Snobby St. Santorum of Mamby-Pamby Land

St. Santorum has taken the office of the President of the United States, hostage, and just because he is running for that office, we get a peek of what that office will look like in Vatican Land.

Santorum flogs our President for saying he wishes all Americans can own a college education. He calls him and his idea eletist
“snobby” However, every virgin in the world is a potential Saint of the Catholic church where in the Pope chooses members of the College of Cardinals that elect the next Pope.

“It’s snobby to want everyone to go to college. It’s not stuck-up, though, to pursue a higher education”.

I tried to find out how many Saints there are in Catholic history – and failed. On this site there are 892 under A. Some estimate 20,000 – and not one of them figured out Jesus took the vow of the Nazarite which forbids him to take sacrament!

http://www.catholic.org/saints/stindex.php

What makes me want to throw up, is the sugary description of some of these saints. For example

” Clare of Assisi was named patron of television because one Christmas when she was too ill to leave her bed she saw and heard Christmas Mass — even though it was taking place miles away.”

Puke! What fantasy, coming from a church that is famous for its ANTI-INTELLECTUALISM, where everything on earth is hijacked in some weird vision – and put in their holy pile. How dare that vest-sweatered wimp, hijack our Democracy while on St. Clare’s Holy Airwaves! And if you don’t go along with this Holy Snobbery – here come the Holy Whine!

“American Politics aren’t holy enough – for me. The White House needs to be sprinkled with holy water – for me!

I will post my Saint of the Weel until St. Santorum is out of the public eye!

I wonder who the Patron Saint of Freudian Psychology is? St. Paul…..for his edict bidding husbands to stop screwing their wives! Talk about – snbbery!

Jon the Nazarite

It’s snobby to want everyone to go to college. It’s not stuck-up, though, to pursue a higher education.
Rick Santorum parsed the difference Sunday morning on NBC’s “Meet The Press.”
Appearing at a campaign stop in Troy, Mich., Santorum — his voice thick with derision — said on Saturday: “President Obama once said he wants everybody in America to go to college. What a snob. There are good, decent men and women who go out and work hard everyday and put their skills to test that aren’t taught by some liberal college professor that [tries] to indoctrinate them.”
Anti-elitism is a popular chord, especially for a candidate appealing for working-class and blue-collar support, as Santorum is doing in Michigan. But his remarks also seemed to clash with the American ideal of self-betterment and the fact that college graduates fared much better through the recession than those lacking degrees.
Asked Sunday on NBC to explain his remark, Santorum assailed the “overly politicized values and [politically] correct values that are on most college and university campuses.” He said everyone should have the opportunity to go to college or acquire a “higher level of training skills.”
“But it doesn’t mean you have to get a four-year college degree,” Santorum said. “The question is what is best for you.”
He cited his seven children. “You know what, they have different skills, they have different things that they want to do with the lives and the idea of sort of saying, ‘Well, unless you do this… you’re not sort of living up to our goals,’ I disagree with that.”
Pressed by moderator David Gregory whether he encouraged his children to go to college, Santorum said he encouraged them “to get higher education.”
“In fact, if college is the best place for them, absolutely, but you know what? If going to a trade school and learning to be a carpenter or a plumber or other types of skills or an artist… or musician, all of those things are very important and worthwhile professions that we should not look down our nose at.”
Chris Christie, the outspoken New Jersey governor who has endorsed Mitt Romney, said Sunday that calling the president a snob was “probably over the line.”

“Every kid doesn’t want to go to college, but I think we should aspire to let every child reach his maximum or her maximum potential,” Christie said on CBS’ “Face the Nation.” “… And I certainly don’t think the president’s a snob for saying that.”

Patron saints are chosen as special protectors or guardians over areas of life. These areas can include occupations, illnesses, churches, countries, causes — anything that is important to us. The earliest records show that people and churches were named after apostles and martyrs as early as the fourth century.
Recently, the popes have named patron saints but patrons can be chosen by other individuals or groups as well. Patron saints are often chosen today because an interest, talent, or event in their lives overlaps with the special area. Angels can also be named as patron saints. A patron saint can help us when we follow the example of that saint’s life and when we ask for that saint’s intercessory prayers to God.
For example, Francis of Assisi loved nature and so he is patron of ecologists. Francis de Sales was a writer and so he is patron of journalists and writers. Clare of Assisi was named patron of television because one Christmas when she was too ill to leave her bed she saw and heard Christmas Mass — even though it was taking place miles away.

I was Bishop Martyr of Antinoe. Arians killed me.

350 of 892 Saints beginning with ‘A’.

The College of Cardinals is the body of all cardinals of the Catholic Church.[1]

A function of the college is to advise the pope about church matters when he summons them to an ordinary consistory.[2] It also convenes on the death or abdication of a pope as a papal conclave to elect a successor.[3] The college has no ruling power except during the sede vacante (papal vacancy) period, and even then its powers are extremely limited by the terms of the current law, which is laid down in the Apostolic constitution Universi Dominici Gregis and the Fundamental Law of Vatican City State.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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