Awakening America’s Royal Muse

Thanks to my new computer, alas I was able to open the New York Times archive on the wedding of Flora Sharon to Lord Hesketh. Here is Sleeping Beauty’s castle. Those who decorated Ralston Hall, used the name ‘Flora’ as their theme. There were flowers galore. Briar Rose and Princess Rosamond were raised from the dead. Here is America’s Royal Muse being wed to an English Lord whose great granddaughters have kissed Prince Harry, and have been considered royal mates for the Windsors. But, what is truly amazing, Flora Sharon’s Bridesmaid was Bessie Sedgwick, the kindred of Andy Warhol’s Muse, Edith Sedgwick.

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=FB0712F63D541B7A93C0A9178AD85F458884F9

Also present was General Irvine McDowell a close kindred of Jessie and Susan Benton who held Salons on Paris and San Francisco. There is little doubt that my kindred, the Jankes and Stuttneisters, attended this wedding that brought a thousand guests on a special train that also brought folks to Belmont Park where they danced around a great redwood. My great grandparents were married at Ralston Hall that was a portable house the video below says Count Cipriani shipped from Italy, but I believe it was one of the six Janke houses that were shipped around the Cape in 1848. The video talks about how it was added to.

My book has become as big as Gone With the Wind! Warhol did prints of my kindred, Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor – that have sold for hundreds of million of dollars. Edith was a member of the Bohemian Harvard crowd. My ex-wife was a member of the Bohemian Cornell scene. The Hesketh sisters are Boho fashion models that sell cloths to the royalty of Europe. Add to this the Benton Artist, and it all comes together at ‘Beautiful Mountain’.

The Sedgwick Family is one of America’s most patriotic and prestigious families who got close to America’s wealthiest family who lived in Oakland and Piedmont. Together with the Preston-Hart-Clay family, this is the gene pool that made America great. We are worthy of our own Jubilee. It’s time for new beginnings.

I have communicated with two members of the Sharon-Hesketh family about restarting the family reunions held at the Palace Hotel that William Ralston ‘The Man Who Built San Francisco’ inagurated.

It is time to enjoin my family history to one of the most cultured histories – in the world! I have made my way through the thorns. Now, with a kiss, I awaken all the sleeping beauty.

Let it be known that the God I know, meant for us to own a earthly kingdom, as well as a eternal one. I have seen both. I am forever amazed!

Jon Presco

Copyright 2012

1888: From the Daily Alta, an article on the marriage of Dr. William O.
Stuttmeister and Augusta D. Janke.
Daily Alta California, Volume 42, Number 14175, 24 June 1888
STUTTMEISTER-JANKE.
One of the most enjoyable weddings of the past week took place at
Belmont, Wednesday morning last, the contracting parties being Miss
Augusta Janke, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. August Janke of Belmont,
and Dr. Wm. Stuttmeister of San Francisco. The house was
handsomely decorated with a rich profusion of ferns and flowers, and
at the appointed hour was filled with the relatives and intimate friends
of the contracting parties. At 11 o’clock the wedding march was played
and the bridal party entered the parlor. The bride was attended by Miss
Alice Stuttmeister, a sister of the groom, and Miss Minnie Janke, a
sister of the bride, as bridesmaids, and Dr. Muldownado and Wm.
Janke, a cousin of the bride, were groomsmen. The Rev. A. L. Brewer
of San Mateo performed the beautiful and impressive ceremony under
an arch composed of flowers and greens very prettily arranged, after
which the guests pressed forward and offered their congratulations.
The bride was attired in a very pretty and becoming costume of the
crushed strawberry shade, and wore a corsage bouquet of orange
blossoms. She carried a handsome bouquet of white flowers. After the
guests had paid their compliments the bride and groom led the way to
the dining-room, where the wedding dinner was served and the health
of the newly married pair was pledged. The feast over, the guests
joined in the dance, and the hours sped right merrily, interspersed with
music singing and recitations, until the bride and groom took their
departure amid a shower of rice and good wishes. Many beautiful
presents were received. Dr. and Mrs. Stuttmeister left Thursday
morning for Santa Cruz and Monterey, where they will spend the
honeymoon. On their return they will make their home in Belmont.
1911: Dr. Willian O. Stuttmeister was practicing dentistry in Redwood
City, CA. (Reference: University of California, Directory of Graduates,

Flora Sharon Sedgwick (b. November 03, 1879, d. November 05, 1945)
Flora Sharon Sedgwick (daughter of John Sedgwick and Malvina Davis) was born November 03, 1879 in San Francisco, CA, and died November 05, 1945 in San Francisco, CA.

Edith Minturn “Edie” Sedgwick (April 20, 1943 – November 16, 1971) was an American actress, socialite, fashion model and heiress. She is best known for being one of Andy Warhol’s superstars. Sedgwick became known as “The Girl of the Year” in 1965 after starring in several of Warhol’s short films in the 1960s.[1][2] She was dubbed an “It Girl”,[3] while Vogue magazine also named her a “Youthquaker”.[4]

[edit] Family background and early lifeEdie Sedgwick was born in Santa Barbara, California, to Alice Delano de Forest (1908–1988) and Francis Minturn Sedgwick, (1904–1967, known as either “Duke” or “Fuzzy”), a philanthropist, rancher and sculptor.[5] She was named after her father’s aunt, Edith Minturn, famously painted with her husband, Isaac Newton Phelps-Stokes, by John Singer Sargent.

Sedgwick’s family was long established in Massachusetts history. Her seventh-great grandfather, English-born Robert Sedgwick,[6] was the first Major General of the Massachusetts Bay Colony settling in Charlestown, Massachusetts in 1635.[7] Edie’s family later originated from Stockbridge, Massachusetts where her great-great-great grandfather Judge Theodore Sedgwick had settled after the American Revolution. Theodore married Pamela Dwight of the New England Dwight family[8] who was the daughter of Abigail (Williams) Dwight, which means that Ephraim Williams, the founder of Williams College, was her fifth-great grandfather.[9] Theodore Sedgwick was the first to plead and win a case for the freedom of a black woman, Elizabeth Freeman, under the Massachusetts Bill of Rights that declared all men to be born free and equal.[10] Sedgwick’s mother was the daughter of Henry Wheeler de Forest (President and Chairman of the Board of the Southern Pacific Railroad and a direct descendant of Jessé de Forest whose Dutch West India Company helped to settle New Amsterdam).[11] Jessé de Forest was also Edie’s seventh-great grandfather.[12] Her paternal grandfather was the historian and acclaimed author Henry Dwight Sedgwick III; her great grandmother, Susanna Shaw, was the sister of Robert Gould Shaw, the American Civil War Colonel; and her great-great grandfather, Robert Bowne Minturn, was a part owner of the Flying Cloud clipper ship and is credited with creating and promoting Central Park in New York City.[13] And her great-great-great grandfather, William Ellery, was a signatory of the United States Declaration of Independence.[10]

She was the first cousin, once removed, of actress Kyra Sedgwick. Kyra is the daughter of Henry Dwight Sedgwick V (Edie’s first cousin), the son of Robert Minturn Sedgwick, who was the older brother of Francis Minturn Sedgwick.

Despite her family’s wealth and high social status, Edie’s early life was troubled. All the Sedgwick children had deeply conflicted relationships with their father Fuzzy—they adored him, but by most accounts he was narcissistic, emotionally remote, controlling and frequently abusive. Her eldest sister Alice (“Saucie”) eventually broke with the family and her two older brothers died prematurely. Francis (known as “Minty”), who had a particularly unhappy relationship with Fuzzy, suffered several breakdowns, eventually committing suicide in 1964 while in a psychiatric hospital. Her oldest brother Robert (“Bobby”), who also suffered from mental health problems, died in a motorcycle accident in 1965. Edie had a very difficult relationship with her father, who openly carried on affairs with other women. On one occasion she walked in on him while he was having sex with one of his paramours. She flew into a rage, but Fuzzy claimed that Edie imagined the whole event. As a result of her emotional problems, Edie developed anorexia by her early teens and settled into a lifelong pattern of binging and purging.

The Sedgwick children were raised on their family’s California ranches. Initially schooled at home and cared for by nannies, their lives were rigidly controlled by their parents; they were largely isolated from the outside world and it was instilled into them that they were superior to most of their peers. At age 13, (the year her grandfather Babbo died) Edie began boarding at the Branson School near San Francisco, but, according to Saucie, she was soon taken out of the school because of her anorexia. In 1958, she was enrolled at St. Timothy’s School in Maryland. She was eventually taken out of the school due to her anorexia.

In the fall of 1962, at Fuzzy’s insistence, Sedgwick was committed to the Silver Hill Hospital in New Canaan, Connecticut. According to fellow patient Virginia Davis, the regime was very lax there, and Edie and her friends often left the hospital after lunch and went into town on shopping sprees, charging up thousands of dollars worth of goods on credit at local stores. Edie easily manipulated the situation at Silver Hill, but her weight kept dropping to just ninety pounds. Consequently, her family had her transferred to a “closed” facility at Bloomingdale, the Westchester County, New York division of the New York Hospital. There, thanks to the strict treatment program, Edie’s condition improved markedly. Around the time she left the hospital she had a brief relationship with a Harvard student, became pregnant and procured an abortion with her mother’s help.

In the fall of 1963, Sedgwick moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts and began studying art with her cousin Lily Saarinen.[14] During this period she partied with members of the bohemian fringe of the Harvard social scene, which included many gay men.

Sedgwick was deeply affected by the loss of her brothers, who died within 18 months of each other. Francis (nicknamed “Minty”) also had a troubled life; he became an alcoholic in his early teens, triggering a downward spiral of drug and alcohol abuse, and in late 1963 he suffered a serious breakdown and was admitted to Bellevue Hospital before being transferred to Silver Hill. According to her friend Ed Hennessy, Sedgwick told him that Minty had finally admitted to his father that he was homosexual, and that this had enraged Fuzzy, who said that he would never speak to him again. Shortly after this, in May 1963, on the day before his twenty-sixth birthday, Minty hanged himself with a tie from the door of his bathroom at Silver Hill.

By the time of Minty’s death, Sedgwick had moved to New York City. She lived at first with her senile grandmother, who had an apartment on 75th Street, but in late fall 1964 she took an apartment in the East Sixties between Fifth and Madison, which her mother decorated lavishly. Edie embarked on a constant round of partying and spent her trust fund at an astonishing rate; according to friend Tom Goodwin she went through eighty thousand dollars in just six months and bought huge amounts of clothing, jewellery and cosmetics. After her ‘chauffeur’ crashed the gray Mercedes she had been given by her father, she began using limousine services constantly, moving from company to company each time she had exhausted her credit. She also began experimenting with drugs and was reportedly introduced to LSD by friends from Cambridge who knew Timothy Leary and Richard Alpert.

Sedgwick’s eldest brother Bobby was also experiencing serious mental health problems, and in late 1963, a few months before Minty’s breakdown, Bobby too suffered a breakdown and his sister Saucie had to have him admitted to Bellevue. He became increasingly self-destructive, crashing a sports car and habitually riding his powerful Harley Davidson motorcycle without a helmet. Bobby was asked not to attend the Sedgwick Christmas gathering in California (according to Saucie, his father told Bobby he was a “bad influence” on the other children) and on December 31, 1964 Bobby suffered critical head injuries when his bike slammed into the side of a bus on Eighth Avenue in New York City; he never regained consciousness and died in hospital twelve days later, aged 31. Edie told her friend Gillian Walker that she knew that Bobby was going to die and that he had killed himself. In Walker’s view, Sedgwick dealt with these tragedies by suppressing her feelings and throwing herself back into the New York party world.

Shortly after Bobby’s death, Sedgwick was herself injured in a car accident in California, in which she suffered a broken knee. She was afraid that her father might use this as a reason to have her sent back into psychiatric care, so with her mother’s help she surreptitiously left California and returned to New York.

[edit] The Factory daysIn March 1965, Sedgwick met artist and avant-garde filmmaker Andy Warhol at Lester Persky’s apartment. She began going to The Factory regularly in March 1965 with her friend, Chuck Wein. During one of those visits, Warhol was filming Vinyl, his interpretation of the novel A Clockwork Orange. Despite Vinyl’s all-male cast, Warhol put Sedgwick in the movie. She also made a small cameo appearance in another Warhol film, Horse, when she entered towards the end of the film. Although Sedgwick’s appearances in both films were brief, they generated so much interest that Warhol decided to create a vehicle in which she could star.

The first of those films, Poor Little Rich Girl, was originally conceived as part of a series featuring Sedgwick, called The Poor Little Rich Girl Saga. The series was to include Poor Little Rich Girl, Restaurant, Face and Afternoon. Filming of Poor Little Rich Girl started in March 1965 in Sedgwick’s apartment. The first reel shows Sedgwick waking up, ordering coffee and orange juice, and putting on her makeup in silence with only an Everly Brothers record playing. Due to a problem with the camera lens, the footage on the first reel is completely out of focus. The second reel consists of Sedgwick smoking cigarettes, talking on the telephone, trying on clothes, and describing how she had spent her entire inheritance in six months.

On April 30, 1965, Warhol took Sedgwick, Chuck Wein and Gerard Malanga to the opening of his exhibition at the Sonnabend Gallery in Paris. On returning to New York City, Warhol asked his scriptwriter, Ronald Tavel, to write a script for Sedgwick, “something in a kitchen – something white, and clean, and plastic”, Warhol is to have said, according to Ric Burns’ Andy Warhol: A Documentary Film. The result was Kitchen, starring Sedgwick, Rene Ricard, Roger Trudeau, Donald Lyons and Elecktrah. After Kitchen, Chuck Wein replaced Ron Tavel as writer and assistant director for the filming of Beauty No. 2, in which Sedgwick appeared with Gino Piserchio. Beauty No. 2 premiered at the Film-Makers’ Cinematheque at the Astor Place Playhouse on July 17.

Warhol’s films were not commercially successful and rarely seen outside The Factory circle, but as Sedgwick’s notoriety grew, mainstream media outlets began reporting on her appearances in Warhol’s underground films and her unusual fashion sense. During this period, she developed her “trademark” look – black leotards, mini dresses, and large chandelier earrings. Sedgwick also cut her hair short and colored her naturally brown hair with silver spray, creating a similar look to the wigs Warhol wore. Warhol christened her his “Superstar” and both were photographed together at various social outings.

Throughout 1965, Sedgwick and Warhol continued making films together – Outer and Inner Space, Prison, Lupe and Chelsea Girls. However, by late 1965, Sedgwick and Warhol’s relationship had deteriorated and Sedgwick requested that Warhol no longer show any of her films. She asked that the footage she filmed for Chelsea Girls be removed and it was replaced with footage of Nico, with colored lights projected on her face and The Velvet Underground music playing in the background. The edited footage of Sedgwick in Chelsea Girls would eventually become the film Afternoon.

Lupe is often thought to be Sedgwick’s last Warhol film, but Sedgwick filmed The Andy Warhol Story with Rene Ricard in 1966, almost a year after she filmed Lupe. The Andy Warhol Story was an unreleased film that was only screened once at The Factory. The film featured Sedgwick, along with Rene Ricard, satirically pretending to be Andy Warhol. It is thought to be either lost or destroyed.[citation needed]

[edit] Bob Dylan and Bob NeuwirthFollowing her estrangement from Warhol’s inner circle, Sedgwick began living at the Chelsea Hotel, where she became close to Bob Dylan. Dylan’s friends eventually convinced Sedgwick to sign up with Albert Grossman, Dylan’s manager. Sedgwick and Dylan’s relationship ended when Sedgwick learned Dylan had married Sara Lownds in a secret ceremony – something she apparently learned from Warhol during an argument at the Gingerman Restaurant in February 1966.

According to Paul Morrissey, Sedgwick had said: “‘They’re [Dylan’s people] going to make a film and I’m supposed to star in it with Bobby [Dylan].’ Suddenly it was Bobby this and Bobby that, and they realized that she had a crush on him. They thought he’d been leading her on, because just that day Andy had heard in his lawyer’s office that Dylan had been secretly married for a few months – he married Sara Lownds in November 1965… Andy couldn’t resist asking, ‘Did you know, Edie, that Bob Dylan has gotten married?’ She was trembling. They realized that she really thought of herself as entering a relationship with Dylan, that maybe he hadn’t been truthful.”[15]

Several weeks before the December 29, 2006, one-week release of the controversial film Factory Girl (described by a review in The Village Voice as Edie for Dummies[16]), the Weinstein Company and the film’s producers interviewed Sedgwick’s older brother, Jonathan, who asserted that she “had an abortion of the child she was (supposedly) carrying by Dylan”.[17] Jonathan Sedgwick, a retired airplane designer, was flown in from Idaho to New York City by the distributor to meet Sienna Miller, who was playing his late sister, as well as to give an eight-hour video interview with details about the purported liaison between Edie and Dylan, which the distributor promptly released to the news media. Jonathan claims an abortion took place soon after “Edie was badly hurt in a motorcycle crash and sent to an emergency unit. As a result of the accident, doctors consigned her to a mental hospital where she was treated for drug addiction.” No hospital records or Sedgwick family records exist to support this story. Nonetheless, Edie’s brother also claimed “Staff found she was pregnant but, fearing the baby had been damaged by her drug use and anorexia, forced her to have the abortion.”[18][19] However, according to Edie Sedgwick’s personal medical records and oral life-history tape recorded less than a year before her death for her final film, Ciao! Manhattan, there is credible evidence that the only abortion she underwent in her lifetime was at age 20 in 1963.

Throughout most of 1966, Sedgwick was involved in an intensely private yet tumultuous relationship with Dylan’s closest friend, Bob Neuwirth. During this period, she became increasingly dependent on barbiturates. Although she abused many drugs, there is no evidence that Sedgwick ever became a heroin addict. In early 1967, unable to cope with Sedgwick’s drug abuse and erratic behavior, Neuwirth broke off their relationship.

[edit] Later yearsSedgwick auditioned for Norman Mailer’s play The Deer Park, but Mailer thought she “wasn’t very good… She used so much of herself with every line that we knew she’d be immolated after three performances.”[20]

In April 1967, Sedgwick began shooting Ciao! Manhattan, an underground movie. After initial footage was shot in New York, co-directors John Palmer and David Weisman continued working on the film over the course of the next five years. Sedgwick’s rapidly deteriorating health saw her return to her family in California, spending time in several different psychiatric institutions. In August 1969, she was hospitalized in the psychiatric ward of Cottage Hospital after being arrested for drug offenses by the local police. While in the hospital, Sedgwick met another patient, Michael Brett Post, whom she would later marry. Sedgwick was in the hospital again in the summer of 1970, but was let out under the supervision of a psychiatrist, two nurses, and the live-in care of filmmaker John Palmer and his wife Janet. Staunchly determined to finish Ciao! Manhattan and have her story told, Sedgwick recorded audio-tapes reflecting upon her life story, which enabled Weisman and Palmer to incorporate her accounts into the film’s dramatic arc.

[edit] Last years and deathSedgwick married Michael Post on July 24, 1971, and under his influence she reportedly stopped abusing alcohol and other drugs for a short time. Her sobriety lasted until October, when pain medication was given to her to treat a physical illness. She remained under the care of her physician Dr. Wells, who prescribed her barbiturates, but she would demand more pills or claim that she had lost them in order to get more, and often combined the medications with alcohol. Post was later put in charge of administering her medication; by his account, she took at least two 300 mg Quaalude tablets and two capsules of three-grain Tuinal every night, in addition to alcohol and whatever other drugs she may have been secretly consuming.

On the night of November 15, 1971, Sedgwick went to a fashion show at the Santa Barbara Museum, a segment of which was filmed for the television show An American Family.[21] After the fashion show, she attended a party where (according to the accounts of her husband and brother-in-law) a drunken guest insulted her by calling her a heroin addict and repeatedly asserting that her marriage would fail. Sedgwick phoned Post, who arrived at the party and, seeing her distress at the accusations, took her back to their apartment around one in the morning. On the way home, Sedgwick expressed thoughts of uncertainty about their marriage.[22] Before they both fell asleep, Post gave Sedgwick the medication that had been prescribed for her. According to Post, Sedgwick started to fall asleep very quickly, and her breathing was, “bad – it sounded like there was a big hole in her lungs”, but he attributed that to her heavy smoking habit and went to sleep.[23]

When Post awoke the following morning at 7.30 am, Sedgwick was dead. The coroner ruled Sedgwick’s death as “undetermined/accident/suicide”. The death certificate was signed at 9:20 am and states the immediate cause was “probable acute barbiturate intoxication” due to ethanol intoxication. Sedgwick’s alcohol level was registered at 0.17% and her barbiturate level was 0.48 mg%. She was 28.[24] Allegedly when learning of Sedgwick’s death, film director Paul Morrissey responded with “Edie who?”[25]

Sedgwick was buried in the small Oak Hill Cemetery in Ballard, California. Her epitaph reads “Edith Sedgwick Post – Wife Of Michael Brett Post 1943–1971”.[26] Her mother Alice was buried next to her in 1988.

John SEDGWICK / Malvina DAVIS

Husband: John SEDGWICK

Born:
11 Apr 1826[2866]
at:
Sharon, Litchfield, Connecticut
Married:
28 Oct 1858[9742]
at:
Shaws Flat, Tuolumne, California
Died:
22 Sep 1908[2867]
at:
Oakland, Alameda, California
Father:
Charles Frederick SEDGWICK

Mother:
Betsey SWAN

Spouses:
Malvina DAVIS
Notes:
[NI5532]

Wife: Malvina DAVIS

Born:
18 Jul 1838[2910]
at:
Independence, Jackson, Missouri
Died:
16 Oct 1890[2911]
at:
Oakland, Alameda, California
Father:
Caswell DAVIS

Mother:
Sarah A UNKNOWN

Spouses:
John SEDGWICK

CHILDREN

Name:
Bessie SEDGWICK

Born:
19 Sep 1859[2915]
at:
Sonora, Tuolumne, California
Married:
7 Aug 1890[9747]
at:
Oakland, Alameda, California
Died:

at:

Spouses:
Thomas T DARGIE

Name:
John SEDGWICK , Jr

Born:
1 Jul 1866[2917]
at:
Stockton, San Joaquin, California
Died:
10 Nov 1876[2918]
at:
San Francisco, San Francisco, California
Spouses:

Name:
Louise Browne SEDGWICK

Born:
25 Dec 1871[2920]
at:
Stockton, San Joaquin, California
Married:
15 Apr 1891[9748]
at:
Oakland, Alameda, California
Died:

at:

Spouses:
Frederick Augustus MERRITT

Name:
Flora Sharon SEDGWICK

Born:
3 Nov 1879[2922]
at:
San Francisco, San Francisco, California
Died:
5 Nov 1945[2923]
at:
San Francisco, San Francisco, California
Spouses:

Name:
Mary Alice SEDGWICK

Born:
4 Apr 1882[2926]
at:
San Francisco, San Francisco, California
Died:
Infant[2927]
at:

Spouses:

Husband: Benjamin SEDGWICK

Born:
7 Nov 1716[117]
at:
West Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut
Married:
BEF 1739[9608]
at:

Died:
7 Feb 1757[118]
at:
Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut
Father:
Samuel SEDGWICK

Mother:
Mary HOPKINS

Spouses:
Ann THOMPSON

Husband: William SEDGWICKE

Born:
1556
at:
England
Married:

at:

Died:

at:

Father:

Mother:

Spouses:

Wife:

CHILDREN

Name:
William SEDGWICK [NI0167]

Born:
ABT 1579
at:
Woburn, Bedfordshire, England
Married:
10 Apr 1604
at:
Woburn, Bedfordshire, England
Died:
Jul 1632
at:
Woburn, Bedfordshire, England
Spouses:
Elizabeth HOWE

CHILDREN

Name:
Bessie SEDGWICK

Born:
19 Sep 1859[2915]
at:
Sonora, Tuolumne, California
Married:
7 Aug 1890[9747]
at:
Oakland, Alameda, California
Died:

at:

Spouses:
Thomas T DARGIE

Name:
John SEDGWICK , Jr

Born:
1 Jul 1866[2917]
at:
Stockton, San Joaquin, California
Died:
10 Nov 1876[2918]
at:
San Francisco, San Francisco, California
Spouses:

Name:
Louise Browne SEDGWICK

Born:
25 Dec 1871[2920]
at:
Stockton, San Joaquin, California
Married:
15 Apr 1891[9748]
at:
Oakland, Alameda, California
Died:

at:

Spouses:
Frederick Augustus MERRITT

Name:
Flora Sharon SEDGWICK

Born:
3 Nov 1879[2922]
at:
San Francisco, San Francisco, California
Died:
5 Nov 1945[2923]
at:
San Francisco, San Francisco, California
Spouses:

Name:
Mary Alice SEDGWICK

Born:
4 Apr 1882[2926]
at:
San Francisco, San Francisco, California
Died:
Infant[2927]
at:

Spouses:

John Sedgwick (son of Charles Frederick Sedgwick and Betsey Swan) was born April 11, 1826 in Sharon, Litchfield, Connecticutt, and died September 22, 1908 in Oakland, Alameda, CA. He married Malvina Davis on October 28, 1858 in Shaws Flat, Tuolumne, CA, daughter of Caswell Davis and Sarah A Unknown.

More About John Sedgwick and Malvina Davis:
Marriage: October 28, 1858, Shaws Flat, Tuolumne, CA.

Children of John Sedgwick and Malvina Davis are:
i. Bessie Sedgwick, b. September 19, 1859, d. date unknown.
ii. John Sedgwick, Jr., b. July 01, 1866, Stockton, San Joaquin, CA, d. November 10, 1876, San Francisco, CA.
iii. +Louise Browne Sedgwick, b. December 25, 1871, Stockton, San Joaquin, CA, d. March 15, 1966, Santa Rosa, Sonoma, CA.
iv. Flora Sharon Sedgwick, b. November 03, 1879, San Francisco, CA, d. November 05, 1945, San Francisco, CA.
v. Mary Alice Sedgwick, b. April 04, 1882, d. Infant.

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA

In Memoriam

1899

49 Students in June Graduating Class

56 Students in December Graduating Class

http://ohsmemorial.com/OHS/1899Wall.htm

Flora Sedgwick
by Adele Cole
Many of us are blessed by special friends in our lives, persons who have led and inspired us. Flora Sedgwick comes readily to mind. My husband John and I met her in 1989 when she and Grant moved to Covenant Manor (now Covenant Village). From the start we shared a love of literature, laughter, and faith.
Flora taught at Minnehaha Academy in the 1960s, and had become more than a teacher in the lives of many of her students, forming bonds that lasted the rest of her life. Many of them attended the Memorial Service held in her honor this January, and it was very meaningful for me as they recounted fond memories of Flora’s impact on their lives. Several recalled the inspiration that seemed to be woven into her teaching, and without exception they remembered her love of Guy Fawkes Day, a festival celebrated with good humor as an appendage to the established curriculum.
In its Spring 2006 issue, The Arrow, published by Minnehaha Academy, contains a tribute to Flora, which appropriately closes with these lines: “All who knew her remember her as a faithful friend, a woman with a steady glisten of humor in her eye, a dedicated teacher, a loving mother and wife, and a good Christian who knew what it meant to be a steward who took care of the gifts and opportunities she had in her life.”
John and I cherished our friendship with Flora and Grant, and we especially remember having “walked through the valley” with them when their precious daughter Priscilla died. Then in 2001 Flora walked alone with us, following the death of Grant. She was resilient, and bore her grief while trusting in God’s love, and yet was not afraid to repeat with feeling “Lord, I believe; help thou my unbelief.”
Always the teacher, Flora helped start two book groups. One consisted of five couples who read poetry and short stories chosen by Flora for our study together. The second group was (and is) a melding of nine women from various careers who have met for 17 years. The 14 books Flora chose for our study were challenging, as was she. Examples include Pride and Prejudice, Crime and Punishment, Madame Bovary, and others in a list that has since grown to more than 140 books. Not too bad for an octogenarian group and, in a real way, it is a tribute to the “founder!”
Flora loved poetry, and one of her favorites was read beautifully by her daughter Sara during the Memorial Service. It is entitled “God’s Grandeur” by Gerard Manley Hopkins, and reads in part: “The world is charged with the grandeur of God… because the Holy Ghost over the bent world broods with warm breast and with…Ah! bright wings.” The voice was Sara’s, but the flawless delivery personified Flora. We thank God for sending us those “bright wings.”
Theodore Sedgwick

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For his grandson the law writer, see Theodore Sedgwick (writer).
Theodore Sedgwick

Portrait by Gilbert Stuart c1808 (Museum Fine Arts Boston)
5th Speaker of the United States House of Representatives
In office
December 2, 1799 – March 4, 1801
President
John Adams
Preceded by
Jonathan Dayton
Succeeded by
Nathaniel Macon
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts’s 1st, 2nd, 4th districts
In office
March 4, 1789 – June 1796
March 4, 1799 – March 4, 1801
United States Senator
from Massachusetts
In office
June 11, 1796 – March 4, 1799
Preceded by
Caleb Strong
Succeeded by
Samuel Dexter
President pro tempore of the United States Senate
In office
June 27, 1798 – December 5, 1798
President
John Adams
Preceded by
Jacob Read
Succeeded by
John Laurance
Personal details
Born
(1746-05-09)May 9, 1746
West Hartford, Connecticut
Died
January 24, 1813(1813-01-24) (aged 66)
Boston, Massachusetts
Political party
Federalist
Alma mater
Yale College
Profession
Law
Military service
Service/branch
Continental Army
Rank
Major
Battles/wars
American Revolutionary War
Theodore Sedgwick (May 9, 1746 – January 24, 1813) was an attorney, politician and jurist, who served in elected state government and as a Delegate to the Continental Congress, a US Representative, and a United States Senator from Massachusetts. He served as the fifth Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. He was appointed to the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court in 1802 and served there the rest of his life.

Contents
 [hide] 
1 Early life and education
2 Early career
3 Marriage and family
4 Political career
5 Freedom suit
6 References
7 External links
[edit] Early life and education
His father was Benjaman Sedgwick (1716-1755). His paternal immigrant ancestor Major General Robert Sedgwick arrived in 1636 in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, as part of the Great Migration.[1]
The younger Sedgwick attended Yale College, where he studied theology and law. He did not graduate, but went on to study law (“read law”) under the attorney Mark Hopkins of Great Barrington. (He was the grandfather of the Mark Hopkins who later became president of Williams College.)
[edit] Early career
Sedgwick was admitted to the bar in 1766 and commenced practice in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. He moved to Sheffield. During the American Revolutionary War, he served in the Continental Army as a major, and took part in the expedition to Canada and the Battle of White Plains in 1776.[2]
[edit] Marriage and family
After his first wife died, Sedgwick married a second time on April 17, 1774 to Pamela Dwight of the New England Dwight family. She was born June 9, 1752 and died September 20, 1807, and was the daughter of Brigadier General Joseph Dwight of Great Barrington and his second wife, the widow Abigail Williams Sargent. Abigail was the daughter of Colonel Ephraim Williams, and half-sister of Ephraim Williams, Jr. the founder of Williams College.[1]
The Sedgwicks had ten children, although three died within a year of birth, reflecting the high infant mortality of the time. They were:[1]
1. Elizabeth Mason Sedgwick, born April 30, 1775, married Thaddeus Pomeroy, and died October 15, 1827.
2. A child died at birth March 27, 1777.
3. Frances Pamela Sedgwick, born May 6, 1778, married Ebenezer Watson and died June 20, 1842.
4. Theodore Sedgwick II, born December 9, 1780, became a lawyer, and died 1839. He married Susan Anne Livingson (1788–1867). Their son Theodore Sedgwick (1811–1859) was a lawyer and author.
5. Catherine Sedgwick, born July 11, 1782 and died March 4, 1783.
6. Henry Dwight Sedgwick, born April 18, 1784 and died March 1, 1785.
7. Henry Dwight Sedgwick, born September 22, 1785, married Jane Minot (1795–1859) and died December 23, 1831. Their grandson was also a lawyer, Henry Dwight Sedgwick III (1861–1957).
8. Catharine Maria Sedgwick, born December 28, 1789, became one of the first noted female writers in the United States,[3] and died July 31, 1867.
9. Charles Sedgwick, born December 15, 1791, became clerk of Massachucetts Supreme Court, married Elizabeth Buckminster Dwight (1801–1864), and died August 3, 1856. Their grandson was the anatomist Charles Sedgwick Minot (1852–1914).

SEDGWICK.ORG
Sedgwick Genealogy North America

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North America: Robert Sedgwick (1613 – 1656)
Benjamin Sedgwick (1716 – 1757)

B
Benjamin Sedgwick  [Samuel Sedgwick / Mary Hopkins]
b. November 7, 1716, West Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut1,2,3,4
d. February 07, 1757, Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut
bu Cornwall Hollow, Litchfield, Connecticut, old cemetery
m. bef 1739, Ann Thompson
Ann Thompson  [John Thompson / Sarah Culver]
b. Abt. 1719, Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut
d. June 03, 1793, [Cornwall Hollow, Litchfield, Connecticut]
bu Cornwall Hollow, Litchfield, Connecticut, new lower burying ground
m1 bef 1739, Benjamin Sedgwick
m2 August 8, 1764, Timothy Judd, Esq.
Census records: Son John appears:
1790 CT Litchfield, Cornwall
Born in West Hartford, Connecticut, the youngest of eleven children of Samuel Sedwgick and Mary Hopkins, Benjamin moved his family “out west” to Cornwall Hollow, Connecticut.
Here is Hubert Merrill Sedgwick’s article about Benjamin Sedgwick.
Children:
Sarah Sedgwick (B1)
  b. abt March 25, 1739, West Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut
  d. August 18, 1766, Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut
  m. November 23, 1758, Hezekiah Gold, Jr
John Sedgwick (B2)
  b. abt March 07, 1741/42
  d. August 28, 1820, Cornwall Hollow, Litchfield, Connecticut
  bu Cornwall Hollow, Litchfield, Connecticut, new lower burying ground
  m1 February 03, 1763, Abigail Andrews
  m2 aft April 26, 1811, Mrs Sarah Lewis
Benjamin Sedgwick, Jr (B3)
  b. abt March 11, 1743/44, West Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut
  d. June 16, 1778, Canaan, Litchfield, Connecticut
  bu Canaan, Litchfield, Connecticut
  m. Mary Tuttle
Theodore Sedgwick (B4)
  b. abt May 09, 1746, Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut
  d. January 24, 1813, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts
  bu Stockbridge, Berkshire, Massachusetts
  m1 bef 1773, Eliza Mason
  m2 April 17, 1774, Pamela Dwight
  m3 November 07, 1808, Penelope Russell
Mary Ann Sedgwick (B5)
  b. July 27, 1749, Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut
  d. February 06, 1826, Addison, Addison, Vermont
  m. November 06, 1769, Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut, Job Swift
Lorain Sedgwick (B6)
  b. 1755, [Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut]
  d. April 09, 1823, Broome County, New York
  bu Whitney Point, Broome County, New York
  m. bef 1773, Jacob Parsons

Sources:
Assume All items 1 and/or 2 unless noted.
1. The Sedgwick Collection (MSS B46) at the New Haven Colony Historical Society papers of Hubert Merrill Sedgwick, Francis Morris Sedgwick and Frederick J Sedgwick,
genealogists of the family of Robert Sedgwick (1613 – 1656)
2. A Sedgwick Genealogy: Descendants of Deacon Benjamin Sedgwick
book compiled by Hubert Merrill Sedgwick (1867 – 1950)
published posthumously in 1961 by The New Haven Colony Historical Society
3. West Hartford, Connecticut, Town Records
4. West Hartford, Connecticut, Congregational Church

http://www.sedgwick.org/na/families/robert1613/B/4/B4-sedgwick-theodore.html

SEDGWICK.ORG
Sedgwick Genealogy North America

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North America: Robert Sedgwick (1613 to 1656)
Theodore Sedgwick (1746 – 1813)

B4
Theodore Sedgwick  [Benjamin Sedgwick / Ann Thompson]
b. bef May 9, 1746, Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut
bp May 9, 1746, Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut
d. January 24, 1813, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts
bu Stockbridge, Berkshire, Massachusetts, Stockbridge Cemetery
m1 bef 1773, Eliza Mason
m2 April 17, 1774, Pamela Dwight
m3 November 7, 1808, Penelope Russell

Elizabeth Mason  [Jeremiah Mason / Nancy Clark]
b. August 27, 1844
d. bef 1774
Pamela Dwight  [Joseph Dwight / Abigail (Williams) Sargeant]
b. June 26, 1753
d. September 20, 1807
bu Stockbridge, Berkshire, Massachusetts, Stockbridge Cemetery
Penelope Russell  [Charles Russell / Elizabeth (Vassal)]
b. March 17, 1769
d. May 18, 1827, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts
bu Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, under King’s Chapel
 

Pamela Dwight
Census records:
1790 MA Berkshire, Stockbridge
1800 MA Berkshire, Stockbridge
1810 MA Berkshire, Stockbridge
Theodore SEDGWICK, a descendant of Major General Robert Sedgwick, was a delegate to the convention that ratified the U.S. Constitution. He served in the Continental Congress, then six years in the U.S. House of Representatives, three years in the U.S. Senate (one year as President pro tem) then three more years in the House of Representatives as Speaker of the House (1799-1801.) The house he built at Stockbridge, MA is still owned by the Sedgwick family, and the location of the famous “Sedgwick Pie” cemetery plot.
Here is Hubert Merrill Sedgwick’s article about Theodore Sedgwick.
John Shaw Sedgwick, a descendant of Theodore, has written a book delving deeply into the character of Theodore and some of his other ancestors:
In My Blood: Six Generations of Madness & Desire in an American Family
available at Amazon.com
Children of Theodore Sedgwick and Pamela Dwight:
Elizabeth Mason Sedgwick (B41)
  b. 30 Apr 1775
  d.15 Oct 1827
  m. 23 Oct 1797, Thaddeus Pomeroy
Child Sedgwick (B42)
  b. 27 Mar 1777
  d. 27 Mar 1777
Frances Pamela Sedgwick (B43)
  b. 6 May 1778
  d. 20 Jun 1842, Stockbridge, Berkshire, Massachusetts
  m. 9 Apr 1801, Ebenezer Watson
Theodore Sedgwick II (B44)
  b. 9 Dec 1780, Sheffield, Berkshire, Massachusetts
  d. 7 Nov 1839, Sheffield, Berkshire, Massachusetts
  m. 28 Nov 1808, Susan Anne Livingston Ridley
Catherine Sedgwick (B45)
  b. 11 Jul 1782
  d. 4 Mar 1783
Henry Dwight Sedgwick (B46)
  b. 18 Apr 1784
  d. 1 Mar 1785
Henry Dwight Sedgwick (B47)
  b. 22 Sep 1785, Stockbridge, Berkshire, Massachusetts
  d. 23 Dec 1831, Stockbridge, Berkshire, Massachusetts
  m. 2 Jun 1817, Jane Minot
Robert Sedgwick (B48)
  b. 6 Jun 1787, Stockbridge, Berkshire, Massachusetts
  d. 2 Sep 1841, Sachems Head Connecticut
  m. 21 Aug 1822, Elizabeth Dana Ellery
Catharine Maria Sedgwick (B49)
  b. 28 Dec 1789, Stockbridge, Berkshire, Massachusetts
  d. 31 Jul 1867, West Roxbury, Suffolk, Massachusetts
Charles Sedgwick (B4A)
  b. 15 Dec 1791, Stockbridge, Berkshire, Massachusetts
  d. 3 Aug 1856, Lenox, Berkshire, Massachusetts
  m. 30 Sep 1819, Elizabeth Buckminster Dwight

This coat-of-arms is one commonly used by Sedgwicks. One Sedgwick who apparently used it was William Sedgwicke, father of General Robert Sedgwick who emmigrated to Charlestown, Massachusetts about 1635.
The shield is “Or, on a cross gu. five bells of the field.” The crest is “A Lion Passant through sedge on cap of maintenance.”
The lion is red, the sedge green, the crown of the cap is red and the ermine trim white. The shield is gold with a red cross. The five bells are gold.
The motto is “Confido in Domino” which is Latin and means “Trust in God.”
Sources:
The General Armory Burke’s Peerage, Limited :
SEDGEWICK (Co. Lancaster) : “Or. on a cross gu. five bells of the field”
SEDGEWICKE (Wisbeach, Isle of Ely) : “Ar. on a cross gu., five bells of the first”
(or. = gold, argent = silver, gules = red)
Heraldic Journal :
The arms of the widow of John Leverett :
1st argent , a chevron between three leverets, sable, impaling, 2nd, gold on a cross gules, five bells argent.
The arms impaled are certainly those of Sedgwick, Leverett married Sarah Sedgwick.
Sarah Sedgwick the daughter of General Robert Sedgwick.
Sedgwick.org note: Sarah Sedgwick who married John Leverett was a sister of Robert Sedgwick

This variation of the above coat (or is the above a variation of this?) was sent to me by an art historian. She found it as a bookplate glued inside each book of a ten volume set of the works of Shakespeare published in 1767.
Apparently John Sedgwick of Nottingham, born 1751 owned the set. Apparently this is the coat-of-arms he or his ancestors used. I found it interesting in that it does not have the lion and cap of the above. Is that grass (sedge) or rye? (See below)

In a recent archeological excavation a wine bottle was found with a seal which features another variation of the above coat-of-arms

I found in a book (I can’t find the copy of the title page) this image with the description: “Sedgewick, or Sedgewicke, two ears of rye, in saltier, or.”

This is another Sedgwick arms. Mark A Sedgwick, webmaster of SedgwickResearch.com found this description in a book that claimed to quote Burke’s General Armory:
    “Sa. An inescutcheon ar. an orle of martlets of the last.”
When translated the blazon also describes the original colors of the Sedgiwck arms as:
    “Black; a small silver shield; an inner border of silver martlets.”
above the shield and helmet is the crest which is described as:
    “Two gold ears of rye crossing diagonally.”
The first photo is more true to color, the second is color enhanced to better show the detail.
Note the crest is exactly the rye crest above, “two ears of rye, in saltier.”
photo courtesy of Leslie Wilson

Thomas Alexander Fermor-Hesketh, 3rd Baron Hesketh, KBE, PC (born 28 October 1950), is a British UK Independence Party politician. In 2006, he sold the family seat Easton Neston, at Towcester, Northamptonshire, the only surviving complete house by the English baroque architect, Nicholas Hawksmoor, together with the estate, the furnishings of the house and family portraits.

Contents
 [hide] 
1 Early life
2 Family
3 Political career
4 Business
5 Honours
6 See also
7 References
8 External links
[edit] Early life
Hesketh succeeded in the barony on 6 October 1955, aged four, when his father, Frederick Fermor-Hesketh, 2nd Baron Hesketh, died at age 39.[1]
He was educated at Ampleforth College, Yorkshire, England.[2] He went on to work for Dean Witter Inc in San Francisco before returning to manage his family’s businesses.[3]
[edit] Family
He married Hon. Claire Georgina Watson, daughter of Joseph Rupert Eric Robert Watson, 3rd Baron Manton and Mary Elizabeth Hallinan, on 21 May 1977 and has three children, Hon. Flora Mary Fermor-Hesketh (born 1981), Hon. Sophia Christian Fermor-Hesketh (born 1984) and the Hon. Frederick Hatton Fermor-Hesketh (born 13 October 1988).[2] The children use the surname Hesketh day-to-day.
[edit] Political career
Hesketh automatically became a member of the House of Lords but took no active part in politics until he met Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher after the Irish Republican Army’s bomb attack on her in Brighton on 12 October 1984. Thatcher visited Easton Neston and in conversation, Hesketh explained that he did not occupy his seat in the House of Lords. He later explained, “Mrs. Thatcher asked me if I served on a regular basis in the House, and when I told her no, she said, ‘You must. It’s your duty, and I expect you to be there.'”[1] From that point Hesketh worked under Thatcher, whom he described as “the most outstanding person I ever worked with”[4] and held the office of Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment between 1989 and 1990 and was Minister of State in the Department of Trade and Industry between 1990 and 1991. On 22 May of that year, he became Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen at Arms (Government Chief Whip in the House of Lords) under the next Prime Minister John Major, a position he kept until the 16 September 1993.[2] During his period in office as Chief Whip he helped secure the Local Government Finance Act 1992, which introduced council taxes, and the European Communities (Amendment) Act 1993,[5] which ratified the Maastricht Treaty. In 2003, he became Treasurer of the Conservative Party, resigning in 2006 due to his own financial difficulties, and was formerly a board member of The Conservative Party Foundation.[3] On 10 October 2011, Lord Hesketh defected to the UK Independence Party, in response to Prime Minister David Cameron ruling out a referendum on Britain’s membership of the European Union.[6]

Spiffing time: Sophia Hesketh, Alice Rothschild and Laura Lopes at Ben and Mary-Clare’s wedding

It is alleged the first girl Prince Harry Windsor kissed, was Sophia Hesketh. Sophia appears to have dated Freddy Windsor. Sophia’s sister, Flora, is also a British Socialite. These sisters are my distant kin, related to the Witherspoons. I lived with Dottie Witherspoon. Being facebook friends of William and Harry, I suggested Will invite Reese Withersppon to his wedding in order to extend hands across the water. To the Hesketh sisters acknowlege their American roots?

THE HON. SOPHIE HESKETH
As the first girl Harry is rumoured to have ever kissed, flaxen-haired Sophia, 26, will no doubt always hold a place in the Prince’s heart. They were last seen dancing together at a charity ball in 2007, despite the fact that Chelsy was also there.

Lord Hesketh married Florence Louise Breckinridge, of Kentucky, daughter of John Witherspoon Breckinridge, and granddaughter of General John C Breckinridge, Vice-President of the United States, in 1909. They had three sons and two daughters (Flora and Louise[1]). Their eldest son Lieutenant the Hon. Thomas Sharon Fermor-Hesketh was killed in an aeroplane accident in France in 1937. Lord Hesketh died in July 1944, aged 62, and was succeeded in his titles by his second son Frederick. His third son John married Patricia Macaskie Cole in 1946[1]. His grandson Alexander Fermor-Hesketh, 3rd Baron Hesketh, is a former Conservative government minister. Florence, the Dowager Lady Hesketh died 1956.

Ephriam McDowell was descended from Somerled (or Somervil), Lord of the Isles, then from his son Dougall who founded the Clan of Dougall or MacDougal, one of the eldest of the fifty-two Highland Clans proper. In the coat of arms of the McDougals or McDowells ins quartered the lymphiad or ancient four-eared galley found in the armorial bearings of the clans of the western part of Scotland.

Ephraim’s father (Abraham McDowal [1648]) left Scotland with his father, Joseph “the Calvinist” and with his family during the period of the English Civil Wars (abt. 1650). The name Mc Dowell is a modification of the Gaelic: Mac Dhu ghall, or MacDougal, meaning son or descendant of the dark stranger or Dane. The name was given over ten centuries ago to Norse settlers in Galloway, Scotland and the descendants of a son of Prince Fergus and Princess Elizabeth de Galloway, daughter of King Henry I of England.

They soon drew around them other Scotch and Scotch-Irish families: McClungs, McElroys, McCampbells, McKees, Paxtons, Caruthers, Cowans, Campbells, Lyles, Irvins, Caldwells, Colquhouns, Stuarts—names which have since illuminated every page of Southern and Western history. In the field, in the pulpit, at the bar, in the senate, by their eloquence, learning, courage and patriotism, everywhere they have been conspicuous and have helped to build up and render famous the country with whose history and growth their illustrious names are identified.

Ephraim McDowell lived in Augusta County until his death, having accumulated an estate which was regarded as very large in those days. He was esteemed by all for his intelligence, usefulness and probity, wielding a singular and beneficent influence among the intrepid and independent spirits by whom he was surrounded, and retaining the possession of all his faculties to the last. He is buried in an enclosed cemetery between Lexington and Staunton, Virginia. The children of Governor James McDowell, together with the children of his sisters, Mrs. Taylor and Nrs. Benton, erected there a monument to their grandfather Colonel James McDowell. Ephraim McDowell’s name appears upon the monument, as will be seen in the following copy of the inscriptions upon said monument which is cut out of the dark marble common in Rockbridge County.

North Face.
Near this spot repose the remains of Ephraim McDowell, the first of his name in America, who died about 1780; John McDowell, his son, who was killed by the Indians in 1742; (December 25th) James McDowell, his son, born 1739, died 1772, and Elizabeth his wife, who died about 1810; and also their daughter Elizabeth McGavock, who died 1803.

East Face.
James McDowell was born August, 1770 and died September, 1838. Distinguished by native talent of high order, a gallant and fearless spirit, a noble sense of justice, a lofty courage and an invincible power of will, he lived honorably and usefully, discharging with singular ability and fidelity, the trusts, civil and military, committed to him, and died universally regretted. His remains repose here with those of his ancestors for three generations.

West Face.
Sarah McDowell, daughter of Col. William Preston, and wife of James McDowell, was born May 23, 1768, and died July 3rd, 1841. Born in the stormy period of our national history, her character, moulded by the spirit and developed by the struggle of the times, was eminently truthful, patriotic and elevated; Yet to those traits she added the gentler qualities of the tender and devoted woman and the sincere christian.

South Face.
To commemorate the virtues, to perpetuate the memory; to record the truth, honor, patriotism and public and social fidelity that impressed the generations to which they belonged and enabled them to transmit an honored name to their descendants; and also to testify the gratitude and reverence of their family,

This Monument
is erected to their grandparents, James and Sarah McDowell, by the surviving children of Susan P. Taylor, Elizabeth Benton, and James McDowell, in the year 1855.

– From “Genealogy of the Greenlee Families in America, Scotland, Ireland and England” (pp 616-619)

Ephralm McDowell > 1
Margaret Irvine /

daughter of James McDowell and Sarah Preston, married COLONEL THOMAS
HART BENTON U. S. senator from Jlissouri for thirty years, an earnest
patriot and a man of unflinching courage.

CHILDREN:

I. Eliza P. Benton; married William Carey Jones, a lawyer of New
Orleans. Children: Betty, Benton and Carey Jones.

II. Jessie Benton; married Major-General John C. Fremont the Pathfinder,

first Republican candidate for the presidency. Children: Lilly,
Charles (in U. S. navy), and Frank Paxton Fremont.

638 GREENLEE GENEALOGY.

HL Sarah Benton ; married Richard Taylor Jacob, a member of the Legis-
lature, Lieut.-Governor of Kentucky, and Colonel of the U. S. Vol.
Children: Leila Jacob, who married a relative, D. V. Woolley of
Lexington, Virginia ; Richard Jacob, Lieutenant in U. S. army.

rV. Randolph Benton ; died unmarried.

V. McDowell Benton ; died in childhood.

VL Susan V. Benton ; married Baron Goldrei Boillean of the French Diplo-
matic Service at the time of marriage, ^linister of France to Pern,
1870. Children: Elizabeth (dead), Benton, Charles (dead), Desiree,
Claude (dead), Augusta (dead), and Mary Boillean.

30.

Florence Emily Sharon1
F, #152842, b. 1858, d. 25 September 1924
Florence Emily Sharon|b. 1858\nd. 25 Sep 1924|p15285.htm#i152842|Hon. William Sharon|b. 9 Jan 1821\nd. 13 Nov 1885|p15285.htm#i152843|Maria Malloy|b. c 1833\nd. 20 May 1875|p15310.htm#i153096|William Sharon||p15315.htm#i153145|Susannah Kirk||p15315.htm#i153146|||||||

Last Edited=21 Aug 2005
     Florence Emily Sharon was born in 1858 at San Francisco, California, U.S.A..2 She was the daughter of Hon. William Sharon and Maria Malloy.1,2 She married Sir Thomas George Fermor-Hesketh, 7th Bt., son of Sir Thomas George Fermor-Hesketh, 5th Bt. and Lady Anna Maria Isabella Fermor, on 22 December 1880 at Belmont, San Francisco, California, U.S.A..3 She died on 25 September 1924 at London, England.1,2
      From 22 December 1880, her married name became Fermor-Hesketh.1
Children of Florence Emily Sharon and Sir Thomas George Fermor-Hesketh, 7th Bt.
Thomas Fermor-Hesketh, 1st Baron Hesketh+1 b. 17 Nov 1881, d. 20 Jul 1944
Lieutenant Frederick Fermor-Hesketh4 b. 24 Sep 1883, d. a 29 Oct 1910
Citations
1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XIII, page 546. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
2. [S1384] James Cecil, Baron Revelstoke Baring, “re: Baring Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Lundy, 18 June 2005 and 9 August 2005. Hereinafter cited as “re: Baring Family.”
3. [S15] George Edward Cokayne, editor, The Complete Baronetage, 5 volumes (no date (c. 1900); reprint, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 1983), volume V, page 122. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Baronetage.
4. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1894. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
Hon. William Sharon1
M, #152843, b. 9 January 1821, d. 13 November 1885
Hon. William Sharon|b. 9 Jan 1821\nd. 13 Nov 1885|p15285.htm#i152843|William Sharon||p15315.htm#i153145|Susannah Kirk||p15315.htm#i153146|||||||||||||

Last Edited=16 Feb 2009
     Hon. William Sharon was born on 9 January 1821.2 He was the son of William Sharon and Susannah Kirk.2 He married Maria Malloy. He died on 13 November 1885 at age 64.2
     He held the office of Senator [U.S.] between 1875 and 1882, from Nevada.1,2
Children of Hon. William Sharon and Maria Malloy
Florence Emily Sharon+1 b. 1858, d. 25 Sep 1924
Frederick William Sharon+2 b. 1862, d. 15 Jul 1914
Citations
1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XIII, page 546. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
2. [S1425] Gloria Hursey, “re: Breckinridge Family,” e-mail message to James Baring, 15 August 2005. Hereinafter cited as “re: Breckinridge Family.”
Florence Louise Breckinridge1
F, #152844, b. November 1881, d. 4 March 1956
Florence Louise Breckinridge|b. Nov 1881\nd. 4 Mar 1956|p15285.htm#i152844|John Witherspoon Breckinridge|b. 22 Dec 1850\nd. 9 May 1892|p15285.htm#i152845|Florence Louise Tevis|b. 12 Oct 1858\nd. 19 Dec 1938|p15285.htm#i152846|General John C. Breckinridge|b. 16 Jan 1821\nd. 17 May 1875|p15287.htm#i152867|Mary C. Burch|b. 16 Aug 1826\nd. 8 Oct 1907|p15312.htm#i153115|Lloyd Tevis|b. 20 Mar 1824\nd. 24 Jul 1899|p15285.htm#i152847|Susan G. Sanders|b. 9 Feb 1831\nd. 29 Apr 1902|p15312.htm#i153112|

Last Edited=11 Mar 2012
     Florence Louise Breckinridge was born in November 1881 at California, U.S.A..2 She was the daughter of John Witherspoon Breckinridge and Florence Louise Tevis.1 She married Thomas Fermor-Hesketh, 1st Baron Hesketh, son of Sir Thomas George Fermor-Hesketh, 7th Bt. and Florence Emily Sharon, on 9 September 1909 at British Embassy Church, Paris, France.1 She died on 4 March 1956 at age 74 at Easton Neston, Towcester, Northamptonshire, England.3,4 She was buried at St. Mary’s Church, Easton Neston, Northamptonshire, England.4
      From 9 September 1909, her married name became Fermor-Hesketh.1 As a result of her marriage, Florence Louise Breckinridge was styled as Baroness Hesketh on 25 January 1935.
Children of Florence Louise Breckinridge and Thomas Fermor-Hesketh, 1st Baron Hesketh
Lt. Hon. Thomas Sharon Fermor-Hesketh1 b. 7 Sep 1910, d. 21 Jun 1937
Hon. Louise Fermor-Hesketh+5 b. 15 Dec 1911, d. 1994
Hon. Flora Breckinridge Fermor-Hesketh+1 b. 23 Feb 1913, d. 15 Sep 1970
Major Frederick Fermor-Hesketh, 2nd Baron Hesketh+1 b. 8 Apr 1916, d. 10 Jun 1955
Major Hon. John Breckinridge Fermor-Hesketh5 b. 7 Mar 1917, d. 8 Nov 1961

Ann Witherspoon1
F, #153140, b. before 1771
Ann Witherspoon|b. b 1771|p15314.htm#i153140|John Witherspoon||p21347.htm#i213464||||||||||||||||

Last Edited=27 Aug 2005
     Ann Witherspoon was born before 1771. She was the daughter of John Witherspoon.1 She married Reverend Samuel Stanhope Smith.
      Her married name became Smith.1
Child of Ann Witherspoon and Reverend Samuel Stanhope Smith
Anne Witherspoon was the oldest child of John the Signer. She did marry Samuel Stanhope Smith, who did become his father-in-law’s successor at Princeton.

Anne Witherspoon was the oldest child of John the Signer. She did marry Samuel Stanhope Smith, who did become his father-in-law’s successor at Princeton.
http://www.spencermarks.com/html/sharon.html

http://home.comcast.net/~davidmartin/ppl/a/b/abc80ae0c8a698883d5.html

McDowell was born in Columbus, Ohio, son of Abram Irvin McDowell and Eliza Seldon McDowell.[2] He was a cousin-in-law of John Buford,[3] and his brother, John Adair McDowell, served as the first colonel of the 6th Iowa Volunteer Infantry Regiment during the Civil War.[2]

In July 1864, McDowell was given command of the Department of the Pacific. He later commanded the Department of California, the Fourth Military District (the military government for Arkansas and Louisiana during Reconstruction), and the Department of the West. He was promoted to permanent major general in the regular army in 1872.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to Awakening America’s Royal Muse

  1. Reblogged this on rosamondpress and commented:

    On June 18, 2015 at Skinner’s Butte Park, we met, my ‘Last Muse’ Trinity Rose James’.

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