The Rose Wolf of the Reconquista

Raoul (Rollo) de Toine fought against the Muslims in Spain a hundred an fifty years before the first Crusade. Ralph ‘famous wolf’ was a standard bearer for William the Conqueror and married GODECHILDIS, a Spanish woman, whose daughter of the same name married Baldwin, the Crusader King of Jerusalem, and was the first Queen of the Holy Land. Roelof’s great grandchild was Rosamond Joan Clifford who was revered by Knights going on Crusade. Five of Roelof’s great grandsons took the name of this Viking, this Sea-Rover whose line begat the Rose of the World.

Today is my birthday. I have decided to make a movie about Fair Rosamond and the her Viking Wolves. I am going to dedicate this movie to Barack Obama the President of the United States who sent Rangers (Rovers) to put an end to the terrorist, Osama Bin Laden. My ancestors, Samuel and James Rosamond fought alongside Francis Marion who formed the first Army Rangers.

It is time for true Patriots to come forth and mend the divide made in our nation when President Bush launched a false crusade in Iraq, and against half of America judged the enemies of Jesus by the Christian-Coalition that took over the party of my kindred. It is time to take back America in a new Reconquesta, and restore the true image of Patriots in the West who rose to guard the homeland in Europe from Muslims bent on overcoming the world. America does well when it defends the homeland, and meets with ruin when coaxed into going on foreign crusades by the evil Industrial Military Complex that is behind the Tea Party Traitors who bid Romney to get a trillion dollars from us tax payers so they can feel even more powerful. But, they do not have God on their side, and thus can not give any good reason why poor young men and women should lay down their lives. My movie will provide that good reason, once, and for all!

Jon Presco
Copyright 2012

Raoul II de Tosny[1] seigneur de Conches-en-Ouche[2] (died 1102) was a Norman nobleman of the house of Tosny, son of Roger I of Tosny. He was active in Normandy, England and Wales.

“Ralph Tosny”, “Ralph de Toeni”, “Ralph de Tonei”, “Ralph de Tony”, “Ralph de Toni”, “Ralph de Todeni”, “Ralph de Tosney”, “Raoul de Conches”, “Raoul de Toeny”, “Raf Thoney”, “Rafe de Tosny.”, “aka Raoul IV de Tosny; Raoul IV Seigneur de Conches”, “Raoul de Tosny”,

[edit] Victor at Hastings in 1066
He is one of the very few proven Companions of William the Conqueror known to have fought at the Battle of Hastings in 1066.[3] Tradition says he gave up the role of standard bearer, his hereditary office, to Walter Giffard, in order to be able to fight closer to William, duke of Normandy.[4]
[edit] Marriage
He married Isabel de Montfort, daughter of Simon I de Montfort. There was a feud with Guillaume d’Evreux and his wife Helvise de Nevers, recorded by Ordericus Vitalis.[5] This came to open war in 1091–92, when Guillaume attacked Conches. A settlement was reached.[6] They later co-operated in attacking Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester’s county of Meulan.
The first known Toney ancestor ever was Ralph the son of Hugh De Calvacamp. Hugh’s father was Malahulic/(Malahule)who came to the Normandy area of France from Norway on a Viking ship. He came with Rollo, or Rolph the Ganger. Hugh De Calvacamp’s father Malahulic was uncle to Rollo. Rollo was the leader of the group that our ancestors came with. He and his followers( taunted/annoyed/stalked or worse) the coastlines of France until the King gave him the area that is now Normandy.
Hugh De Calvacamp also had a son Hugh De Calvacamp Jr. He was given the Archbishopship of Rouen by the Duke of Normandy, he being cousin to the Duke. There were certain lands that came with this title. Hugh gave his brother Ralph a piece of land called Tosni/Toeni, it was situated just across the River Seine from Les Andelys. The “s” in Tosni is silent therefore sounding like Toney. Ralph then became known as Raph de Toney. Our first ancestor was Standard Bearer to the Duke of Normandy, and became a hereditary position to Ralph’s descendants.
[edit] In England
He had widely spread holdings, as recorded in the Domesday Survey. His seat was at Flamstead in Hertfordshire.[7] He held Clifford Castle.It is also believed that he held assets in the village of Hose, Leicestershire which was split into two manors, Tosny’s and that of the title holder of the Norman Belvoir Castle.
[edit] Family
Robert de Stafford was his brother.
His second son, Raoul III de Conches, was his surviving heir. He married Alice of Huntingdon, daughter of Waltheof, Earl of Northumbria and Judith of Lens.[8]

Baldwin I of Jerusalem, formerly Baldwin I of Edessa, born Baldwin of Boulogne (French: Baudouin de Boulogne), 1058?[1] – 2 April 1118, was one of the leaders of the First Crusade, who became the first Count of Edessa and then the second ruler and first titled King of Jerusalem. He was the brother of Godfrey of Bouillon, who was the first ruler of the crusader state of Jerusalem, although Godfrey refused the title of ‘king’ which Baldwin accepted.

“Ralph Tosny”, “Ralph de Toeni”, “Ralph de Tonei”, “Ralph de Tony”, “Ralph de Toni”, “Ralph de Todeni”, “Ralph de Tosney”, “Raoul de Conches”, “Raoul de Toeny”, “Raf Thoney”, “Rafe de Tosny.”, “aka Raoul IV de Tosny; Raoul IV Seigneur de Conches”, “Raoul de Tosny”, “Seigneur de …”

Birthdate:
1079
Birthplace:
Flamstead, Herefordshire, England
Death:
Died 1126 in Conches-en-Ouches, Eure, Haute-Normandie, France
Occupation:
Seigneur de Conches-en-Ouches, Seigneur de Tosny, Lord of Clifford (Flamstead, Herefordshire, England), Lord of Flamstead, aka “de Conches”, Sieur, de Conches-en-Ouche, de Tosny

ger I “d’Espagne” or “Conches de Tosny/Toeni, Seigneur de Conches
son of Raoul II de Tosny married to Adelaide de Barcelona and Godechilde.
FMG Medieval Lands:
ROGER [I] de Tosny [Conches] ([990]-killed in battle [1040]).
Guillaume de Jumièges names “Roger du Ternois, de la mauvaise race de Hulce…oncle du duc Rollon, et se battant avec lui contre les Francs avait jadis concouru par sa valeur à la conquête de la Normandie”, recording that Roger was “porte-bannière de toute la Normandie” and left for Spain when Duke Robert II left on pilgrimage to Jerusalem but refused to serve Duke Guillaume II on returning to Normandy[1810].
The Chronici Hugonis Floriacensis names “Rotgerius filius Rodulfi comitis” when recording that he left Normandy for Spain[1811].
The Chronico S Petri Vivi Senonensi records that “Rotgerius filius Rodulfi comitis” left Normandy for Spain with an army in 1015[1812].
He founded the abbey of Conches in 1035[1813].
He and his two sons “Helbert et Hélinant” were killed during his rebellion by “Roger de Beaumont”[1814]. “…Rogerii filii Radulfi…” witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy donated “in comitatu Abrincatensi villam…Sancti Johannis” to the abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel[1815].
He left Normandy for Spain in [1030/35], fought against the Moors, and lived there for 15 years with his Spanish wife[1816].
“…Rodgerii filii Rodulfi…Rogerii de Conchis” subscribed the charter dated to [1040] under which “Vuillelmus Ricardi magni ducis Normannorum filius” donated property to the abbey of Jumièges[1817]. The apparent duplication of these names is difficult to explain.
“…Nigelli vicecomitis, Tursteni vicecomitis…Willelmi Arcacensis comitis, Godefridi vicecomitis, Rodgerii filii Rodulfi, Wimundi…” witnessed the charter dated to [1040] under which Guillaume Comte de Talou donated property to Jumièges[1818].
Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Conches abbey, including donations by “Rogeris senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulfus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius predicti Radulphi senex et Roger filius Radulphi juvenis”, by charter dated 1165 or [1167/73][1819].
[m firstly (1018 or soon after) ADELAIDA [Papia] de Barcelona, daughter of RAMÓN BORELL I Conde de Barcelona & his wife Ermesinde de Carcassonne.
The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that “Normanni duce Rotgerio”, who had been fighting Saracens in Spain, asked “comitissa Barzelonensi Ermensende…vidua” for the hand of her daughter, but does not name the latter[1820].
It is not clear that “dux Rotgerius” is Roger de Conches, particularly as it seems surprising that Adémar would have accorded him the title “dux”.
It is assumed that this marriage proposal took place in 1018 or soon after: if it had taken place much later, there would have been little reason to have referred to the bride’s mother as “vidua”. In addition, the other events recorded by Adémar in the same paragraph, all relate to 1016/18.
The Chronici Hugonis Floriacensis records that “Rotgerius filius Rodulfi comitis” married “sororem Raymundi-Berengarii Stephaniam” in Spain, specifying that she later married “rex Hispaniæ Garsias”[1821], but this account is even more confused and clearly conflates several different individuals. The Chronico S Petri Vivi Senonensi records the same marriage using the same wording[1822].
The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.]
m [secondly] as her first husband, GODECHILDIS, daughter of —. Guillaume de Jumièges records the marriage of the widow of “Roger du Ternois” and “Richard comte d’Evreux et fils de Robert l’archevêque”[1823]. The Miracles of Sainte-Foy recount her being cured of a serious illness by miracle, when she was still married to her first husband[1824]. She married secondly Richard Comte d’Evreux.
Roger [I] & his [first/second] wife had four children:
a) HELBERT (-killed in battle [1040]). Guillaume de Jumièges names “Helbert et Hélinant” as the two sons of “Roger du Ternois” when recording that they were killed with their father by “Roger de Beaumont” during their rebellion against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy in the early years of the duke’s reign[1825].
b) HELINANT (-killed in battle [1040]). Guillaume de Jumièges names “Helbert et Hélinant” as the two sons of “Roger du Ternois” when recording that they were killed with their father by “Roger de Beaumont” during their rebellion against Guillaume II Duke of Normandy in the early years of the duke’s reign[1826].
c) VUASCO . The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 1037/1045.
d) ADELISA (-6 Oct —-, bur Abbaye de Lire).
Guillaume de Jumièges names “Adelise fille de Roger du Ternois” as wife of “Guillaume fils d’Osbern, proche parent du duc Guillaume”, recording that her husband buried her in the monastery of Lire which he had built[1827].
Robert of Torigny’s De Immutatione Ordinis Monachorum records that “Willermus filius Osberni Normanniæ dapifer et cognatus Willermi ducis…Aelizam uxorem suam filiam Rogeri de Toeneio” was buried in the monastery of Lire[1828].
The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death “6 Oct” of “Adeliz uxor Willelmi hujus loci fundatoris”[1829]. The necrology of the monastery of Ouche records the death “6 Oct” of “mater Willelmi Britolii Adeliza”[1830].
m as his first wife, GUILLAUME FitzOsbern Seigneur de Breteuil, son of OSBERN de Crépon & his wife Emma d’Ivry (-killed in battle Cassel, Flanders 22 Feb 1071, bur Abbaye de Corneilles).
Roger [I] & his [second] wife had one child:
e) RAOUL [III] de Tosny (-24 Mar[1831] [1102], bur Conches Saint-Pierre). “Radulphus de Tony cum Godehelde matre mea” donated property to Wotton Wawen Abbey, Warwickshire by undated charter[1832].
=============================
Roger I of Tosny
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Roger I of Tosny or Roger of Hispania[1] was a Norman nobleman of the House of Tosny who took part in the Reconquista of Iberia. He was the son of Raoul I of Tosny.
In 1013, Roger and his father Raoul I guarded the castle at Tillières for Richard II, Duke of Normandy. A few years later, for an unknown reason, the pair were forced into exile.
While his father gained a reputation for himself in Apulia, Roger did the same in fighting the Muslims in Iberia. The small Christian states of Northern Iberia welcomed volunteers and adventurers who they could use to mount a strong force for the

Roger was summoned by Ermessenda, regent-countess of Barcelona after the death of her husband Ramon Borrell, to help her against the Muslim threat to her power. Roger rushed to help, marrying Ermesende’s daughter[2], terrorising the Saracens and capturing several towns and castles.
Adémar de Chabannes gives an echo of the more or less legendary deeds of Roger in Iberia. He gained the nickname Mangeur de Maures (Moor-Eater). Adémar recounts that Roger took his captured Saracens each day and, in front of them, cut one of their number in two, boiling the first half and giving it to the other Muslims to eat, and pretending to take the other half into his own tent for him and his companions to eat. Then Roger allowed some of these prisoners to escape, to spread these horrific rumours.[3].
Before 1024, Roger and his father gained permission from Richard II to return to Normandy, and Raoul died soon afterwards.
Roger de Tosny founded Conches-en-Ouche. He built its church of Sainte-Foy[4] (before 1026) then the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Castillon (c. 1035) where monks from Fécamp Abbey were installed. This monastery was one of the first baronial foundations in Normandy[5] The foundation charter reveals that the lord of Tosny gave it a small possession around Conches and his forest.
In 1035, Robert I’s death began a troubled period in the duchy of Normandy. Civil wars multiplied and Roger (whose relations with his neighbours was already argumentative) was one of the main players in them. According to the Norman chroniclers[6], the lord of Tosny refused to serve the new duke, the future William the Conqueror, due to his being a bastard. He especially took advantage of the weakness of the duke’s power by ravaging his neighbours’ lands, notably those of Humphrey of Vieilles. Humphrey sent his son Roger to face Roger of Tosny, and around 1040 the latter was killed in battle, and his two eldest sons[7] died a few weeks later of their wounds.
Peace was re-established between the Tosny family and the neighbouring families. The widow Gotelina/Godehildis was forced to marry Richard, Count of Évreux.

Family and descendents
Married :
Adelaide, daughter of Ermesende, countess of Barcelona
Gotelina/Godehildis who married, after the death of Roger count of Évreux, Richard
Children :
Helbert (died 1040 with his father),
Elinand, (idem),
Raoul II of Tosny, successor of his father
Robert of Tosny, lord of Stafford [NOTE: THIS IS QUESTIONABLE]

“The Ternois Roger, bad race of Hulce… uncle of Duke Rollon, and fighting with him against the Franks had formerly contributed by its value to the conquest of Normandy”, recording that Roger was “flagship of the Normandy”
The first known Toney ancestor ever was Ralph the son of Hugh De Calvacamp. Hugh’s father was Malahulic/(Malahule)who came to the Normandy area of France from Norway on a Viking ship. He came with Rollo, or Rolph the Ganger. Hugh De Calvacamp’s father Malahulic was uncle to Rollo. Rollo was the leader of the group that our ancestors came with. He and his followers( taunted/annoyed/stalked or worse) the coastlines of France until the King gave him the area that is now Normandy.
Hugh De Calvacamp also had a son Hugh De Calvacamp Jr. He was given the Archbishopship of Rouen by the Duke of Normandy, he being cousin to the Duke. There were certain lands that came with this title. Hugh gave his brother Ralph a piece of land called Tosni/Toeni, it was situated just across the River Seine from Les Andelys. The “s” in Tosni is silent therefore sounding like Toney. Ralph then became known as Raph de Toney. Our first ancestor was Standard Bearer to the Duke of Normandy, and became a hereditary position to Ralph’s descendants.

Béranger l’Espagnol, [NOT listed by FMG]
Adelise, married Guillaume Fils Osbern
Berthe, married Guy de Laval [NOT listed by FMG]
One other son
References
1. ^ A name given him by Orderic Vitalis.
2. ^ However, the marriage in Barcelona is uncertain. Gotelina/Godehildis, Roger’s only wife to be known by name, was not Iberian but it is not known if she was his second or first wife. See Lucien Musset, “Aux origines d’une classe dirigeante : les Tosny, grands barons normands du Xe au XIIe siècle”, Sonderdruck aus Francia Forschungen zur westeuropäischen Geschichte, Munich, 1978, p.53.

In 1947 in Italy the Virgin Mary appeared to Pierina Gilli and called herself Rosa Mystica. Her second apparition was on July 13 1947 and the 13th of each month was to be a Day of Rosa Mystica and the annual day of celebration for Rosa Mystica was to be July 13th. This modern Rosa Mystica devotion stresses the Feast of the Immaculate Conception on December 8th in which a special hour of Mercy is kept. It is as if the Virgin Mary has come to confirm the insights about Rosa Mystica and the Immaculate Conception found in the opening verses of the Zohar

Rosamund Clifford (before 1150 – c. 1176), often called “The Fair Rosamund” or the “Rose of the World”, was famed for her beauty and was a mistress of King Henry II of England, famous in English folklore.
Rosamund was the daughter of the marcher lord Walter de Clifford and his wife Margaret Isobel de Tosny (referred to as “de Toeni” on the Page of her husband, Walter de Clifford). Walter was originally known as Walter Fitz Richard, but his name was gradually changed to that of his major holding, first as steward, then as lord. This was Clifford Castle on the River Wye. Rosamund had two sisters, Amice and Lucy. Amice married Osbern fitz Hugh of Richard’s Castle and Lucy Hugh de Say of Stokesay. She also had three brothers, Walter II de Clifford, Richard and Gilbert.
Rosamund probably first met the King when he passed by Clifford Castle in 1163 during one of his campaigns in Wales against Rhys ap Gruffydd.
Her name, Rosamund, may have been influenced by the Latin phrase rosa mundi, which means “rose of the world.”
Jon Rosamond Broseman

Copyright 2012

The Reconquista (Spanish, Galician, Asturian: [rekoŋˈkista], Portuguese: [ʁɛkõˈkiʃtɐ] or [ʁekõˈkistɐ],[1] Catalan: Reconquesta [rəkuŋˈkestə], Basque: Errekonkista [erekonkis̺ta], “Reconquest”; Arabic: الاسترداد‎ trans. al-Istirdād, [æl ɪstɪrˈdæːd], “the Recapturing”) is a centuries-long period in the Middle Ages in which several Christian kingdoms succeeded in reconquering the Iberian Peninsula from the Islamic kingdoms collectively known as Al-Andalus.

In the High Middle Ages, the fight against the Moors in the Iberian Peninsula became linked to the fight of the whole of Christendom. The Reconquista was originally a mere war of conquest. It only later underwent a significant shift in meaning toward a religiously justified war of liberation (see the Augustinian concept of a Just War). The papacy and the influential Abbey of Cluny in Burgundy not only justified the acts of war but actively encouraged Christian knights to seek armed confrontation with Moorish “infidels” instead of with each other. From the 11th century onwards indulgences were granted: In 1064 Pope Alexander II allegedly promised the participants of an expedition against Barbastro (Tagr al-Andalus, Aragon) a collective indulgence 30 years before Pope Urban II called the First Crusade. The legitimacy of such a letter establishing a grant of indulgence has been disputed at length by historians, notably by Ferreiro. Papal interest in Christio-Muslim relations in the peninsular are not without precedent – Popes Leo IV (847-855), John VIII (872-882) and John XIX (1024–33) are all known to have displayed substantial interest in the region. Whilst there is little evidence to invalidate the letter as a whole, both the recipient(s) of the letter and whether such a letter actually nominates Barbastro as the first ‘crusade’ are still a matter of dispute.[citation needed][by whom?] Neither is there evidence to support the contention that the Cluniacs publicised the letter throughout Europe. It was addressed to the clero Vulturnensi. The name has been associated with the castle of Volturno in Campania but even this is not concrete. Baldwin, for example, stipulates that the name is simply “garbled” and that it was intended for a French bishopric. Not until 1095 and the Council of Clermont did the Reconquista amalgamate the conflicting concepts of a peaceful pilgrimage and armed knight-errantry.
But the papacy left no doubt about the heavenly reward for knights fighting for Christ (militia Christi): in a letter, Urban II tried to persuade the reconquistadores fighting at Tarragona to stay in the Peninsula and not to join the armed pilgrimage to conquer Jerusalem since their contribution for Christianity was equally important. The pope promised them the same rewarding indulgence that awaited the first crusaders.
Later military orders like the Order of Santiago, Montesa, Order of Calatrava and the Knights Templar were founded or called to fight in Iberia. The Popes called the knights of Europe to the Crusades in the peninsula. After the so-called Disaster of Alarcos, French, Navarrese, Castilian, Portuguese and Aragonese armies united against the Muslim forces in the massive battle of Las Navas de Tolosa (1212). The big territories awarded to military orders and nobles were the origin of the latifundia in today’s Andalusia and Extremadura, in Spain, and Alentejo, in Portugal.

The First Crusade (1096–1099) was a military expedition by Roman Catholic Europe to regain the Holy Lands taken in the Muslim conquests of the Levant (632–661), ultimately resulting in the recapture of Jerusalem in 1099. It was launched on 27 November 1095 by Pope Urban II with the primary goal of responding to an appeal from Byzantine Emperor Alexios I Komnenos, who requested that western volunteers come to his aid and help to repel the invading Seljuq Turks from Anatolia. An additional goal soon became the principal objective—the Christian reconquest of the sacred city of Jerusalem and the Holy Land and the freeing of the Eastern Christians from Islamic rule.

de Toeni of Normandy and Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England
——————————————————————————–
Hugh de Cavalcamp [a] b abt 890, prob Eure, France.
Child of Hugh de Cavalcamp was:

Ralph I de Toeni [b] b abt 925, of Tosni, Eure, France.
Child of Ralph I de Toeni was:

Ralph II de Toeni [c], Seigneur of Tosni and Conches, b abt 965, Tosni, Eure, France, d abt 1015. The identity of his wife is not known.
Children of Ralph II de Toeni were:

Ralph de Toeni, d young.
Roger I de Toeni b abt 992. See LINE A
(poss.) Robert de Toeni b abt 996. See LINE B
LINE A
Roger I de Toeni [d], Standard Bearer of Normandy, aka “de Conches”, b abt 992, Conches, Normandy, d 31 May 1039. He md Godeheut abt 1022, daughter of Raymond III Borrel, Count of Barcelona, and Ermesende of Carcassonne.
Children of Roger I de Toeni and Godeheut were:

Sir Ralph III de Toeni b abt 1034.
Adelize de Toeni b abt 1036. She md Sir William Fitz Osbern, Earl of Hereford, abt 1050, son of Osbern, Steward of Normandy, and Emma.
Robert de Stafford, Baron Stafford, Sheriff of Staffordshire, b abt 1038.
Sir Ralph III de Toeni [e], Lord of Flamstead, aka “de Conches”, b abt 1034, of Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England, d 24 Mar 1101/02. He md Isabel/Elizabeth de Montfort abt 1070, France, daughter of Simon I de Montfort, Seigneur of Montfort l’Amauri, and Isabel de Bardoul.
Children of Ralph III de Toeni and Isabel/Elizabeth de Montfort were:

Roger II de Toeni b abt 1074, d 15 May 1091.
Ralph IV de Toeni b abt 1078.
Godeheut de Toeni b abt 1082; md Baldwin I of Boulogne, King of Jerusalem.
Sir Ralph IV de Toeni [f], Lord of Flamstead, aka “de Conches”, b abt 1078, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England, d abt 1126. He md Alice of Northumberland 1103, daughter of Sir Waltheof II of Huntingdon, Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton, Count of Lens, and Judith of Lens.
Children of Ralph de Toeni and Alice of Huntingdon were:

Sir Roger III de Toeni b abt 1104.
Robert de Toeni b abt 1108.
Margaret de Toeni b abt 1112, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England, d 1185. She md Sir Walter Fitz Richard de Clifford, Lord of Clifford, abt 1135, son of Richard Fitz Pons and Maud Fitz Walter.
Sir Roger III de Toeni [g], Lord of Flamstead, aka “de Conches”, b abt 1104, of Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England, d 1157-62. He md Ida of Hainault abt 1130, daughter of Baldwin III, Count of Hainault, and Yolande of Guelders.
Children of Roger III de Toeni and Ida/Gertrude of Hainault were:

Ralph V de Toeni, Seigneur, b abt 1132.
Godeheut de Toeni b abt 1140, of Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England, d bef 1186. She md William de Mohun abt 1155, son of Sir William de Mohun, Earl of Somerset, and Agnes de Gant.
Sir Ralph V de Toeni [h], Lord of Flamstead, aka “de Conches”, b abt 1132, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England, d 1162. He md Margaret de Beaumont aft 1155, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England, daughter of Sir Robert de Beaumont, Knight, Earl of Leicester, Justiciar of England, and Amice de Montfort.
Children of Ralph V de Toeni and Margaret de Beaumont were:
Ida de Toeni [i] b abt 1158, of Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England. She md Sir Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, Magna Carta Surety, abt 1181, son of Sir Hugh Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, and Juliana de Vere. She was also previously a mistress of Henry II Curtmantle, King of England, son of Geoffrey V of Anjou, Count of Anjou, and Matilda of Germany.
Sir Roger IV de Toeni b abt 1160.
Sir Roger IV de Toeni [j], Lord of Flamstead, Knight, aka “de Conches”, b abt 1160, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England, d 29 Dec 1208, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England. He md Constance de Beaumont abt 1185, daughter of Richard I de Beaumont, Viscount of Maine, and Daughter de l’Aigle.
Child of Roger IV de Toeni and Constance de Beaumont was:
Sir Ralph VI de Toeni [k], Lord of Flamstead, b abt 1189/90, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England, d abt 29 Sep 1239 (at sea). He md Petronilla de Lacy Nov 1234, daughter of Sir Walter de Lacy, Lord of Meath and Weobley, and Margaret/Margery de Braose.
Children of Ralph de Toeni and Petronilla de Lacy were:

Sir Roger V de Toeni, Lord of Flamstead, b abt 1235.
Constance de Toeni b abt 1236, Radnor, Wales, d aft Feb 1266. She md Fulk Fitz Warin abt 1249, son of Fulk Fitz Warin and Maud le Vavasour.
Sir Roger V de Toeni [l], Lord of Flamstead, b Sep 1235, of Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England, d bef 12 May 1264. He md [1] Alice de Bohun bef 1255, daughter of Sir Humphrey V de Bohun, Earl of Hereford and Essex, and Maud d’Eu; and [2] Isabel aft 1255.
Child of Roger de Toeni and Alice de Bohun was:
Sir Ralph VII de Toeni [m], Lord of Flamstead, b 1255, of Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England, d bef 29 Jul 1295, Gascony, France. He md Mary abt 1280. She was b abt 1258, prob Scotland.
Child of Ralph VII de Toeni and Mary was:

Alice de Toeni [n] b abt 1283, of Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England, d bef 8 Jan 1324/25. She md:

[1] Thomas de Leyburne,
[2] Sir Guy de Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, Knight, 12 Feb 1309/10, son of Sir William de Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, and Maud Fitz John, and
[3] Sir William la Zouche de Mortimer, Lord Zouche of Mortimer, bef 25 Feb 1316/17, son of Robert de Mortimer and Joyce la Zouche.

LINE B
(poss) Robert de Toeni b abt 996, prob Conches, Normandy.

Sir Robert de Toeni, Lord of Belvoir, b abt 1042. He md Adeliza abt 1062. She was b abt 1046.
Child of Robert de Toeni and Adeliza was:

Adelize/Alice de Toeni b abt 1066, d aft 1136. She md Roger Bigod abt 1082.

——————————————————————————–
NOTES:
This name is seen as de Conches, de Tony, de Toni, de Tosni, etc, but it’s derivation is almost certainly from Tosni, in Eure, France. Several members held Conches, also in Eure, hence the nickname “de Conches”.

a. Virtually nothing is known of Hugh de Cavalcamp except that he had two sons, Hugh, and Ralph (or Rodolf). Son Hugh was a monk at the abbey of St. Denis and in 942 he was made Archbishop of Rouen by William “Longsword”, Duke of Normandy. From the estates of this Achbishopric, Hugh gave to his brother, Ralph, the domain of Tosni.

b. Described as “a most powerful man”, he is often confused with his son of the same name, but the dates involved indicate there must have been two Ralphs, belonging to successive generations.

c. Born probably before 970, as in 1013-14, the Duke of Normandy, having founded the castle of Tillieres, gave custody of it to Ralph and his son Roger. Around 1015 he went to Apulia, and in the winter of 1015-16, he was at the seige of Salerno. While record of his wife’s name has not survived, Orderic, in writing of Ralph’s son, Roger, stated that he descended from an alleged uncle of Rolf/Rollo, founder of Normandy, so some believe it possible that Ralph’s wife may have belonged to a ducal branch of that house. Ralph II de Toeni had at least two sons, Ralph and Roger, and may have also had a son, Robert de Toeni, who is known to have had a brother, Berenger “Spina”, as well as a sister Bertha, who married Guy de Laval circa 1025. Some sources identify this Robert de Toeni as a predecessor of the later Robert de Toeni, Lord of Belvoir in 1086.

d. Styled also de Conches, he was a powerful man and banner-bearer of all Normandy. About 1035 he founded the abbey of Chatillon or Conches, and while Duke Robert was away on pilgrimage, he went to Spain where he distinguished himself fighting “the infidels”. When he returned to Normandy and found that William had succeeded his father, Duke Robert, Roger was furious that a bastard ought not to rule over him and other Normans. And accordingly, Robert rebelled and ravaged the lands of his neighbors, particularly those of Humphrey de Vieielles, whose son, Roger de Beaumont then marched against him. In the battle that followed, Roger de Toeni and two of his sons, supposedly named Elbert and Elinant, were slain. He left at least three sons and a daughter, Ralph, who succeeded him, Robert de Stafford, Gazon, and Alice, who married William Fitz Osbern, Earl of Hereford.

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4 Responses to The Rose Wolf of the Reconquista

  1. Ben Toney says:

    It is not known the paternity of Godehildis de Toney, wife of Roger I de Toney. It has often been said she was a daughter of Ramon Borrell, Count of Barcelona, but there is no evidencwe to prove this. The sons of Roger de Toney who were killed in battle with their father, were likely older than
    Ralph deToney and were likely the sons of a Spanish mistress of Roger. Then when Roger married Godehildis, who was likely Norman, he gave his first legitimate son Ralph the name of his ancestors. It is doubtful that Roger de Toney ever married in Spain.

  2. Ben Toney says:

    The name Godehildis or Godehilde is a very unusual name. For many years I could only find Godehilde, wife of Roger de Tosny I and her granddaughter Godehilde de Boulogne as bearers of this name. However, recently I have discovered a number of ladies with this name and they all are associated with the Counts of Maine. The first of these ladies was Godehilde, Jewess Princess of Septimania, the daughter of King Makhir b. 725; d. 793. She was the wife of Herve (sometimes called Charivius) Count of Maine b. ca. 740.

    About 100 years later Gauzlin III Count of Maine married Godehilde, daughter of Charles the Bald, King of the West Franks and King of Italy. This Godehilde had a daughter named Godehilde who married Herve de Poher of Britanny.

    Hugh I Count of Maine who was a nephew of Gauzlin III’s wife had a daughter, Godehilde b. 939, who married Ives I Count of Belleme.

    Since there were few women in France with the name Godehilde, before the birth of Godehilde de Tosny, and since most of them were associated with the Counts of Maine, it is not beyond reason to believe that Godehilde de Tosny was descended from the Counts of Maine. Count Hugh II Count of Maine was born ca. 967 and died 1015. Godehilde de Tosny was born ca. 1000. Count Hugh would have been about 33 years of age when she was born. He was likely her father. She was likely named for Hugh III’s aunt Godehilde de Belleme.

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