Prince of Solms-Braunfels, First Commissioner-General of the Adelsverein in Texas: Myth, History, and Fiction,” Yearbook of German-American Studies 16 (1981). Glen E. Lich, “Archives of the German Adelsverein, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University,” Southwestern Historical Quarterly 91 (January 1988). Glen E. Lich, The German Texans (San Antonio: University of Texas Institute of Texan Cultures, 1981). Glen E. Lich and Dona B. Reeves, eds., German Culture in Texas (Boston: Twayne, 1980). Wolf Heino Struck, Die Auswanderung aus dem Herzogtum Nassau, 1806–1866 (Wiesbaden: Steiner, 1966).

edrich Wilhelm Karl Ludwig Georg Alfred Alexander, Prince of Solms, Lord of Braunfels, Grafenstein, Münzenberg, Wildenfels, and Sonnenwalde was born in Neustrelitz . He was the offspring of Prince Friedrich Wilhelm of Solms-Braunfels and Princess Friederike of Mecklenburg-Strelitz.[1]
His 1834 morganatic marriage to Luise Auguste Stephanie Beyrich was considered below his royal station. In 1841 he gave in to royal pressure and settled on a monetary arrangement for a de facto royal annulment. Luise and the three children were ennobled by the Grand Duchy of Hesse with the name von Schoenau March 25, 1841. The family was later ennobled in the Kingdom of Bavaria in 1912.[2]
Prince Solms married Maria Josephine Sophie,[3] widow of Prince Franz of Salm-Salm and princess of Lowenstein-Wertheim-Rosenberg, on December 3, 1845. The union produced five children:[1] Prince Ludwig (1847–1900), Princess Eulalia (1851–1922), Princess Marie (1852–1882), Princess Sophie (1853–1869) and Prince Alexander (1855–1926).
He was the well-educated and well-connected handsome prince of wealth and privilege who sought adventure and looked for new worlds to explore. In 1841, he became Captain in the cavalry in the Imperial Army of Austria.[4]
[edit] Texas
It was during his service with the cavalry that Carl read books about Texas and became interested in joining the Adelsverein, zealously campaigning for its success. Prince Solms was the motivating force, as the 1844 Commissioner General[5] of the Adelsverein, for the first colony of German emigrants to Texas. He arrived on Texas soil in July 1844, making an exploratory tour of Texas as advisor to the Adelsverein, who owned the rights to the Fisher-Miller Land Grant.[6] Subsequently, on behalf of the Adelsverein, Carl purchased an additional 1,300 acres (5.3 km2) on the Guadalupe River, where he established the colony of New Braunfels, Texas.[7] His vision cleared the path for John O. Meusebach to follow in 1845 as the organizer, negotiator and political force needed for community-building structure in the “New Germany”.[8]
In anticipation of his marriage to Maria Josephine Sophie, Prince Solms formed plans to build “Sophie’s Castle”, laying the cornerstone in New Braunfels, Texas in 1845.[9] Sophie refused to leave Germany, and Carl never returned to Texas after his marriage to her on December 3, 1845.

In 1797 she and her cousin Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge, seventh son of King George III of Great Britain by his wife Queen Charlotte (Frederica’s paternal aunt), were unofficially engaged. The Duke of Cambridge asked the consent of his father to the marriage, but the King, under pressure from his wife, refused.[citation needed]

On 14 March 1793, the Princesses of Mecklenburg-Strelitz “coincidentally” met the Prussian King Frederick William II at the Prussian Theatre in Frankfurt-am-Main. He was immediately captivated by the grace and charm of Frederica and her sister Louise.

Famous statue of Frederica (right), with her sister Louise by the sculptor Schadow.
Some weeks later, Frederica and Louise’s father began marriage negotiations with the Prussian King: Louise would marry Crown Prince Frederick William and Frederica would follow suit with his younger brother Frederick Louis Karl (called Prince Louis, b. 5 November 1773).
The double engagement was celebrated in Darmstadt on 24 April. On December 24, Louise and the Crown Prince were married in the Royal Palace of Berlin; two days later, on 26 December Frederica and Prince Louis were also married in the same place. Unlike her sister, Frederica did not enjoy a happy marriage. Her husband preferred the company of his mistresses and completely neglected her; in response, the humiliated wife apparently began an affair with her husband’s uncle Prince Louis Ferdinand, but these allegations cannot be proved.[citation needed]
In 1795 King Frederick William II appointed Louis as Chief of the Dragoons Regiment No. 1, which was stationed in Schwedt, and one year later, on 23 December 1796, he died of diphtheria. Frederica and her three children consequently moved to Schönhausen Palace near Berlin.

Frederica of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (full name: Frederica Louise Caroline Sophie Charlotte Alexandrine) (3 March 1778 – 29 June 1841), Duchess of Cumberland and later Queen of Hanover (now part of Germany), was the consort of Ernest Augustus I of Hanover, the fifth son and eighth child of George III and Queen Charlotte.
She was born in the Altes Palais of Hanover as the fifth daughter of Charles II, Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, and his first wife, Frederica, daughter of George William, Prince of Hesse-Darmstadt. From birth until her first marriage her title was Her Serene Highness Duchess Frederica of Mecklenburg, Princess of Mecklenburg-Strelitz
Her father assumed the title of Grand Duke of Mecklenburg on 18 June 1815. Duchess Frederica was the niece of her future mother-in-law, Queen Charlotte (formerly Duchess Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz), since her last husband was her first cousin.

In May 1813, during a visit to his uncle Duke Charles in Neustrelitz, Prince Ernest Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, the fifth son of King George III of Great Britain, met and fell in love with Frederica.[citation needed] Duke Charles made it clear to his daughter that her separation from the Prince of Solms-Braunfels was absolutely logical, and that he saw a marriage with an English prince as a great opportunity for her. During the next months Frederica considered the intentions of Ernest Augustus and the possible effects on her own situation. When, after the victory of the allies in the Battle of Leipzig, Ernest Augustus spent some days in Neustrelitz, he was greeted enthusiastically. Some time later Frederica asked the Prussian King for approval for her divorce from the Prince of Solms-Braunfels. All parties agreed, including the Prince of Solms-Braunfels, but his sudden death on 13 April 1814 precluded the need for a divorce. The Prince’s demise was considered by some as a little too convenient, and some suspected that Frederica had poisoned him.[1] In August, the engagement with Ernest Augustus was officially announced. After the British Parliament gave its consent to the wedding, Frederica and Ernest Augustus were married on 29 May 1815 at the parish church of Neustrelitz.[citation needed] Some time later, the couple traveled to Great Britain and married again on 29 August 1815 at Carlton House, London.
Queen Charlotte bitterly opposed the marriage, even though her future daughter-in-law was also her niece.[citation needed] She refused to attend the wedding and advised her son to live outside England with his wife. Frederica never obtained the favor of her aunt/mother-in-law, who died unreconciled with her in 1818. From her marriage to Ernest Augustus, she had a further three children, only one of whom survived childhood: a son, who would eventually become King George V of Hanover.
[edit] Queen of Hanover

Queen Frederica of Hanover.
On 20 June 1837 King William IV of the United Kingdom and Hanover died without issue. His heir was Princess Victoria, only daughter of Prince Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent, but because Hanover had been ruled under Salic Law since the times of the Holy Roman Empire, she could not inherit the Hanoverian throne. The next male descendant of the late King was the Duke of Cumberland, Frederica’s husband, who then became King Ernest Augustus I of Hanover, with Frederica as his Queen consort.
After a short illness, Queen Frederica of Hanover died in 1841 at Hanover. The Court master builder Georg Ludwig Friedrich Laves was instructed by the King to build a mausoleum for his wife and himself in the garden of the Chapel at Herrenhausen Palace. He also gave royal orders for the transformation of a central square near the Leineschloss and renamed it Friederikenplatz in her honor.

The Prince Adolphus, 1st Duke of Cambridge (Adolphus Frederick; 24 February 1774 – 8 July 1850), was the tenth child and seventh son of George III and Queen Charlotte. He held the title of Duke of Cambridge from 1801 until his death. He also served as Viceroy of Hanover on behalf of his brothers George IV and William IV. His granddaughter, Mary of Teck, was Queen consort of the United Kingdom and paternal grandmother of the current monarch, Elizabeth II.

Prince Adolphus was born at Buckingham Palace, the tenth child and seventh son of George III and Queen Charlotte,[1] as well as being the youngest son to survive infancy.
On 24 March 1774, the young prince was christened in the Great Council Chamber at St James’s Palace by Frederick Cornwallis, The Archbishop of Canterbury. His godparents were Prince John Adolphus of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg (his great-uncle, for whom the Earl of Hertford, Lord Chamberlain, stood proxy), Landgrave Charles of Hesse-Kassel (his first cousin once-removed, for whom the Earl of Jersey, Extra Lord of the Bedchamber, stood proxy) and The Princess of Orange (the wife of his first cousin once-removed, for whom the Dowager Countess of Effingham, former Lady of the Bedchamber to The Queen, stood proxy).[2]
He was tutored at home before being sent to the University of Göttingen in Germany in summer 1786, along with his brothers Prince Ernest (created Duke of Cumberland in 1799) and Prince Augustus (created Duke of Sussex in 1801).[1]

Duke of Cambridge

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search
This article is about the title. For the current holder of the title, see Prince William, Duke of Cambridge.

Prince William, the current Duke of Cambridge
Duke of Cambridge is a title (named after the city of Cambridge in England) which has been conferred upon members of the British royal family several times. It was first used as a designation for Charles Stuart (1660–1661), the eldest son of James, Duke of York (later James II), though he was never formally created Duke of Cambridge. The title was most recently bestowed upon Prince William on 29 April 2011.

Contents
 [hide] 
1 History
2 Dukes of Cambridge
2.1 Styled (1660)
2.2 First creation (1664)
2.3 Second creation (1667)
2.4 Styled (1677)
2.5 Third creation (1706)
2.6 Fourth creation (1801)
2.7 Fifth creation (2011)
3 Marquesses of Cambridge (1917)
4 References
5 See also
[edit] History
The first officially recognised creation was in the Peerage of England in 1664, when James Stuart, son of the Duke of York by his first wife, was granted the title. James, Duke of Cambridge died young and without heirs, and the title became extinct. The title was next granted to Edgar Stuart, another son of the Duke of York by his first wife. Edgar also died young and the title again became extinct.
The Duke of York’s eldest son by his second wife, Charles Stuart (1677), was also styled Duke of Cambridge, but died approximately a month old, not having lived long enough to be formally created.
The dukedom was next granted to George Augustus, son of George Louis, Hereditary Prince of Hanover and Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, who would later become George I of Great Britain. When George Augustus ascended to the throne as George II, the dukedom merged into the crown.[1] The title was next given, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, to Prince Adolphus, the seventh son of George III. Upon the death in 1904 of his only son, Prince George, 2nd Duke of Cambridge, without a legitimate heir, the title became extinct.[2]
The first Duke’s grandson (through a female line), Adolphus, Duke of Teck, who was the brother of Queen Mary, George V’s consort, was created Marquess of Cambridge in 1917 when he gave up his German titles and took the surname “Cambridge”. Upon the death of the second Marquess without any male heirs, the marquessate became extinct.
During the period leading up to the 1999 wedding of The Prince Edward, the youngest son of Elizabeth II, experts speculated the dukedom of Cambridge or Sussex as the most likely to be granted to him, and The Sunday Telegraph later reported that Prince Edward was at one point set to be titled Duke of Cambridge.[3] Instead, Prince Edward was created Earl of Wessex, and that he would eventually succeed his father as Duke of Edinburgh.[4]
On 29 April 2011, the day of his wedding, Prince William was created Duke of Cambridge, Earl of Strathearn and Baron Carrickfergus.[1]
[edit] Dukes of Cambridge
[edit] Styled (1660)
Duke
Portrait
Birth
Marriages
Death
Charles Stuart
House of Stuart
1660–1661
no portrait
22 October 1660
Worcester House, London
son of James, Duke of York and Anne Hyde
not married
5 May 1661
Whitehall Palace, London
[edit] First creation (1664)
Duke
Portrait
Birth
Marriages
Death
James Stuart
House of Stuart
1664–1667
also: Earl of Cambridge, Baron of Dauntsey (1664–1667)

12 July 1663
St James’s Palace, London
son of James, Duke of York and Anne Hyde
not married
20 June 1667
Richmond Palace, London
[edit] Second creation (1667)
Duke
Portrait
Birth
Marriages
Death
Edgar Stuart
House of Stuart
1667–1671
also: Earl of Cambridge, Baron of Dauntsey (1667–1671)
no portrait
14 September 1667
St James’s Palace, London
son of James, Duke of York and Anne Hyde
not married
8 June 1671
Richmond Palace, London
[edit] Styled (1677)
Duke
Portrait
Birth
Marriages
Death
Charles Stuart
House of Stuart
1677–1677
no portrait
7 November 1677
St James’s Palace, London
son of James, Duke of York and Princess Mary of Modena
not married
12 December 1677
St James’s Palace, London
[edit] Third creation (1706)
Duke
Portrait
Birth
Marriages
Death
Prince George Augustus
House of Hanover
1706–1727
also: Prince of Wales, Duke of Cornwall, Duke of Rothesay (1714–1727)

30 October / 9 November 1683O.S./N.S.
Herrenhausen Palace or Leine Palace, Hanover
son of George Louis, Prince-Elector, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg and Sophia Dorothea of Celle
22 August 1705
Caroline of Ansbach
25 October 1760
Kensington Palace, London
Prince George succeeded as George II in 1727 upon his father’s death, and his titles merged with the crown.
[edit] Fourth creation (1801)
Duke
Portrait
Birth
Marriages
Death
The Prince Adolphus
House of Hanover
1801–1850
also: Earl of Tipperary, Baron Culloden (1801–1850)

24 February 1774
Buckingham Palace, Westminster
son of George III and Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz
18 June 1818
Princess Augusta of Hesse-Cassel
8 July 1850
Cambridge House, Piccadilly
Prince George
House of Hanover
1850–1904
also: Earl of Tipperary, Baron Culloden (1850–1904)

26 March 1819
Cambridge House, Hanover
son of Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge and Princess Augusta of Hesse-Cassel
8 January 1847
Sarah Fairbrother
17 March 1904
Gloucester House, Piccadilly
[edit] Fifth creation (2011)
Duke
Portrait
Birth
Marriages
Death
Prince William
House of Windsor
2011–present
also: Earl of Strathearn, Baron Carrickfergus (2011–present)

21 June 1982
St. Mary’s Hospital
son of Charles, Prince of Wales and Lady Diana Spencer
29 April 2011
Catherine Middleton

[edit] Marquesses of Cambridge (1917)

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.