48ers Battle Traitors and Royal Houses of Europe

William Preston was appointed Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary from the Confederacy to Maximilian, Emperor of Mexico in 1864. Maximilian and his wife, Carlota, held many titles and were kin to much European Royalty. They inherited many crowns via royal genealogies. Consider ‘The Beast’ in Revelations. Did the Mormons baptize this royal dead couple – and their legion of royal ancestors?

Carlota was first cousin to both Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom and her husband, Prince Albert, as well as Ferdinand II of Portugal. She belonged to the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha which changed their name to Windsor during the WW1 due to anti-German fervor. In the novel ‘Kentucky’s Last Cavalier’ one can read how William Preston tempted the Habsburg Emperor and his Empress with many of OUR FREEDOMS if they come to the military and monetary aid of the Confederate Traitors. This is to say, the Red States of the South wanted ‘The Beast’ to come across the Mexican border into the Land of Free and kill American citizens. Many Red State Tea Party Patriots, whose kindred fought for Traitors, accuse our President of being in league with The Beast – after they claim he is a foreigner.

I have asked so called ‘Christians’ if Jesus founded our democracy, and if so, why didn’t he want to free the slaves – like the Mormons?
Now I ask – Did Jesus fight for our democracy? If so, whose side was he on in the Civil War? Was he on the side of the Confederacy and many royal houses of Europe? Almost every king and queen in Europe believed Jesus was on their side – especially when the peasents rose up in arms.

If Jesus and the Holy Spirit had a hand in the founding of this Democracy, then the Confederate Traitors and their foreign backers – are of Satan. Did John and Jessie Fremont believe this was the case, and thus they did battle with ‘The Beast’?

Jesus, and not God, is tempted by Satan in the wilderness by the offer of many crowns and many fine cities to rule over. He turns Satan down saying he already has a sovereign – God! Many evangelicals say Jesus is God. Satan knows God will never worship him, and already is the Lord of Jerusalem and Judea. So, Satan did not tempt God. It is lie when many Christians claim they are doing God’s work.

“Again, the devil took Him to a very high mountain and showed him all the kingdoms of the world and their splendor. ”All this I will give you,” he said, “if you will bow down and worship me.” Jesus said to him, “Away from me, Satan! For it is written, ‘Worship the Lord your God and serve him only.’”

Then the devil left him, and angels came and attended him.

After the Red State Traitors were crushed, ‘The Beast’ that ruled Mexico offered Confederate Murderers sanctuary across the border in a colony named after the cousin of Queen Victoria. Many were tempted, and many took up the offer.

“Maximilian invited ex-Confederates to move to Mexico in a series of settlements called the “Carlota Colony” and the New Virginia Colony with a dozen others being considered, a plan conceived by the internationally renowned U.S. Navy oceanographer and inventor Matthew Fontaine Maury. Maximilian also invited settlers from “any country” including Austria and the other German states.

My kindred, Jessie Benton, and her scouts, made forays into Mexico and brought arms to the anti-Emperor anti-Confederate forces. Her scouts were made up of Forty-Eighters, foreigners who fought against the Hapsburg Empire in Europe, and lost. My kindred were Forty-Eighters who fled to Chile and then came to San Francisco. Fremont’s Republican Party was made up of commoners who fought against the imperial houses of Europe that appear to have put their foot in the American door, and were poised to burst in when the Confederacy siezed the day, and their runaway slaves. My kindred, stood in the way of ‘The Beast’ and were victorious.

“In 1848, revolutions erupted across Europe. In face of protests and riots, Emperor Ferdinand I abdicated in favor of Maximilian’s brother, who became Franz Joseph I.[18][19] Maximilian accompanied him on campaigns to put down rebellions throughout the Empire.[20][19] Only in 1849 would the revolution be stamped out in Austria, with hundreds of rebels executed and thousands imprisoned. Maximilian was horrified at what he regarded as senseless brutality and openly complained about it. He would later remark: “We call our age the Age of Enlightenment, but there are cities in Europe where, in the future, men will look back in horror and amazement at the injustice of tribunals, which in a spirit of vengeance condemned to death those whose only crime lay in wanting something different to the arbitrary rule of governments which placed themselves above the law.”[21][22]

President James Buchanan appointed William Preston as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Spain in 1858. He resigned as ambassador in 1861 at the outbreak of the Civil War.

Although his home state of Kentucky did not secede from the Union, Preston followed his former brother-in-law and served in the Confederate Army, attaining the rank of brigadier general in 1862. He was appointed Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary from the Confederacy to Maximilian, Emperor of Mexico in 1864.
After the war, he again served as a member of the Kentucky State house of Representatives in 1868 and 1869.
William Preston died in Louisville and was interred in Cave Hill Cemetery in Louisville.

As the Confederacy collapsed, U.S. leaders were able to shift resources to resisting French intervention in Mexico and to deploy troops along the Texas-Mexico border. U.S. pressure, combined with Mexican resentment and military success against Emperor Maximilian ultimately compelled French Emperor Napoleon III to end his imperial venture in Mexico.

Breckinridge feared that he would be put on trial for treason by the United States government. He fled to Florida, May 15, 1865,[6] and resolved to flee the country. He and a small band sailed from Florida in a tiny boat to reach safety in Cuba, June 11, 1865.[6] On June 17, 1865, he continued to the United Kingdom,[6] Canada, and the United Kingdom again on August 21, 1865.[6] He returned to Lexington, Kentucky, on March 9, 1869[6] after being granted amnesty, and resumed the practice of law. While turning down suggestions that he become active in politics again, he spoke out strongly against the Ku Klux Klan

Breckinridge family

The Breckinridge family is a family of public figures from the United States. The family has included six members of the United States House of Representatives, two United States Senators, a cabinet member, two Ambassadors, a Vice President of United States and an unsuccessful Presidential candidate. Breckinridges have served as college presidents, prominent ministers, soldiers, theologians and in important positions at state and local levels. The family was most notable in the State of Kentucky and most prominent during the 19th century, during nearly one-third of which a member of the family served in the Congress of the United States. Below is a list of members.

Alexander Breckenridge (1686–1743), First Breckenridge in New World, emigrated to Philadelphia PA c. 1728. Married to Jane Preston in 1695 in County Londonderry, Ireland. She was sister of Robert Preston, first Speaker of Kentucky State House of Representatives .
Robert Breckenridge, Sr. (1720–1773), here termed Colonel Robert Breckenridge, Captain in Virginia militia during the French and Indian War and officer in the Revolutionary Army.[dubious – discuss] Son of Alexander Breckenridge I. Married first Sarah Poage. After his first wife’s death Breckenridge married second, his first cousin Letitia Preston.[1]
Alexander Breckenridge, son of Robert Breckenridge and Sarah Poage, here termed Captain Alexander Breckenridge. Married wealthy widow Jane Buchanan Floyd whose son John Floyd was Governor of Virginia.[1]
James Douglas Breckinridge, son of Captain Alexander Breckenridge (d. 1849), member of Kentucky House of Representatives (1809–11) and the U.S. House of Representatives (1821–23).[1]
Robert Breckenridge (1754–1833), son of Col. Robert Breckenridge and Sarah Poage, Revolutionary War General. Ratifier of the U.S. Constitution. Kentucky State Representative 1792–1795. Speaker of the Kentucky House of Representatives. Brother of Captain Alexander Breckenridge; half-brother of John Breckinridge and James Breckinridge. Robert Breckenridge never married. Nota Bene: During his lifetime Colonel Robert Breckenridge spelled his surname as shown here, as did his father Alexander Breckenridge I. His sons by Leticia Preston, (i.e. James and John) began spelling the family name ‘Breckinridge’.[2]
James Breckinridge (1763–1833), Virginia House Delegate 1789–1802 1806–1808 1819–1821 1823–1824, member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Virginia 1809–1817. Brother of John Breckinridge, Son of Robert Breckinridge and Letitia Preston.[3]
John Breckinridge (1760–1806), Member of House of Burgesses, U.S. District Attorney of Kentucky 1793–1794, Attorney General of Kentucky 1793–1797, Kentucky State Representative 1788–1790 1799–1801, delegate to the Kentucky Constitutional Convention 1799, U.S. Senator from Kentucky 1801–1805, Attorney General of the United States under Jefferson 1805–1806. Married Mary Hopkins Cabell in 1785. Half-brother of Alexander and Robert Breckenridge, brother of James Breckinridge, Son of Colonel Robert Breckinridge and Letitia Preston.[4]
Letitia Breckinridge, Daughter of John Breckinridge. Married first to Alfred William Grayson in 1804. Graduate of Cambridge University, lawyer, son of Senator William Grayson of Virginia. Died in 1810. Married second to Peter B. Porter (1773–1844), New York Assemblyman 1802 and 1828, U.S. Representative from New York 1809–1813 and 1815–1816, New York Secretary of State 1815–1816, U.S. Secretary of War 1828–1829.[5]
General John Breckinridge Grayson (1806–1862) Born at Cabell’s Dale, Fayette County, Kentucky. Son of Letitia Preston Breckinridge and Alfred William Grayson. Graduated West Point Military Academy, 1826. Lieutenant Colonel U.S. Army at outbreak of Civil War, resigned in 1861, enterest C.S.A. and commissioned Brigadier General. Died while in command of the coastal defenses of Georgia and Florida, in Tallahassee 1862.[6]
Colonel Peter A. Porter (1827–1864), New York Assemblyman 1861–62, Colonel of the 129th New York State Volunteers, killed in action, 1864, Only son of Peter Buell Porter. Married cousin Mary Cabell Breckinridge in 1852.
Peter A. Porter (1853–1925), member of the New York Legislature, U.S. Representative from New York 1907–1909. Son of Peter Augustus Porter and Mary Cabell Breckinridge, Grandson of Peter Buell Porter.[7]
Joseph Cabell Breckinridge I (1788–1823), Major in War of 1812. Kentucky State Representative 1817–1818, Speaker of the Kentucky House of Representatives. Kentucky Secretary of State 1820–1823. Married Mary Clay Smith, daughter of Samuel Stanhope Smith, President of Princeton University. Son of John Breckinridge.[8]
John Cabell Breckinridge (1821–1875) Member Kentucky House of Representatives 1849–51. U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1851–55. Delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1856. Vice President of the United States 1857–61. Candidate for President of the United States 1860. United States Senator from Kentucky 1861. Confederate States Secretary of War 1865. Son of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge I.[9]
Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, II (1844–1906) Major in the C.S.A. Married Sallie Frances Johnson, daughter of Robert Ward Johnson in 1869. Son of Hon. John Cabell Breckinridge.[10]
John Cabell Breckinridge, II (1870–1941) Prominent New York attorney. Married to Isabella Goodrich (1874–1961), daughter of B.F. Goodrich. Son of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge. Grandson of John Cabell Breckinridge.[11]
Mary Marvin Breckinridge (1905–2002), Photojournalist, cinematographer, and philanthropist. Daughter of John Cabell Breckinridge, II and Isabella Goodrich. Great-granddaughter or John Cabell Breckinridge and granddaughter of B.F. Goodrich.
Clifton Rhodes Breckinridge (1846–1932), U.S. Representative from Arkansas 1883–1889 1890–1895, U.S. Minister to Russia 1894–1897, delegate to the Arkansas Constitutional Convention 1917. Married Katherine Breckinridge Carson in 1876. Son of Hon. John Cabell Breckinridge.[12]
James Carson Breckinridge (1877–1942) Lieutenant General, U.S.M.C., Married Dorothy Throckmorton Thompson, 1922. Son of Clifton Rhodes Breckinridge.[13]
Mary Breckinridge (1881–1965), Founder of the Frontier Nursing Service. Married Richard Thompson. Daughter of Clifton Rhodes Breckinridge, sister of James Carson Breckinridge.
John Witherspoon Owen Breckinridge (1850–1892) Member of California State Assembly 1884–85. Son of Hon. John Cabell Breckinridge. Married to Louise Tevis, daughter of Lloyd Tevis, First President of Wells Fargo Bank.[14]
John Cabell Breckinridge, Sr. (1879–1914) Prominent San Francisco businessman. Son of John Witherspoon Owen Breckinridge. Married Adelaide Murphy, daughter of Samuel Green Murphy, President of the First National Bank of San Francisco, California.[15]
John Cabell “Bunny” Breckinridge, Jr. (1903–1996) Actor and drag queen. Son of John Cabell Breckinridge, Sr.[15]
Rev. John Breckinridge, D. D. (1797–1841) Born at Cabell’s Dale, son of John Breckinridge. Presbyterian Minister. Graduated Princeton College 1818, Princeton Theological Seminary 1821. Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives. Married in 1823 Margaret, daughter of Rev. Samuel Miller D. D.[6]
Mary Cabell Breckinridge (1826–1854) Married cousin Colonel Peter A. Porter in 1852. Daughter of Rev. John Breckinridge.
Samuel Miller Breckinridge (1828–1891) Member of Missouri legislature 1854–1855. Became Circuit Court judge in 1859. Elder in the Presbyterian Church and a leading member of its General Assembly. Married Virginia Harrison Castleman. Son of Rev. John Breckinridge.[16]
Margaret Miller Breckinridge (1851–1919) Married St. Louis, Missouri businessman William Strudwick Long. Daughter of Samuel Miller Breckinridge.[17]
Samuel Miller Breckinridge Long (1881–1958) lawyer and diplomat. Graduated Princeton in 1904. Advisor to Presidents Woodrow Wilson and Franklin Delano Roosevelt. U.S. Ambassador to Italy 1933–36. U.S. delegate to Dumbarton Oaks Conference. Son of Margaret Miller Breckinridge and William Strudwick Long.[18]
Robert Jefferson Breckinridge (1800–1871), Kentucky State Representative 1825–1828, Kentucky Superintendent of Public Instruction 1849–1853, candidate for delegate to the Kentucky Constitutional Convention 1849. Son of John Breckinridge. Married Ann Sophonisba Preston in 1823.[19]
Mary Cabell Breckinridge, (born 1828) Daughter of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge. Married to William Warfield.
Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield (1851–1921), Presbyterian theologian, principal of Princeton Theological Seminary. Son of Mary Cabell Breckinridge and William Warfield.[6]
Ethelbert Dudley Warfield (1861–1936) Graduate of Princeton, Oxford, and Columbia Law School. President of Miami University and Lafayette College, author, Director of Princeton Theological Seminary. Son of Mary Cabell Breckinridge and William Warfield.[6]
Robert Jefferson Breckinridge, Jr. (1834–1915), Confederate States Representative from Kentucky 1862–1865, Colonel in the Confederate States Army, Kentucky Common Pleas Court Judge 1876. Son of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge. Married Katharine Morrison in 1856.[20]
Marie Lettice Preston Breckinridge (born 1836), married Rev. William Collins Handy in 1857.
L. Irving Handy (1861–1922), U.S. Representative from Delaware 1897–1899, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1904. Son of Marie Lettice Preston Breckinridge and Rev. William Collins Handy. Nephew of William Campbell Preston Breckinridge.[21]
William Campbell Preston Breckinridge (1837–1904), delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1876, U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1885–1895. Married Lucretia Hart Clay, granddaughter of Henry Clay. Son of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge.[22]
Desha Breckinridge (1867–1935), editor and publisher of the Lexington Herald. Married Madeline McDowell Breckinridge, great-granddaughter of Henry Clay in 1898. Son of W.C.P. Breckinridge. Brother of Sophonisba Breckinridge.
Sophonisba Preston Breckinridge (1886–1948), Lawyer, Activist involved in Women’s rights, Civil Rights, Labor, and Pacifist movements; namesake of Breckinridge House, a dormitory of the University of Chicago. Daughter of W.C.P. Breckinridge. Sister of Desha Breckinridge.
Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Sr. (1842–1921), General in the U.S. Army. Married Louise Ludlow Dudley, daughter of Ethelbert Ludlow Dudley, 1868. Son of Robert Jefferson Breckinridge.[23]
Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Jr. (1872–1898), U.S. Naval officer, drowned. Namesake of USS Breckinridge. Son of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Sr.[24]
Ethelbert Ludlow Dudley Breckinridge (1875–1914) Graduated Princeton 1898, Captain in U.S. Army, wounded in the Philippine-American War. Son of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Sr. Married Genevieve Pearson Mattingly (1878–1957).[25]
William Mattingly Breckinridge (1905–1996) Major General, U.S. Army. Chief of the U.S. Army Security Agency. Married Frances Naylor. Son of Ethelbert Ludlow Dudley Breckinridge.[26]
Scott Dudley Breckinridge, Sr. (1882–1941) Physician in Lexington, Kentucky, author, U.S. Fencing Champion (Foil), 1906 and 1914. Competed in 1912 Olympic Games in Stockholm. Married Gertrude Ashby Bayne. Son of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Sr.[27]
John Bayne Breckinridge (1913–1979), Colonel in U.S. Army during World War II. Kentucky State Representative 1956–59, Attorney General of Kentucky 1960–64, 1968–1972, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1960, U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1973–79. Son of Scott Dudley Breckinridge, Sr.[28]
Scott Dudley Breckinridge, Jr. (1917–2000) Deputy Inspector General of the C.I.A., author. Married Helen Virden Babbit. Son of Scott Dudley Breckinridge, Sr.[29]
Henry Skillman Breckinridge (1886–1960), Colonel in U.S. Army, United States Assistant Secretary of War, prominent attorney, U.S Fencing Champion (Épée), 1924. Son of Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, Sr. Married Ruth Bradley Woodman in 1910, member of prominent New England Perkins Family.
Elizabeth Foster Breckinridge (1911–2005), Prominent Washington, D.C. socialite and philanthropist. Daughter of Henry Skillman Breckinridge. Married to John Stephens Graham, attorney, Assistant U.S. Secretary of Treasury, Commissioner of U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Commissioner of Internal Revenue, brother of Katherine G. Howard.
Rev. William Lewis Breckinridge, D. D. (1803–1876) Born at Cabell’s Dale, Fayette County, Kentucky. Presbyterian minister for 45 years. Moderator of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Council. Son of John Breckinridge. Married Frances Prevost in 1823, Granddaughter of President Samuel Stanhope Smith of Princeton University.[30]
Francis Preston (1765–1736), Virginia House Delegate 1788–1789 1812–1814, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1793–1797, Virginia State Senator 1816–1820. Cousin of John Brown, John Breckinridge, and James Breckinridge, Grandson of Robert Preston.[31]
William Campbell Preston (1794–1860), South Carolina State Representative 1828–1834, U.S. Senator from South Carolina 1833–1842. Son of Francis Preston.[32]
William Ballard Preston (1805–1862), Virginia House Delegate 1830–1832 1844–1845, Virginia State Senator 1840–1844, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1847–1849, U.S. Secretary of War 1849–1850, Delegate to the Confederate States Congress from Virginia 1861–1862, Confederate States Senator from Virginia 1862. Nephew of Francis Preston.[33]
William Preston (1816–1887), delegate to the Kentucky Constitutional Convention 1849, Kentucky State Representative 1850 1868–1869, Kentucky State Senator 1851–1853, U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1852–1855, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1856, U.S. Minister to Spain 1859–1861. Nephew of Francis Preston.[34]
John Brown (1757–1837), Virginia State Senator 1784–1788, Delegate to the Continental Congress from Virginia 1787–1788, U.S. Representative from Virginia 1789–1792, U.S. Senator from Kentucky 1792–1805. Brother of James Brown, Cousin of John Breckinridge, James Breckinridge, and Francis Preston.[35]
B. Gratz Brown (1826–1885), Missouri State Representative 1852–1858, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1860, U.S. Senator from Missouri 1863–1867, Governor of Missouri 1871–1873, candidate for Vice President of the United States 1872. Grandson of John Brown.[36]
James Brown (1766–1835), U.S. District Attorney in Kentucky 1791, Kentucky Secretary of State 1792–1798, Secretary of the Territory of Orleans 1804, U.S. District Attorney in Louisiana 1805–1808, U.S. Senator from Louisiana 1813–1817 1819–1823, U.S. Minister to France 1823–1829. Brother of John Brown, Cousin of John Breckinridge, James Breckinridge, and Francis Preston.[37]
Thomas H. Clay (1803–1871), U.S. Minister to Nicaragua 1863, U.S. Minister to Honduras 1863. Father-in-law of William Campbell Preston Breckinridge.[38]
Henry Donnel Foster (1808–1880), U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1843–1847 1871–1873, Pennsylvania State Representative 1857, candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania 1860. Cousin of John C. Breckinridge.[39]
NOTE: Peter B. Porter was also uncle of U.S. Senator Augustus S. Porter.[40] Thomas H. Clay was also son of Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives Henry Clay,[41] brother of U.S. Representative James Brown Clay,[42] third cousin of U.S. diplomat Brutus Clay,[43] fourth cousin of U.S. Senator Clement Claiborne Clay, Jr.,[44] first cousin twice removed of U.S. Representative Matthew Clay[45] and Kentucky State Senator Green Clay,[46] third cousin once removed of U.S. Senator Clement Comer Clay,[47] and second cousin once removed of Alabama State Senator Matthew Clay,[48] U.S. Representative Brutus J. Clay,[49] and U.S. diplomat Cassius M. Clay.[50]
William C. Preston

William Campbell Preston (December 27, 1794 – May 22, 1860) was a senator from the United States and a member of the Nullifier, and later Whig Parties. He was also the cousin of William Ballard Preston, William Preston and Angelica Singleton Van Buren.
[edit] Early life
Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he was the son of Francis Preston, a well-to-do businessman, and Sarah Buchanan Campbell, daughter of Gen. William Campbell. During his childhood he was educated by private tutors, then enrolled in Washington University (later known as Washington and Lee University) in Lexington, Virginia. He then transferred to and graduated from South Carolina College (later known as the University of South Carolina) in Columbia in 1812, where he was a member of the Euphradian Society.
[edit] Career
After traveling and studying around Europe, Preston studied law at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. He sailed back to the States in 1819 and was admitted to the bar of Virginia in 1820. He practiced law there for two years. He then moved to Columbia, South Carolina in 1822 and ran unsuccessfully for election to the Twenty-Second Congress. He was, however, elected to the South Carolina House of Representatives and served from 1828 to 1834. He was then elected in 1833 as a Nullifier to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy after the resignation of Stephen D. Miller. Preston was then reelected as a Whig in 1837 and served until his resignation on November 29, 1842. During that time he served as the chairman for the Committee on the Library and the Committee on Military Affairs. After his resignation, Preston returned to practicing law and served as president of South Carolina College from 1845 until 1851, when he resigned due to poor health. He died in Columbia, South Carolina. He was buried in the Trinity Episcopal Churchyard.

William Ballard Preston (November 25, 1805 – November 16, 1862) was a United States political figure. He served as the U.S. Secretary of the Navy between 1849 and 1850. He is also the cousin of William Campbell Preston and William Preston.
Born in 1805 at Smithfield Plantation in Blacksburg, Virginia, Preston entered Hampden-Sydney College in 1821, where he was active in literary and forensic activities. Graduating in 1824, Preston studied law at the University of Virginia and was admitted to the bar in 1826. In 1831 he became the Commonwealth’s Attorney for Floyd County, Virginia. He married Lucinda Redd of Henry County, Virginia.[1]
The young attorney soon entered politics as a Whig and was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates in 1830. During the 1831–1832 session, he took an active part in the campaign to abolish slavery. Then there followed an eight-year hiatus in his political activities during which he returned to the practice of law. In 1840, he was elected to the State Senate, where he served from 1840 to 1844, before returning to the House of Delegates. In 1846, he was elected to the United States House of Representatives.
In March 1849, President Zachary Taylor appointed the Preston Secretary of the Navy. During Preston’s tenure in that office, the United States Navy acquired new duties in the course of America’s westward expansion and acquisition of California. Trade and commerce in the Pacific Ocean beckoned, and the Stars and Stripes flew from the masts of Navy ships in Chinese waters, while the shores of Japan, then unopened to the west, presented a tantalizing possibility for commercial intercourse. The Navy also was progressing through a technological transition, especially in the area of moving from sails to steam propulsion, and with the improvements in gunnery and naval ordnance. Upon the death of President Taylor, new President Millard Fillmore reorganized the Cabinet and appointed William Alexander Graham Secretary of the Navy. Preston retired from office and withdrew from politics and public life.

Preston, the nephew of Francis Preston, was born Louisville, Kentucky. His sister Henrietta married Albert S. Johnston in 1829. He pursued preparatory studies and graduated from St. Joseph’s College in Kentucky. He attended Yale College in 1835 and graduated from the law department of Harvard University in 1838. After graduation from Harvard, Preston was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Louisville in 1839.
He served as lieutenant colonel of the 4th Kentucky Volunteers in the Mexican–American War (1846–1848). After the war, he was a delegate to the State constitutional convention in 1849 and a member of the Kentucky House of Representatives in 1850. Subsequently, he served in the State senate 1851–1853. He was elected as a Whig to the Thirty-second Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Humphrey Marshall and reelected to the Thirty-third Congress and served from December 6, 1852, to March 3, 1855. He stood again for another term in 1854 but was unsuccessful. President James Buchanan appointed Preston as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Spain in 1858. He resigned as ambassador in 1861 at the outbreak of the Civil War.
Although his home state of Kentucky did not secede from the Union, Preston followed his former brother-in-law and served in the Confederate Army, attaining the rank of brigadier general in 1862. He was appointed Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary from the Confederacy to Maximilian, Emperor of Mexico in 1864.
After the war, he again served as a member of the Kentucky State house of Representatives in 1868 and 1869.
William Preston died in Louisville and was interred in Cave Hill Cemetery in Louisville.

The word plenipotentiary (from the Latin, plenus + potens, full + power) has two meanings. As a noun, it refers to a person who has “full powers.” In particular, the term commonly refers to a diplomat fully authorized to represent his government as a prerogative (e.g., ambassador). As an adjective, plenipotentiary refers to that which confers “full powers.”

Maximilian invited ex-Confederates to move to Mexico in a series of settlements called the “Carlota Colony” and the New Virginia Colony with a dozen others being considered, a plan conceived by the internationally renowned U.S. Navy oceanographer and inventor Matthew Fontaine Maury. Maximilian also invited settlers from “any country” including Austria and the other German states.[25]

In 1848, revolutions erupted across Europe. In face of protests and riots, Emperor Ferdinand I abdicated in favor of Maximilian’s brother, who became Franz Joseph I.[18][19] Maximilian accompanied him on campaigns to put down rebellions throughout the Empire.[20][19] Only in 1849 would the revolution be stamped out in Austria, with hundreds of rebels executed and thousands imprisoned. Maximilian was horrified at what he regarded as senseless brutality and openly complained about it. He would later remark: “We call our age the Age of Enlightenment, but there are cities in Europe where, in the future, men will look back in horror and amazement at the injustice of tribunals, which in a spirit of vengeance condemned to death those whose only crime lay in wanting something different to the arbitrary rule of governments which placed themselves above the law.”[21][22]

The only daughter of Leopold I, King of the Belgians (1790–1865) by his second wife, Louise-Marie, Princess of France (1812–1850), Charlotte was born at the Royal Castle of Laeken in Laeken, Brussels, Belgium. Charlotte had three brothers: Louis-Philippe, who died in infancy, Leopold, who on the death of their father became Leopold II of Belgium and Philippe, Count of Flanders. She was also a first cousin to both Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom and her husband, Prince Albert, as well as Ferdinand II of Portugal. She belonged to the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.
Her favorite grandparent Maria Amalia of the Two Sicilies, Queen of France, was the consort of Louis-Philippe of France, and a niece of Marie Antoinette. Maria Amalia was Charlotte’s close confidante, and on her wedding day in 1857, she wore a bracelet with a miniature portrait of her. They regularly corresponded, especially later while Charlotte was in Mexico.
When Charlotte was ten years old, her mother, Louise-Marie, died of tuberculosis and Charlotte was entrusted to the Countess of Hulste, a close family friend. Although young, the princess had her own household; but for a few weeks out of the year, Charlotte stayed in Claremont with Maria Amalia and the rest of her mother’s family in exile.
[edit] Archduchess of Austria

Photo of young Archduke Maximilian and Archduchess Charlotte
On 27 July 1857 in Brussels, Charlotte married her second cousin Archduke Maximilian of Austria, the idealistic younger brother of Emperor Franz Josef of Austria. In the Court of Vienna she was much prized by her mother-in-law, who saw in her the perfect example of a wife to an Austrian Archduke. Charlotte disliked Empress Elizabeth (also known as Sissi, Franz Josef’s wife). It is said that the archduchess disliked the deep connection that existed between the empress and Maximilian, who were confidantes and shared the same tastes for many things, especially because her sister-in-law was universally admired for her beauty and charms.
Charlotte spent several relatively happy years in Italy as Maximilian’s wife while the archduke served as governor of the provinces of Lombardy and Venetia. Although Lombardy and Venetia were then under the rule of the Austrian Empire, neither Maximilian nor Charlotte held real power, and both were fatally eager for more challenging roles in life.
[edit] Empress of Mexico

Maximilian and Carlota were crowned in 1864 at the Catedral Metropolitana in Mexico City.
In the early 1860s, the ambitious Napoleon III initiated the French intervention in Mexico. France, eager to turn Mexico into a satellite state, searched for a suitable figurehead to serve as the nominal emperor of Mexico. Maximilian accepted the Mexican crown and the couple sailed for the New World. The imperial couple were crowned at the Catedral Metropolitana in 1864 and chose as their seat Mexico City, making their home in the Neoclassical Castillo de Chapultepec. As Empress, Charlotte took the name of Carlota (Spanish for Charlotte). Carlota tried to take her imperial duties seriously, and even undertook a tour of the remote Yucatán frontier, visiting the ruins of Uxmal.
Only months after the coronation, however, Napoleon III began signaling his abandonment of Maximilian, and the French began to withdraw their troops from Mexico. This strategic pullback was a potentially fatal blow to the infant Mexican monarchy. The situation was exacerbated by a United States blockade that prevented French reinforcements from landing. In a desperate attempt to save her husband’s throne, Charlotte returned to Europe, seeking assistance for her husband in Paris, Vienna, and finally in Rome from Pope Pius IX. Her efforts failed; she manifested symptoms of paranoia, suffered a profound cognitive and emotional collapse, and never returned to Mexico.

Descendants of Richard De Preston

196. GLEN F.9 PRESTON (MORRELL GALLUP8, MOSES7, MOSES6, MOSES5, PHILLIP4, GEORGE3, GEORGE2, RICHARD1 DE PRESTON) was born September 17, 1888 in Johnson Co., KY, and died April 02, 1975 in Shelbyville, Shelby Co., KY. He married LAURA NICKELL. She was born 1893, and died July 23, 1948 in Johnson Co., KY.

Notes for GLEN F. PRESTON:
[Moses Coby Preston.GED]

Paintsville Herald , KY 4/9/1975

Died at the Old Masons Home in Shelbyville, KY. He was affiliated with the Paintsville Masonic Lodge 381 F&AM. Survivors include his wife, Bessie Preston of Russell, a son, William E. Preston of Hollywood, FL; a granddaughter, Laura DeBoard of Flatwoods, a sister, Gertrude Hudson of FL, and a brother, Curtis Preston of Salyersville. Burial in Preston Cemetery in Paintsville.

More About GLEN F. PRESTON:
Burial: Unknown, Preston Cemetery, Paintsville, Johnson Co., KY

More About LAURA NICKELL:
Burial: Unknown, Preston Cemetery, Paintsville, Johnson Co., KY
     
Child of GLEN PRESTON and LAURA NICKELL is:
478.
i.
 
WILLIAM E.10 PRESTON, b. Private.

197. WILLIAM CURTIS9 PRESTON (MORRELL GALLUP8, MOSES7, MOSES6, MOSES5, PHILLIP4, GEORGE3, GEORGE2, RICHARD1 DE PRESTON) was born September 22, 1890 in Johnson Co., KY, and died July 23, 1980 in Prestonsburg, Floyd Co., KY. He married MARY JANE HELTON July 30, 1914 in Magoffin Co., KY. She was born June 15, 1890 in Magoffin Co., KY, and died March 16, 1983 in Paintsville, Johnson Co., KY.

Notes for WILLIAM CURTIS PRESTON:
[Moses Coby Preston.GED]

From Magoffin County Cemetery Records:
Bailey-Kazee Cemetery, Salyersville, KY on Tommy Prater Farm:
William Curtis Preston 22 Sep 1890
23 Jul 1980
Mollie Helton Preston 15 Jun 1890
16 Mar 1983
Noted beside the names William Curtis was son of Morrell G. and Ida Walker Preston; Mollie was dau of Epheriam and Abby Jane Conley Helton.

More About WILLIAM CURTIS PRESTON:
Burial: Unknown, Bailey-Kazee Cemetery, on the Tommy Prater Farm, Salyersville, Magoffin Co., KY

More About MARY JANE HELTON:
Burial: Unknown, Bailey-Kazee Cemetery, on the Tommy Prater Farm, Salyersville, Magoffin Co., KY

Marriage Notes for WILLIAM PRESTON and MARY HELTON:
[Moses Coby Preston.GED]

Magoffin County Marriages Vol II-W. M. Preston married July 30 1914 Mollie Helton by J.J. Prater, United Baptist, witnesses B.F. Conley and Taylor Bradley.
     
Children of WILLIAM PRESTON and MARY HELTON are:
479.
i.
 
JOHN REDMOND10 PRESTON, b. Private.
480.
ii.
 
HENRY FORD PRESTON, b. Private.
481.
iii.
 
ANNE ELIZABETH PRESTON, b. Private.
 
iv.
 
RALPH CARTER PRESTON, b. June 27, 1922, Magoffin Co., KY; d. January 31, 1979, Springfield, Clark Co., OH; m. MYRLE MARIE ADAMS, Private; b. Private.
 
Notes for RALPH CARTER PRESTON:
[Moses Coby Preston.GED]

Ralph and Myrle did not have children, but they did raise two nieces as their own. (1) Judy Adams married Dennis Miller (2) Donna Adams.
482.
v.
 
LUVA MAE PRESTON, b. Private.
483.
vi.
 
WILLIAM ROGER PRESTON, b. January 05, 1926, Magoffin Co., KY; d. February 18, 1984, Floyd Co., KY.
484.
vii.
 
ROY JACK PRESTON, b. Private.
485.
viii.
 
IDA JANE PRESTON, b. Private.
486.
ix.
 
WALKER H. PRESTON, b. Private.
487.
x.
 
GLENNA SUE PRESTON, b. Private.

198. DARWIN WEBSTER9 PRESTON (MORRELL GALLUP8, MOSES7, MOSES6, MOSES5, PHILLIP4, GEORGE3, GEORGE2, RICHARD1 DE PRESTON) was born June 25, 1897 in Johnson Co., KY, and died February 12, 1975 in Clifton Forge, Alleghany Co., VA. He married HARRIET FULTZ. She died Unknown.

Notes for DARWIN WEBSTER PRESTON:
[Moses Coby Preston.GED]

Paintsville Herald Feb 26, 1975

He was a native of Paintsville, a retired C & O Railroad civil engineer; member of the Central United Methodist Church; a 50 year member of Lodge 331, Kentucky, and Member of the Scottish Rite Lodge in Logan, WV. Surviving are his wife, Harriet Fultz Preston; two sons, Sam M. Preston of Waynesboro, VA, and James L. Preston of St. Lucy, FL; a daughter, Mrs. Suzanne Hamerick of Hartsdale, NY; two brothers Curtis Preston of Salyersville and Glen Preston of Louisville; a sister, Mrs. Gertrude Hudson of FL, six grandchildren; a number of nieces and nephews and two cousins, Freda Willoughby of Paintsville and Pauline Ramsey of Ashland.

More About DARWIN WEBSTER PRESTON:
Occupation: Civil Engineer for the KY Hi-Way Dept., and C&O RR
     
Children of DARWIN PRESTON and HARRIET FULTZ are:
 
i.
 
JAMES L.10 PRESTON, b. Private.
 
ii.
 
SUZANNE PRESTON, b. Private; m. UNKNOWN HAMERICK, Private; b. Private.
 
iii.
 
SAMUEL M. PRESTON, b. Private.

199. GERTRUDE9 PRESTON (MORRELL GALLUP8, MOSES7, MOSES6, MOSES5, PHILLIP4, GEORGE3, GEORGE2, RICHARD1 DE PRESTON) was born January 07, 1904 in Johnson Co., KY, and died February 12, 2000 in Burke County Hospital, Waynesboro, Burke Co., GA. She married ROBERT FLETCHER HUDSON, JR.. He was born November 15, 1898 in Richmond, Richmond Co., VA, and died October 22, 1978 in Port Richey, Pasco Co., FL.

Notes for GERTRUDE PRESTON:
[Moses Coby Preston.GED]

GERTRUDE HUDSON
1904-2000

Gertrude Preston Hudson, 95, of Keysville, Ga., formerly of Johnson County, died Saturday Feb.12 2000 in Burke County Hospital in Waynesboro, Ga.

Mrs. Hudson was born Dec. 7, 1904, in Johnson County, a daughter of the late Morrell Gallup and Ida Walker Preston.

Her husband, Robert Fletcher Hudson Jr., died in 1978.

Surviving are a son, Robert W. Hudson of Wrens, Ga.; two daughters, Joan Hudson Boelens of Houston, Texas, and Lois Hudson Glass of Lakeland, Fla.; eight grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren.

A memorial service was held at 10 a.m. today at Jones-Preston Funeral Home in Paintsville by Terry Reffett.

Burial was in Preston Cemetery in Paintsville.

More About GERTRUDE PRESTON:
Burial: Unknown, Preston Cemetery, Paintsville, Johnson Co., KY

Notes for ROBERT FLETCHER HUDSON, JR.:
[Moses Coby Preston.GED]

Paintsville Herald 11/1/1978

He was a retired machinist and a member of the Methodist Church. Surviving are his wife, Gertrude Preston Hudson; a son, Bob Hudson of Joliet, Ill; 2 daughters, Joan Bolens of Lansing, MI and Lois Glass of New Port Richey, FL; 8 grandchildren and 2 great grandchildren. Burial in Preston Cemetery at Paintsville.
     
Children of GERTRUDE PRESTON and ROBERT HUDSON are:
 
i.
 
ROBERT W.10 HUDSON, b. Private.
 
ii.
 
JOAN HUDSON, b. Private; m. UNKNOWN BOELENS, Private; b. Private.
 
iii.
 
LOIS HUDSON, b. Private; m. UNKNOWN GLASS, Private; b. Private.

1. SIR RICHARD1 DE PRESTON was born Abt. 1550 in England, and died Unknown.
     
Child of SIR RICHARD DE PRESTON is:
2.
i.
 
GEORGE2 PRESTON I, b. 1591, Ingestrie Parish, Staffordshire, England; d. Unknown.

PRESTON RICHARD.
1170–84 Uctred son of Osulf [de Preston Richard] attested charters of William de Lancaster II; Farrer, Lancs. Pipe R., 443.
1184–90 Hutred son of Osolf and his heirs gave to the canons of Cockersand land at Preston in Kendale lying next the great brook [Peasey Beck] which is the boundary between the two Prestons, below the highway which leads to Wathsuthenan, ascending that way to the head of the great tillage which crosses the tillage of Hoscal-hofeh [Oskill’s Head], as the peat-moss meets the hard land in going round to the spring below Hoscal-houet, and by the syke of the spring to the said great brook, with common of pasture within Ekergart in Winter and Spring for eight beasts with calves, two horses and 20 sheep with lambs, and from the beginning of summer outside Ekergart with the donor’s men until Martinmas; Cockersand Chartul., 1001.
1190–1220 Richard son of Hutred son of Osolf confirmed his father’s gift to the canons, namely the land between the brook and the land of Henry de Mamecestre, son of Geoffrey [de Cheteham] on the east side of the way which leads to Wathsuthenan, where their buildings stand etc. (as above); ib., 1002.
Henry de Chetham gave to the same canons his part of the mill of Preston, which he had by the gift of Richard de Preston, for pittance of the convent, reserving the multure of the grain of his men there; with grant of the moiety of the forinsec multure, reserving the multure of his own house of Preston; and two a. in Houeskelleheuet; ib. 1003.
1198 A day was given to Anselm de Furness and Uchtred son of Osolf to hear their record and judgment of a plea of perambulation and division of lands on the octaves of St. John the Baptist. Curia Regis Rolls (P.R.O.) i, 51.
1220–46 Walter de Strikland confirms to the monks of St. Bees, 2 a. land in Stirkland, which Richard de Preston and his wife, Amabel, his (the grantor’s) daughter, had given; Wilson, Reg. of St. Bees. 412-14.
1230 Richard de Preston, a justice at Appleby; Pat. R. 1230, p. 354.
1246–72 Richard de Preston appears as a juror on various inquests during the period 1246 to 1272; Lancs. Inq. (Rec. Soc.), pt. i, passim.
1256 Henry de Notingham granted to Richard de Preston and Alice his wife two bovates, except a mill and 25 a. land, in Preston; Feet of F., file 4, n. 30.
Grant by Richard de Preston to Richard his son and Amabilla, wife of the said Richard the son, of lands etc. at Preston; Hist. MSS. Com. Rep. x, app. 4, p. 225.
1277 Order for the election of a coroner for Westmorland in place of Richard de Preston, who is incapacitated by infirmity; Cal. Close R. 1277, p. 405.
1277–1307 John Gudeberd of Burnham (Bruham ?) and Margery his wife grant to Richard de Preston, son of Sir Richard de Preston, and to Amabill his wife and the heirs of Richard a messuage lying between Latuneland (fn. 1) and Richard’s land in Great Stirkeland; D. at Sizergh.
Grant by Roger de Barton to the same Richard and Amabill of a messuage and lands in various places (named) in Great Stirkeland; ib.
The same Richard and Amabill purchased land in Great Stirkeland of Adam the Hunter, clerk, and Joan his wife; ib.
Henry de Lynacre of Great Stirkelaund and Christiana daughter of the same Henry granted a messuage and lands in Great Stirkelaund to the said Richard, son of Sir Richard, and to Amabill his wife; ib.
1282 Demise by the abbot and convent of Cokersand to Richard de Preston (of Preston) in Kendall of the mill of Preston, etc. Witnesses, Henry de Lee, sheriff of Lancascer, Alan de Singilton, Henry le Botiler (pincerna), William le Botiler (pincerna), Benedict Gernet, William de Heton, John de Thatham (all domini). Dated in 10 Edward; Hist. MSS. Com., Rep. x, app. 4., p. 225.
1290 Walter de Stirklaund complains that Roger de Burton, Richard de Preston and many others came to his land in Nateland and took away his goods and those of Nicholas de Crakehale, his bondsman. Cal. Pat. Rolls, 1290, p. 408.
1294 Richard de Preston and Thomas de Pykering were appointed to assess and levy the tenth in Westmorland; Cal. Pat. Rolls, 1294, p. 103.
1295 At Kirkby in Kendale on the feast of the Apostles, Philip and James, 23 Edward I (1 May, 1295), Elizabeth daughter of Robert the clerk gave an acquittance to Richard de Preston, son of Sir Richard de Preston, for 21s. 7d., part of a legacy of 40s. of the testament of her mother; D. at Sizergh.
1301 Between William son of Margaret de Ros querent and Margaret de Ros deforciant of two messuages, 31 carucates and 45 acres of land, 15 mills, and one half share of three mills with appurtenances in Helsington, Preston Richard etc., in Westmorland. The same is held by the said William and his heirs the remainder being to Marmaduke de Twenge in perpetuity; the said Margaret warrants to the said William and his heirs and also to the said Marmaduke and his heirs. Feet of Fines, 29 Edward I, n. 62.
1303 Roger de Burton held lands in Preston Richard and Hencastre in Kendale, as of his manor of Burton, of William son of Margaret de Ros; Cal. Inq., iv, 87.
1311 Roger son of Roger de Burton held the hamlets of Preston Richard and Hencastre with his manor of Burton of William de Ros of Kendale; Cal. Inq. v, 118.
1315 Amabill late the wife of Richard de Preston made fine with the king by 40s. for pardon in acquiring from Margaret de Ros 40s. of rent in [Great] Stirklaund; Abbrev. R. Original, i, 214; Cal. Pat. R. 1315, p. 302.
1332 Preston Richard. Subsidy of a fifteenth.

Richard de Prestonin goods60s.
John de Preston”30s.
Ellis son of Hawe”30s.
William de le Syle”15s.
Robert Couhirde”22s.6d.
Robert son of Alan”15s.
William de Calvemyre”30s.
Nicholas Shepherd (bercarius)”22s.6d.
John Walker”30s.
Richard son of Ellis (Elye)”40s.
Roger Laboray”30s.
William Stage”30s.
Sum of goods £18, whereof to the king 24s.; Exch. Lay Sub. 195A.
1334–43 Richard de Preston attests various local charters during this period.
1335 Release by John de Wyndesore to Richard de Preston relating to the park of Preston. Dated 30 April, 9 Edward III. Heraldic Seal; Hist. MSS. Com. Rep. x, app. 4, p 225.
1335 Exemption for life of Richard de Preston (fn. 2) from being put on assize etc. or appointed sheriff etc.; Cal. Pat. R. 1335, p. 187.
1340 Richard de Preston was appointed one of the four collectors of the ninth in co. Westmorland; Cal. Pat. R. 1341, p. 151; 1340, p. 504.
1341 Richard de Preston held of William de Twenge a messuage and 40 a. land in Preston by the service of the 30th part of a knight’s fee. Cal. Inq., viii, 202.
Licence granted to Richard de Preston, the elder, and John de Haveryngton of Thirneby to alienate in mortmain to the abbot and convent of Hepp two messuages, 31 a. land etc. in Bampton Cundale and Heppe. Cal. Pat. Rolls, 1341, p. 305.
1342 Richard de Preston was one of the collectors of wool in Westmorland in 1342; Cal. of Fine R., 1342, p. 285; Cal. Pat. R. 1341, p. 151.
1344–5 The same was one of the assessors and collectors of the fifteenth and tenth in Westmorland in 1344 and 1345; ib., 393–4, 435.
1354 Richard de Preston, a confederate of William de Wyndesore, chivaler, and others in rioting at Little Stirkeland. Cal. Pat. Rolls, 1354, p. 161.
1357 John de Preston, elder, impleaded Richard Brysbane for taking a horse at Preston Richard, price 40s.; De Banco R., Hil., 389, m. 85d.
The same John demanded against John Wilkynson that he render an account of the time that he was his receiver; ib.
Richard de Preston demands against Adam de Berburn of Lonesdale that he render to him 40s. which he owes and has unjustly detained; ib., Trin., 391, m. 184d.
1358 John de Preston, elder, demands against Joan late the wife of John de Haveryngton and Sibyl late the wife of Thomas de Levenes that the said Joan render 60s. and the said Sibyl 40s. which they respectively owe him; ib., Hil., 393, m. 99d.
1360 John de Preston in Kendale party to a recognizance; Cal. Close R., 1360, p. 110; 1359, p. 625.
1362 William de Wyndesore, chivaler, going to Ireland on the king’s service, nominates John de Preston of Kendale and Roger de Levenes, his attorneys, for one year; Cal. Pat. R. 1362, p. 217.
1362 Richard son of Richard de Preston had letters of protection going with William de Wyndesore, chivaler, to Ireland on the king’s service; Cal. Pat. R., 1362, p. 219.
1363 The same William de Wyndesore, going to Ireland, nominates Richard de Preston and John de Preston, his attorneys in England for one year; ib. 416.
1374 Robert son of Peter of Kirkeby in Kendale and Richard de Preston held of Thomas de Thwenge the 30th part of a knight’s fee in Preston and Mareshalholm; Chan. Inq. p.m., 48 Edward III, n. 68.
1377 John de Preston demands against Robert de Cliburn that he render to him 43s. 4d. which are in arrears of a yearly rent of 13s. 4d.; De Banco R., Mich., 468, m. 334.
1378 The abbot of Heppe demands against John de Preston that he render an account of the time that he was his receiver; ib., Trin., 471, m. 172 d.
1380? Richard de Preston grants to Richard de Milnthorp all his good and chattels. Dated 8 December, 4(?) Richard II.—Heraldic Seal. Hist. MSS Com. Rep., x, app. 4, p. 225.
1388 Cecily late the wife of Thomas de Stirkeland, knt., appoints her son, Thomas de Stirkeland to be steward of all her lands etc. in co. Westmorland. Dated at Preston in Kendale, in 12 Richard II; ib.
1390 Richard de Preston held of Thomas de Ros, chivaler, the manor of Preston Richard by knight’s service, which Richard died seised of the said manor, his heir being a minor and in the custody of the said Thomas, the manor was therefore in the possession of the said Thomas de Ros on the day he died; Chan. Inq. p.m., 14 Richard II, n. 41.
1390 The following notes tend to confirm the statement that Richard de Preston of Preston Richard, who died after 1390, had a younger brother who continued the line.
17 November, 1362. Order for the payment to James de Pykeryng and John de Preston of £19 12s. for their expenses for 49 days at the Parliament summoned at Westminster a fortnight after Michaelmas last; Cal. Close R., 1362, p. 440.
1 June 1362. William de Wyndesore chivaler going to Ireland on the king’s service, has letters nominating John de Preston of Kendale and Roger de Levenes as his attorneys for one year; Cal. Pat. R. 1362. p. 217. He has like letters nominating John de Wyndesore of Kendale and John son of William de Stoke, clerk, his attorneys;ib.
18 November, 1363. He has like letters nominating Richard de Preston and John de Preston his attorneys for one year; ib., 416.
21 May, 1368. Order for the payment to John de Preston, knight of the shire for Westmorland of £7 for 25 days at the Parliament summoned at Westminster on 1 May last; Cal. Close R. 1368, p. 480.
29 March, 1371. Order to pay Hugh de Louthre and John de Preston, knights of the shire of Westmorland £19 12s. for 49 days at the Parliament summoned at Westminster on the feast of St. Matthias last; Cal. Pat. R. 1371, p. 289. In 1380 John de Preston was on the commission of the peace for Westmorland; ib., 1380, p. 515. He occurs as justice as “the elder,” for many years down to 1390, and as John de Preston simply for many later years. In 1398 a commission was appointed to inquire about dissensions between John de Preston and John son of Thomas de Middleton and others, who lay in wait to kill the said John de Preston and his friends; ib. 1398, p. 503. In 1405 John de Preston and the sheriff of Westmorland were commissioned to inquire about the failure of the prior and convent of Watton to find three canons to dwell in a cell of the priory at Ravenstandale to celebrate for the good estate of the king and the souls of his progenitors and to do alms and other works of piety there according to the original foundation of the priory; ib. 1405, p. 63.
1394–1428 John de Preston, was a justice of the king’s bench; recorder of London in 1406; sergeant-at-law in 1411; raised to the bench of the Common Pleas in 1415; retired in 1428; Foss, The Judges of England (ed. 1870), 538.
1404 John de Preston of Kendale held of William de Parr, chivaler, the manor of Preston Richard by knight’s service, worth 100s.; Chan. Inq. p.m., 6 Henry IV, n. 37.
1404 Commission to Simon Blakeburn, serjeant at arms, to receive John de Preston and Robert his son, Matthew del Grene, and John de Sygilswyk, detained in the prison within the king’s castle of Pevensey, with the cause of their seizure and bring them before the king; Cal. Pat. R. 1404, p. 364.
1407 Alan de Penyngton, chivaler, and John de Lamplugh, chivaler, held of John de Parr the manor of Preston Richard by knight’s service, worth 100s.; ib., 9 Henry IV, n. 38.
1420 John de Penyngton, knt., appoints Richard de Preston, his attorney to deliver seisin to John de Preston of Bygynges of all his lands etc. in co. Westmorland. Dated at Mulcaster, on Wednesday after St. John of Beverley, 8 Henry v (8 May, 1420). Heraldic seal broken; Orig. at Sizergh.
1445 Pardon of outlawry for Thomas Otheland of Preston in Kendale, yeoman, for not appearing to answer Thomas Botiler touching a debt of six marks; Cal. Pat. R. 1445, p. 303.
1445 It was found by inquest that in the Chapel of St. Gregory by Preston Richard, par. Burton (sic) a chantry was founded by John de Preston, late one of the justices of the Bench, and incorporated of two chaplains to celebrate divine service for the souls of him and his ancestors; that the founder enfeoffed John Urswyk, Thomas Barburn, Nicholas Preston, clerk, and Robert Preston and their heirs of premises in London (described) to the use of Roger Casterton and Henry Preston, then chaplains of the said chantry, without licence, and that the feoffees named continued their estate in the premises contrary to the statute of mortmain; whereupon the king granted the premises to two of his serjeants, in survivorship; Cal. Pat. R. 1445 pp. 366, 373.
1452 Grant by Nicholas Radclyff, knt., John Knobilhowe, parson of the church of Lamplugh, William Farlam and Robert Roskyll, chaplain, to John son of John Penyngton, esq., and to Isabel his wife, daughter of John Broghton, esq., of a yearly rent after the death of John Penyngton, knt., in Preston in Kendale. Dated 12 August, 30 Hen. VI. Hist. MSS. Com., Rep. x, App. IV, p. 225.
1477 Pardon of outlawry for Roger Bateman of Preston in Kendale, chapman, administrator of the goods of Roger Bek, who died intestate for not appearing to answer Dennis Bayle touching a debt of £4; Cal. Pat. R. 1477, p. 28.
1532 Inquest taken at Appulby, on Wednesday, 21st Oct., 24 Henry, VIII (1532) before John Skelton, esquire, escheator.
William Pennyngton, the elder, knight, on the day he died and William Pennyngton, junior and Mary Strykland, daughter of Walter Strykland, were seised in their demesne as of fee tail of the manor of Preston Richard and of Little Langden according to the tenor and effect of the charter of Richard Barwis, Francis Maundforde, John Thwaites with others dated 4 June, 20 Henry VIII (1528). The manor of Preston is worth yearly £20 and more; Little Langden is worth yearly £10 and more. The manor of Preston is held of the castle of Kendall by service unknown; Little Langden is held of the duke of Richmond by service unknown. He died 20 May, 24 Henry VIII (1532) and William Pennyngton his son is his next heir, aged 14 years; Excheq. Inq. p.m., Ser. ii, file 131, n. 3.
1534 John Lamplughe, knt., passed to William Baxster and Robert Sterlyng tenements in Lamplughe etc., co. Cumberland, and Preston, co. Westmorland; Feet of Fines, Mich. term, 26 Henry VIII.
1542 John Lamplewgh, esq., passed by fine to Thomas Carus, gent., a tenement in Preston Richard; ib. Trin. term, 34 Henry VIII.
1586 Abstract of the will of Robart Atkinson of Thendmore in the parishe of Heversham. Dated 7 May, 1586.
Burial in the parishe Churchyarde of Heversham nigh unto my father and my owne child. Wife Elizabeth Atkinson my estate of my cottage for life or widdowhood, then to William Atkinson my son, and if he should die before the age of 21, then to Thomas Atkinson, my brother John youngest son, the said Thomas paying my sister £3 6s. 8d. Son William my suit of best apparrell etc. Brother John second best suit of apparrell. Sister Alice two of my best sheipe, etc. Sister Agnes one sheipe. Aunt Elsabeth one paire of sleeves. Residue to Elizabeth my wife, and to be sole executrix.
Allane Prickett and Thomas Parke to be supervisors.
Alane Pricket, Randall Wryght, Thomas Parke, witnesses.
Inventory £14 6s. 6d. Proved in the Arch. Richmond, Deanery of Kendal, last day of June. 1586.
c1600 John Preston, of Holker, esq., son and heir of Christopher Preston, married Mabel, daughter and coheir of George Benson of Hugill, and with her obtained one moiety of the manor of Preston Richard; Nicolson and Burn, i, 212.
1603 William Johnson of Stub, gent., purchased the Old Hall of Preston Richard with the demesne; Nicolson and Burn, i, 213.
1623 George Preston, who died in 1640, settled the manor or lordship of Preston Richard and lands in Heversham upon himself for life with remainder to his younger son, George. See Kirkby Lonsdale; Court of Wards, Inq. p.m., vol. 94, n. 207.

Prestons of Great Britain

The derivation of the name of PRESTON is a matter of doubt. Some say it is derived from “praestone”, meaning “excellent”, others say it is assumed by the family from their landed estates in Mid. Lothian, Scotland. Also there are indications that the estates were named from the circumstances that the owner somewhere along the line was a priest; thus Priest-town, or Preston. The City of Preston was originally settled by a group of monks, and it is almost certain that the name was derived from Priest. This is also borne out by the description of the earliest known family crest that is described as follows:
This crest bore the conceit of a castle, from whose high tower rose an eagle plunged for higher flight, with the pious aspiration at its base “SI DIEU VEULT”, which freely rendered means, “Leaving the towers of earth we sore D. V. to heaven.”
It must also be remembered that up to about the year 900 or 1000 AD, there were no permanent names among European peoples. A person had a name that applied to him individually and the name passed away at the person’s death. In fact, a mans name might be changed during the course of his life. People generally lived and died in the community where they were born, and of course they were well known in that community.
Whatever the origin of the name of Preston, it was borne by the family as early as the time of Malcolm I of Scotland, who reigned from 944 to 953 AD.
The first name on record was LEOLPHUS DE PRESTON. He lived in the time of William, surnamed the Lion, who reigned in Scotland from 1165-1214. There is no record of his son and heir, but his grandson was William de Preston. William was one of the Scottish nobles chosen by Edward I of England, at the death of Margaret, “The Maid of Norway”, to arbitrate between Baliol and Bruce, the main disputants for the crown of Scotland.
The fourth generation, Nicol De Preston, of which nothing more is known. Titles of estates in those days were considered “indivisible inheritances”, and except in the case of failure to have male issue, all that was of consequence in the family genealogy was to know the one person to whom the title and estates descended. (This is great if you are in line with the one person, usually the first born male, if however, there were ten other male members of the family, unless they did something outstanding, their names and descendents are almost impossible to trace.)
The fifth generation, Lawrence De Preston.
The sixth generation, Richard de Preston, owned vast estates in the north of England. His estates of which there are two, were called PRESTON RICHARD and PRESTON PATRICK, and were located in the County of Westmoreland.
The seventh generation, Sir Richard de Preston, whose name appears on several conveyances of land in Lancashire by Sir William de Furness along with Sir John de Fleming and others, as a witness to the transfer. He was also a witness to a grant and conveyance of lands in Preston, Holme and Hutton, by William de Lancaster the third, to Patrick, grandson of Gospatrick.
The eighth generation, Richard de Preston, was named as one of the jurors in the postmortem inquisition of William de Lindsay.
The ninth generation, Sir Richard de Preston, one of the jurors called to settle a dispute between the King of England and the Abbot of St. Mary’s Convent, Yorkshire, as to whose right it was to make appointments to the two churches of Appleby. It was in this period that the struggles between the successions of William the Conqueror and the adherents of the Pope of Rome were in progress.
The tenth generation, Richard de Preston, was named as a witness, 1333 AD, to a conveyance of land at Old Hutton. He married Annabella who survived him and by whom he had issue.
The eleventh generation, Sir Richard de Preston, who represented his county, Westmoreland, in the English Parliament. This was in the time of Edward III when chivalry was at its height. His son succeeded him in the Preston estates and also in Parliament as Knight of the Shire for Westmoreland,
The twelfth generation, Sir Richard de Preston, who in the year 1368, obtained from the King a license to a tract of land containing five hundred acres.
The thirteenth generation, Sir John de Preston was the last of the Prestons to hold the two estates, Preston Patrick and Preston Richard. He also was a member of the Parliament in the time of Edward III. He had two sons, Sir Richard de Preston and Sir John de Preston.
The fourteenth generation, Sir Richard de Preston, left only daughters upon his decease. Margaret Preston married Alan Pennington. Through this marriage, the manor of Richard Preston was removed from the Preston family. Preston Patrick however, passed to his brother, Sir John de Preston.
Sir John de Preston was a judge of the Court of Commons Pleas under two monarchs, Henry IV and Henry V, from which position he was obliged to retire in 1427, because of infirmities of old age. He was the last of the ‘de’ Prestons and left issue.
The fifteenth generation, John Preston, a Catholic priest, who received from Henry V a grant of the church of Sandal from the priory of St. Pancras. The second son Richard Preston, became his heir, and a daughter, who married Thomas de Ros, the owner of Kendal Castle, from whom was descended Queen Catherine Parr, the last wife of King Henry VIII.

Richard Preston
Prestons of Great Britain, abt.1425-1550

Richard Preston, son of John Preston, married Jacobina Middleton, dau. of John Middleton of Middleton Hall. To the Preston family estate of Preston Patrick he added the manor of Under Levins Hall, also in the Shire of Westmoreland; and in the thirtieth year of the reign of Henry VI, A.D. 1452, he and his wife obtained from the Archdeacon of Richmond the privilege of maintaining within the manors of Preston and Levins an oratory, or house of prayer. Richard was succeeded by his son.
Thomas Preston, Sixteenth Generation, son of Richard Preston, married Miss Redmayne of the estates of Twistleton and had issue:
1. John Preston who married Margaret Redmayne and who succeeded Thomas.
2. Lawrence Preston whose son married Miss Butler and left one daughter and heiress, Ann, who married William, first Lord Paget Knight of the Garter.
3. Helen Preston who married Lord Thomas Stanley of Monteagle.
John Preston, Seventeenth Generation, son of Thomas Preston, succeeded to both the family estates of Preston Patrick and Under Levins Hall, and married Margaret Redmayne, dau. of Richard Redmayne, of Harewood Castle, Yorkshire, and Over Levins Hall, Westmoreland. John left issue. (Over Levins Hall has been described as romantic seat that was much admired for the beauty of its park and gardens which, in 1841, had been preserved in the old style. The property passed from the Redmaynes to the Bellinghams, from them to the Grahams, then to the Suffolk family.
Sir Thomas Preston, Eighteenth Generation, son of John Preston, married Ann Thornburgh, daughter of William Thornburgh (Thornborough), of Hampsfield in Lancashire. She was a direct descendent in the fifteenth degree, through the family of Musgrave, Fitzwilliam, Plantagenet, and DeWarren of King William the Conqueror. For more genealogy on Thornburgh see this link.
During Sir Thomas Preston’s administration of the estates of Preston Patrick and Under Levins Hall of Westmoreland, were added the valuable properties of Furness Abbey and Holker Park of Lancashire. It was during the time of the suppression of the monasteries by King Henry VIII that the purchase from the trustees of the Crown of the site of the Abbey of Furness, with other large estates amounting in value to more than 3000 pounds a year was made. (The village of Levens and Levens Hall are south of Kendal. Holker Hall is near Cartmel on Humphrey Head in Morecambe Bay.)
Sir Thomas had three sons and six daughters:
1. John Preston born in 1511 d.1585 (or >1569) m. Margaret Curwen and 2nd Dorothy Layton Redmayne. John Preston and Margaret Curwen had 3 sons and a daughter. Margaret Curwen was the daughter of Sir Thomas Curwen, of Workington in Cumberland, and Agnes Strickland, was the daughter of Sir Walter Strickland of Syzergh Castle.
2. Christopher Preston b.ca.1520 d.5-27-1594 m. Margaret Southworth and 2nd Miss Jephson. Christopher became the founder of the powerful branch of the Prestons of Holker Hall.
3. George Preston who died without issue.
4. Ann Preston who married William Bancastre of Easington.
5. Ellen Preston who married first Sir James Leybourne of Cunwick Park, in Westmoreland and married second Lord Stanley, 3rd Lord Monteagle, by whom she had Elizabeth Stanley, who was the mother of William, Lord Morley and Monteagle, the discoverer of the Gunpowder Plot AD 1605.
6. Jane Preston who married William Lamplough Esq., of Dovenby Hall in Cumberland.
7. Dorothy Preston who married William Travers, Esq., of Nateby Hall in Lancashire.
8. Elizabeth Preston who married Robert Cancefield, Esq., of Robert Hall in Lancashire.
9. Catherine Preston who married Thomas Carus, one of the judges of the Court of the Queen’s Bench in the time of Queen Elizabeth who reigned from 1558-1603.
Sir Thomas died in 1523 and left to his eldest son, John, the estates of Preston Patrick, Under Levins Hall and Furness Abbey, while to his son Christopher, he devised the magnificent estate surrounding Holker Hall. (Links same as above.)
Source:Preston Genealogy edited by L.A. Wilson under direction of William Bowker Preston, pub. 1900.

30.  Susanna PRESTON (William2, John1) was born on October 7, 1772 in “Greenfield”, Botetourt Co., VA. She married Nathaniel Hart Jr. on August 26, 1797 in Montgomery Co., VA. She died on June 21, 1833 in “Spring Hill”, Woodford Co., KY, at age 60.
     Nathaniel HART Jr., son of Nathaniel and Sarah (Simpson) Hart, was born on September 30, 1770 in Caswell Co., NC. He died on February 7, 1844 in “Spring Hill”, Woodford Co., KY, at age 73.
     Children of Susanna Preston and Nathaniel Hart Jr. were as follows:
       143.        i.    Sarah Simpson HART, born June 8, 1800; married George Claiborne Thompson.
       144.       ii.    Letitia Preston HART, born March 15, 1802; married Arthur Hooe Wallace.
+     145.     iii.    Louisiana Breckinridge HART, born December 4, 1803 in “Spring Hill”, Woodford Co., KY; married Tobias Gibson.
       146.      iv.    Nathaniel HART was born on April 27, 1805. He died in 1854.
     Nathaniel was a farmer in Woodford Co., KY.
       147.       v.    William Preston HART was born on July 25, 1807. He died in 1868.
+     148.      vi.    Virginia H. HART, born June 14, 1809; married Alfred Shelby.
       149.    vii.    Mary Howard HART, born July 17, 1814; married William Voorhies.

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