Elizabeth “Rosebud” Taylor

It was my dream to send my grandson, Tyler Hunt, to Le Rosey that is located in Rolle Switzerland near Chateau Rougemont. When I went to Bullhead City over a year ago for a family reunion, I thought I had the happy ending to my book ‘Capturing Beauty’. However, “the best laid pans of mice and men soon come to folly.’ I met my Waterloo in the Las Vegas airport while walking with my sister, Victoria Presco, who I had not lay eyes on in seven years. We spotted Heather and Tyler from afar, and then beheld the love of her life, Bill Cornwell, for the first time. He was straining to get a glimpse of his future father-in-law, his nemesis, his bitter enemy he never met, and when he beheld me, he lowered his eyes and looked down on the ground.

“Did you catch that look?” I asked Vicki.
“Yep!” she replied, knowing this dude was looking for a fight. Bill, and his father, wanted my daughter and grandson in their camp, because at forty years of age, Bill had failed to sire an heir, a grandson for his father, a ex-military career grunt who hates hippies and liberals because they are part of the One World conspiracy to elevate blacks and other races over white people.

Above is a gold medallion issued by the founded by Denis de Rougemont who may be my kindred and related to Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor who shares the same great great grandfather as I and the world famous artist, Rosamond. Denis was titled ‘The Prince of European Culture’. He is a co-founder of the European Union. He was close with founders of the One World Dream that included Otto Von Habsburg, the son of Empress Zita who feld to America when Hitler put a price on her head. Her ancestor, Charles V had a one world vision that my kindred Gottschalk Rosemondt may have shared, he the Master of ‘The Falcon’ art college. The Habsburgs had to leave most of the worldy possesions behind. Zita shipped some of her families treasure to a woman in Portland Oregon. A large painting this woman was put in care of ended up in a bank vault here in Eugene Oregon, it rolled up in a Persian carpet – like Cleopatra. ‘The Last Audience of the Habsburgs’ is now in the University of Oregon Museum. Here is the ‘Rosebud’ of the Habsburgs, the greastes patrons of the art the world has ever known. Note the faint unfinished images of the children. These are orphans that Zita helped smuggle out of Austria. Consider the faint leaves on the stem of my rose.

What were Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor’s last words? She collected masterpieces like her uncle who went to Europe to purchase fine art for oil barons. Are the children of another Rose of the world interested in carrying on their mother’slegacy, her interest in art?

My mother, Rosemary, told uncle Vinnie and aunt June a lie after she forced me from my home at seventeen. She told me I had gone to New York to attend the New School. Vinnie knew this was a lie, and thus, he dare not intervene, and, send me to………………Le Rosey?

What is in a name? I see Rolles Royce.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2012

Arthur von Ferraris was truly a citizen of the world at a time when that designation was relatively rare.   He was born in 1856 in Galkovitz, Hungary, a small agricultural town.  Like so many European regions in 1848, Hungary experienced a major reform movement—in this case to oust the longstanding Hapsburg rulers in Vienna.  The revolutionaries succeeded, albeit briefly, in creating the first Republic of Hungary only to be completely defeated when the Austrian emperor Franz Joseph called for assistance from the Russian tsar, Nicholas I, who promptly invaded Hungary. By August 1849, the revolution was over, the Hapsburgs were firmly in control again, and the Hungarian people would not sever their political connection to Austria until the end of World War I.  Nonetheless, the second half of the nineteenth century was a time of persistent upheaval with reform movements always simmering just beneath the surface of society.  In light of this importunate turmoil, it is not surprising that a young painter might want to relocate to a more welcoming environment for the arts.
 
Von Ferraris’ first move was to Vienna during his teenage years, where he was able to understand the language, and begin his art education.  His first teacher was the Viennese artist, Joseph Matthaus, who specialized in portrait painting.   Intriguingly, Matthaus had fought for reform in Vienna in October 1848, and had been sentenced to death for high treason.  He was later pardoned and went on to establish a career painting the leaders of Austrian society.  The young von Ferraris must have known of his mentor’s political activities—perhaps even supporting the same ideals.  He did not stay long in Vienna however, leaving for Paris in 1876.
 
After settling into life in Paris, von Ferraris studied with Jules Lefebvre at the Académie Julian, and then with Jean-Léon Gérôme at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts.  Both these instructors were advocates of classical educational methods, teaching students to draw first, and then to paint.  Von Ferraris’ earlier training in Vienna provided him with a solid foundation, facilitating his smooth progress through his studies at the Ecole.  He began exhibiting at the Salon des Artistes Français in 1881, just a year after beginning his studies with Gérôme. 
 
The next notable journey for von Ferraris began in the winter of 1884-85 when he traveled to Egypt with his friend, Ludwig Deutsch, an Austrian painter who was also living in Paris.  Undoubtedly Gérôme encouraged the trip as he so often did when students expressed an interest in Orientalist imagery.  Von Ferraris and Deutsch spent a productive winter in Cairo, returning to Paris with a wealth of drawings, oil sketches and possibly photographs.  The Learned Man of Cairo, a painting from 1888, is a case in point.  Like Gérôme’s paintings, this image is meticulously detailed and almost photographic in its polished realism.  Von Ferraris’ style is more intimate, however; he concentrates on what seems to be a portion of a larger scene, suggesting that the viewer is privileged to observe this elderly wise man at his study—unaware of the viewer’s presence. The most apt comparison is to the work of Edgar Degas, whose spatial composition has been described as looking through a keyhole. Nor does the similarity end there; von Ferraris also poses his subject in a corner, distorting the spatial perspective with sophisticated subtlety so that the plane of the stone floor seems to tilt forward very slightly.  By 1888, this technique was explicitly associated with the Impressionists, but it is unusual to see it in the academic realists affiliated with Gérôme.
 
By the late 1880s, von Ferraris had set up a studio with another Orientalist painter, Charles Wilda, on the Boulevard de Clichy.  He continued to paint society portraits—still a reliable source of income with wealthy clients who preferred the more prestigious oil portrait to the increasingly popular photographic print.  These commissions, such as Young Girl in a White Dress, were painted with that unique sensitivity that characterizes a skilled portraitist, emphasizing the essential qualities of the personality while simultaneously highlighting all the best physical aspects of the sitter.  Von Ferraris exhibited many of his society portraits at the annual Salon.
 
In addition, his Orientalist paintings were regularly shown at the Salon throughout the late 1880s and early 1890s.  A brief list includes: Narghile Smokers (1887), At the El Azhar Mosque, Cairo (1889), Visit of the Great Sheikh to the University of Cairo (1890), A Descendant of the Prophet (1891) and Bedouin at the Arms Dealer (1893).   Von Ferraris also won honorable mentions at both of the world fairs, the Exposition Universelle, in Paris in 1889 and 1900.  At these international events, he exhibited his work with the Hungarian Section of artists rather than the French group, an indication that he was about to start moving once again.
 
The success of a delightful anecdotal genre painting called The Wise Monkey (Le Singe savant) at the Budapest salon of 1892 was an early sign that von Ferraris had reestablished contact in Hungary. A year later, in 1893, he left Paris for Budapest, where he stayed for the next two years; although the reason for this move remains unknown, it seems probable that family concerns may have required not only his attention, but his presence in Hungary.
 
By 1894, he left Budapest for Vienna, and began to exhibit his work in Berlin as well.  Turn-of-the-century Vienna was a particularly exciting place: Sigmund Freud was developing his new science of psychoanalysis; Arnold Schoenberg was composing with his revolutionary 12-tone musical scale; and the Vienna Secession group (led by Gustave Klimt) was proclaiming that art should be free—especially from the stodgy, provincial thinking at the tradition-bound Künstlerhaus.  Von Ferraris seems not only to have supported the ideas of the Secession reform group, but also to have become a member in 1898, shortly after it was founded.  This would have been in keeping with his best economic interests as well since “foreign” (i.e., non-Austrian) artists were not permitted to exhibit at the Künstlerhaus salons. 
 
The next fifteen years were increasingly busy and productive.  From his home base in Vienna, von Ferraris also exhibited in Düsseldorf, Munich and Berlin.  He traveled frequently throughout the Middle East, returning to Egypt, but also exploring the lands around the Tigris-Euphrates river valley and Palestine.  Significantly, his reputation as a society portraitist continued to bring steady, financially rewarding work from international clients.  He received commissions in all of the European capitols, adding London, Stockholm and Rome to his already extensive client list.  He also made several trips to the New York City where he achieved a certain social status for having painted the portrait of John Davison Rockefeller, the founder of Standard Oil. 
 
Regrettably, the peripatetic nature of his work, combined with his natural wanderlust, has left some gaps in the history of von Ferraris’ life.  Although there is documentation of his presence in 1920s Vienna, his death can only be dated to an unspecified time after 1928.

“According to de Rougemont, in the twelfth century a Christian
heresy known as Catharism arose in southern France which involved a
dualism of body and soul. The divine soul has been tempted by the
Woman and is imprisoned in the body. It longs to be delivered from
the body so that it can be reunited with the divine. This longing is
directed at an ideal woman named Maria, the mother of a docetic
Jesus who teaches an ascetic way of deliverance from the body. This
deliverance occurs finally in death. So the passionate longing of
the soul for deliverance is essentially a longing for death. Thus,
Catharism transformed natural sexual desire into passion, limitless
aspiration and longing.”

My mother Rosemary said Christine and her managers were going after
the Lesbian market – before she died! Was she trying to capture a
forbidden market and milk it like a drug? None of these managers,
before and after Rosamond’s death, bothered to investigate, see if
the majority of Rosamond’s fans were heterosexual, and were having a
long love affair with Rosamond’s unatainable women.

I suggest a world council gather and discuss Love and Marriage, and
stop employing young lovers in dirty religious holy wars, in dirty
politics, and in thedirty oppression of our sexual nature.

I was a member of the Love Genration who was stomped upon because we
felt compelled to oppose the War in Vietnam. It is time to stop
Demonizing this peace-loing heterosexual revolution that the
rightwing Christians borrow from in part, when they employ Christian
rock groups to attract converts. I revoke their permission to do so!

Jon Presco

http://www.bryanmaclean.com/gallery/related.htm

http://www.bryanmaclean.com/lovebiogs.htm

http://www.bryanmaclean.com/album/foreverchangesalbum.htm

http://www.thetruthseeker.co.uk/article.asp?ID=1938

http://www.ransomfellowship.org/R_Marriage.html

In the thirties and forties of this century there arose a largely
silent debate about the meaning and significance for human life of
romantic love. On the one hand, Charles Williams (1886-1945), the
English poet, novelist, literary critic, and theologian, proposed an
orthodox Christian theology of romantic love. Following Dante he saw
it as an experience of grace and salvation.l On the other hand,
Denis de Rougemont (1906-1985), the Swiss historian, literary
critic, and theologian, proposed an interpretation of what he called
the myth of romantic love which had its origin in heretical
Catharist sources. This myth interpreted the experience of the
passion of romantic love as one which promised the exaltation and
destruction of the lovers.2 As far as I know, neither Williams nor
de Rougemont knew of the work of the other, with a single exception
to which I will refer later.

The theses of Williams and de Rougemont on romantic love appear to
be quite contradictory. They refer to much of the same historical
and literary material and come to what seem to be exactly opposite
conclusions. Let us consider their theses.

According to de Rougemont, in the twelfth century a Christian heresy
known as Catharism arose in southern France which involved a dualism
of body and soul. The divine soul has been tempted by the Woman and
is imprisoned in the body. It longs to be delivered from the body so
that it can be reunited with the divine. This longing is directed at
an ideal woman named Maria, the mother of a docetic Jesus who
teaches an ascetic way of deliverance from the body. This
deliverance occurs finally in death. So the passionate longing of
the soul for deliverance is essentially a longing for death. Thus,
Catharism transformed natural sexual desire into passion, limitless
aspiration and longing.

Catharism was persecuted by the Inquisition, went underground, and
appeared again in the guise of courtly love. This was expounded in
the poems and songs of the troubadours who were its evangelists. The
fundamental myth of courtly love is the story of Tristan and Iseult.
This is the legend of the passionate adulterous love of these two
which was inflamed by numerous obstacles, the main one being that
Iseult was married to King Mark. The message of the myth is that
passionate romantic love is the true human fulfillment which exalts
and transforms the lovers through death. De Rougemont interprets
this myth to be in direct contradiction to the Christian
understanding of love as Agape.

According to Williams the modern view of romantic love had its
source in Dante’s experience of falling in love with Beatrice and
his interpretation of this as an experience of grace and
salvation. “He is the spring of all modern love literature.”3
Williams claims that the common experience of falling in love can be
an experience of the unfallen state of original perfection, of the
kingdom of God, and especially an experience of the love and grace
of God incarnate in Christ, an experience of salvation. It depends
upon what is done with the experience. If it is not seen as an end
in itself but rather a beginning, it can be a following of the
Christian way, especially in marriage.

Williams gives the larger context for his theology of romantic
love. “It has been part of the work of Christianity in the world to
make men aware of the spiritual significance of certain natural
experiences…. [But this] has been attempted very little with
romantic love. Yet an human energy which can be so described is
capable of being assumed into sacramental and transcendental heights-
such is the teaching of the Incarnation.”

4 The lack of such an attempt in regard to romantic love in the past
has been due to apocalypticism, the concentration upon another
world, suspicion of any sacrament involving human delight, the
haunting of Manicheanism, the asceticism necessary for the mystical
life, and clerical celibacy.

5
The beginning of romantic love was Beatrice’s appearance to Dante
and his response. “A flame of caritas possessed me, which made me
pardon anyone who had offended me.”

6 Williams comments, “The experience . . arouses a sense of intense
significance, a sense that an explanation of the whole universe is
being offered.”

7 This requires a response of intellect, will, and emotions. “Is it
serious? Is it capable of intellectual treatment? Is it capable of
belief, labor, fruition? Is it (in some sense or other) true? . . .
Can this state of things be treated as the first matter of a great
experiment? . . . The end of course is known by definition of the
kingdom: it is the establishment of a state of caritas, of pure
love, the mode of expression of one moment into eternity.”8 This is
the Way of Romantic Love.

CHARTIER Catherine married in 1480 OF the TEMPLE Jean IV
prosecutorin the officiality of Chartres, lord of Brerville, expert
inChartres, descendant of Geoffroi OF the TEMPLE (Banker of
kingPhilippe the Bold one and Jean 1° its son, secretary of the
commandsof kings Philippe Length and Charles the Beautiful one

The Comtesse Jean-Louis du Temple de Rougemont, née Louise Lejeune,
on April 5th 2002. Her funeral will take place at 12h00 CEST at the
Basilique Saint-Clotilde in Paris on Tuesday, April 9th 2002. The
deceased was born in Tours on April 20th 1913 as daughter of Edgar
4. Baron Lejeune and his wife, née Princesse Marguérite Murat. On
June 6th 1933 she got married to Comte Jean-Louis du Temple de
Rougemont in Paris. She is survived by her son Guy and his wife, the
husband of her late daughter Cécile, himself the Duc de Lorge, and
their 4 children, her son François and his wife, née Arielle de
Moustier, and their only child, her daughter Laure, herself the
Princesse de Beauvau Craon, and her daughter Anne and her only child
and also by her sister-in-law Solange and her husband Elie, himself
the 5. Duc Decazes et de Glucksbierg. Louise is a great-great-
grandchild of Louise Clary, herself a nice of Drottning Desideria av
Sverige, and a great-great-great-grandchild Caroline Bonaparte and
Herzogin Maria Elisabeth in Bayern. [Le Figaro]

Lt. Colonel de Rougemont assistant of the chief Pommiès (Krüth)The
Count Jean-Louis of the Temple of old Rougemont raises school
ofSaumur. Captain in 1942, takes part in the organization
ofresistance in the S-O of France. Lieutenant-colonel within
theIrregular force Pommiès where he will be the first assistant of
theChief.The command of the Pyrénéenne zone was entrusted to the
chief ofRougemont (Taillard) for the occupation of the Béarn
maquis.At the end of July and at the beginning of August 1944, the
Pommièschief entrusts to Lt.colonel de Rougemont the coordination of
theactivities of the Balade brigades and Milleret. The battalions
ofCarrère, Maupéou and Milleret, must maintain the permanence of
thedestruction around the towns of Pau, Tarbes, Mont of Marsan
andSurface-on-the Adour like on the railways there driving. They
willhave to envisage the permanence of ambushes on the principal
routes.In its preparatory order of August 4, he writes: “Within the
limitof the means of which it lays out, the Detachment tries to
createfor the enemy a zone of insecurity such as, not being able
toreceive reinforcements in consequence of the interallied
operationsin France, it can only go or destroyed.”After many
contacts carried out by Rougemont, concretized by themeeting of July
20 in Pau, collaboration C.F.P. and U.N.E. (SpanishNational Union)
will be realized for their actions in the Pyreneansolid mass.After
the capitulation of Germany, it will have an importantmilitary
career and will be Général of army corps in 1968. Tally ofreserve in
1970.He is Commandeur of the Legion of honor. Large Officer of
thenational order of merit. Military Cross 1939 – 45. Cross of
themilitary value. Rivet washer of Resistance. Commander of
theacademic palms. Large cross about Malta.

I am looking for descendants of Philip Rosemond and Moses Morton Rosemond
who lived in Guernsey County, OH in the mid-1800s. This family descended
from a James Rosemond who lived in County Leitrim, Ireland in the early
1700s. Other members of this same family settled in Lanark, Ontario, Canada.
The southern Rosamond family is also said to be descended from this same
family, as are the Rosamond families in Australia and New Zealand. I am
trying to tie all the branches of the family together. The information on
the family in Guernsey County, OH is shown below. I’d appreciate hearing
from anyone who has any information regarding this family.
The reference for the earlier generations of this family is the booklet “The
History of the Rosemond Family” by Leland Eugene Rosemond, 1939.
Thanks.
Descendants of Moses Morton Rosemond
Generation No. 1
1. MOSES MORTON11 ROSEMOND (PHILIP10, WILLIAM9, JAMES8, UNKNOWN7, JAMES
“JACOB?”6, HANS ULRICH5, HANS4, FRED3, HANS2, ERHART1 DE ROUGEMONT)1,2,3,4
was born Bet. 1843 – 1845 in Guernsey County, Ohio5,6. He married MARTHA E
LIKES7,8 26 Jul 1868 in Guernsey County, OH9. She was born Abt. 1847 in
Ohio.

If you want to find a gathering of the world’s elite, there’s no better place to look than the village of Rolle, Switzerland. Drive along the coast of Lake Geneva, turn south among the picturesque vineyards and farms, and you will come to a discreet driveway nestled among the chestnut trees. It leads to an old chteau surrounded by a cluster of newer buildings.
Here you will find an illustrious gathering. The names speak of the great private fortunes from around the world: Persian Gulf oil money, Greek shipping lords, Italian textile billionaires, Spanish banking families, American tobacco magnates, Japanese industrial tycoons, Hong Kong real estate moguls.
No, this is not a business conference like the World Economic Forum at Davos. The people gathered in this corner of Switzerland are children. And the institution is a boarding school called Institut Le Rosey.
The Guinness Book of World Records doesn’t list the world’s most expensive boarding schools, but Le Rosey is certainly a contender–it costs a cool $40,000 a year to send your child there. And it is still the most intense concentration of the global elite.
ewels, gowns and paintings that added color to Elizabeth Taylor’s life are already, six months after her death, traveling the world en route to new owners. Christie’s is taking the material to eight cities in seven countries for sales previews or “exhibitions” before putting it up for auction.
This weekend is the London showing. Much of the material then travels to Los Angeles for a preview at MOCA’s Pacific Design Center branch from Oct. 13 to 16. Tickets for the L.A. event went on sale Thursday at christies.com. Five thousand tickets are available at $20 each; 850 sold within the first two hours, according to a Christie’s spokesperson.
1. Joachim, Napoléon, Michel Murat (° 1885-1938), qui suit.
2. princesse Marguerite, Malcy, Caroline, Alexandrine Murat (° Paris,
28.11.1886-1956) ép. 1912, Edgard Lejeune (° Trois-Moustier (Vienne),
3.01.1881-1914, mort pour la France), baron E. Lejeune. Dont :
A. Louise Lejeune (° 1913) ép. 1933, Jean-Louis du Temple de
Rougemont (° 1910), comte J.-L. du Temple de Rougemont. Dont :
a. Guy du Temple de Rougemont (° 1935).
b. Cécile du Temple de Rougemont (° 1936) ép. 1959, Jacques-Henri de
Durfort (° 19…), comte J.-H. de Durfort, fils de N…, comte de
Durfort et de Colette Brossand de Juigné. Dont :
– Guy de Durfort (° 1960).
c. François du Temple de Rougemont (° 1939).
d. Laure du Temple de Rougemont (° 1942).
e. Anne du Temple de Rougemont (° 1946).
B. Edgard-Louis Lejeune (° 1915), baron Lejeune ép. 1942, Claude de
Bonardi du Mesnil (° 1914), fille du comte Alfred de Bonardi du
Mesnil et de Ghislaine de Gislain de Cernay. Dont :
a. Ghislaine Lejeune (° 1943).
b. Stanislas Lejeune (° 1944).
c. Laetitia Lejeune (° 1948).
3. prince Pierre Murat (° 1887-1888).
4. prince Alexandre, Michel, Eugène, Joachim, Napoléon Murat (°
Rocquencourt, 12.09.1889-1926) ép. 1920, Yvonne Gillois (°
Fontainebleau, 20.12.1894-1961), fille de Maurice Gillois et de
Eugénie Marcelle. Dont :
1.
Cecile du TEMPLE de ROUGEMONT was born 1936, and died 2000. She was the daughter of 2. Jean Louis du TEMPLE de ROUGEMONT and 3. Louise LEJEUNE. She married Living.
 
 
Ahnentafel, Generation No. 2
2.
Jean Louis du TEMPLE de ROUGEMONT was born 1910, and died 1990.
3.
Louise LEJEUNE was born 1913, and died 2002. She was the daughter of 6. Edgard LEJEUNE and 7. Marguerite MURAT.
 
 
Children of Louise LEJEUNE and Jean Louis du TEMPLE de ROUGEMONT are:
1.
  i.
Cecile du TEMPLE de ROUGEMONT was born 1936, and died 2000. She married Living.
 
  ii.
Living. She married Marc de BEAUVAU-CRAON. He was born 1921, and died 1982.
 
  iii.
Living. He married Arielle de MOUSTIER.
 
  iv.
Living. He married Living.
 
  v.
Living. She married Living.
Ahnentafel, Generation No. 3
6.
Edgard LEJEUNE was born 1881, and died 1914. He was the son of 12. Robert LEJEUNE and 13. Louise TAIGNY.
7.
Marguerite MURAT was born 1886, and died 1956. She was the daughter of 14. Joachim MURAT and 15. Cecile NEY d’ELCHINGEN.
 
 
Children of Marguerite MURAT and Edgard LEJEUNE are:
3.
  i.
Louise LEJEUNE was born 1913, and died 2002. She married Jean Louis du TEMPLE de ROUGEMONT. He was born 1910, and died 1990.
 
  ii.
Edgard Louis LEJEUNE was born 1915, and died 1989. He married Claude de BONARDI du MENIL. She was born 1914, and died 1967. He married Gilberte BREGUET 1970, daughter of Louis BREGUET and Nelly GIRARDET. She was born 1910, and died 1973.
Ahnentafel, Generation No. 4
12.
Robert LEJEUNE was born 1861, and died 1943.
13.
Louise TAIGNYwas born 1858, and died 1911. She was the daughter of 26. Ernest TAIGNY and 27. Marie Julie DELON.
 
 
Children of Louise TAIGNY and Robert LEJEUNE are:
6.
  i.
Edgard LEJEUNE was born 1881, and died 1914. He married Marguerite MURAT1912, daughter of Joachim MURAT and Cecile NEY d’ELCHINGEN. She was born 1886, and died 1956.
 
  ii.
Hubert LEJEUNE.
 
  iii.
Elisabeth LEJEUNE was born Abt 1885, and died Aft 1973.
14.
Joachim MURAT was born 1856, and died 1936.
15.
Cecile NEY d’ELCHINGEN was born 1867, and died 1960.
 
 
Child of Cecile NEY d’ELCHINGEN and Joachim MURAT is:
7.
  i.
Marguerite MURAT was born 1886, and died 1956. She married Edgard LEJEUNE 1912, son of Robert LEJEUNE and Louise TAIGNY. He was born 1881, and died 1914.
Ahnentafel, Generation No. 5
26.
Ernest TAIGNY was born 21 Mar 1828 in Paris, 75, Ile-de-France, FRA, and died 5 Oct 1906 in Paris, 75, Ile-de-France, FRA.
27.
Marie Julie DELON was born 1837. She was the daughter of 54. Charles DELON and 55. Elisabeth “Lisa” BONAFIDE.
 
 
Children of Marie Julie DELON and Ernest TAIGNY are:
 
  i.
Living.
 
  ii.
Jeanne TAIGNY was born 1856, and died 1919. She married ? GOUIN.
13.
  iii.
Louise TAIGNYwas born 1858, and died 1911. She married Robert LEJEUNE 20 Apr 1880. He was born 1861, and died 1943.
Ahnentafel, Generation No. 6
54.
Charles DELON was born 20 Jan 1798, and died 1885. He was the son of 108. “Louis” Frédéric DELON and 109. Marie “Julie” SANTERRE.
55.
Elisabeth “Lisa” BONAFIDE was born 20 Apr 1798, and died 1879 in Paris, 75, Ile-de-France, FRA.
 
 
Children of Elisabeth “Lisa” BONAFIDE and Charles DELON are:
 
  i.
Anne “Ninette” DELONwas born 1831. She married Denis RAIMBERT 1848, son of Bertrand RAIMBERT and Julie BERTRAND. He was born 18 Nov 1822, and died 1886.
27.
  ii.
Marie Julie DELON was born 1837. She married Ernest TAIGNY 1855. He was born 21 Mar 1828 in Paris, 75, Ile-de-France, FRA, and died 5 Oct 1906 in Paris, 75, Ile-de-France, FRA.
 
  iii.
Henriette DELON died 1903. She married Jules RAIMBERT 1845. He was born 1819, and died 1882.

ROUGEMONT ; DU TEMPLE de François
   
    Père : ROUGEMONT ; DU TEMPLE de Jean-Louis (Cte) (1910 – ?)
    Mère : LEJEUNE Louise (1913 – ?)
    Freres/Soeurs :
       ROUGEMONT ; DU TEMPLE de Guy (1935)
       ROUGEMONT ; DU TEMPLE de Cécile (1936)
       ROUGEMONT ; DU TEMPLE de Laure (1942)
       ROUGEMONT ; DU TEMPLE de Anne (1946)
    Naissance :
          Date : 1939
    Prénom : François
          Nom de famille : ROUGEMONT ; DU TEMPLE de
ROUGEMONT ; DU TEMPLE de Guy
   
    Père : ROUGEMONT ; DU TEMPLE de Jean-Louis (Cte) (1910 – ?)
    Mère : LEJEUNE Louise (1913 – ?)
    Freres/Soeurs :
       ROUGEMONT ; DU TEMPLE de Cécile (1936)
       ROUGEMONT ; DU TEMPLE de François (1939)
       ROUGEMONT ; DU TEMPLE de Laure (1942)
       ROUGEMONT ; DU TEMPLE de Anne (1946)
    Naissance :
          Date : 1935
    Prénom : Guy
          Nom de famille : ROUGEMONT ; DU TEMPLE de
ROUGEMONT ; DU TEMPLE de Jean-Louis (Cte)
   
    Naissance :
          Date : 1910
    Prénom : Jean-Louis (Cte)
          Nom de famille : ROUGEMONT ; DU TEMPLE de
    Information de famille :
          avec LEJEUNE Louise (1913 – ?) :
                Mariage :
                      Date : 1933 (23 ans)
                enfants :
                   ROUGEMONT ; DU TEMPLE de Guy (1935)
                   ROUGEMONT ; DU TEMPLE de Cécile (1936)
                   ROUGEMONT ; DU TEMPLE de François (1939)
                   ROUGEMONT ; DU TEMPLE de Laure (1942)
                   ROUGEMONT ; DU TEMPLE de Anne (1946)

If you want to find a gathering of the world’s elite, there’s no better place to look than the village of Rolle, Switzerland. Drive along the coast of Lake Geneva, turn south among the picturesque vineyards and farms, and you will come to a discreet driveway nestled among the chestnut trees. It leads to an old chteau surrounded by a cluster of newer buildings.
Here you will find an illustrious gathering. The names speak of the great private fortunes from around the world: Persian Gulf oil money, Greek shipping lords, Italian textile billionaires, Spanish banking families, American tobacco magnates, Japanese industrial tycoons, Hong Kong real estate moguls.
No, this is not a business conference like the World Economic Forum at Davos. The people gathered in this corner of Switzerland are children. And the institution is a boarding school called Institut Le Rosey.
The Guinness Book of World Records doesn’t list the world’s most expensive boarding schools, but Le Rosey is certainly a contender–it costs a cool $40,000 a year to send your child there. And it is still the most intense concentration of the global elite.
ewels, gowns and paintings that added color to Elizabeth Taylor’s life are already, six months after her death, traveling the world en route to new owners. Christie’s is taking the material to eight cities in seven countries for sales previews or “exhibitions” before putting it up for auction.
This weekend is the London showing. Much of the material then travels to Los Angeles for a preview at MOCA’s Pacific Design Center branch from Oct. 13 to 16. Tickets for the L.A. event went on sale Thursday at christies.com. Five thousand tickets are available at $20 each; 850 sold within the first two hours, according to a Christie’s spokesperson.
1. Joachim, Napoléon, Michel Murat (° 1885-1938), qui suit.
2. princesse Marguerite, Malcy, Caroline, Alexandrine Murat (° Paris,
28.11.1886-1956) ép. 1912, Edgard Lejeune (° Trois-Moustier (Vienne),
3.01.1881-1914, mort pour la France), baron E. Lejeune. Dont :
A. Louise Lejeune (° 1913) ép. 1933, Jean-Louis du Temple de
Rougemont (° 1910), comte J.-L. du Temple de Rougemont. Dont :
a. Guy du Temple de Rougemont (° 1935).
b. Cécile du Temple de Rougemont (° 1936) ép. 1959, Jacques-Henri de
Durfort (° 19…), comte J.-H. de Durfort, fils de N…, comte de
Durfort et de Colette Brossand de Juigné. Dont :
– Guy de Durfort (° 1960).
c. François du Temple de Rougemont (° 1939).
d. Laure du Temple de Rougemont (° 1942).
e. Anne du Temple de Rougemont (° 1946).
B. Edgard-Louis Lejeune (° 1915), baron Lejeune ép. 1942, Claude de
Bonardi du Mesnil (° 1914), fille du comte Alfred de Bonardi du
Mesnil et de Ghislaine de Gislain de Cernay. Dont :
a. Ghislaine Lejeune (° 1943).
b. Stanislas Lejeune (° 1944).
c. Laetitia Lejeune (° 1948).
3. prince Pierre Murat (° 1887-1888).
4. prince Alexandre, Michel, Eugène, Joachim, Napoléon Murat (°
Rocquencourt, 12.09.1889-1926) ép. 1920, Yvonne Gillois (°
Fontainebleau, 20.12.1894-1961), fille de Maurice Gillois et de
Eugénie Marcelle. Dont :
1.
Cecile du TEMPLE de ROUGEMONT was born 1936, and died 2000. She was the daughter of 2. Jean Louis du TEMPLE de ROUGEMONT and 3. Louise LEJEUNE. She married Living.
 
 
Ahnentafel, Generation No. 2
2.
Jean Louis du TEMPLE de ROUGEMONT was born 1910, and died 1990.
3.
Louise LEJEUNE was born 1913, and died 2002. She was the daughter of 6. Edgard LEJEUNE and 7. Marguerite MURAT.
 
 
Children of Louise LEJEUNE and Jean Louis du TEMPLE de ROUGEMONT are:
1.
  i.
Cecile du TEMPLE de ROUGEMONT was born 1936, and died 2000. She married Living.
 
  ii.
Living. She married Marc de BEAUVAU-CRAON. He was born 1921, and died 1982.
 
  iii.
Living. He married Arielle de MOUSTIER.
 
  iv.
Living. He married Living.
 
  v.
Living. She married Living.
Ahnentafel, Generation No. 3
6.
Edgard LEJEUNE was born 1881, and died 1914. He was the son of 12. Robert LEJEUNE and 13. Louise TAIGNY.
7.
Marguerite MURAT was born 1886, and died 1956. She was the daughter of 14. Joachim MURAT and 15. Cecile NEY d’ELCHINGEN.
 
 
Children of Marguerite MURAT and Edgard LEJEUNE are:
3.
  i.
Louise LEJEUNE was born 1913, and died 2002. She married Jean Louis du TEMPLE de ROUGEMONT. He was born 1910, and died 1990.
 
  ii.
Edgard Louis LEJEUNE was born 1915, and died 1989. He married Claude de BONARDI du MENIL. She was born 1914, and died 1967. He married Gilberte BREGUET 1970, daughter of Louis BREGUET and Nelly GIRARDET. She was born 1910, and died 1973.
Ahnentafel, Generation No. 4
12.
Robert LEJEUNE was born 1861, and died 1943.
13.
Louise TAIGNYwas born 1858, and died 1911. She was the daughter of 26. Ernest TAIGNY and 27. Marie Julie DELON.
 
 
Children of Louise TAIGNY and Robert LEJEUNE are:
6.
  i.
Edgard LEJEUNE was born 1881, and died 1914. He married Marguerite MURAT1912, daughter of Joachim MURAT and Cecile NEY d’ELCHINGEN. She was born 1886, and died 1956.
 
  ii.
Hubert LEJEUNE.
 
  iii.
Elisabeth LEJEUNE was born Abt 1885, and died Aft 1973.
14.
Joachim MURAT was born 1856, and died 1936.
15.
Cecile NEY d’ELCHINGEN was born 1867, and died 1960.
 
 
Child of Cecile NEY d’ELCHINGEN and Joachim MURAT is:
7.
  i.
Marguerite MURAT was born 1886, and died 1956. She married Edgard LEJEUNE 1912, son of Robert LEJEUNE and Louise TAIGNY. He was born 1881, and died 1914.
Ahnentafel, Generation No. 5
26.
Ernest TAIGNY was born 21 Mar 1828 in Paris, 75, Ile-de-France, FRA, and died 5 Oct 1906 in Paris, 75, Ile-de-France, FRA.
27.
Marie Julie DELON was born 1837. She was the daughter of 54. Charles DELON and 55. Elisabeth “Lisa” BONAFIDE.
 
 
Children of Marie Julie DELON and Ernest TAIGNY are:
 
  i.
Living.
 
  ii.
Jeanne TAIGNY was born 1856, and died 1919. She married ? GOUIN.
13.
  iii.
Louise TAIGNYwas born 1858, and died 1911. She married Robert LEJEUNE 20 Apr 1880. He was born 1861, and died 1943.
Ahnentafel, Generation No. 6
54.
Charles DELON was born 20 Jan 1798, and died 1885. He was the son of 108. “Louis” Frédéric DELON and 109. Marie “Julie” SANTERRE.
55.
Elisabeth “Lisa” BONAFIDE was born 20 Apr 1798, and died 1879 in Paris, 75, Ile-de-France, FRA.
 
 
Children of Elisabeth “Lisa” BONAFIDE and Charles DELON are:
 
  i.
Anne “Ninette” DELONwas born 1831. She married Denis RAIMBERT 1848, son of Bertrand RAIMBERT and Julie BERTRAND. He was born 18 Nov 1822, and died 1886.
27.
  ii.
Marie Julie DELON was born 1837. She married Ernest TAIGNY 1855. He was born 21 Mar 1828 in Paris, 75, Ile-de-France, FRA, and died 5 Oct 1906 in Paris, 75, Ile-de-France, FRA.
 
  iii.
Henriette DELON died 1903. She married Jules RAIMBERT 1845. He was born 1819, and died 1882.

Born in Paris, in 1935. He lives and works in his hometown. Guy de Rougemont studies decorative arts at l’École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs in Paris (1954-1958). His first individual exhibition takes place in 1962. During the events of May 1968 he organizes, together with Éric Seydoux, the Atelier Populaire at the École des Beaux-arts in Paris, this workshop allows the creation of serigraph posters. Guy de Rougemont becomes a member of the Académie des Beaux-Arts in 2002.
Brief Chronology
Since the early 60’s, Guy de Rougemont has thought of cities as jungles and has tried to create, through his interventions, ways to “penetrate”. He wants to make “his art work create a resonance with its surroundings”. He works on large canvases, mural paintings, creates environments, gives color to different spaces, sculpts; his work is always abstract, baroque and colorful. In 1971 he begins experimenting with “the color of space around the volume”, he creates polychrome cylinders, a “foundation of colors”. Following this same principle, he gives color, in 1974, to the colonnade in the Musée d’art moderne de la Ville and to the colonnade in the Palais de Tokyo; he envelops them with lacquered PVC. He works in monumental interventions. He designs city squares (Totem, Villeurbanne, 1981), fountains (Fontaine monumentale, in four-colored marble, Belfort, 1986), atriums (Musée d’Orsay, Paris; floor of the Ministère des Finances, Bercy, Paris, 1986-1989), expressways (Environnement pour une autoroute, 30 km of the East expressway in France, 1977), private and public buildings (Cent images, Nanterre, 1997). He also designs furniture, objects, carpet decorative motifs, stained-glass windows. He works on porcelain, he creates ceramics, stamps and posters. He has also made films (La tasse, 1966; Les trois comparses, 1969; Environnement pour une autoroute, 1977).

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Famille_de_Beauvau

In Auctions, Vive the Opened Market; Legal Changes Allow Sotheby’s and Christie’s to Hold First Sales on French Turf
By ALAN RIDING
Published: November 28, 2001
Sign In to E-Mail
Print

PARIS, Nov. 27— As Sotheby’s lives through the uncertainty of the price-fixing trial of its former chairman in New York, it can at least boast to be making history this week in Paris when it becomes the first foreign auction house to hold a public sale in France. Christie’s, its main competitor, will follow suit next week, but it was stubborn campaigning by Sotheby’s that broke the monopoly granted to French auctioneers by Henri II in 1556.
For free marketeers, at least, the heroine in this battle is Laure de Beauvau Craon, the president of Sotheby’s France, who as far back as 1993 began pressing the European Union to require France to enforce regional legislation on free competition.
Prolonged foot-dragging by successive French governments followed, but Ms. de Beauvau Craon kept knocking on doors, writing letters and speaking out. ”One senator said I was promoting measures that would empty French cellars and fill the coffers of foreign companies,” she recalled with a smile. ”It was hard to fight archaic conservatism.”
Change was promised for Jan. 1, 1998, but elections toppled the government, and parliamentary approval of a new law was delayed until the summer of 2000. Finally, last month, Sotheby’s was given the green light to hold an auction on Thursday at its fancy new headquarters facing the Élysée Palace.
While Sotheby’s and Christie’s should be the immediate beneficiaries (Phillips, de Pury & Luxembourg, another international auction house, is not yet ready to do business here), the reform is also widely expected to energize France’s long-sluggish art market.
”I think London is a bit worried by the shadow that Paris could cast,” Ms. de Beauvau Craon said. ”My view is that if you want to counterbalance New York, you need two cities — London and Paris — to act as anchors in Europe.” She is not alone in believing that the French monopoly is responsible for France’s shrinking share — just 6 percent today — of the global auction market. ”France lost the pre-eminent position it enjoyed until the 1960’s because it could not adjust to globalization of the market,” said François Curiel, the president of Christie’s France. ”You either limited yourself to France or you got into the global business.”

My first encounter with Elizabeth Taylor came in 1964 when I was attending the Le Rosey boarding school in Switzerland, and we were at our winter campus in Gstaad. I was 12 at the time. The head of the English side of the school, Mr. Edward Turner, summoned me to his office. Once again, I thought I was in trouble.

However, on this occasion, Mr. Turner said that an American mother wanted to send her son to Le Rosey the next school-year. Before doing so, she wanted to speak with an American student her son’s age to ask how I liked the school and my experiences. I was selected for this duty, and told to go to Charley’s Tea Room, a local Gstaad après ski gathering place, the next afternoon at 4:30. I was to meet a “Mrs. Burton.”

My first encounter with Elizabeth Taylor came in 1964 when I was attending the Le Rosey boarding school in Switzerland, and we were at our winter campus in Gstaad. I was 12 at the time. The head of the English side of the school, Mr. Edward Turner, summoned me to his office. Once again, I thought I was in trouble.

However, on this occasion, Mr. Turner said that an American mother wanted to send her son to Le Rosey the next school-year. Before doing so, she wanted to speak with an American student her son’s age to ask how I liked the school and my experiences. I was selected for this duty, and told to go to Charley’s Tea Room, a local Gstaad après ski gathering place, the next afternoon at 4:30. I was to meet a “Mrs. Burton.”

Château du Rosey (depicted at left), a Feudal chateau located on Le Rosey’s main campus at Rolle, dates to the Middle Ages and presently houses Le Rosey’s central reception area.[18] In 1880, the site of the Le Rosey campus was chosen by the school’s founder, Paul-Emile Carnal, “a lover of nature, history and the countryside”. The Le Rosey campus at Rolle is situated adjacent to the famous Lake Geneva. In 1911, the founder passed the ownership of Le Rosey to his son, Henri-Paul Carnal. In 1917, the school began to go to Gstaad in the German-speaking Canton of Berne for the winter months to escape the dense fog that settles in on Lake Geneva.[19] In 1947, the third generation of directors, Louis Johannot and Helen Schaub, assumed ownership of Le Rosey. Under the same ownership, in 1967, Le Rosey admitted girls for the first time and opened a separate girls’ campus. In 1980, the current owners, Philippe and Anne Gudin de la Sablonnière, became the fourth generation of Directors at Le Rosey. Louis Johannot, in an interview with Life Magazine in 1965, made a comment that received considerable attention: “The only reason I always try to meet and know the parents better is because it helps me to forgive their children.”[20]

Institut Le Rosey, with over 5,000 former students,[21] has one of the most prestigious alumni registries in the world.[43] Le Rosey has educated generations of dynastic families, including Hohenzollerns, Rothschilds, Metternichs, Borgheses, Hohenlohes, and Radziwiłłs.[44][45] The school has also famously educated royalty from around the world, particularly the deposed royal family members of the Muhammad Ali Dynasty of Egypt, Alexander, Crown Prince of Yugoslavia, the House of Glücksburg of Greece, and the House of Savoy of Italy.[21] Le Rosey has educated several monarchs, including Aga Khan IV, King Albert II of Belgium, King Baudouin I of Belgium, King Fuad II of Egypt, King Ntare V of Burundi, Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi of Persia, and Prince Rainier III of Monaco.[46] The future Grand Duke of Luxembourg, Prince Guillaume, was also educated at the school. At this moment, the future King of Bhutan is still educated there.[47] Famous parents of past students at Le Rosey, who often visited the Rolle and Gstaad campuses, include: Elizabeth Taylor, David Niven, Alain Manoukian, John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Diana Ross, King Leopold III of Belgium, Aristotle Onassis, and Sir Winston Churchill, a Rosean’s grandfather.[48] Rainier III once commented on Le Rosey: “The students were much friendlier because they were from such diverse, international backgrounds. I felt, for once in my childhood, that I could take a breath.”[49]

Institut Le Rosey, commonly referred to as Le Rosey or simply Rosey, is a school near Rolle, Switzerland. The school was founded by Paul-Émile Carnal in 1880 on the site of the 14th-century Château du Rosey near the town of Rolle in the Canton of Vaud. Rosey is one of the oldest boarding schools in Switzerland and one of the most prestigious educational institutions in the world.

Pia Christina Miller Getty (born New York, New York, 1966), is an independent filmmaker.[1] She is the oldest daughter of businessman Robert Warren Miller and sister of Marie-Chantal of Greece and Alexandra von Fürstenberg, a trio famously dubbed “The Miller Sisters”.
Pia spent her childhood in Hong Kong and attended Le Rosey School in Switzerland. She later studied art history at Georgetown University.
In 1992, she married Getty Oil heir Christopher Ronald Getty, son of Jean Ronald Getty and grandson of Jean Paul Getty. The couple has four children, Isabelle (b. 1993), Robert Maximilian (b. 1996), Conrad (b. 1998), and Maximus (b. 2002). They divorced in 2005.
Pia is the American spokeswoman for the cosmetics company Sephora. She is frequently featured in Vogue, Vanity Fair and other society magazines.
Her first feature documentary film, China Power – Art Now After Mao, released in 2008, focused on China’s burgeoning art scene.

Denis de Rougemont (September 8, 1906, Couvet – December 6, 1985, Geneva) was a Swiss writer and European federalist, who wrote in French.
He studied at the University of Neuchâtel, and then moved to Paris in 1930. There he wrote for and edited various publications, associating with the personalist groupings and the non-conformists of the 1930s. He founded in Geneva the “Centre Européen de la Culture” in 1950[1] and in 1963[2] the “Institut Universitaire d’Etudes Européennes” (IUEE, “Graduate Institute of European Studies”, attached to the University of Geneva).

1952 Geneva European Cultural Centre Gold Medallion

1952 Geneva European Cultural Centre Gold Medallion
1952 (MCMLII), Swiss gold medal, European Cultural Centre Geneva (CENTRE EUROPEEN DE LA CULTURE GENEVE), Charles V holy Roman Emperor.
An Intriguing Medal
Normally, we can work out what most medals and medallions were issued for, they are often self explanatory. This one leaves us slightly puzzled. Let’s start with what we do know:-
Obverse
A Roman style portrait of Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, wearing a radiate style crown, the legend reads:
CAROLUS V ROM IMP
There is a makers mark HF for Huguenin Freres of Le Locle Switzerland, the fitted box describes them as “Medailleurs”.
Reverse
A three-tongued flame atop the inscription:
CENTRE
EUROPEEN DE
LA CULTURE
GENEVE
MCMLVII
GR. 29.03 OR FIN
What We Don’t Know
We do not understand the connection between Charles V, 1500 – 1558, Holy Roman Emperor from 1519 to 1556 (or 1558), and Geneva.
We also don’t know who issued the medals, and why. An organisation called the EAEA, the European Association for Education of Adults, appear to have held a meeting in 1952 at Geneva:
It was the “Centre Européen de la Culture” established in 1949 in Geneva, that under the directorship of Denis de Rougemont, developed the idea of having a number of “Foyers de Culture” throughout Europe in and through which European Culture in its diversity and unity could be experienced and spread. Or, as it was expressed in a paper resulting from a meeting in Brussels on March 15, 1952, a Foyer de Culture, on European level should contribute, particularly for young adults, to finding a new set of values in a world that has lost its sense of “culture” and of “community” (note sur le secrétariat Européen des Foyers de Culture 24 Avril 1952).
Whether this was the forerunner of the “European Capital of Culture” award designated annually since 1985 to qualifying European Cities, we also do not know.
The nett gold content shown on the medal is a rather precise figure, and we have assumed it is composed of .900 gold, although our calculations produce a slightly different figure from that claimed on the medal, on this assumption.
Summary
There is probably more we do not know about this medal than we do know, but it remains an interesting historical piece.
There are a few light scratches on the reverse, together with a few greasy fingerprints, otherwise it is about uncirculated condition.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Elizabeth “Rosebud” Taylor

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.