Patton and The Glorious Revolution

If Jesus came to America, he did not come with the Mormons, but with the Orangemen of Ulster. Here is the premiere religion of America. All the others – are pretenders!

Jon the Nazarite

Patton Genealogy Report
Descendants of William Patton, M. A.

Generation No. 1

1. WILLIAM1 PATTON, M. A. was born Abt. 1590 in Ferrochie, Fifshire, Scotland, and died January 31, 1641/42 in Clondevadock, Clomany, Donegal, Ireland. He married MARGARET UNKNOWN Abt. 1620. She was born Abt. 1590.

Notes for WILLIAM PATTON, M. A.: The Roseberry-Keister Family Tree 7221 total entries, last updated Thu Mar 22 09:52:13 2001 All questions, comments or suggestions regarding information on this page should be addressed to: G. E. Roseberry ID: I5674 Reference Number: 5674 Title: Rev. 1 Name: William Patton 1 Sex: M Change Date: 03 FEB 2001 Immigration: BEF 1626 County Donegal, Ireland Note: during the King James Plantation at the beginning of the seventeenth century (the settling of Protestant colonies in Ireland to promote loyalty). Six counties were originally set aside to form the “Ulster Plantation.” 1 2 Occupation: Rector of the parishes of Ramoigh and Clonmary, the Barony of Raphoe and later at Aughnish, the Barony of Kilmacrenan AFT 1626 1 Residence: AFT 1626 Ireland Note: the estate of “Croghan” 1 Birth: ABT 1590 in Ferrochie, Fifeshire, Scotland 1 Death: 31 JAN 1641/42 in Clondevadock, Clonmany, Donegal, Ireland 3 Note: From “James Patton and the Appalachian Colonists” by Anne Rhea Bruce: The Pattons were originally landed gentry seated at Ferrochie, Fifeshire, Scotland. The progenitor of the Irish branch of the family, William Patton, M.A. was born in Scotland; had immigrated to Northern Ireland during the King James Plantation. He was in County Donegal by 1626 as Rector of the parishes of Ramoigh and Clonmary, Barony of Raphoe and later at Aughnish, Barony of Kilmacrenan. Rev. William Patton and his wife, Margaret, made their home at an estate called “Groghan” and reared to sons, Henry (Sr.) and John.

From “Chronicles of American Lineage”: The Pattons (Paten or Patis) are supposed to have reached England from Normandy, then to Scotland and later, with many other families, induced to leave Northern Scotland to colonize Northern Ireland with Scotch Presbyterians for political reasons by James 1st.

William was Rector of the parishes of Ramoigh, Aughanish and Clonmany, Diocese of Raphal County, in County Donegal, Ireland. The homeplace in Ireland was the Manor of Springfield, Barony of Kilmacrenan, County of Donegal, Province of Ulster.

From ” Coming to America; A Chronicle of the American Lineage of the Pattons” by C. L. Patton,Springfield, Illinois, 1954:

The earliest known progenitors of the Patton Pioneers in America were of scotch origin, living in the Highlands and Lowlands of Scotland, in the vicinity of Loch Linnhe. They were ardent Presbyterians and took their religion seriously. For many years they had opposed the tyranny of the English monarchs, who had denied them the right of freedom of worship or participation in civic affairs.

For centuries, the Irish, who were Roman Catholics, independent and aggressive in Character, had been a source of great concern to England. In the latter part of the sixteenth century, Queen Elizabeth conceived the plan of planting colonies of Protestants in Ireland, to promote loyalty in that rebellious country. Six counties comprising a half-million acres were set aside to form the Ulster Plantation. The settlement of this area was at first indifferent and inconsequential but after the advent of James the Sixth of Scotland, who became James the First of England, at the beginning of the seventeenth century, colonization became more active. The great majority of the colonists sent to Northern Ireland by James, were Scotch Lowlanders and English from the northern counties of England. These people, through intermarriage with the Irish, inaugurated the “Ulster Scots” or “Scotch-Irish.”

The reign of Charles the First (1625-1649) brought the Ulstermen, as well as the Presbyterians of the Lowlands of Scotland a period of vicious persecution, practically suppressing the Presbyterian religion in Ireland and demanding subservience to the Church of England, which bore heavily upon these staunch Protestants. This persecution continued throughout the reign of Charles the Second (1660-1685) and the passage of the Corporation acts and the Test Acts demanded conformity with the practices of the Church of England. Little relief was experienced by these unhappy people during the Cromwell Protectorate (1635-1658) which preceded the reign of Charles and despite the fact tha tall of this period was under Protestant domination, the Presbyterians and Nonconformists suffered quite as badly as they did under the persecutions of Catholic James, who ascended the throne in 1685.

It was during the reign of James the Second that the discontented and oppressed English invited William of Orange to accept the throne; jointly with his cousin Mary, daughter of James the Second. This precipitated war and induced many of the Scotch Lowlanders to join the army of William and proceed to Ulster to oppose the army of James. A successful resistance to the Siege of Londonderry in 1689 and a victory over the forces of James at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690 terminated hostilities and established William and Mary upon the throne of England.

Despite these victories, life became almost unbeaable in Ulster because of the many years of guerilola warfare with the Irish Celts. This, together withthe desire for more religious freedom and political independence and because of the glowing accounts of life in the New World, ws a detemining factor in causing the Ulsterites to seek their fortune in America. It is estimated that twenty thousand of the Scotch-Irish left Ireland in the first three decades of the eighteenth century. More than six thousand entered the Port of Philadelphia in the year 1729. These adventurers, however, did not tarry long in “The City of Brotherly Love” but moved into adjoining counties in the Province of Pennsylvania and acquired parcels of land, particularly in the County of Lancaster.

After a comparatively short residence in the Pennsylvania country, these hardy Scotch-Irish pioneers developed an urge for further exploration. Large numbers of them proceeded up the valley of the Shenandoah to the mountains and fertile valleys of Virginia. Coincident with this immigration was the movement of the Germans into the valley. They, for the most part, settled in the lower part of the valley in the region of the present town of Winchester, while the Scotch-Irish continued their trek up the valley into the county of Augusta and across the Blue Ridge into the present county of Pendleton, West Virginia. Their first settlement was near the present town of Staunton, which had been founded by John Lewis in 1732. From thence they spread to other parts of the Virginia Frontier, into North and South Carolina and Tennessee. By mid-century they were exploring the Ohio and Kentucky country and had established themselves on the headwaters of the James River and the region of the Cumberland. In all of these adventures the Pattons took an active part and left ehri imipress upon the communities in which they lived.

It seems certain that the various Pattons settling in Augusta County, Virginia, in the early part of the eighteenth century, were of the same origin, the father of whom was John Patton, brother of Colonel James Patton and Elizabeth Patton Preston. Colonel James had come from Ireland in 1730. Probably one of the compelling reasons for the mass migration at this time was the forced exile of John lewis in 1729. He was a brother-in-law of Henry Patton, having married Margaret Lynn, sister of Henry’s wife, Sarah Lynn. They were daughters of the Laird of Loch Lynn (Linnhe). John Lewis first took up his residence in Philadelphia but he soon went into Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, purchasing severla tracts of land in that county but later moving on to the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia.

The early attempts at colonization in America by the English were made at the incidence of the Crown and were not particlarly successful. At a later period independent immigration took place but was sporadic and disorganized. It was not long however before certain small groups found their way to the New World seeking a greater religious and political freedom than they had experienced in the mother country. Later, independent ship-owners brought increasing numbers of colonists to the small communities established by the ealier pioneers, hoping to find a haven where they might better their fortunes and social standing. Companies were organized and controlled by groups of men in England, under the protection of the King, for the purpose of increasing immigration and developing the resources of the colonies.

The immigrants were largely of the “middle class” of society and were composed of farmers, tradesmen, artisans, laborers and apprentices. The limited number of the “nobility” to venture to this new land were, as a rule, reprsentaives of the Crown and therefore not permanent residents. At a later time, considerable numbers of “redemptioners” and “political offenders” were transported to the colonies. There were two main sources of ingress in the early 1700’s; one being direct to Virginia and Massachusetts and the other up the Delaware to the Port of Philadelphia. A small number of the Scotch-Irish landed in Charleston, South Carolina, but by far the greater number came direct to Philadelphia because of the liberality of the Pennsylvania government, but the inhabitants of this part of the colony preferred to see the newcomers pass on, so they moved inland in search of unoccupied land.

The Scotch-Irish being on the whole the more venturesome, went further and penetrated the mountain valleys and spread northward and southward and thus formed a solid rim of settlement all along the Virginia frontier. Their first abode was in that part of Augusta County that later became Pendleton County, West Virginia. From this stopping point they soon advanced up the valley to southwestern Virginia, North Caolina and Tennessee and on to Ohio, Kentucky, Illinois and Missouri.

When the Scotch-Irish began to arrive in Philadelphia, the Secretary of the Province of Pennsylvania wrote, “It looks to me as if all of Ireland is to send its inhabitants hither, for last week not less than six ships arrived. It is strange that they thus crowd in where they are not wanted.” The Scotch-Irish were accustomed to not being wanted. This did not deter them from a continued and steady advance into more remote parts of the country. By 1738 when the first valley counties were established, they were in such numbers that a petition was sent by them to the Governor of Virginia, asking “that we might be allowed the liberty of our consciences in worshipping God in a way agreeable to the principles of our education.” The Governor graciously replied that “they would not be interfered with so long as they behaved peaceably, registered their meeting places, abjured the Stuart Pretender, the doctrine of transubstantiation and the Pope at Rome.” Nothing in this request disturbed a Presbyterian conscience so they, in turn, agreed to pay their tithes to the Established Church so long as they did not have to attend its services. His Honor welcomed an increase in quitrents and the Governor took pleasure in establishing a group of hardy people between the rich plantation owners and the inhabitants of the frontier. Thee was no one to object to the Scotch-Irignh in the Valley and this time they found rest and peace and thse descendants of the “persecuted” found contentment and dwelt amicably, one with another.

There, early settlers in Western Virginia were descended from nonconformist Presbyterians and the Covenanters. It has been said “They had such a fear of God that it left no room in their hearts for any fear of Man.” Certainly man they did not fear and persecution had taught them only to adhere more firmly to their principles, their customs and their faith.

The Pattons, on the whole, were a God-fearing, earnest and industrious lot and, despite trials and tribulations, became influential and aggressive members of their communities. They occupied positions of trust in both military and civic affairs and in general were successful in the pursuit of fortune.

Descendants of the early settlers, either from the Pilgrim fathers or from the colonists of Virginia, should take a justifiable pride in their early American ancestry. This feeling of pride, however, should rise from the sturdy character of the pioneers and from the things they accomplished and not from any false idea of an aristocratic heredity imported from the Mother Country. Those individuals who became prominent and influential in the development of the colonies did so through their own initiative, energy and ability and not through the influence and favor of the “Hierarchy.”

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 27, Ed. 1, Tree #2183, Date of Import: Aug 12, 2000] 4

Marriage 1 Margaret b: ABT 1590 Married: ABT 1620 1 Children Henry Patton b: 31 JAN 1626/27 in Ramoigh Parish, Donegal, Ireland John Patton b: ABT 1630 in Ireland

Sources: Title: James Patton and the Appalachian Colonists Abbrev: Patton and Colonists Author: Johnson, Patricia Givens Publication: Edmonds Printing Inc., Pulaski, VA, 1983 Page: p. 4 Title: Coming to America: A Chronicle of the American Lineage of the Pattons Abbrev: Coming to Americal Author: Patton, C. L. Publication: Springfield, IL, 1954 Page: quoted from within World Family Tree, Vol. 27, Tree #2183 Title: World Family Tree Vol. 24, Ed. 1 Abbrev: World Family Tree Vol. 24 Author: Brøderbund Software, Inc. Publication: Release date: July 16, 1998 Note: Customer pedigree. Page: Tree #0881, Date of Import: Sep 6, 2000 Title: World Family Tree Research, Vol. 1-27 Abbrev: World Family Tree Publication: Broderbund Software, Inc.

Jahnz Entries: 5622 Updated: Sat Aug 25 21:20:30 2001 Contact: Jeanette Jahnz ID: I4307 Name: William PATTON Sex: M Birth: in ,,SCOTLAND Death: 1641 in ,,IRELAND

Marriage 1 UNKNOWN Children Henry PATTON b: 1629 in ,,SCOTLAND

More About WILLIAM PATTON, M. A.: Occupation: 1626, Rector-Rev.

Children of WILLIAM PATTON and MARGARET UNKNOWN are: 2. i. HENRY (UNKNOWN)2 PATTON, SR., b. January 31, 1626/27, Ramoigh Parish “Donegal” Ireland; d. Aft. 1689, Donegal, Ireland. 3. ii. JOHN (UNKNOWN) PATTON, SR., b. Abt. 1630, Donegal Ireland; d. Aft. 1659, Donegal Ireland.

e Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, is the overthrow of King James II of England (James VII of Scotland and James II of Ireland) by a union of English Parliamentarians with the Dutch stadtholder William III of Orange-Nassau (William of Orange). William’s successful invasion of England with a Dutch fleet and army led to his ascending the English throne as William III of England jointly with his wife Mary II of England.
King James’s policies of religious tolerance after 1685 met with increasing opposition by leading political circles who were troubled by the King’s Catholicism and his close ties with France. The crisis facing the king came to a head in 1688, with the birth of the King’s son, James Francis Edward Stuart, on 10 June (Julian calendar).[nb 1] This disrupted the existing line of succession by displacing the heir presumptive, his daughter Mary, a Protestant and the wife of William of Orange, with young James as heir apparent. The prospect of a Roman Catholic dynasty in the kingdoms was now likely. Key leaders of the Tories united with members of the opposition Whigs and set out to resolve the crisis by inviting William of Orange to England,[1] which the stadtholder, who feared an Anglo-French alliance, had indicated as a condition for a military intervention.
After consolidating political and financial support, William crossed the North Sea and English Channel with a large invasion fleet in November 1688, landing at Torbay. After only two minor clashes between the two opposing armies in England, and anti-Catholic riots in several towns, James’s regime collapsed, largely by a lack of resolve shown by the king. However, this was followed by the protracted Williamite War in Ireland and Dundee’s rising in Scotland.[2] In England’s geographically-distant American colonies, the revolution led to the collapse of the Dominion of New England and the overthrow of the Province of Maryland’s government. Following a defeat of his forces at the Battle of Reading on 9 December, James and his wife fled the nation; James, however, returned to London for a two-week period that culminated in his final departure for France on 23 December. By threatening to withdraw his troops, William in February 1689 convinced a newly chosen Convention Parliament to make him and his wife joint monarchs.
The Revolution permanently ended any chance of Catholicism becoming re-established in England. For British Catholics its effects were disastrous both socially and politically: Catholics were denied the right to vote and sit in the Westminster Parliament for over a century, were denied commissions in the army; the monarch was forbidden to be Catholic or to marry a Catholic, a prohibition that continues to 2012. The Revolution led to limited toleration for nonconformist Protestants, although it would be some time before they had full political rights. It has been argued that James’s overthrow began modern English parliamentary democracy: never since has the monarch held absolute power, and the Bill of Rights has become one of the most important documents in the political history of Britain.
Internationally, the Revolution was related to the War of the Grand Alliance on mainland Europe. It has been seen as the last successful invasion of England.[3] It ended all attempts by England in the Anglo-Dutch Wars of the 17th century to subdue the Dutch Republic by military force. However, the resulting economic integration and military co-operation between the English and Dutch Navies shifted the dominance in world trade from the Dutch Republic to England and later to Great Britain.
The expression “Glorious Revolution” was first used by John Hampden in late 1689,[4] and is an expression that is still used by the British Parliament.[5] The Glorious Revolution is also occasionally termed the Bloodless Revolution, albeit inaccurately. The English Civil War (also known as the Great Rebellion) was still within living memory for most of the major English participants in the events of 1688, and for them, in comparison to that war (or even the Monmouth Rebellion of 1685) the deaths in the conflict of 1688 were mercifully few.

During his three-year reign, King James II became directly involved in the political battles in England between Catholicism and Protestantism, on the one hand, and on the other, between the Divine Right of Kings and the political rights of the Parliament of England. James’s greatest political problem was his Catholicism, which left him alienated from both parties in England. The low church Whigs had failed in their attempt to pass the Exclusion Bill to exclude James from the throne between 1679 and 1681, and James’s supporters were the high church Anglican Tories. In Scotland, his supporters on the Parliament of Scotland increased attempts to force the Covenanters to renounce their faith and accept episcopalian rule of the church by the monarch.
When James inherited the English throne in 1685, he had much support in the ‘Loyal Parliament’, which was composed mostly of Tories. His Catholicism was a concern to many, but the fact that he had no son, and his daughters were Protestants, was a “saving grace”. James’s attempt to relax the penal laws alienated his natural supporters, however, because the Tories viewed this as tantamount to disestablishment of the Church of England. Abandoning the Tories, James looked to form a ‘King’s party’ as a counterweight to the Anglican Tories, so in 1687 James supported the policy of religious toleration and issued the Declaration of Indulgence. By allying himself with the Catholics, Dissenters, and nonconformists, James hoped to build a coalition that would advance Catholic emancipation.
In May 1686, James decided to obtain from the English courts of the common law a ruling which affirmed his power to dispense with Acts of Parliament. He dismissed judges who disagreed with him on this matter as well as the Solicitor General Heneage Finch. Eleven out of the twelve judges ruled in favour of dispensing power.[6]

Legacy
The Glorious Revolution of 1688 is considered by some as being one of the most important events in the long evolution of the respective powers of Parliament and the Crown in England. With the passage of the Bill of Rights, it stamped out once and for all any possibility of a Catholic monarchy, and ended moves towards absolute monarchy in the British kingdoms by circumscribing the monarch’s powers. These powers were greatly restricted; he or she could no longer suspend laws, levy taxes, make royal appointments, or maintain a standing army during peacetime without Parliament’s permission – to this day the Army is known as the “British Army” not the “Royal Army” as it is, in some sense, Parliament’s Army and not that of the King. (This is, however, a complex issue, as the Crown remained – and remains – the source of all executive authority in the British army, with legal implications for unlawful orders etc.).[96] Since 1689, government under a system of constitutional monarchy in England, and later the United Kingdom, has been uninterrupted. Since then, Parliament’s power has steadily increased while the Crown’s has steadily declined. Unlike in the English civil war of the mid-seventeenth century, the “Glorious Revolution” did not involve the masses of ordinary people in England (the majority of the bloodshed occurred in Ireland). This fact has led many historians, including Samuel Saunders Webb,[97] to suggest that, in England at least, the events more closely resemble a coup d’état than a social revolution.[nb 5] This view of events does not contradict what was originally meant by “revolution”: the coming round of an old system of values in a circular motion, back to its original position, as Britain’s constitution was reasserted, rather than formed anew.[98][99]
Prior to his arrival in England, the new king William III of England was not Anglican, but rather was a member of the Dutch Reformed Church. Consequently, as a Calvinist and Presbyterian he was now in the unenviable position of being the head of the Church of England, while technically being a Nonconformist. This was, however, not his main motive for promoting religious toleration. More important in that respect was the need to keep happy his Catholic allies[nb 6] in the coming struggle with Louis XIV.[100] Though he had promised legal toleration for Catholics in his Declaration of October, 1688, he was ultimately unsuccessful in this respect, due to opposition by the Tories in the new Parliament.[101] The Revolution led to the Act of Toleration of 1689, which granted toleration to Nonconformist Protestants, but not to Catholics.
The Williamite war in Ireland can be seen as the source of later conflict, including The Troubles of recent times. The Williamite victory in Ireland is still commemorated by the Orange Order for preserving British and Protestant dominance in the country.
In North America, the Glorious Revolution precipitated the 1689 Boston revolt in which a well-organized “mob” of provincial militia and citizens successfully deposed the hated governor Edmund Andros, which has been seen as a precedent for the American War of Independence a century later. In New York, Leisler’s Rebellion caused the colonial administrator, Francis Nicholson, to flee to England. A third event, Maryland’s Protestant Rebellion was directed against the proprietary government, seen as Catholic-dominated.
Lord Macaulay’s account of the Revolution in The History of England from the Accession of James the Second exemplifies its semi-mystical significance to later generations.

Formation and early years
The 1790s were a time of political and religious conflict in Ireland. On one side were the Irish nationalists (mostly Irish Catholics, but also some liberal Anglicans) and on the other were the so-called “Protestant Ascendancy” and its supporters. In October 1791 the nationalist Society of United Irishmen was founded by liberal Protestants in Belfast. Its leaders were mainly Presbyterians. They called for a reform of the Irish Parliament that would extend the vote to all Irish men (regardless of religion) and give Ireland greater independence from Britain.[15]
Although the United Irishmen were trying to unite Catholics and Protestants behind their goal, northern County Armagh was undergoing fierce sectarian conflict. Catholics and Protestants set up rural “vigilante” groups – on the Catholic side was the “Defenders” and on the Protestant side was the “Peep-o’-Day Boys”. In July 1795 a Reverend Devine had held a sermon at Drumcree Church to commemorate the “Battle of the Boyne”.[16] In his History of Ireland Vol I (published in 1809), the historian Francis Plowden described the events that followed this sermon:
Reverend Devine so worked up the minds of his audience, that upon retiring from service, on the different roads leading to their respective homes, they gave full scope to the anti-papistical zeal, with which he had inspired them… falling upon every Catholic they met, beating and bruising them without provocation or distinction, breaking the doors and windows of their houses, and actually murdering two unoffending Catholics in a bog. This unprovoked atrocity of the Protestants revived and redoubled religious rancour. The flame spread and threatened a contest of extermination…
The Orange Order was founded after an incident known as the “Battle of the Diamond”, which happened two months after the Drumcree sermon. It took place on 21 September 1795 near Loughgall, a few miles from Drumcree. It was a clash between Defenders and Peep-o’-Day Boys[17][18][19][20] in which four to thirty (mostly un-armed) Defenders were killed. The Governor of Armagh, Lord Gosford, gave his opinion of the violence in County Armagh that followed the “battle” at a meeting of magistrates on 28 December 1795. He said:
It is no secret that a persecution is now raging in this country… the only crime is… profession of the Roman Catholic faith. Lawless banditti have constituted themselves judges….[21]
However, two former grand masters of the Order, William Blacker and Robert Hugh Wallace, have questioned this statement, saying whoever the Governor believed were the “lawless banditti” they could not have been Orangemen as there were no lodges in existence at the time of his speech.[22] According to historian Jim Smyth:
Later apologists rather implausibly deny any connection between the Peep-o’-Day Boys and the first Orangemen or, even less plausibly, between the Orangemen and the mass wrecking of Catholic cottages in Armagh in the months following ‘the Diamond’ — all of them, however, acknowledge the movement’s lower class origins.[23]

Daniel Winters’s home near Loughgall
The Order’s three main founders were James Wilson (founder of the Orange Boys), Daniel Winter and James Sloan.[24] The first Orange lodge established in nearby Dyan, County Tyrone. Its first grand master was James Sloan of Loughgall, in whose inn the victory by the Peep-o’-Day Boys was celebrated.[25] Like the Peep-o’-Day Boys, one of its goals was to hinder the efforts of Irish nationalist groups and uphold the “Protestant Ascendancy”. The Orange Order’s first ever marches were to celebrate the “Battle of the Boyne” and they took place on 12 July 1796 in Portadown, Lurgan and Waringstown.[26]
By the time the Orange Order formed, the United Irishmen (still led mainly by Protestants) had become a republican group and sought an independent Irish republic that would “Unite Catholic, Protestant and Dissenter”. United Irishmen activity was on the rise, and the government hoped to thwart it by backing the Orange Order from 1796 onward.[17] Nationalist historians Thomas A. Jackson and John Mitchel argued that the government’s goal was to hinder the United Irishmen by fomenting sectarianism — it would create disunity and disorder under pretence of “passion for the Protestant religion”.[27] Mitchel wrote that the government invented and spread “fearful rumours of intended massacres of all the Protestant people by the Catholics”.[28] Historian Richard R Madden wrote that “efforts were made to infuse into the mind of the Protestant feelings of distrust to his Catholic fellow-countrymen”.[28] Thomas Knox, British military commander in Ulster, wrote in August 1796 that “As for the Orangemen, we have rather a difficult card to play…we must to a certain degree uphold them, for with all their licentiousness, on them we must rely for the preservation of our lives and properties should critical times occur”.[17][29]
When the United Irishmen rebellion broke out in 1798, Orangemen and ex-Peep-o’-Day Boys helped government forces in suppressing it. According to Ruth Dudley Edwards and two former grand masters, Orangemen were among the first to contribute to repair funds for Catholic property damaged in the violence surrounding the rebellion.[30][31]

The Ulster Scots (Ulster-Scots: tha Ulstèr-Scotch [fowk])[2] are an ethnic group in Ireland, descended from Lowland Scots and English from the border of those two countries, many from the “Border Reivers” culture. These people first began to occupy Ireland in large numbers with the Plantation of Ulster, a planned process of colonisation which took place under the auspices of James VI of Scotland and I of England on land confiscated from the Irish nobility, most extensively in the Province of Ulster. The term “Ulster-Scots” refers to both these colonists of the 17th century and, less commonly, to the Gallowglass who began to arrive from what is now northwest Scotland centuries earlier.
Ulster-Scots were largely descended from colonists from Galloway, Ayrshire, and the Scottish Borders Country, although some descend from people further north in the Scottish Lowlands and the Highlands. Ulster-Scots emigrated in significant numbers to the United States and all corners of the then-worldwide British Empire — Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa — and to a lesser extent to Argentina and Chile in South America. Scotch-Irish is a traditional term for Ulster Scots who later emigrated to what is now the United States; “Scots-Irish” is a more recent form of the American term,[3] and is not to be confused with Irish-Scots, i.e., recent Irish immigrants to Scotland.

Although population movement of Gaels to and from the northeast of Ireland and the west of Scotland had been on-going since pre-historic times, a class of warriors from the west of what is now Scotland fought in significant numbers as mercenaries for Irish kings from the mid-13th century to the end of the 16th century. These were known as gallowglass, from the Irish for “foreign gaels”, referring to their mixed Norse and Gaelic heritage. Many settled in Ireland at the conclusion of their service. The next major influx of Scots was a concentrated migration of Lowland Scots to Ulster, mainly during the 17th and 18th centuries.
The first major influx of border English and Lowland Scots into Ulster came in the first two decades of the 17th century. Starting in 1609, Scots began arriving into state-sponsored settlements as part of the Plantation of Ulster. This scheme was intended to confiscate all the lands of the Gaelic Irish nobility in Ulster and to settle the province with Protestant English and Scottish colonists. Under this scheme, a substantial number of Scots were settled, mostly in the south and west of Ulster, on confiscated land.
At the same time, there was an independent Scottish settlement in the east of the province, which had not been affected by the terms of the plantation. In east Down and Antrim, Scottish migration was led by James Hamilton and Sir Hugh Montgomery, two Ayrshire lairds. This started in May 1606 and was followed in 1610.
During the Irish Rebellion of 1641, the native Irish gentry attempted to expel the English and Scottish settlers, resulting in severe violence, massacres and ultimately leading to the deaths of between four and six thousand settlers over the winter of 1641-42.[4] Native Irish civilians were massacred in kind.[5]
The Ulster-Scottish population in Ireland was further augmented during the subsequent Irish Confederate Wars, when a Scottish Covenanter army was landed in the province to protect the Ulster-Scottish settlers from native Irish landowners. After the war was over, many of their soldiers settled permanently in eastern Ulster.[6] The war itself, part of the Wars of the Three Kingdoms, ended in the 1650s, with the Cromwellian conquest of Ireland. At the head of the army, Oliver Cromwell re-conquered Ireland. Defeating the native Irish forces on behalf of the English Commonwealth, he and his forces employed methods and inflicted casualties among the civilian Irish population that were long commonly considered by historians and the popular culture to be outside of the accepted military ethics of the day (see more on the debate here). Under the Act of Settlement 1652, all Catholic-owned land was confiscated and the Plantations, which had been destroyed by the rebellion of 1641, were restored. However, due to the Scots’ enmity to the English Parliament in the final stages of the English Civil War, English settlers rather than Scots were the main beneficiary of this scheme.
There was a generation of calm in Ireland until another war broke out in 1689, again due to political conflict closely aligned with ethnic and religious differences. The Williamite war in Ireland (1689–91) was fought between Jacobites who supported the restoration of the Catholic James II to the throne of England and Williamites who supported the Protestant William of Orange. The Protestant Ulster community, including the Scots, fought on the Williamite side in the war against Irish Catholics and their French allies. The fear of a repeat of the massacres of 1641, religious persecution under a Catholic monarch, as well as their wish to hold onto lands which had been confiscated from Catholic landowners, were all principal motivating factors.
The Williamite forces, composed of British, Dutch and Danish armies as well as troops raised in Ulster, ended Jacobite resistance by 1691, confirming the Protestant monopoly on power in Ireland. Their victories at Derry, the Boyne and Aughrim are still commemorated by the Orange Order into the 21st century.
Finally, another major influx of Scots into northern Ireland occurred in the late 1690s, when tens of thousands of people fled a famine in Scotland to come to Ulster.[7]
It was only after the 1690s that Scottish settlers and their descendants, the majority of whom were Presbyterian, gained numeric superiority in Ulster. Along with Catholic Irish, they were legally disadvantaged by the Penal Laws, which gave full rights only to members of the state church (the Church of Ireland), who were mainly Anglo-Irish and converts or the descendants of English settlers. For this reason, up until the 19th century, there was considerable disharmony between Dissenters and the ruling Protestant Ascendancy in Ireland. With the enforcement of Queen Anne’s 1703 Test Act, which caused further discrimination against all who did not participate in the established church, considerable numbers of Ulster-Scots migrated to the colonies in British America throughout the 18th century.
Towards the end of the 18th century many Ulster-Scots Presbyterians ignored religious differences and, along with many Catholic Irish, joined the United Irishmen to participate in the Irish Rebellion of 1798 in support of republican and egalitarian ideals.
[edit] 1800 – Present
See also: History of the Orange Institution

This section requires expansion.
[edit] Scotch-Irish / Ulster Scots
Further information: Scotch-Irish American

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Andrew Jackson, seventh President of the United States, was the first of Scotch-Irish extraction.
Just a few generations after arriving in Ulster, considerable numbers of Ulster-Scots emigrated to the North American colonies of Great Britain. Between 1717 and 1775, an estimated 200,000 migrated to what became the United States of America.[8] In the United States Census of 2000, 4.3 million Americans (1.5% of the population of the United States) claimed Scotch-Irish ancestry. The author Jim Webb suggests that the true number of people with some Scotch-Irish heritage in the United States is more in the region of 27 million, possibly because contemporary Americans with some Scotch-Irish heritage may regard themselves as either Irish or Scottish.[9][10][11]
[edit] Culture
Because of the large scale intermingling of the Ulster Scots population with the Irish, it is difficult to define distinct aspects of Ulster Scots that would distinguish it from either. An example of this being that the Ulster Scots Agency itself points to many of its cultural icons as being from either the Scottish lowlands or from Ireland.
[edit] Language
Ulster Scots, the local dialect of Lowland Scots, which has, since the 1980s, also been called ‘Ullans’, a portmanteau neologism popularised by the physician, amateur historian and politician Dr Ian Adamson,[12] merging Ulster and Lallans – the Scots for Lowlands[13]- but also an acronym for “Ulster-Scots language in literature and native speech”.[14]
[edit] Music
In music, there is believed to be[weasel words][original research?][who?] a distinguishable line between the cultures of the native Irish and the Ulster-Scots living in Ireland. In Ireland the traditional music is focused around the 19th century ‘session’ or until the 1990s, ‘kitchen session’. This is a regular meeting, often weekly, and is marked by informal arrangement of both musicians and audience, although Irish traditional music is one of the most influential types of music known to the modern world, and can be heard in some of the Ulster Scots music. Protestant Scottish traditional music is sometimes similar to Irish and Scottish Gaelic-centred music, in that it is usually informal. A popular example of Protestant Ulster-Scots musical events is the marching bands. Here a formal and organised structure is more obvious. Although they play less frequently, these bands meet regularly in community halls to tune their instruments and to practice popular tunes and songs. The strong Scottish Unionist roots of the Ulster-Scots musical scene is evident through the continuing celebrations during the Marching Season, which has caused much controversy in Northern Ireland.[citation needed]
[edit] Intermingling and intermarriage in Ulster
A question that has been raised by many historians about the Ulster-Scots is the question of intermingling and more importantly, intermarriage between the native Irish and the incoming Scots. However others contest such claims.
Pádraig Ó Snodaigh, author of the book Hidden Ulster, Protestants and the Irish language, states that many of the settlers came from Gaelic speaking areas in Scotland and thus would have culturally meshed well with their new neighbours. Also he states that church records show that by 1716 close to ten percent of ministers in Ulster preached in Gaelic. He claims that such cultural and geographic affinity would have produced numerous conversions and also marriages.[15] In addition James G. Leyburn, author of The Scotch-Irish: A social history, quotes James Reid, a historian of the Irish Presbyterian Church in 1853, that when the marriage ban was lifted in 1610 that it was a “great joy to all parties”. However Professor Leyburn examines both sides of the intermixture debate in Chapter 10 “Intermarriage with the Irish” where after examination of both viewpoints, ends the chapter by giving his own view of the matter:
“If one must give his verdict, the weight of evidence seems to be on the side of little intermixture. The Scotch-Irish, as they came to be known in America, were overwhelmingly Scottish in ancestry and Presbyterian in faith. To the extent that occasional intermarriage occurred, the Irish partner seems almost invariably to have been absorbed into the Presbyterian element.”[16]
James Woodburn holds that the Scots and Irish “commonly intermarried”.[17] In 1923, The Handbook of the Ulster Question published by the Free State government, stated that English politicians were quite perturbed how the Scots were ready enough to intermarry with the Irish.[18]
[edit] Hereditary disease
The North American ancestry of the X-linked form of the genetic disease, congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, has been traced to Ulster Scots who came to Nova Scotia in 1761 on the ship Hopewell.[19]

Generation No. 2

2. HENRY (UNKNOWN)2 PATTON, SR. (WILLIAM1) was born January 31, 1626/27 in Ramoigh Parish “Donegal” Ireland, and died Aft. 1689 in Donegal, Ireland.

Notes for HENRY (UNKNOWN) PATTON, SR.: The Roseberry-Keister Family Tree 7221 total entries, last updated Thu Mar 22 09:52:13 2001 All questions, comments or suggestions regarding information on this page should be addressed to: G. E. Roseberry ID: I5676 Reference Number: 5676 Name: Henry Patton 1 Sex: M Change Date: 03 FEB 2001 Death: AFT 1689 2 Residence: Note: Henry settled in the Province of Ulster in the north of Ireland near the Town of Newton-Limagdy. He inherited the Estate of Crogann (Groghan) in Clondevaddock, County Donegal, Ireland.

3 Birth: 31 JAN 1626/27 in Ramoigh Parish, Donegal, Ireland 4

Father: William Patton b: ABT 1590 in Ferrochie, Fifeshire, Scotland Mother: Margaret b: ABT 1590

Marriage 1 Spouse Unknown Children Rebecca Patton b: ABT 1650 Henry Patton b: 1660 in Caiggo, Dundee, Scotland

Sources: Title: James Patton and the Appalachian Colonists Abbrev: Patton and Colonists Author: Johnson, Patricia Givens Publication: Edmonds Printing Inc., Pulaski, VA, 1983 Page: p. 4 Title: World Family Tree Vol. 27, Ed. 1 Abbrev: World Family Tree Vol. 27 Author: Brøderbund Software, Inc. Publication: Release date: September 15, 1998 Note: Customer pedigree. Page: Tree #2183, Date of Import: Aug 12, 2000 Title: World Family Tree Vol. 27, Ed. 1 Abbrev: World Family Tree Vol. 27 Author: Brøderbund Software, Inc. Publication: Release date: September 15, 1998 Note: Customer pedigree. Page: Tree #2183 Title: World Family Tree Vol. 24, Ed. 1 Abbrev: World Family Tree Vol. 24 Author: Brøderbund Software, Inc. Publication: Release date: July 16, 1998 Note: Customer pedigree. Page: Tree #0881, Date of Import: Sep 6, 2000

Jahnz Entries: 5622 Updated: Sat Aug 25 21:20:30 2001 Contact: Jeanette Jahnz ID: I4305 Name: Henry PATTON Title: Sr. Sex: M Birth: 1629 in ,,SCOTLAND Death: AFT 1641 Note: The Pattons (Paten, Patis) are supposed to have reached England from Normandy then to Scotland & later with many other families induced to leave Northern Scotland to colonize Northern Ireland with Scotch Presbyterians for political reasons by James I.

Father: William PATTON b: in ,,SCOTLAND Mother: UNKNOWN

Marriage 1 UNKNOWN Children Henry PATTON b: ABT 1660 in ,Dundee(Lowlands),SCOTLAND

Children of HENRY (UNKNOWN) PATTON, SR. are: i. REBECCA3 PATTON, b. Abt. 1650.

Notes for REBECCA PATTON: The Roseberry-Keister Family Tree 7221 total entries, last updated Thu Mar 22 09:52:13 2001 All questions, comments or suggestions regarding information on this page should be addressed to: G. E. Roseberry ID: I5680 Reference Number: 5680 Name: Rebecca Patton 1 Sex: F Change Date: 03 FEB 2001 Birth: ABT 1650 1

Father: Henry Patton b: 31 JAN 1626/27 in Ramoigh Parish, Donegal, Ireland

Sources: Title: World Family Tree Vol. 27, Ed. 1 Abbrev: World Family Tree Vol. 27 Author: Brøderbund Software, Inc. Publication: Release date: September 15, 1998 Note: Customer pedigree. Page: Tree #2183, Date of Import: Aug 12, 2000

4. ii. HENRY (PATTEN) PATTON, JR. ESQ., b. 1660, Caiggo “Dundee” Ireland; d. 1743, Clodevaddock “Parish” Ireland.

3. JOHN (UNKNOWN)2 PATTON, SR. (WILLIAM1) was born Abt. 1630 in Donegal Ireland, and died Aft. 1659 in Donegal Ireland. He married NANCY NEELY.

Notes for JOHN (UNKNOWN) PATTON, SR.: McDaniel-Patton File Entries: 18170 Updated: Sat Aug 25 15:39:57 2001 Contact: Lynn Mittet ID: I19779 Name: John PATTON 1 Sex: M Birth: ABT. 1630 in Donegal, Ireland 1 Birth: ABT. 1630 Death: AFT. 1659 in Donegal, Ireland 1

Father: William PATTON b: 1590 in Scotland Mother: MARGARET

Marriage 1 Nancy NEELY b: in Donegal, Ireland Children Margaret PATTON b: ABT. 1656 in Donegal, Ireland

Sources: Title: William Patton abt. 1590.FTW Repository: Call Number: Media: Other Text: Date of Import: Apr 19, 2001

Child of JOHN PATTON and NANCY NEELY is: 5. i. MARGARET (NEELY)3 PATTON, b. Abt. 1676, Scotland; d. Abt. 1727.

Generation No. 3

4. HENRY (PATTEN)3 PATTON, JR. ESQ. (HENRY (UNKNOWN)2, WILLIAM1) was born 1660 in Caiggo “Dundee” Ireland, and died 1743 in Clodevaddock “Parish” Ireland. He married SARAH LYNN 1696 in Kilmacrenan “County Donegal: Ireland, daughter of LAIRD OF LOCH LYNN DAVID LYNN. She was born 1664 in Kilmacrenan, Scotland.

Notes for HENRY (PATTEN) PATTON, JR. ESQ.: miclew 3774 total entries, last updated Thu Sep 13 08:22:03 2001 All questions, comments or suggestions regarding information on this page should be addressed to: Michele Simmons Lewis ID: I2842 Name: Henry PATTON Sex: M Birth: 1660 in Caiggo, Dundee, Scotland Death: 1743 in Clodevaddock, Parrish, Ireland Reference Number: 2842

Father: Henry PATTON b: 31 JAN 1626/27 in Ramoigh Parish, Donegal, Ireland Mother: UNKNOWN

Marriage 1 Sarah LYNN Married: 1696 in Kilmacrenan, County Donegal, Northern Ireland Children Robert PATTON Thomas PATTON John J. PATTON Benjamin PATTON Charles PATTON David PATTON Richard PATTON Elizabeth PATTON Andrew PATTON Henry PATTON Matthew PATTON Hugh PATTON William PATTON James PATTON b: 1692 in Newton-Limavady, Londonderry, Ireland

Jahnz Entries: 5622 Updated: Sat Aug 25 21:20:30 2001 Contact: Jeanette Jahnz ID: I4303 Name: Henry PATTON Title: Jr. Sex: M Birth: ABT 1660 in ,Dundee(Lowlands),SCOTLAND 1 Death: AFT 1692 in Prob Newton Lemavaddy,Londonderry, IRE 2 Note: Other children may be: William H,Matthew H,Thomas H,Robert H,Henry Jr,David H, Benjamin H, Hugh H, & James B-1692 Ireland

Father: Henry PATTON b: 1629 in ,,SCOTLAND Mother: UNKNOWN

Marriage 1 Sarah LYNN b: CA 1662 in Co Donegal,Ulster,IRELAND Married: ABT 1688 in ,Dundee,SCOTLAND Children John (Capt) PATTON b: ABT 1689 in Derry,Ulster,IRELAND James (Col) PATTON b: 1692 in Newton Limavaddy,Londonderry,IRE Elizabeth PATTON b: 1700 in Ulster,Donegal,IRE Andrew PATTON Richard PATTON Robert PATTON b: 1685 in ,Donegal,IRE William PATTON Matthew PATTON Thomas PATTON Henry PATTON David PATTON Benjamin PATTON Hugh PATTON

Sources: WFT 18-1079 says Croghan,Barony of Kolmoerenan,Donegal,IRE 4-0389 says Ferrod ie (Freuchie)Co Fife,SCOT WFT 18-1079

Notes for SARAH LYNN: The Roseberry-Keister Family Tree 7221 total entries, last updated Thu Mar 22 09:52:13 2001 All questions, comments or suggestions regarding information on this page should be addressed to: G. E. Roseberry ID: I7107 Reference Number: 7107 Name: Sarah Lynn Note: daughter Laird of Loch Lynn, Scotland 1 2 Name: Patton 1 Sex: F Change Date: 03 FEB 2001 Birth: 1664 in Kilmacrenan, Scotland 3

Father: David Lynn b: ABT 1635

Marriage 1 Henry Patton b: 1660 in Caiggo, Dundee, Scotland Married: ABT 1685 4 2 Children Richard Patton b: ABT 1685 Thomas Patton b: 1686 John Patton b: ABT 1689 in Newton-Limavady, Derry (now Londonderry), Ireland Andrew Patton b: BEF 1690 James Patton b: 08 JUL 1692 in Newton Limavady, Limavady, Londonderry, Ireland Robert Patton b: ABT 1695 Charles Patton b: ABT 1695 in Ireland David Patton b: ABT 1695 Patton b: ABT 1695 Patton b: ABT 1695 Patton b: ABT 1695 Matthew Patton b: ABT 1695 Benjamin Patton b: ABT 1695 Elizabeth Patton b: 25 DEC 1700 in Newton-Limavady, Derry (now Londonderry), Ireland Henry Patton b: ABT 1705 William Patton b: ABT 1706 in Ireland Hugh Patton b: ABT 1710

Sources: Title: The Compendium of American Geneaolgy, 1600s-1800s Abbrev: Compendium American Genealogy Author: Virkus Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, Baltimore, 1997 Page: v. 5; p. 164. Title: James Patton and the Appalachian Colonists Abbrev: Patton and Colonists Author: Johnson, Patricia Givens Publication: Edmonds Printing Inc., Pulaski, VA, 1983 Page: p. 4 Title: World Family Tree Vol. 27, Ed. 1 Abbrev: World Family Tree Vol. 27 Author: Brøderbund Software, Inc. Publication: Release date: September 15, 1998 Note: Customer pedigree. Page: Tree #2183, Date of Import: Aug 12, 2000 Title: The Compendium of American Geneaolgy, 1600s-1800s Abbrev: Compendium American Genealogy Author: Virkus Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, Baltimore, 1997 Page: v. 5; p. 164. Lists c. 1670

Children of HENRY PATTON and SARAH LYNN are: 6. i. ROBERT (LYNN)4 PATTON, b. Abt. 1685, Donegal, Ireland; d. June 1755, Sadsbury “Chester Co., ” Pennsylvania. 7. ii. THOMAS (LYNN) PATTON, SR., b. 1686, Ireland; d. Aft. 1774. 8. iii. JOHN (LYNN) PATTON, SR., CAPT., b. 1689, Newton-Limavady, Derry (now Londonderry), Ireland; d. 1757, August Co., (Now Rockingham Co., ) Virginia. iv. ANDREW (LYNN) PATTON, b. Bef. 1690; d. Abt. 1747.

Notes for ANDREW (LYNN) PATTON: The Roseberry-Keister Family Tree 7221 total entries, last updated Thu Mar 22 09:52:13 2001 All questions, comments or suggestions regarding information on this page should be addressed to: G. E. Roseberry <swvirginia@hotmail.com

ID: I6438 Reference Number: 6438 Name: Andrew Patton 1 Sex: M Change Date: 03 FEB 2001 Birth: BEF 1690 2 Death: ABT 1747 2

Father: Henry Patton b: 1660 in Caiggo, Dundee, Scotland Mother: Sarah Lynn b: 1664 in Kilmacrenan, Scotland

Sources: Title: James Patton and the Appalachian Colonists Abbrev: Patton and Colonists Author: Johnson, Patricia Givens Publication: Edmonds Printing Inc., Pulaski, VA, 1983 Page: p. 5 Title: World Family Tree Vol. 24, Ed. 1 Abbrev: World Family Tree Vol. 24 Author: Brøderbund Software, Inc. Publication: Release date: July 16, 1998 Note: Customer pedigree. Page: Tree #0881, Date of Import: Sep 6, 2000

9. v. JAMES (LYNN) PATTON, COL., b. 1692, Newton-Limavady, Derry (now Londonderry), Ireland; d. July 30, 1755, Drapers Meadow "Augusta Co., " Virginia. vi. DAVID (LYNN) PATTON, b. Abt. 1695, Ireland.

Notes for DAVID (LYNN) PATTON: The Roseberry-Keister Family Tree 7221 total entries, last updated Thu Mar 22 09:52:13 2001 All questions, comments or suggestions regarding information on this page should be addressed to: G. E. Roseberry ID: I5781 Reference Number: 5781 Name: David Patton 1 Sex: M Change Date: 03 FEB 2001 Birth: ABT 1695

Father: Henry Patton b: 1660 in Caiggo, Dundee, Scotland Mother: Sarah Lynn b: 1664 in Kilmacrenan, Scotland

Sources: Title: Coming to America: A Chronicle of the American Lineage of the Pattons Abbrev: Coming to Americal Author: Patton, C. L. Publication: Springfield, IL, 1954 Page: quoted from within World Family Tree, Vol. 27, Tree #2183

Sources: Title: A Chronicle of the American Lineage of the Pattons Author: C. L. Patton Publication: Copyright 1954 Note: Good Repository: Note: In the possession of Fay L. Clark Call Number: Media: Book Page: 10 Text: “All these Pattons were in Pennsylvania at the same time and all owned land in Lancaster County. Their names all appear in Augusta County, Virginia records at a later time. They were all property owners in Augusta and resided in the same vicinity.”

vii. CHARLES (LYNN) PATTON, b. Abt. 1695, Ireland; d. Ireland.

Notes for CHARLES (LYNN) PATTON: The Roseberry-Keister Family Tree 7221 total entries, last updated Thu Mar 22 09:52:13 2001 All questions, comments or suggestions regarding information on this page should be addressed to: G. E. Roseberry

ID: I5780 Reference Number: 5780 Name: Charles Patton 1 Sex: M Change Date: 03 FEB 2001 Birth: ABT 1695 in Ireland Event: Inheritnce Note: Charles stayed in Ireland and inherited the Crogan Estate. 2

Father: Henry Patton b: 1660 in Caiggo, Dundee, Scotland Mother: Sarah Lynn b: 1664 in Kilmacrenan, Scotland

Sources: Title: World Family Tree Vol. 27, Ed. 1 Abbrev: World Family Tree Vol. 27 Author: Brøderbund Software, Inc. Publication: Release date: September 15, 1998 Note: Customer pedigree. Page: Tree #2183, Date of Import: Aug 12, 2000 Title: World Family Tree Vol. 27, Ed. 1 Abbrev: World Family Tree Vol. 27 Author: Brøderbund Software, Inc. Publication: Release date: September 15, 1998 Note: Customer pedigree. Page: Tree #2183

viii. BENJAMIN (LYNN) PATTON, b. Abt. 1695, Ireland.

Notes for BENJAMIN (LYNN) PATTON: The Roseberry-Keister Family Tree 7221 total entries, last updated Thu Mar 22 09:52:13 2001 All questions, comments or suggestions regarding information on this page should be addressed to: G. E. Roseberry ID: I6114 Reference Number: 6114 Name: Benjamin Patton 1 Sex: M Change Date: 03 FEB 2001 Birth: ABT 1695

Father: Henry Patton b: 1660 in Caiggo, Dundee, Scotland Mother: Sarah Lynn b: 1664 in Kilmacrenan, Scotland

Sources: Title: Coming to America: A Chronicle of the American Lineage of the Pattons Abbrev: Coming to Americal Author: Patton, C. L. Publication: Springfield, IL, 1954 Page: quoted from within World Family Tree, Vol. 27, Tree #2183

Sources: Title: A Chronicle of the American Lineage of the Pattons Author: C. L. Patton Publication: Copyright 1954 Note: Good Repository: Note: In the possession of Fay L. Clark Call Number: Media: Book Page: 10 Text: “All these Pattons were in Pennsylvania at the same time and all owned land in Lancaster County. Their names all appear in Augusta County, Virginia records at a later time. They were all property owners in Augusta and resided in the same vicinity.”

ix. MATTHEW (LYNN) PATTON, b. Abt. 1695.

Notes for MATTHEW (LYNN) PATTON: The Roseberry-Keister Family Tree 7221 total entries, last updated Thu Mar 22 09:52:13 2001 All questions, comments or suggestions regarding information on this page should be addressed to: G. E. Roseberry

ID: I5930 Reference Number: 5930 Name: Matthew Patton 1 Sex: M Change Date: 03 FEB 2001 Event: LandRecord 29 OCT 1735 Lancaster Co., PA Note: 200 acres 1 Birth: ABT 1695

Father: Henry Patton b: 1660 in Caiggo, Dundee, Scotland Mother: Sarah Lynn b: 1664 in Kilmacrenan, Scotland

Sources: Title: Coming to America: A Chronicle of the American Lineage of the Pattons Abbrev: Coming to Americal Author: Patton, C. L. Publication: Springfield, IL, 1954 Page: quoted from within World Family Tree, Vol. 27, Tree #2183

x. RICHARD (LYNN) PATTON, b. 1700, Kilmacrenan, Scotland; d. 1751, Raphoe, County of Donegal, Ireland.

Notes for RICHARD (LYNN) PATTON: Bigg-Forsythe-Fritts-Hicks-McRorey-Rabenau-Westenberger- Williams & Many More 1371 total entries, last updated Mon Feb 7 18:55:23 2000 All questions, comments or suggestions regarding information on this page should be addressed to: Victoria Johnson ID: I1356 Name: Richard PATTON Given Name: Richard Surname: PATTON Sex: M Birth: 1700 in Kilmacrenan, County Donegal, Northern Ireland Death: 1751 in Raphoe County of Donegal, Ireland 3

Father: Henry PATTON b: 1676 in Kilmacrenan, County Donegal, Northern Ireland Mother: Sarah Lynn b: 1685 in Northern Ireland

Sources: Title: Coming to America: A Chronicle of the American Lineage of the Pattons Abbrev: Coming to Americal Author: Patton, C. L. Publication: Springfield, IL, 1954 Page: quoted from within World Family Tree, Vol. 27, Tree #2183 Title: James Patton and the Appalachian Colonists Abbrev: Patton and Colonists Author: Johnson, Patricia Givens Publication: Edmonds Printing Inc., Pulaski, VA, 1983 Page: p. 5 Title: World Family Tree Vol. 24, Ed. 1 Abbrev: World Family Tree Vol. 24 Author: Brøderbund Software, Inc. Publication: Release date: July 16, 1998 Note: Customer pedigree. Page: Tree #0881, Date of Import: Sep 6, 2000

10. xi. ELIZABETH (LYNN) PATTON, b. December 25, 1700, Newton-Limavady, Derry (now Londonderry), Ireland; d. December 25, 1776, Greenfield “Botetourt Co., ” Virginia. 11. xii. HENRY (LYNN) PATTON, b. 1705; d. Aft. 1824, Tazewell Co., Virginia. 12. xiii. WILLIAM (LYNN) PATTON, b. Abt. 1710, Ulster, Ireland; d. Aft. September 05, 1742, August Co., (Now Rockingham Co., ) Virginia. xiv. HUGH (LYNN) PATTON, b. Abt. 1710; m. ELIZA HANNA, Abt. 1735; b. Abt. 1715.

Notes for HUGH (LYNN) PATTON: The Roseberry-Keister Family Tree 7221 total entries, last updated Thu Mar 22 09:52:13 2001 All questions, comments or suggestions regarding information on this page should be addressed to: G. E. Roseberry ID: I6105 Reference Number: 6105 Name: Hugh Patton 1 Sex: M Change Date: 03 FEB 2001 Birth: ABT 1710 Note: Hugh Patton came to America from Ireland in the late 1700’s. He and Eliza ended up living in southwest PA, Washington County. 2

Father: Henry Patton b: 1660 in Caiggo, Dundee, Scotland Mother: Sarah Lynn b: 1664 in Kilmacrenan, Scotland

Marriage 1 Eliza Hanna b: ABT 1715 Married: ABT 1735 3

Sources: Title: Coming to America: A Chronicle of the American Lineage of the Pattons Abbrev: Coming to Americal Author: Patton, C. L. Publication: Springfield, IL, 1954 Page: quoted from within World Family Tree, Vol. 27, Tree #2183 Title: World Family Tree Vol. 27, Ed. 1 Abbrev: World Family Tree Vol. 27 Author: Brøderbund Software, Inc. Publication: Release date: September 15, 1998 Note: Customer pedigree. Page: Tree #2183 Title: World Family Tree Vol. 27, Ed. 1 Abbrev: World Family Tree Vol. 27 Author: Brøderbund Software, Inc. Publication: Release date: September 15, 1998 Note: Customer pedigree. Page: Tree #2183, Date of Import: Aug 12, 2000

5. MARGARET (NEELY)3 PATTON (JOHN (UNKNOWN)2, WILLIAM1) was born Abt. 1676 in Scotland, and died Abt. 1727. She married WILLIAM LYNN, son of LAIRD OF LOCH LYNN DAVID LYNN. He was born Abt. 1672 in Loch Lynn, Scotland, and died Abt. 1727.

Notes for MARGARET (NEELY) PATTON: Family of Barbara (Lynn) Shave 11214 total entries, last updated Sun Aug 5 14:05:19 2001 All questions, comments or suggestions regarding information on this page should be addressed to: Barb Shave ID: I6452 Name: Margaret PATTON Given Name: Margaret Surname: Patton Sex: F Birth: ABT 1676 in Scotland Death: 1727 Change Date: 27 JAN 2001 at 00:00:00

Father: John PATTON b: ABT 1628 in Ireland

Marriage 1 William LYNN b: ABT 1672 in Loch Lynn,Scotland Children John LYNN b: ABT 1685 in Ireland Margaret LYNN b: 3 JUL 1693 in County Donegal,Ulster Province,Ireland William LYNN b: in or Ireland or Scotland Audley LYNN Elizabeth LYNN Charles LYNN b: ABT 1700 in Ireland

Notes for WILLIAM LYNN: MISCELLANEOUS: Shane Interview, SCOTT, Patrick, Bourbon County, Kentucky Corn Island: Clark settled these thirteen families on Corn Island. Of the thirteen families,* one was this [James] Patton’s who died in Louisville some years ago. Another was this Lynn’s. (Which Lynn’s?) [William Lynn]

Children of MARGARET PATTON and WILLIAM LYNN are: i. ELIZABETH4 LYNN, m. UNKNOWN HUTCHENSON.

Notes for ELIZABETH LYNN: Family of Barbara (Lynn) Shave 11214 total entries, last updated Sun Aug 5 14:05:19 2001 All questions, comments or suggestions regarding information on this page should be addressed to: Barb Shave ID: I27 Name: Elizabeth LYNN Given Name: Elizabeth Surname: Lynn Sex: F Birth: Change Date: 16 JUL 2001 at 23:22:36

Father: William LYNN b: ABT 1672 in Loch Lynn,Scotland Mother: Margaret PATTON b: ABT 1676 in Scotland

Marriage 1 HUTCHENSON b: in Ireland Children David HUTCHENSON William HUTCHENSON

Marriage 2 John PATTON b: ABT 1772 Children Martha PATTON

ii. WILLIAM LYNN, DR., b. Ireland or Scotland; d. 1758, Fredicksburg, “Spotsylvania Co., ” Virigina; m. UNKNOW CALHOUN.

Notes for WILLIAM LYNN, DR.: Family of Barbara (Lynn) Shave 11214 total entries, last updated Sun Aug 5 14:05:19 2001 All questions, comments or suggestions regarding information on this page should be addressed to: Barb Shave ID: I24 Name: William LYNN Given Name: William Surname: Lynn NPFX: Dr. Sex: M Birth: in or Ireland or Scotland Death: ABT 1758 in Fredricksburg,Spotsylvania Co VA Change Date: 12 MAR 2001 at 22:43:32

Father: William LYNN b: ABT 1672 in Loch Lynn,Scotland Mother: Margaret PATTON b: ABT 1676 in Scotland

Marriage 1 CALHOUN Children Ann LYNN Hannah (Poss.) LYNN

iii. AUDLEY LYNN, b. Ireland; d. Bef. October 21, 1767.

Notes for AUDLEY LYNN: Family of Barbara (Lynn) Shave 11214 total entries, last updated Sun Aug 5 14:05:19 2001 All questions, comments or suggestions regarding information on this page should be addressed to: Barb Shave

ID: I26 Name: Audley LYNN Given Name: Audley Surname: Lynn Sex: M Death: BEF 21 OCT 1757 Change Date: 10 APR 2001 at 16:53:19

Father: William LYNN b: ABT 1672 in Loch Lynn,Scotland Mother: Margaret PATTON b: ABT 1676 in Scotland

Marriage 1 Spouse Unknown Children Ann LYNN

linn/lynn Entries: 11473 Updated: Wed Feb 27 10:26:28 2002 Contact: willie browning

ID: I80380585 Name: Audley LINN Given Name: Audley Surname: Linn Sex: M Birth: Bef. 1758 in Ireland

Father: William LINN b: in Ireland Mother: Margaret PATTON b: in Ireland

Marriage 1 Spouse Unknown Children Ann LINN

iv. JOHN LYNN, DR., b. Ireland; d. Abt. 1751, August Co., (Now Rockingham Co., ) Virginia; m. MARGARET CAMERON.

Notes for JOHN LYNN, DR.: Family of Barbara (Lynn) Shave 11214 total entries, last updated Sun Aug 5 14:05:19 2001 All questions, comments or suggestions regarding information on this page should be addressed to: Barb Shave ID: I28 Name: John LYNN Given Name: John Surname: Lynn NPFX: DR Sex: M Birth: ABT 1685 in Ireland Death: ABT 1751 in Augusta Co VA Change Date: 6 JUN 2001 at 12:29:03

Father: William LYNN b: ABT 1672 in Loch Lynn,Scotland Mother: Margaret PATTON b: ABT 1676 in Scotland

Marriage 1 Margaret CAMERON Children John LYNN b: BEF 1720 in Ireland- Andrew LYNN James LYNN b: ABT 1725 in Ireland

v. MARGARET LYNN, b. July 03, 1693, County Donegal, Ulster Province, Ireland; d. 1773, Bellefonte “Augusta Co., ” Virginia; m. JOHN LEWIS, 1715, County Conegal, Ulster Provicence Nothern Ireland; b. February 01, 1677/78, Donegal Co., Ireland.

Notes for MARGARET LYNN: Family of Barbara (Lynn) Shave 11214 total entries, last updated Sun Aug 5 14:05:19 2001 All questions, comments or suggestions regarding information on this page should be addressed to: Barb Shave ID: I29 Name: Margaret LYNN Given Name: Margaret Surname: Lynn NICK: Peg Sex: F Birth: 3 JUL 1693 in County Donegal,Ulster Province,Ireland Death: 1773 in Bellefonte,Augusta Co VA Change Date: 11 APR 2001 at 01:43:26

Father: William LYNN b: ABT 1672 in Loch Lynn,Scotland Mother: Margaret PATTON b: ABT 1676 in Scotland

Marriage 1 John LEWIS b: 1 FEB 1678 in Donegal Co Ireland Married: 1715 in County Donegal,Ulster Prov.,N. Ireland Children Samuel LEWIS b: 1716 in County Donegal,Ulster Prov,Ireland Thomas LEWIS b: 27 APR 1718 in County Donegal,Province of Ulster,North Ireland Andrew LEWIS b: 9 OCT 1720 in Province of Ulster,North Ireland Alice LEWIS b: 1722 William Lynn H. Lewis b: 17 NOV 1724 in County Donegal,Province of Ulster,North Ireland Margaret Lynn LEWIS b: 1726 in County Donegal,Ulster Prov.,N. Ireland Anne LEWIS b: 1728 in Donegal county,Ulster,Ireland or Augusta Co VA Charles LEWIS b: 11 MAR 1736 in Augusta Co VA

Notes for JOHN LEWIS: Robinson vs. Patton.–John Patton’s estate attached, September, 1752. Robinson vs. Hugart.–Hugart’s bond to John Robinson, Esq., of King and Queen, and John Lewis, dated 1750. Several suits, probably for land, against many different people.

Court Minutes, 1898 – 1903; Rockbridge County Court, Va. Rockbridge County, Va. DIED DURING THE WAR Manson Tomlinson died on the way home from prison in 1865; Lieutenant Robert A. Glasgow died at the residence of James Bumgardner, Augusta County, May 11th, 1862 of typhoid fever; John M. Elliott and George S. Lewis in 1863; Lieutenant William Patton died in Winchester, July 16th, 1861; James Ricketts died at Mount Jackson, March 24th 1862; James H. Pugh died at Point Lookout prison in 1864; Benjamin Hite died in Hospital at Winchester; R.G. Clark died at Swift Run Gap in 1863; J.J. Pleasants died in Hospital; Wm.H. Rogers died in 1863; Baxter Slough died at Fort Delaware.

The Company when organized had as Captain James G. Updike; First Lieutenant, Alexander M. Hamilton; Second Lieutenant, William Patton; Third Lieutenant, Clifton C. Burks

With these officers it was mustered into service, but there were quite a number of changes in a short time. The death of Second Lieutenant William Patton at Winchester, July 16th, 1861, creating a vacancy,

The following died in prison: H.W.Patterson, Cyrus Patterson, John Henry Mackey, Gideon Marks, William Brownlee, Franklin Patton, William Blackwell and John Campbell.

Died of Disease Charles B. Buchanan,

vi. CHARLES LYNN, b. Abt. 1700, Ireland.

Notes for CHARLES LYNN: Family of Barbara (Lynn) Shave 11214 total entries, last updated Sun Aug 5 14:05:19 2001 All questions, comments or suggestions regarding information on this page should be addressed to: Barb Shave

ID: I21 Name: Charles LYNN Given Name: Charles Surname: Lynn Sex: M Birth: ABT 1700 in Ireland Change Date: 10 APR 2001 at 13:20:27

Father: William LYNN b: ABT 1672 in Loch Lynn,Scotland Mother: Margaret PATTON b: ABT 1676 in Scotland

Marriage 1 Spouse Unknown Children John LYNN b: 1729/1737 in Prob. Ireland Michael MICALE Lynn b: AFT 1730 in Prince William Co VA William LYNN b: BEF 1733 in Ireland Moses (Poss.) LYNN b: in Prince William Co VA Benson (Poss) LYNN

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About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to Patton and The Glorious Revolution

  1. revlinda48 says:

    I really enjoyed this.. but it won’t let me go to the second page.

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